OCR Interpretation


The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, October 09, 1947, Image 8

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1947-10-09/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

PAGE EIGHT
Spinach
Whole Kernel
Corn
Garden Fresh
Peas
Dole’s Chunk
PORK
PICNIC
News Our Grandfathers Read
From Issue Of December 20, 1917
At the recent Boxwell-Patterson
examination held at Lima 333 pupils
were present. Of this number only
53 were successful candidates.
Successful Richland Twp. candidates
were Irma Stearns, Margaret Herr,
Mary L. Barber, Marjorie Day, Pearl
Bowers, Edna Steiner, Louella Phit
ilps, Mary Hauenstein, David Barki
mer, Clyde Augsburger, Joseph
Barnes, Walter Amstutz, Elizabeth
Gratz.
Chase Ewing, well known Orange
township farmer was killed by a
runaway team hitched to a spreader
driven by his son Harry. Mr. Ewing
attempted to stop the team as it
bolted down the lane toward him
and was struck by the front end of
the spreader. Harry, age 13, who
did a masterful job of controlling
the team did not know of the ac
cident until he had safely guided
the runaway team home again.
Daniel Moser and son Ira who
recently purchased the Russel feed
bam are busy constructing an ad
dition to the bam and repairing the
entire structure.
Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Stratton are
BEEF PORK
If you need gas, that is my business
Phillips Pure Oil Station
Pack 23c
Pack 23c
Pack 31c
Pack 35c
Pineapple
Whole or Sliced—Sweetened
Strawberries Pck. 55c
Tenderloin
Steer BEEF Steer
Extra Lean
Beef Roasts
Beef Boil
Round, Sirloin
or T-Bone
Steak
HAMS
the proud parents of a baby boy
bom Sunday morning. Cliff says he
may call the little shaver Billy Sun
day.
The Benroth Auto Company sold
a Ford torpedo car to John Hirsch
field.
William Plattner and Miss Bertha
Sheldon w’ere married at North At
tleboro, Mass.
Ray Hauenstein has accepted a
position with the Northern National
bank at Toledo.
Grover and Oliver Klay have been
busy for several weeks building a
foundry on their home lot on Grove
street.
Chas. Stratton purchased the Mrs.
Tipton property on Elm street.
The sprinkling wagon will make a
tour of the streets soon to lay the
dust.
The Sanitarium Company has a
big lot and house for rent on College
avenue at $50 per year.
U. S. Route 25 just east of Route 69
BORDENS ICE CREAM—-Cones—Pints—Quarts
Candy Tobacco Cigars
Open until 10:00 P. M. every night except Monday
Lila Lora was a successful ap
plicant in the Boxwell-Patterson ex
amination.
David and Albert Reichenbach are
painting the David Luginbihl proper-
1 The value of the dollar is not as im
portant as the number of dollars that are
available.
We furnish dollars at a discount.
The Northwestern Mutual Life ins. Co.
A. C. BURCKY Local Representative
A to Z
I
AUTHORIZED DEALER
Moat Market & Looker Service
Home Killed Meats
FOODS
FROSTED
VEAL LAMB
SPECIAL
Friday & Saturday
MILK FED VEAL
Roasts
Stew Meat
Veal Steak
Veal Chops
iVeal
lb. 49c
lb. 39c
lb. 65c
Beef Liver lb. 39c
All Meat—No Fat or Bone
Cube Steak lb. 65c
All Beef
Beef Ground lb. 45c
lb. 45c
lb. 35c
lb. 59c
lb. 55c
Shoulder Steak 49c
(Ju-Maid
)LEO
lb. 33c
i
lb. 79c
FISH
Haddock Fil’ts lb. 45c
Perch Fillets lb. 43c
Oysters Pint 79c
CHEESE
’/2 or Whole
Brick Cheese lb. 49c
Sharp Cheese lb. 45c
Swiss Cheese lb. 69c
or Tenderized
Our Own Make Fresh or Smoked Sausage,
Pudding, Paunhaus or Ring Bologna.
Steer or Heifer Beef Sold by the Quarter.
We Do Custom Slaughtering.
lb. 55c
ty.
Sam C. Steiner has returned from
an extended western trip. He was
gone for over a yar.
Friends surprised Carl Roethlis
berger with a birthday postal card
shower.
Mrs. A. D. Goble and Mrs. P.
Wilch expect to leave here on an
extended western trip. Thy plan to
visit Mrs. Wilch’s son Fred in
Spokane, Wash.
True Tales About Ohio
(Concluded from page 1)
tions and were alike terrorized by
the Indians.
Most “first” settlers were interest
ed only in hunting, pelts and the
game. They thought little of the
development or farming and desired
isolation. Few wanted neighbors
nearer than five or ten miles. Too
thick settlement disturbed the game
and when settlers began to flock in
the game was quick to disappear.
“Half-faced Camps”
As a consequence the first cabins
were built by the hunters themselves
without neighborhood help and were
“Half-faced camps”—log cabins open
in front and with only three walls.
As more pioneers came into the
wilderness their cabins were built
with assistance of neighbors in “rais
ings,” and their small patch of land
was cleared by “log rollings.” These
w’ere social events in the settlements
and always were followed by big
suppers and plenty of whisky, fur
i nished by the neighbor who had so
been helped.
There was a system to pioneer
“raisings.” First the settler would
go into the forest and select, fell and
cut in measured lengths the strong,
even young trees which were to
comprise his cabin walls. They would
be dragged to his building lot and
piled on the four sides where they
w’ere to be used. Then wide, tough
clapboards for the roof were rived
from even w’hite oak blocks and put
near the logs. Then the neighbors
were notified.
Everyone Comes
They came with handspikes and
axes and the anticipation of much
enjoyment. Each neighbor had a job
he was most adept at and the
cabin usually w’as up before twilight.
Some raised the logs to the places
they were to be used others notched
and fitted the ends others placed
the clapboards and put on the roof
poles. Then came the big stick-and
muJ chimney, the log fire-place and
mud hearth, and the chinking of the
cracks between logs with mud.
Then supper, the liquor, and the
raising was over. The light work—
sawing out a window space fram
ing it and fixing on the paper win
dow, greased w’ith bears’ grease to
make it transparent the wooden
door, wooden hinges and the latch
string, wras left to the cabin owner.
Furnishings of the cabin were
meager. There was a pole bed with
laced thong springs in the corner.
The mattress was a tanned buffalo
hide. The table was a split log w’ith
four legs and the chairs, rounds cut
from a log into w’hich legs had been
fixed—just three-legged stools. A
Dutch oven, large pot and skillet,
hollowed wooden dishes and a few
pewter tea and table spoons were
the household outfit.
Patch Cleared for Corn
Usually a small patch surround
iig the cabin was cleared for com. If
the settler had a horse, its harness
w’as of leatherwood bark and the
collar of plaited com husks, sewed
together. If he owned oxen, wooden
yokes were used. When possible he
plowed the ground with a shovel
plow—it was better among the roots.
They ground their own com in a
hand-mill or pounded it with pestle
and mortar, sieving it into flour.
Out of the finer they made bread
and mush, and out of the coarser,
boiled hominy.
Their meat w’as bear, venison and
wild turkey. It was difficult to raise
hogs or sheep because of the wolves
and bears. Consequently pork and
woolen clothes were very scarce.
Buckskin, homespun and linsey-wool
sey were worn by both sexes.
And so began every county in
Ohio, it was a wonderful life if a
settler could survive the wilderness,
the Indians, the hardship and pri
vation.
CARD OF THANKS
We are grateful to all our friends
and neighbors for their kindness and
sympathy which was shown us, dur
ing our recent bereavement, the loss
of our wife and mother, Clara M.
Badertscher. We want especially to
thank Rev. Smiicker for his consoling
w’ords. The pall bearers, the sing
ers, floral donors, the ladies of the
church, and all who were so kind
and helpful.
Mr. Dan Badertscher
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Brauen
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Brauen
THANK YOU!
I want to thank My many
friends who are giving my
new Jane Parker Enriched
White Bread such a won
derful reception at the A&P
Food Stores.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS. BLUFFTON. OHIO
In
BOOK-LEARNING
the earlier schools of oue
COUNTRY, BOOKS WERE SO HARO
70 COME RY THAT ONE BOOK,
ITS PAGES SEPARATED AND
PROTECTED BY TRANSPARENT
SHEETS OF HORN, OFTEN HAD
TO SERVE A/V ENTIRE. CLASS.
*AORNBOOKS"ARE A CURIO TODAY, WHEN OUR
PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES
MAKE AVAILABLE TO ALL OUR PEOPLE
CHILDREN AND GROWN-UPS ALIKE
BOOKS THE MILLIONS.
RECOGNITION OF THE VALUE OF800K LEARNING
THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF READING
IS INGRAINED IN OUR PEMOCRACV,
Saving Food for Europe and
High Cost of Living
Get Equal Credit
Cost of Table Menu Has More
Than Doubled Since 1939
Pre-War Level
The nation’s voluntary food con
servation program has become a dis
tinct reality so far as the average
Bluffton family is concerned, but
whether it is due to local coopera
tion in the save food for Europe
campaign or represents a necessary
move dictated by high prices re
mains a matter of conjecture.
With food prices continuing on the
uptrend generally, except for eggs
and butter, governmental pleas for
further conservation of foodstuff
come at a time when housewives are
particularly anxious to cooperate—
for the sake of their own budgets
as well as for any desire to help
Europe’s hungry.
Despite high prices, however, there
is growing indication of a desire to
go along with the voluntary cam
paign to save food for Europe, and
the drive to cut down on food w’aste
might prove a blessing in disguise
by bringing down some food prices
should curtailment in purchases be
decisive enough in the next several
weeks.
In the meantime, the high cost of
food continued to be the favorite
topic of budget-conscious shoppers,
and percentage tables announced
last week from federal records dem
onstrated just how much the cost of
living has advanced.
For a base comparison, an Aug
ust, 1939, a grocery order for $2.50
was broken down to show $1 for the
farmer 90 cents for the wholesaler
and 60 cents for the retailer. The
wholesaler paid for transportation,
and he and the retailer cared for
costs of handling, storage, spoilage,
wastage and selling.
Last March, the same grocery
order would have cost $5.08. Of this
the farmer got $3.18 the whole
saler, $1.61, and the retailer, 29
cents.
Generally speaking, the cost of
food still is advancing, although
butter and eggs last week broke to
slightly lower levels, but that set
back may be offset by a rumored
boost in bread and pastry prices.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The Board of Public Affairs of the Village
of Bluffton. Ohio, will recefce bids- for the
repairing the roof of Munilipal Elec’tric &
W atcr Pouci Plant, on Hawnon Road.
Siiecifications as follows!
Remove all old flashing vn the fire wall,
covering ail seams in copifg with asbestile
and a.«lx’stls Mt. Cleanirix. priming, and
hot moppi' the original riof and graveling
in a low phu-es of the roof where the water
has been -landing.
Bidder to furnish all materials t*ce«ary
for th i,, and shall beiJohns-MaA or
’iiVRl?nt.
Bidder 'io stieeify time Inecess^ com
plete job. I
Contract to be complet’d to the satisfac
tion of the Board of Public Affairs.
The Board teserves th right to reject any
or all bids, and to wai'j al! informalities.
The contract will be awarded to ’the lowest
and best bidder.
Bids are to be In hanfa of the Clerk of the
Board of Public Affairslof Bluffton, Ohio, on
or before 12 noon OcJ 17th, 1947.
By order of the Brd of Public Affairs
of the Village of Blupton. Ohio.
26 Chalies Emans. Clerk
Food Needs
Here are the foods we need every
day A pint or more of milk an
egg one or more servings of meat,
fish or fowl, or shelled peas or
beans cereals and bread one or
more potatoes two or more vege
tables (one green or yellow in
color) and two or more fruits.
Vhatever The Reason, Bluffton
Housewives Are Using Less Food
East Orange
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Marritt
and Bill and Patty of Piqua spent
the week end with the O. W. Non
na maker family.
The mid-week prayer and Bible
study will be held in the home of
Mrs. Grace Warren of New Stark.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Amstutz of
Harrod, Mr. and Mrs. Rayon Bout
well and Lynn Ray tand Lonnie Sue
were Sunday dinner guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Henry Balmer and Mary
Louise of Bluffton.
The Woman’s Missionary meeting
will be held in the home of Mrs.
Louie Wagner on Wednesday (after
noon, October 8th.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Kimmel, Mr.
and Mrs. Raymond Kimmel and son
Stephen, Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Bout
well spent Sunday afternoon with
Mr. and Mrs. Emerson Lugibihl and
daughters Carolyn Kay and Dorothy
Rae.
Mr. and Mrs. Matt Stewart en
tertained company Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Boutwell and
son Michael Dale spent Monday
evening with Mr. and Mrs. B. J.
Boutwell.
Will Daniels of near Kenton spent
Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Stager.
Soda Fountains
There are from 90,000 to 100.000
soda fountains in the United States,
while the number in European
countries is probably not more than
1,000.
KODAK FILM
fiare
Start
yo»r picture­
making right with depend
able Kodak Film in the yel
low box—the film that gete
the picture. Then send ue
the exposed rails for expert
developing and printing.
SIDNEY’S DRUG SHOP
1 ..
CUSHMAN
MOTOR SCOOTERS
foi
Immediate Delivery
Indiaki lti
OUTDOORS tr v
Equipment Co.
341 E. Ma Acet St.
Lima, (thio
LAWNS
MOWljD
AND
LEAVES
RAKED
LAWNS
GRADED
Pandora
Mrs. Oscar Anderson and daughter
Lois of Aurora, Ill., are ■visiting
relatives here. Miss Lois returned
to her home the first of the week,
while her mother remained for a
longer visit.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buehrer and
son Roger Dean of Ottawa Lake,
Mich., spent the week end in the
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Ray Sheidler. i
Mr. and Mrs. Dale Snavely and
family and Charles Anderson of
Holgate spent Sunday with their
folks here.
Mickey Rapp of Detroit, Mich.,
spent the week end with Miss Audrey
Thrapp and Mr. and Mrs. H. M.
Thrapp.
Mr. and Mrs. Marion Stoody made
a business trip to Youngstown on
Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Laurel Bracy are
spending several days in Chicago, Ill.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reese and
family entertained her brothers and
their families at a family dinner in
their home on Sunday.
Mrs. Elizabeth King is spending
sometime in the home of Mrs. Skelly
of near Leipsic.
Dr. and Mrs. Waldo C. Suter and
daughter Ann Margene of Water
ville, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reese
and children, Miss Harriet Krohn
and Mrs. R. A. Krohn recently at
tended a surprise birthday dinner
given in honor of Mrs. J. G. Reese
in her home.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Savio of
North Baltimore spent Sunday with
Mrs. Virginia Davies and C. C. Cor
son.
Mrs. Zella Hilty is a patient of
Bluffton Community hospital.
Mrs. George Stoody and Mrs.
Russel Welty were hostesses of the
Pandora Flower club on Tuesday
evening.
News Want Ads get results.
Attention Pou I tirymcn!
Your pullets need 6 things to mi
layers this fall and winter.
1. Vaccination against fowl pox.
2. A worm capsule.
3. Proper amount of nests to prevent
4. Adequate feed troughs designed to
feed.
5. A large heated water trough fillet
6. CONKEY’S Superior Y. O. egg mas
100% Wool Army O. D.
BLANKETS
S2.5O up
ALL STEEL
Tool Boxes
WITH TRAY
AND KEYS
»7c
Surplus Outside White
Paint, gallon $2.95
Tarpaulins
All Sizes
Flame Proof Water Proof
Mildew Proof with Grommets
S3.H5 up
SEE-BEE
Fatigue Cap
WITH BILL
49c
CALL ON
CON ROBINSON
FOR
Experienced Service
IN
LANDSCAPE
GABDENING
5 Beaverburg
Bluffton College
Bluffton, Ohio
THURSDAY, OCT. 9, 1947
GASPING FOR BREATH,
DANGER LURKS
In that chokey and hacking cough
due to colds. These deep chest
colds and coughs should be given
relief without delay. Get a bottle
of Lower’s Preparation at
SIDNEY’S DfRUG STORE
Formulae of CJ Lower chemist.
Mfg. by Lower’s Pharmacy, Mari
on, Ohio
Tulip Bulbs
Imported direct
from Holland
Also, varieties grown near
Mt. Vernbn, Washington.
SKIP’S NURSERY
Notice
The Amstutz Cannery
will close Friday for the
season.
We wish to express our
appreciation for the liberal
patronage we have enjoy
ed as well as the considera
tion whjch has been shown
by the public during this
busy season.
Amstutz
Cannery
Muffton, Ohio
he them profitable
egg breaking,
eliminate waste of
I with clean fresh
li.
We can supply you with any of th 6 items mentioned
above. Let us help you with your pou try problems.
Jorg Hatclnery
ARMY-NAVY
GOVERNMENT SURPLUS
Truckloads of New and Di
Arriving Dailj
ITerent Items
othing
Cl
--------------$1.98 up
lers, 100% Wool $3.95
users, 100% Wool 4.95
isers, 100% Wool 5.95
i, 100% Wool __ $2.95
ny Raincoats ..... $3 up
at Shoes _____ $5.95
& Oxfords ____ $6.95
—.....—.....-.......39c up
Suckle Arctics $2.25 up
irees ________ $2.49
Jackets $2.50 up
at Jackets ...........$3.95
Corps Jackets $11.95
ts & Other Jackets
fork Trousers & Shirts
Sweaters ...
Army Trou
Melton Tro
Marine Tro
Army Shirt
Navy & Ar
Army Coml
Navy Shoes
Socks ........1
Army 2 & 5
Navy Dung
Army Field
Army Com|
Leather Ai|
Navy Jack!
All Types 1
loots
Carpenter Levels, 24 inch ...$1.29
End Wrenlhes, Open & Box 25c
Machinist
k
Pipe Vise $7.95
Hand Chialls _.........................25c
Tap & DielSet from ’4 to I1,4" dia.
Power Beiil Saw
Large Pidl Cutters & Pipe Dies
Small Paint Spray Outfits
Spurting Goods
New Pump Guns—12 Gauge—
Winchester
Used Guns—Rifles & Shotguns
120 Pairs Ixng Rubber Gloves for
Trapping and General Housework
Were $2.95—Now ....$1.25
CAMPING EQUIPMENT
Tents, Cots, Sleeping Bags, Jungle
Hammocks, One-man Liferafts, etc.
The Store with 1,000 Items—Many Not Listed Here
For the Home, Farm and Garage at Great Savings
THE SITES TRADING POST CO.
133 N. Main St., Findlay, Ohio
Tune in on our Radio Newsflashes—VVFIN—Daily Except Sunday
HEDGES
AND
BUSHES
TRIMMED
OR
PLANTED

xml | txt