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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, August 19, 1948, Image 1

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BLUFFTON
A Good Place To Live
VOLUME LXXIII
TOWN SCHOOLS AND
COLLEGE TO OPEN
LABOR DAY WEEK
Public School Classes Will Begin
Fall Term on Tuesday
September 7
College Registration To Start
Same Day Classes Will
Convene September 9
Resumption of Bluffton’s scholastic
activity, always one of the major
•events on the community calendar,
is less than one month away, with
the public schools and the college
preparing to begin their fall terms
during Labor Day week.
Bluffton High and Grade schools
■will open for the new term on
Tuesday, Sept. 7, and classroom ses
sions will start at Bluffton college on
Thursday, Sept. 9.
A full complement of teachers has
been engaged for the start of public
school activity, Supt. Ralph S. Lan
ham announced, and students will
report for a full schedule of class
room activity on the opening day of
school.
Fall football practice will get
under way prior to the start of
.school, with the first workout set
for August 20 under Coach Richard
Q. Lowry, new Bluffton High ath
letic director. This will permit the
team to be rounding into shape for
its first competition of the season
in the second annual Bluffton foot
ball preview set for September 10.
College Registration
Altho Bluffton college classes will
start on Thursday, Sept. 9, registra
tion will be completed in the preced
ing days of the week, it was an
nounced by college authorities.
Freshmen will report on Friday,
Sept. 2, for registration and a week
of orientation, and members of the
upper classes will begin their regis
tration on the Tuesday following
Labor Day.
Dormitories are fast filling, in
dicating another record enrollment,
it was announced by President L. L.
Ramseyer. As for the past several
years, men again will be quartered
in Ropp hall and women in Lincoln
nail.
Extensive alterations being made
in College hall where administrative
offices formerly on the second floor
are being moved to the first floor
and classrooms shifted to the second
story will be completed in time for
the opening of the fall school term.
Rites Here Tuesday
For N. F. Steiner
N. F. Steiner, 75, a former
Bluffton college trustee, died at 3:25
a. m. Sunday in his residence, three
miles west of Bluffton.
A retired farmer and breeder of
registered hogs, Mr. Steiner had
been ill for 11 weeks.
He was born Jan. 18, 1873, in
Richland township, the son of Abra
ham and Mary Ann (Kohler) Stein
er. On Jan. 6, 1895, he married
Susan Gerig, who survives.
Other survivors include five daugh
ters, Mrs. Albert Oyer, Mrs. Adella
Oyer and Mrs. Earl Jorg, all of
Bluffton Mrs. Harty Bertsche, Arch
bold, Qhio and Mrs. Karl Gierman,
at home and two sons, Nelson Stein
er, of Bluffton, and Stanley Steiner,
of Detroit.
One sister, Mrs. Mary Ann Lugin
bill, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., 14 grand
children five step-grandchildren and
three great-step-grandchildren also
survive.
Mr. Steiner was a member of the
Evangelical Mennonite church of
Bluffton.
Funeral services were held Tues
day afternoon in the Bluffton Meth
odist church. Rev. Eli Steiner, of
Lafayette, Ind., assisted by Rev. E.
J. Shady, of Bluffton, officiated.
Burial was in the Evangelical Men
nonite cemetery northwest of Bluff
ton.
Rev. Shady Accepts
Pastorate In Iowa
Rev. E. J. Shady, pastor of the
Evangelical Mennonite church here
for the past two years has resigned
his pulpit to accept the pastorate of
the Christian Union church at Milo,
Iowa, it was announced this week.
His successor has not been an
nounced.
Rev. Shady and family will leave
the first of next week for their new
location where he will take up his
duties at once. The residence on
the John Kinsinger farm northwest
of Bluffton which they will vacate
will be occupied by Mr. Styer of the
Pandora bank.
Girl III Of Polio In
Columbus Hospital
Sue, 7-year-old daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Kent Hauenstein of Mar
ion, ill with polio, is a patient in
the Children’s hospital, Columbus.
She is the granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Edgar Hauenstein of South
Jackson street.
The child who became ill a week
ago was removed to the Columbus
hospital on Friday. Her condition
was reported satisfactory the first
of this week. She is the younger
of Mr. and Mrs. Hauenstein’s two
daughters.
Golden Wedding For
Henry Habeggers
Marking the Golden Wedding an
niversary of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Habegger, Riley street, a family din
ner followed by an open house ob
servance for close relatives, will be
held Sunday at the home of their
sin-in-law and daughter, Mr. and
Mrs. Glen Schafer, northwest of
Benton Ridge.
Mr. and Mrs. Habegger were mar
ried on Aug. 25, 1898, at the home
of the bride’s parents, Rev. and Mrs.
Chris Zimmerly, west of Bluffton.
Rev. John Moser officiated.
Mr. Habegger’s parents were Mr.
and Mrs. Isaac Habegger ,pioneer
Settlement residents.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Habegger are
74. They have been residents of
Bluffton for the last quarter century,
moving here from north of Bluffton
where they lived on w’hat is now the
Roy Hauenstein farm.
Living children who will joirretheir
parents in the Golden Wedding cele
bration include: Mrs. Marie Hector,
McComb Mrs. Nell Flick, Bluffton
Mrs. Vera Schafer, Findlay rural
route Vincent Habegger, Rawson
D. C. Habegger, Bluffton and Merl
Habegger, Bluffton. There are nine
grandchildren.
Mr. Habegger has the following
living brothers and "sorters: John,
Joe and Noah Habegger, all of Bluff
ton William Habegger, Pandora
Isaac Habegger, Alta Loma, Calif.*
and the Misses Nancy and Susan
Habegger, both of Findlay.
Mrs. Habegger’s surviving broth
ers and sisters are Leonard and
Arden Zimmerly, both of Pandora
Homer Zimmerly, Bluffton Mrs.
Caroline Augsburger, Mrs. Lavina
Habegger, Mrs. Pauline Lehman and
Mrs. Anna Amstutz, all of Pandora.
The children, brothers and sisters
of the couple will join with them in
the family dinner next Sunday, and
open house will be held from 2 to 4
p. m. for nieces and nephew’s.
Harry Thomas Rites
To Be On Thursday
Harry Thomas, 64, a retired North
Baltimore mail carrier, who had re
sided on Cherry street in Bluffton
since last March died last Sunday
noon at the home of relatives in
Wood county.
Funeral services will be held at
2:30 p. m. Thursday in the McComb
Churc hof Christ, and burial will be
at Leipsic.
Survivors include his widow, and
tw’O children, Mrs. Rolla Henry, of
Leipsic, and Gayion Thomas, Colo
rado Springs, Colorado.
Thomas had been a member of the
McComb Church of Christ since
1905, and served for 14 years as
Sunday school superintendent.
Triplett Plant Leads
County Safety Drive
With reports of the first five
months completed, The Triplett Elec
trical Instrument Co. and Allen
county schools led the honor rolls in
the 18th annual county industrial
safety campaign, it was announced
last week.
The Bluffton industry is leading
the industrial division w’ith 251,700
man-hours worked without a lost
time accident, it was announced by
the safety committee.
Homecoming Set For
Beaverdam Saturday
A social and carnival will feature
Beaverdam’s annual homecoming to
be held Saturday evening starting
at 5 o’clock.
Attractions will include games for
adults and children pony rides and
round and square dancing. The car
nival is sponsored by the Beaverdam
Fire Dept, and the Beaverdam Com
munity Fire association.
Proceeds will be used to purchase
firemen uniforms and additional fire
hose.
Four Foot Wire Fence Divides
Directors Of Sportsmen’s Club
Both Sides Heading for Show
down at Next Meeting on
August 26
Charges and Counter-charges
Hurled as Issue Splits
Club’s Board
Directors of the Bluffton Com
munity Sportsmen’s club are divided
by a four-foot wire fence in the first
major split in the history of the 20
year-old club enrolling some 750
members and one of the largest
groups of its kind in the state.
This became knowm the first of the
week as both factions were prepar
ing for a showdown at the directors
meeting on Thursday night of next
week when the board’s full member
ship of 51 is expected to attend.
The issue of the cence which has
been essentially an intraclub row
came into the open this week as
charges and counter charges were
hurled and several directors’ resigna
tions were reported in prospect.
Difficulties started at a directors’
meeting June 24 when a majority
voted to erect a fence at the club’s
park at the north end of Buckeye
lake as a safeguard for children.
About half of the 350 feet of field
fence had -been erected when at the
next directors’ meting on July 29, a
majority voted to remove the fence
which later 'was done.
Hazard for Children, Claim
Ralph Reichenbach, club secretary,
said this week that the park with
out a fence constitutes a hazard for
children since water is from 15 to 20
feet deep at the banks of the lake,
an abandoned stone quarry.
Aldine Kohli, ex-president of the
club said both the president and vice
president were absent at the June
directors’ meeting which had no
legally constituted chairman. More
over, he added, the fence as original
ly planned interfered with members’
fishing. Plans are now being made,
he said, for children’s play areas at
a safe distance from the water en
closed by a fence more in keeping
w’ith other facilities of the park than
the former field fence.
According to Secretary Reichen
bach there are 51 votes in the board
of directors as now constituted, all
of which are expected to be repre
sented at the meeting next week.
Attendance at the two previous meet
ings was reported as only slightly
more than 10 directors necessary for
a quorum.
Beaverdam Woman
Has Song Published
Mrs. Harley iBshop of eBaverdam,
author of several religious songs has
had one, "Walking in His Footsteps,”
published. She is under contract
with a Chicago publishing firm, it
w’as announced this w’eek.
Moving To Findlay
Mr. and Mrs .Francis Lugibill of
Mt. Cory, former Bluffton residents,
are moving to Findlay where they
recently purchased a new brickcrete
house the first of six to be built by
Clayton Bucher of this place.
Huber Reunion
The 41st Huber reunion was held
at Richland grange hall, Sunday
with 100 attending. After a big
dinner motion pictures w’ere shown
by Henry Huber of the Huber fam
ily and also some travel pictures.
Will Huber, Bluffton resident who
will be 90 on August 21 was the
oldest member present.
Officers for the coming year are:
Pres., Karl Huber vice pres.,
Maurice Huber sec.-treas., Hazel
Hess.
WINS FLOWER AWARD
Mrs. Kermit Herr of South Lawn
avenue was awarded a sectional
championship in the Northwestern
Ohio Gladiolus association show’ at
Toledo, Sunday.
TRIP THRU WEST
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Gossman,
daughter Wanda and son Robert
have returned from a trip through
20 w’estern states, visiting at the
home of Mrs, Ray Pfeiffer, the form
er Doris Klingler of Ada and niece
of Mrs. Gossman. They also visited
an 87-year old aunt, Mrs. Mary
Marshall and daughter Lulu in Loma
Linda. Calif., and stopped at Yellow’
stone park, Salt Lake City, Boulder
Dam and the Grand Canyon,
dam andt he Grand Canyon.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS
A NEWSPAPER DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF BLUFFTON AND VICINITY
BLUFFTON, OHIO, THURSDAY, AUG. 19, 1948
BELL AT GRADE
SCHOOL MAY BE
KEPT AS RELIC
Sentiment Grows For Preserva
tion of Bell As Memento
of Ixng Service
One Suggestion Is To Hang It
At Harmon Field To Be Rung
At Grid Victories
A move to preserve Bluffton’s ven
erable grade school bell as a relic
was gaining in favor here this week,
following announcement that as a
safety measure it will be removed
from the belfry where it has hung
for 65 years.
Sentiment for preservation of the
bell crystallized among Bluffton resi
dents, many of w’hom were former
students in the school, immediately
after it w’as learned that the rolling
clamor no longer will be heard, mark
ing the start of each school session.
Members of the board of education
who ordered removal of the bell a
w’eek ago said that if prevailing senti
ment indicated a popular demand to
keep the bell some plan probably
could be worked out for its preser
vation as a relic.
Offered Bell Free
Previously the board had announced
a plan to give the bell free of charge
to anyone who would assume the cost
of its removal.
The board is scheduled to take up
the matter officially as a special meet
ing next Monday night, and whether
there would be at that time a formal
request to preserve the bell could not
be learned the first of this week.
Several plans for preservation of
the bell as a relic have advanced in
informal discussion.
One group has favored placing the
bell on the grade school grounds as a
memento, and the other suggestion
has been to hang it in a shelter at
Harmon field, so it could be rung
w’hen high school ftfctoatl teams
register a victory.
In event of a decision to retain the
bell here for sentimental reasons, the
board of education w’ould assume the
cost of removing ia from the belfry.
On the other hand, it is not known
whether anyone will submit a pro
posal to take down the bell in order
to gain possession of it.
In Use 65 Years
Current interest aroused by the bell
disclosed that it has hung in the bell
tower at the grade school for 65 years.
It replaced a smaller bell which had
been installed when the building was
erected seven years earlier.
The bell, a holdover from the days
when clocks w’ere none too plentiful
and there was no modern radio or
other means of keeping accurate time,
is largely outmoded from a utilitarian
point of view.
Long years of hanging in the bel
fry have resulted in an unsafe condi
tion, and a large expenditure would be
required to again make it safe in its
moorings, members of the board of
education pointed out.
Jim Miller Resigns
4 s Coach In Texas
James F. Miller, graduate of Bluff
ton High school and Bluffton College,
who has been head coach at Mission,
Texas High school for two years,
resigned that post on July 24, it was
announced this w’eek.
Miller’s grid teams won second
honors last fall in his district, and
two years ago he was selected as
head coach of the annual All-State
Valley high school bowl game.
Herbert Klassen To
Teach At Wharton
Herbert J. Klassen, son of Prof,
and Mrs. John P. Klassen, a gradu
ate of Bluffton college last spring,
will be a teacher at Wharton High
school this fall.
Announcement was made last week
of Klassen’s engagement to Magrita
Christina Anna Freie, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Hendrik Freie, of Am
sterdam, Holland.
Miss Freie w’as a student of Bluff
ton college last year, and this sum
mer has been serving as a counsellor
and instructor at a girls camp.
Driver's Licenses To
Go On Sale Sept. 7
Sale of 1949 automobile driver’s
licenses will open in Ohio on Tues
day, Sept. 7, it was announced this
W’eek by Edward T. Fogo, registrar
of motor vehicles.
Names and locations of deputy
registrars from whom licenses may
be bought will be announced about
two weeks prior to the start of sales.
Sudden Cessation of All Crime
ould Cause Serious Eco
nomic Upheaval
Dr. R. E. Bushong, Superinten
dent of Lima State Hospital,
Is Speaker
Why do men commit crime? Dr.
R. E. Bushong, superintendent of
Lima State hospital for the criminal
insane gave some of the answers in
an address before the Lions club at
their luncheon meeting in the Wal
nut Grill Tuesday night.
Principal factors contributing to
criminal tendencies were listed by
the speaker as poverty ,unemploy
ment, poor family life, an appeal for
easy money and for business reasons.
If by any miracle there should be
suddenly a complete end of all crime
it w’ould cause a greater economic
upheaval than any depression because
all the many agencies to combat law
lessness would be useless and their
staffs out of jobs, Dr. Bushong de
clared.
Crime and cost of controls in the
United States reaches the stupend
ous total of $18 billion dollars every
year. There are two million major
and 20 million minor crimes commit
ted annually, he said.
During hard times, the trend is
toward crimes against property and
in prosperity most crimes are against
persons, he painted out.
The crime rate in this country is
very low among Jew’s, the speaker
said principally because of the
strong ties of family life. Likewise,
little crime is noticed among Japan
ese because of their veneration for
ancestors. Criminal violations among
the foreign-born population of this
country are three and one-half times
greater than among native born
Dr. Bushong dclared.
He also said there is more crime
in cities than in the country, altho
the rural criminal rate has been
climbing.
Orange Twp. Pair
Top Health List
Rosemary Montgomery, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Montgomery
and Robert Warren, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Clyde Warren, both of Orange
towmship, were named healthiest 4-H
girl and boy in the Hancock county
elimination held in Findlay, Satur
day.
Rosemary is in her seventh year
of club w’ork, a member of the Gold
Star 4-H chib and has completed 26
projects.
Robert is in his third year of club
w’ork as a member of the Mt. Cory
Blue Ribbon 4-H club.
Silver Wedding
Of Three Couples
Silver wedding anniversary of
three couples was observed at the
Welty homestead, north of Bluffton.
Couples were Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Welty, Jr., of Toledo Mr. and Mrs.
Monroe Amstutz, Bluffton, and Mr.
and Mrs. Oliver Welty, Col. Grove.
At open house in the afternoon
Mrs. D. W. Reichenbach and Mrs.
W. G. Althaus served assisted by
Misses Betty Reichenbach and Alice
Welty. Moving pictures were taken
by Emory Benroth.
Present were:
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Welty and daugh
ter Rosemary, Jerome, Ohio Mrs.
Bess Bleum, son, Bob, David Jones,
Rossville, Ind. Mrs. Walter Good,
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Althaus, Ash
land Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Welty, To
ledo.
John Stover, Mr. and Mrs. Ken
neth Welty, sons John and David,
Misses Alice and Lois Welty, Colum
bus Grove.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Trijrplehom,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Trippiehorn and
son James, Mr. and Mrs. Emory
Benroth, sons Richard and Roger,
Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Reichenbach,
daughter Betty, Mrs. Edith Burk
holder, daughter Genevieve, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Haas, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin
Lugibill, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mos
er, Mrs. Sam Welty, Fred, Cleo and
Cecelia Welty of Bluffton.
Organ Recital At
Pandora Sunday
David amsey, organist of the
First Methodist church at Anderson,
Indiana, will appear in an organ
recital of sacred music at Grace
Mennonite church. Pandora, Sun
day morning at 10:30 o’clock. He is
a graduate of Arthur Jordan con
servatory, Indianapolis, and has
studied abroad.
Nation’s Annual Crime Bill In Excess
Of 18 Billions, Speaker Tells Lions
With The Sick
Med Murray is ill at the home of
his son Nile Murray south of Bluff
ton.
Nello Steinman is a patient in the
Veterans hospital at Dayton taking
treatment for a stomach ailment.
Mrs. W. M. Niswander is a pa
tient in Lima Memorial hospital
w’here she underwent surgery last
w’eek.
Harold Amstutz who has been a
patient in Bluffton hospital since he
was involved in an automobile ac
cident has improved sufficiently to
be removed to the home of his par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Amstutz on
the former Follett farm.
Rites Here Thursday
For Pvt. Otto Owens
Military services 1 nducted
at Maple Grove cei letery Tiursui.iv
morning fr Pvt. Otto James Ow’ens,
a grandson of the late AncIrew J.
Owens, former ma\zor of E 1 uffton.
Pvt. Owen s was killed in ac tion in
Eastern rance on Nov. 10, 1944.
The bod
y of Pvt
in Youngstown,
home w’as
Owens, w’hose
is at tne
Basinger funeral hoine awaiti ng fun
eral services and bur ial. Rev Simon
Glasl will officiate at rites in St.
Marys Catholic church at 9:30 a. m.
Thursday, with -the rosary recited
the funeral home at 8:30 p. m. Wed
nesday.
Members of th.e Bluffton post,
American Legion, w31 meet at post
headquarters at 9 a. m. Thui sday
to attend the ?es in a body and
to conduct military rites at the
grave.
Pvt. Owen s was born at Man.sfield
August 22, 1918, while his firther
Dr. Otto .Owens, was serving rver
seas in World Wai I. Dr. Owens is
deceased, an survivors include the
mother, Mrs. Otto J. Owrens, of
Youngstown and two brothers, Dr.
Andrew’ J. Owens and Dr. Francis J.
Ow’ens, both of Detroit.
Before entering military service,
Pvt. Owens was employed as an elec
trician by the General Firproofing
Co., of Youngstowm. He was a
graduate of Youngstowm East High
school and had attended Ohio State
university.
The body arrived in Bluffton Tues
day night on the Cleveland-St. Louis
Nickel Plate train.
Rites Tuesday For
Mrs. Susan Miller
Mrs. Susan Miller, 89, widow of
David C. Miller and a formed Bluff
ton resident, died at her home in
Belmore last Saturday of heart dis
ease. She had been an invalid for
11 years.
Born near Bluffton in Hancock
county, June 19, 1859, she w’as the
daughter of David and Mary (To
bias) Whisler. She w’as married in
1876 to Mr. Miller, w’ho died in
1932.
Survivors include two sons, How
ard, Garrett, Ind., and Carl, Lig
gonier, Ind. a daughter, Mrs. Zoe
Rupright, Belomer and tw-o sisters,
Mrs. Ezra Shellar, Rawson, and Mrs.
Ed Ferrall, San Diego, Calif.
Funeral services w’ere held Tues
day at Belomer. Burial w’as in the
Clymer cemetry nar Bluffton.
Cora Brenner Rites
In Mt. Cory Monday
Funeral services were held Mon
day in Mt. Cory for Mrs. Cora
Amanda Brenner, 73, wife of
Charles Brenner, who died of coro
nary sclerosis last Friday night at
her home residence at that place.
A lifelong resident of Hancock
county, she was born March 14, 1875,
in Union township, the daughter of
Jacob and Eliza (Moyer) Ulrich.
She w’as married to Mr. Brenner
on December 14, 1899.
In addition to her husband, sur
vivors include tw’O daughters and a
son.
Rev. Irvin Kauffman officiated at
the funeral rites. Burial w’as in the
Clymer cemetery.
Perry Driver Rites
Are Held In Lima
Perry M. Driver, 86, Lima insur
ance agent and father of Mrs. Sher
wood Diller, formerly of Bluffton,
died last Thursday in Lima Memor
ial hospital, following an illness of
several weeks.
His daughter, the former Phyllis
Driver, attended Bluffton college, and
now lives with her husband and fam
ily in Alameda, Calif. Also surviv
ing are the widow’ and three grand
children.
Funeral rites were held in Lima
Sunday.
BLUFFTON
A Good Place To Trade
___________ NUMBER 18
FIRsTdRAFT MAY
TAKE NONE FROM
BLUFFTON VICINITY
Initial Call Will Average One
for Every 10,000 Popu
lation
Average Will Require About 8
or 9 Draftees From Allen
County
Bluffton, Beaverdam and Richland
township may have no draftees in
the first selective service call if it
represents a fair proportion of the
total population.
The call which will go out about
September 2 for 15,000 men will take
about one draftee for each 10 000
persons throughout the country.
Population of Richland towmship
area, including Bluffton and Beaver
dam, roughly 5,000, would rate one
half a draftee, according to the na
tional average.
Eight
or Nine from County
Eight or nine draftees will be fur
nished by Allen county on the basis
of an estimated population of 82,466.
Similarly initial draft calls w*ill
take three men each from Putnarn
and Hardin counties.
Present indications are that the
men will leave early in November
for induction centers.
Jim Howe Plays On
Winning North Team
Jim Howe, star Bluffton High
football tackle last fall, was the lone
representative from this area on the
North team that defeated an aggre
gation from the southern part of
the state, 20 to 0, in the annual
All-Star gridiron tilt at Canton, last
Friday night.
Howe, the second Class gridder
to be named to the all-star squad in
the three-year history of the game,
played a good line game for the
Northernerns
Neil Schmidt, Bluffton High back
field ace, on the North team last
year, w’as the only other Class
player ever to make the grade.
Roger Howe Wins
City Tennis Tilt
Roger Howe, Allen county singles
champion, won the Bluffton singles
crowm in the annual city tennis
tournament with a 6-2, 6-0, 2-6, 6-4
victory over Dale Reichenbach in a
match here last Sunday afternoon.
To reach the finals Howe had de
feated Woodrow’ Little, and Reichen
bach won over Bob Simsox.
Doubles championship of the two
w’as w’on by Little and Reichenbach,
who defeated Howe and Simcox, 7-9,
6-4, 6-3. No doubles matches were
played, and the two seeded teams
met in the championship round.
This concludes city tournament
play for the season, although several
Bluffton players are planning to com
pete at the Northwestern Ohio tennis
tourney in Toledo over Labor Day
weekend.
Births
The following births at Bluffton
hospital:
Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Wright, Ada,
a boy, Howard Alan, Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Diller,
Lima, a girl, Francis Lou, Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Edw’. Schumacher,
Bow’ling Green, a girl, Wednesday
morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graham,
Lima, a girl, Janet Lynne, last Wed
nesday at Lima Memorial hospital.
Mrs. Graham is the former Gene
vieve Fett, eldest daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. C. B. Ftt, Bluffton.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pannabeck
er of Chicago, former Bluffton resi
dents, a boy, John Richard at Mercy
hospital, Chicago, Thursday. Mrs.
Pannabecker is the former Wanda
Suter of Pandora.
Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Kohli of Bal
timore, Md., a girl, Cheryl Jan, Aug
ust 10 at Baltimore. Mr. Kohli is
the son of Mrs. Eva Kohli of Bluff
ton.
Returns Home After
Summer In England
Mrs. Harry Shrider, Jr., of Har
mon road who spent the summer in
England arrived home last Thursday.
She was accompanied by her hus
band who met her in New York. The
Bluffton woman, a native of Grims
by,, Lincolnshire, visited for three
months at her former home in north
ern England.

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