OCR Interpretation


The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, September 02, 1948, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1948-09-02/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THURSDAY. SEPT. 2. 1948
Francis Basinger, D. D. S
Evan Basipger, D. D. S.
Telephone 271-W
Bluffton, Ohio
D. C. BIXEL. O. D.
GORDON $IXEL. O. D.
122 South Main St., Bluff tan
EYESIGHT JSPEC1ALISTS
Of flee Hours: 9:0® A. 5:30 P. M.
Open Evenings Wed, & Set. 7:00 to 9:00
_______ Closed Thur^ay Afternoon. ___
Net?
Why
Try Our Home-made
Bread!
Also our
Cakes
Pies
Cookies
Sweet Rolls
Buns and
Bread Rolls
Etc.
tiaucnst^in’s
Bakery
“Fine Baked Goods”
111 North Main St.
Phone 298-W Bluffton, O.
xv»10'’ N
gV**
A
V
'■'"Sf
oSOfc
At Ebenezer Church
Miss Margaret Wallace of Van
Wert, missionary to South Africa,
who will speak at the Ebenezer Men
nonite church, Sunday night at 7:30
o’clock at a joint C. E. missionary
service. She has been engaged in
Sunday school and children’s work
under the Scandinavian Alliance mis
sion.
Reunions
The Schifferly reunion will be held
at Richland grange hall, Sunday.
Pres., Harry Schifferly Sec., Mrs.
Harry Schifferly.
Editor’s Note—This is one
of a series of articles to appear
in the Bluffton News dealing
with early Ohio history. Others
will appear in forthcoming
issues.
Indian Penalty For
Murder
About thirty yards north of the
?nnsylvania Railroad and forty-six
leader!
W. H. Gratz Family Shoe Store
Scientific Fitting a Specialty
Bluffton, Ohio
TRAINED OFFICE WORKERS WANTED AT ONCE
The placement department of Tiffin University has on file approximately fifty un
filled calls for young men trained in accounting, including payroll, cost, income tax,
public, and general accounting procedures, and young women trained in executive
secretarial work. These positions are in Tiffin, Clyde, Fremont, Sandusky, Toledo.
Columbus, Shelby, Bellevue, Fostoria, Findlay, Bucyrus, Upper Sandusky, Galion, and
other nearby cities.
Five calls were received Thursday, August 5. One call from a Columbus organiza
tion was for ten young men accountants. Another call of August 5 was from a large
Toledo oil refining company for six young women secretaries at an initial salary of
$160 per month for a three month supervised training period after which the salary
would be advanced to $200 per month, the minimum salary for administrative secre
taries. Calls were received for three Monday, August 31 position calls are received
almost daily at the college.
Positions are now open with manufacturing companies, utility companies, hospitals,
The Ohio Farm Bureau (3), high schools, colleges, the Ohio Civil Service Commission,
the U. S. Civil Service Commission for young women secretaries at $2498 per annum,
and various state and federal agencies,
ANY FORMER TIFFIN U. GRADUATE FROM EITHER THE ACCOUNTING
OR EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL COURSES, UNEMPLOYED, IS URGED TO CON
TACT THE COLLEGE AT ONCE. FREE REPLACEMENT. YOUNG MEN AC
COUNTANTS CAN BE PLACED ANY DAY AT $200 TO $225 MONTHLY. AND
YOUNG WOMEN SECRETARIES AT $125 to $150 PER MONTH. WITH EXCELLENT
OPPORTUNITY FOR PROMOTION.
Ill OF THE 112 T. U. GRADUATES OF MAY 12 ARE EMPLOYED TODAY IN
ACCOUNTING AND SECRETARIAL WORK, AND ALL IN LOCATIONS OF THEIR
CHOICE.
NEW CLASSES STARTING FOR BOTH VETERAN AND CIVILIAN STU
DENTS AT THE OPENING OF THE COLLEGE YEAR, SEPTEMBER 13.
SOME RESERVATIONS STILL AVAILABLE FOR NEW STUDENTS. MAKE
APPLICATION AT ONCE IF INTERESTED. COPY OF ILLUSTRATED
CATALOG FURNISHED ON REQUEST.
THE T. U. VOCATIONAL WAY LEADS TO IMMEDIATE EMPLOYMENT AT
EXCELLENT PAY
TIFFIN UNIVERSITY
Fall Term Opens Sept. 13: Night Classes Start Oct. 5.
rods west of the Sandusky River, near
Upper Sandusky, Wyandotte County,
is a barely perceptible sunken spot
about the size of a grave. And that
is just what it is—once the mound of
the 20-year-old son of Black Chief, of
the Wyandottes, legally executed by
the Indians 107 years ago for murder.
The grave sank after the bark cof
fin had rotted away and the body
within had moldered and the shift
ing soil and falling leaves of more
than a century have spread no thicker
over it than over the surrounding
ground.
The young buck died at the hands
of a firing squad in September, 1840,
i after a fair and impartial trial by his
peers in the Indian council house a
retrial by the grand tribunal after
appeal from the first verdict and the
receipt of a sentence more severe—
“death by firing squad on the morn
ing of the third Friday after
sentence.” The first sentence had been
banishment from the tribe and con
fiscation of his property.” Contrary
to white procedure, the appeal was
taken by the prosecution, not the
defense.
Jail Stood Until 1890
So the son of Black Chief offered
no word but waited stoically in the
little Indian log jail for the third
Friday and death. The jail, one room
above and one below, very small, with
a single tiny window and an outside
stairway, stood until in the early
1890’s some farmer needed the site
for more corn and pulled the historic
relic down.
All the trouble had come about
through the government’s first clumsy
attempt at a prohibition law—almost
as disastrous as those later on.
When the Indians from Ohio were
moved further west the Wyandottes
chose to remain and being the most
warlike and fearless tribe of the
nations, the United States appeased
them by putting them on a reserva
tion established along the Sanduskv
River.
The reservation, according to law,
was bone dry territory—nobody set
tling in it could sell or give to an
Indian any intoxicating
liquor.
Bootleg Liqi
or
Persons living outside the reserva
tion were not by the 1aw prohibited
from keeping and sellinj? liquor. Gon
sequently the Indians could get all
they wanted at the rnany bootleg
villages which sprang
the borders.
up all along
in one of these villages a party of
Indians had congregated to whoop
things up a bit that September day.
Most of them got pretty drunk and
there were several quarrels and a
few fights among them.
One old man, a brother of the
half-breed John Barnet, late in the
afternoon procured a jug of whisky
and started home with it. He soon
was joined by the 20-year old son of
Black Chief, who walked with him
down the wilderness trail and wanted
some of the liquor. The old man
refused to give it to him.
Murder
Furious, the chief’s son seized a
heavy club and beat the old Indian
over the head and when he was down
kept on hitting him. So occurred the
murder for which the son of Black
Chief was sentenced to die.
The evidence was circumstantial
but conclusive. Old Barnet’s body
soon was found by other Indians who
passed along the trail and not many
rods further on the chief’s son was
discovered across the path in a drunk
en sleep. Near him was the murder
victim’s empty whisky jug.
The Indians seized the chief’s son,
bound his arms and took him, the
tell-tale whisky jug and the body of
old Barnet to Upper Sandusky, where
the son of Black Chief was lodged
in the little Indian jail.
There was much excitement
throughout the Wyandotte nation and
THE BLUFFTON NEWS. BLUFFTON, OHIO
the suspected murderer was taken to
the council house, where the executive
council, after sober deliberation.
fount him guilty of murder when in
an intoxicated condition. The sen
tence was life banishment from the
nation and confiscation of the con
vict’s property—if he had any.
Sentence too Light
The tribe was greatly’ dissatisfied
with the light sentence and demand
ed a retrial, that time before the
-st? a (oq.w eq qi!M ‘prnnqui IsoqSiq
semb led nation acting as a jury. That
was a pretty big jury, consisting of
hund reds of warriors and old men.
and all the lesser chiefs sitting as
judges.
The great council house w
ed. Every male member of
as crowd
the tribe
more than 21 was to ballot on “Shall
the prisoner be put to deat ‘i or per
mitted to live?” His guilt
had been established.
al ready
A selected group of Indians was
sent into the grass in fror
council house to “win the
of the
favor of
Manitau, the Great Spirit, Iy giving
Him some of our tobacco.” Manitau
is the word of all Indian ti■ibes and
nations for God, in whom th
fastiy believed.
ey stead-
So, squatted in the grass before
the council house the little ring of
Indian chiefs passed the pipe from one
to another and each blew a few puffs
of a mixture of tobacco, sum ac leaves
and kinnikinnick (yellow will w bark)
skyward. Up there somewhere was
the Happy Hunting Grounc
all Indians expected to wine up. Its
antithesis, below was no matter of
figured on going there any how.
worry’—no Indian, good or bad,
Death Sentence
In the council house the cfin of i
Black Chief stood impassive
sign of emotion while the be
taken. He spoke no word in
defense and asked no mercy,
the sentence of death on the third
Friday after the trial.
From the little window in
diau jail the chief’s son watched the
Indians ^dig his grave near
in the Sandusky bottoms
them nlarn tho rtldo hark
one end of it.
Then came the summons Indian
guards came into the. jail, biund the
and IaaV
prisoner’s arms behind him
him to the grave. There, standing
illu LOOK
in
front of and with his back tU 11, Ult
murderer listened to the reading
a long, Indian death decree.
A handkerchief was hound over his
eyes and stoically the youth stood
waiting—silently. Six selected Indian
riflemen slipped unseen out of the
bushes, stealthily crept almost up to
the prisoner, raised their guns and
at a motion from a chief fired. The
son of Black Chief fell, with five
bullets in his heart. One gun had
been loaded with powder only. Each
executioner could hope that rifle had
been his.
So is the century-old story of the
sunken mound beside the railroad.
Mrs. Tod and her husbaind, who
live in Edinburgh, Scotland, attend
ed the closing day of the ilympics
at Wembley a London subu b.
They wenj able to get tickets only
through the black market, but she
savs it was worth the price
They had standinc room on the
steps beside
],„ fl
She also writes of the terrible
floods that have recently hit the
British Isle, washing out bridges
and sweeping scores of animals out
to sea.
“The Flying Scotsman,” crack Ed
inburg to London train, was more
than 10 hours late.
Wednesday to Saturday
Harry Burkholder Has Third Grand
(’hampion In County Livestock Show
for Harry
and Mr
Quenti
rd tim Meter
Mrs.‘W. M. C. Tod, the former
Barbara Hauenstein of Bluffton,
jrives a close-up of the recerit Olym
pic games ait Lond?n, England, in a
letter to her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney’ Hau enstein of Campus Drive.
ame and beneath
the score aoard, where tl
rrom the winning nations flex
“The closing cei as very
imnressive. The representa! ives of
the 60 nations took their pla'es with
where the contestants and represen
tatives (Boy Scouts) emerged, so
we really had an excellent view.”
“For the closing songs Sir Mal
com Sargent led the Band of the
Guards while they played Greek,
British and Finnish national anth
ems and for the singing of the BBC
Chorus in the Olympic Hymn—then
the flame was extinguished.
“Most of the time I think the
British are pretty inefficient, but I
was amazed at the way the crowd of
82,000 was dispersed. From the
time we left our places in the sta
dium and arrived back at Waterloo
Station only an hour had elapsed.”
Commerc
with the
phos buying tl
of 70 cents a
pounds.
Former Bluffton Woman Writes
Of Sights At Olympic Games
rve champion of
umbus
$71
a pound.
Maurice Criblez, rou
had the Brown Swiss
and female and Isaac
der, Bluffton, copped
Shorthorn calf and fe:
An idea, to be suggestive, must
come to the individual with the force
of a revelation.
—William James.
SAFE, SANITARY
KIDDIE-BATH*
Extra Safe Toe-Controlled Top
Adjustable Height
Easy-to-Clean Plastic Tub
Utility Tray and Pockets
Comfortable Safety Strap
$ Separate Rinsing Spray
30-inch Measuring Scale
Flattering to any bathroom the
shining feather-light Trimalume Kid
die-Bath stays gleaming bright and
clean—folds to a mere 4 inches after
the daily bath!
REG. U. $. PAT. OFF.
Armstrong's
Known for Fine Furniture
108-110 S. Main Street
Bluffton. Ohio
COME TO THE FAlIR
Four Big Days and Nights
HORSE SHOW TEAM PULLING CONTEST LIVESTOCK
AND INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITS 4-H CLUB F. F. A.
HOME ARTS EXHIBITS FARM DISPLAYS MACHINERY
EXHIBITS PONY RACES.
GRANDSTAND ATTRACTIONS
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday Afternoons
FREE EXHIBITIONS DAILY
EVENING ATTRACTIONS
International Revue: Broadway Varieties of 1948
Family Membership
(Sales by mail close September 1. Al
tickets may be obtained at Fair Gro
Gate Admission
PAGE THREE
lets qoto bed* ■Lif
said SLE6PY-HEA0
Lets tarry awhile 4%*
said SIOW
WISE dressed in
SAFE W LEGION TOGS'J?^
rt.
Back To
SCION
TOGS
BALL-BAND GYM SHOES
AND SWEAT SOX.
GYM TRUNKS AND
SUPPORTERS
WEATHER BIRD SHOES
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
SCHOOL WEAR—
Outfit the children for school
best at
"Old Mill Sti•earn’*
Fair Gromnds
FINDLAY, 0
Membership Tickets admit husband, wife, and
children under 18 years of age to each session of
Fair. Also, parking for car and voting! privileges.
For tickets see Clyde Warren, Director.lor Citizens
r&Diller
$2.00
|er that date
iji ds.)
National Bank, Bluffton. I
9-10-11
ME LT YOUR
FRIENDS
AT THE
Pres., Thad Moorhead
Ser.. R. L. Yates

xml | txt