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Freeland tribune. (Freeland, Pa.) 1888-1921, August 29, 1895, Image 3

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Impure Blood
Miinifeata itself in hives, pimples, boils and
other eruptions which disfigure the face and
cause pain and annoyance. By purifying
tho blood llood's Karsapurilla completely
cures theso troubles and clears tho skin.
Hood's Snrsaparilhi overcomes that tired,
drowsy feeling so general at this sejison and
gives strength and vigor. liemember
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is the only tnio blood parifler prominent
ly in tho publlo eyo today. I'l; six for B.
Hoo-I's Pills SS Iffsasg*-
General Custer'a Last I-'ight. |
June 20, Custer struck Sitting Bull's
mnlu trail and eagerly pursued It across
the divide Into the Little Big Horn Val
ley. I'xpectlng battle, be detached
Major Reuo with seven of his twelve
companies to cross the Little Big Horn,
descend it, and strike the foe from the
west; but Reno was soon attacked and
held at bay, being besieged in all more
than twenty-four hours. Meantime,
suddenly coming upon the lower end of
the Indian's immense camp, the gallant
Custer and his braves, without an In
stant's hesitation, advanced into the
jaws of death. Balaklava was pastime
to this, for here not one "rode back."
"All that was left of them," after a
few minutes, was some 200 mostly un
recognizable corpses. Finding himself
outnumbered twelve to one—tho In.
dlans mustered at least 2,500 warriors,
besides a caravan of boys and squaws
—Custer had dismounted his heroes,
who, planting themselves mainly on
two hills someway apart, the advance
one held by Custer, the others by Cap
tains ICeogh and Calhoun, prepared to
sell their lives dearly. By waving
blankets and uttering their hellish yells
they stampeded many of the cavalry
horses, which carried off precious am
munition in their saddle-bags. Lining
up just behind a ridge, they would rise
quickly, lire at the soldiers, and drop,
exposing themselves little, but draw
ing Custer's fire, so causing additional
loss of sorely needed bullets. Tho
whites' ammunition spent, the dls.
mounted savages rose, fired, and
whooped like the demons they were;
while tho mounted ones, lashing their
ponies, charged with infinite venom,
overwhelming Calhoun and Keogh,
and lastly Custer himself. Indian boys
then pranced over the field on ponies,
scalping and reshooting the dead and
dying. At the burial many a stark vis
age wore a look of horror.—Scrlbner's.
FAIR SAILING through life for the person
who keeps in health. With a torpid liver
and the impure blood that follows it, you
are an easy prey to all soils of ailments.
That " used lip " feeling is tlie first warning
that your liver isn't doing its work.
That is the lime to take Dr. Pierce's Gold
en Medical Discovery. As an appetizing,
restorative tonic, to repel disease and build
up the needed flesh and strength, there's
nothing to equal it. It rouses every organ
into healthful action, purifies and enriches
the blood, braces up the whole system, aud
restores li£ alth and vigor.
T N II 3:1
Raphael, Angelo, HuUtna, Tana
Tlir "LINF.NR" aro the Best an<l Most Economi
cal Collars and Cuffs worn: they aro made of lino
cloth, both Bides 11 wished alike, and lieiny reversi
ble, one collar ia equal to two of any otlmr tiud.
The-/ tit well, wear t cell an i look well. A Itox o|
Ton Collars or Piva Pairs of Cuds for Tweaty-Flva
Cents.
A Kamnln dollar and Fair of Cuffs hy mall for Bis
Caatn. Kiune style uud BIZ*. Address
REV Kit BIBLE COLLAR COMPANY,
tV FrauaUiu Bt . Row York. 27 llilbx Bt.. Beaton,
PROFITABLE DAIRY WORK
Can on'.y ho accomplished with tho very best
of tools and appliances.
With a Davis Cream Sepa
rator on tho farm you are
fctireof more J and bottoi
bufter, while the skimmed
milk Is a wil- uahlo food.
I'annebs will make no mis
take to get a * Davis. Neat,
Illustrated catalogue
malted lit KE ♦rTiiSfSe* Agents wanted
DAVIS & UANKIN BLDG. & MFG. CO.
Cor. Randolph's Dearborn Sis., Chicago
ROMAN CATHOLICS? WHERE ARE YOU?
Wo want your services. Wn want a mana
ger in i-vniy county to handle agents and con
trol * Itn ot The Holy Rosary. Illustrated. Tho
finest athollo book over published. Approved
by MonsignorSatolli, tordinal Gibbons and
Archblsl.ops Ryan and t'orrigan. * Second edi
tion ready. Hi st edition of 6,000 gone in four
months. This territory line not boon worked
yet. Big commission. Write quick. The Cath
olic Art Pub. Co., 1026 Arch street, Philadelphia,
, c s !
j® S uocessf■ JI P roiMicu tos Claims.
® J j iain lnot war, ltxuUudiuathitf ulaluia, atty uiuco.
"FRUIT
BOS pr, Wuruc-boro, Pa.
ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR
* THE BEST *
OD
FOR
Dyspeptic,Delicate,lnfirm and
AGED PERSONS
k JOHN CARLE & SONS. New York. *
THE SMOKE.
Dove-winged against a t/nder, turquoise sky
The white smoke flits; or through tho lam
bent air
Quivers to fading violet spirals fair;
Or shifts to gray, eurlel upward heavily.
It rises in strong, twisted columns high
From grimy funnels, fleckod with fitful
flare;
Or through tho planks of creaking bridges
baro
It sifts a sinuous way to trail and die.
Thoslill, vast sklo3 aro background for its
strife;
'Tis like man's yearning, mounting fro m
man's pain,
Seeking tho tranquil Heavens, waveringly;
Earth's ceaseless cltt3h and clangor glvo it
life;
'Tis like man's prayors, that rise from toil
and strain,
Trail, and are lost, In God's immensity.
—Hannah Parker Kimball, in Scribncr.
THOSE CHARMING FRI EN DS.
yUfffcx UT of noon fused
/// % medley of voices 1
hoard in a hnlf-sti-
J ,i lied whisper :
j&, "Mother, look
v-yi who is sitting bo
.J? hiud you ; it's Rog-
M/ gie Clive, I'm posi-
My curiosity outran my manners.] I
turned.
"Miss Eudcot!"l exclaimed. "It's
not three hours siueo I arrived iu Nice,
nnd my cirelo of acipiaiDtauces being
very small, to moot u friend is a pleas
ant surprise.
Miss Endcot blushed, prettily, if
forcedly.
"Now, Mr. Clive, your chnfiing me.
Why, mother and 1 havo not been
hero a week, yet wo have made most
charming friends upon tho strength of
your mutual acquaintance.
"Indeed 1" I replied. "Aro they
still at Nice?"
"Oh, yes, but not at this hotel."
"Their names?"
"The Comtosso d'Angiero and her
frieud—Madame Fletivre."
"The Comtesse d'Angiero!" I re
peated. "Of course 1 met her once or
twieo iu Loudon soon after her mur
lingo to tho Comte. A slim womau,
with fair hair, aqnilino nose and
laughing blue eyes. Oh, yes, I remem
ber her well."
Miss Eudeot laughed merrily.
"Fashions change, Mr. Clive," she
said, holding up one linger playfully,
"and tho color of women's hair and
even tho shape of women's uoscs aro
apt to change with thorn, aren't they,
mother? But lot me waru you, Mr.
Clive, not-to inquire after tho Comto
d'Angiero. He is dead. The Comtesse
makes a most, charming" widow, don't
she, mother?"
Something in tho Inst sentence exas
perated me. The Ilriton in mo resent
ed tho allusion to tho charms of tho
widow so direotly upon the announce
ment of tho poor Comto's doatn, and,
moreover, it contained an insinuation
thut within the meshes of those charms
I might easily become entangled.
Now, it was less than a year siueo Miss
Iris Maypel and her pseudo auntio
had so nourly ensnared mo iuto their
mnrriago trap, and womeu of uucei
tain social status no longer attracted
mo. I felt that Mrs. aud Miss End
cot, with nil the former's American
isms and all the hitter's smartness and
banter wero moro agreeable and emi
nently safer companions than Iris
Maypel & Co. So impressed was I
with-that truth that I gallantly stuck
to tho Endcbts all that evouing for
fear of meeting tho Comtesso and
being ourriod oil by her.
The next morning fonud mo in tho
came mood, though liow much tho
long tete-a-tete I had enjoyed with
Bertha Endcot overnight contributed
to it I know not. Anyway, I proposed
a ramble, and was not dissatisfied to
hear that Mis. Endcot contomplated
sitting in tho veranda with a novel.
Bertha nnd I thereupon started for a
scramble to tho heights at tho back
of the town.
As wo loft tho hotel a telogram was
put into mv hand.
Now, telegrams at homo aro too
common oven to destroy your lethar
gy, but telegrams received iu a Conti
nental town within twenty-four hours
of your arrival, of which you linvo ap
prised nobody, aro apt to startle you.
Bertha saw my surpriso and began
to chaff mo. I opened tho tologram
and read:
"I. aud A. are at Nice. Bowaro!"
I nevor knew how long it took mo
to reoover myself and langh ut tho
warning 1 had receivod, but I know
that Bertha Endcot and I wore well
out from the town and at loust throe
hundred feet above tho sea level.
I apologized profusely for my ab
sence of mind.
"Oh, don't apologize," replied
Bertha. "If sho cannot bo with you,
she should nt least be entitled to oc
cupy your thoughts for an hour or so."
"You're wrong, Miss Bertha," I re
turned. "Aud here's the proof."
I handed her the telegram.
"You're as puzzled us I was at first,"
I added, noting the contraction ol her
eyebrows. "And as it is no secret,
but only a story against myself, I will
explain it."
I thought I hoard a sigh of roliof as
sho returned the tologram.
"This must oomefrom my old frieud
Bob l'allunt," I continued, "siueo no
body but he—at least, nobody in Lon
don—knows my probable whereabouts.
I have boon wandering now for six
months nnd all on account of tho I.
and A. he mentions."
Bertha nodded, but did not inter
rupt.
"The I. stands for Iris—Miss Iris
Maypel—and A. for Auntie. It hap
pened a year ago, Bob Pallant and I
were both in love with Iris, who was
in London ostensibly for the benefit
of the season and in charge of her
aunt. Well, she gave tho preference
to Bob, who, after actually proposing
to her applied to a private detective
agency, asking as to her character and
the social position of her people. Ho
got tho character, a 3 rosy n ono as
could bo painted, and it was settled
that ho should ask her to marry him.
It happened that I called—by iuvita
tion—at tho flat occupied by Iris aud
lier chaperone, and was shown into
tho conservatory by tho servant. Then
caino the denouement. Iris, in ignor
ance of my presence, came into the
conservatory with her chaperone and
in a loud voice let mo into their
secrets, which may bo summed up in
a few words. Iris was an adventuress
in search of a husband. Tho chaper
one was no relation, but employed—
paid—by Iris to introduce her to so
ciety and a likely husband. Tho de
tectivo to whom Bob bad applied for
tho character was Iris's cousin, Nor
ton Scrubbs; hence the rosiness of the
character."
"And theso two women aro in this
town!" exclaimed Bertha.
"Bob Pallnnt's information is usu
ally correct, and I'm not disposed to
doubt it. You ace, ho was so savage
at having been done by thoso peoplo
that ho vowed vengeauco, and as he
couldn't attack tho woman ho sworo
ho would be the undoing of that de
tective agent—Norton Scrubbs. And
Bob Pallaut is generally equal to his
word."
"Suppose you meet those people
here?"
"I shall cut them, of course."
"But, hut you admitted that—that
you loved—lris—-once !"
My henrt gave a great leap of de
light. Bertha's words, the suppressed
eagerness of her tone, tho faltering in
her sentence, all pointed to ono end.
One long teto-a tete of tho previous
evening, though it had been chiefly
concerned about bygone incidents —
tho sort which grow dearer as they
grow older—hail left its mark, I
glanced quickly in her direction, but
her face was averted, and only a very
flushed neck and a very red little eur
wero visible. They were enough.
"Miss Beithn," I replied, impres
sively, "sorno people grow both old
and wise all of a leu]). I'm ono of
them. Tho love of a foolish boy is
how fur below tho level of that of a
sensiblo man? What relation does
tho love-sickness of youth beur to tho
heart-ache of manhood? Aud even
assuming that I had never been duped
to tho extent that Iris Maypel duped
mo, even assuming—"
I don't know how long I should
have talked or Bertha would have
listened had sho not interrupted me.
"Look!" sho said. "Here come
the Comtesse d'Angiero aud Madame
Flouvre. How jolly! won't they be
surprised to see you! Ob, it is fun.
I'm so glad we came this way."
I looked in tho direction indicated
and saw—
I could scarcely believe I saw aright
theii, but now, when I recall tho soeno
—the long, wooded avenuo with its
pinky-blossomed rose hedges, the
waving palms, the bushy eucalyptus,
tho clumps of odorous orange trees
with their pretty white blooms inter
sprinkled with golden fruit— it is dif
ficult to realize now that tho prim lit
tle figure iu widowed garb of Parisian
daintiness quickly approaching us
was Iris Maypel, aud the elderly com
panion was "Auntio" of London fame.-
But they were.
I had no time to plan an action. No
sooner was I assured that my eyes
wero still in normal condition than wo
mot and Bertha was saying in an
ecstatic tone—
"My dear Comtoss, see who 1 havo
brought you!"
Tho Comtesse extended her hand,
while tho most dubious smilo I ever
beheld grow on her face. I obeyed
my impulse.
"This is not an unexpected pleas
ure," I said, politely, "siuco Miss
Bertha has intimated your presenco in
Nice, Madame la Comtesse." I pur
posely emphasized the title. "Never
theless, it is a pleasure to renew an
acquaintance hero so pleasantly ma
tured in London. M. lo Comte, I
trust, is well and---"
It was said with intent. Having
started with a lie I meant to act it out.
I broke oil suddenly, for two reasons.
Bertha tugged vigorously at my coat
sleeve. and Iris alias the Comtesse,
burst into a most realistic fit of weep
ing. I expect tlie excitement of the
moment aided her.
I apologized in tonos so contrite
that I startled myself with my ap
parent sincerity, aud Iris aud her
chaperone bade us adieu.
As wo returned I listened for Ber
tha's merited rebuke for having for
gotten her warning aneut the Comte's
death, but I listened in vain. In fact,
so engrossed was sho in thought that
it was only when I had thrice asked a
question that sho replied.
"To what stago of intimacy have
you and tho Comtesse reached?" I
asked for tho third time.
"Why do you a3k?" Bertha re
plied evasively.
"Because I am more than anxious
to know."
"Mother and I mother at Monaco,"
"Yes?" I replied encouragingly.
"I ought not to tell you anything
more."
"Oh, then there is something more
to tell? Ditl you visit the Casino at
Monte Carlo?"
"Once."
"You resisted the temptation of a
second visit?"
"Wo obeyed instructions. See
here, Mr. Clive, this is in confidence.
Father, as you know, was unable to
accompauy us this trip, but ho gave
us carte blanche to go whither we
liked and to stay where we liked—
with one proviso. He declared if we
went fooling around the gaming tables
at Monte Carlo ho would never lose
sight of us again. So it was on con
dition that we paid but one visit to
the Casino that we were allowed this
European trip."
"It was a fortunate provision, per
haps, for your mother appears to
have imbibed the infatuation for
'methods' and 'systems.' "
"Yes, that is tho "Comtesso d'An
giero's doing."
"The Comtesso gambles?"
"With tho most consistent good
luck. She takes mother's money and
plays with it. Tlifcre, I oughtn't to
have lot on about that, but I know
you'll not give rao awa}*, Mr. Clivo.
You see, the Comtesse bogged mother
to trust her with a pound just to try
her luck—for the Comtesso goes to
tho tables every day—and elio won.
Then mother trusted her witli two
pounds, then five, ten aud twenty, al
ways winning. Now—"
"Please go on," I said, as Bertha
paused.
"There can bo no harm in telling
you the rest, Mr. Ciive. Mother has
raised every possible penny—pawned
her jewels even—and to-morrow the
Comtesso is going to play with tho lot.
There, don't look as if I wore to blame.
I've argued and protested, but whero's
tho use? The Comtesso wins every
time."
Sho had; but would sho win this
time? Tho stako was high. Would
she play with it? That was the ques
tion. Was tho whole thing a scheme
—a common confidence trick—to get
hold of tho American dollars aud bolt
with them?
It goes against tho grain to expose
a woman, however doserving sho may
be. I concluded to give Iris a cliauoe,
aud wrote a short letter stating that I
would keep her identity a secret if
she would return Mrs. Endcot her
money and leave Nice early the next
morning. Omitting either condition,
I declared I would hold her up to rid
icule and scorn.
I left tho note with tho porter at
tho hotel where Iris was staying, and
then walked awiiy to ponder alone
upon fate, coincidences and tho like.
I found a solitary seat upon n stone
boulder, with ouly lho*droariuoss of
some attempted excavations, which
had ended in a failure, to greet my
eyes or impinge upon my thoughts.
I sr.t there and smoked, and mental
ly surveved my entiro world, from
London to Nice, from Bob Pallant to
Norton Scrubbs, from Iris to Bortba.
Suddenly, without warning, a fignro
stood besido mo and said, inquiringly;
"Peggie Clivo!"
Tho silence of his approach and the
aggressiveness of his bearing startled
me. However, I admitted my name.
"You wrote a letter to-duy to a
friend of mine, tho Comtesso d'Au
giere," continued tho man.
"You are mistaken," I replied.
"Mere cavilling!" ho said, with a
sneer. "You wrote, then, to Miss Iris
Maypel."
"If that is more truly her name,
yes."
"You threatened her."
I stood up. Tho man's bluntncss of
speech and scowling brow looked
ominous.
"Call it that, if you will," I replied.
"I tried to do her a good turn, aud to
save her from herself."
"Bah! Merc quibbling! You!
threatened to expose her if she failed
to return certain monoy to that
bumptious old Amerieau woman or to
leave Nico in tho morning. Isn't that
a threat?"
"Call it so if you like," I returned.
"Coward!" bo yelled.
"Thank-you," 1 said. "If you will
givo mo your card I shall kuow better
to whom I am indebted to that pseu
donym."
"flouud !" ho said. "If you want
to know, my name's Norton Scrubbs,
which, until your villainous friend,
Pallant—whom I'll be on level terms
with yet—ruined it, was a flourishing
name in Loudon. All! you shrink, do
you? Hero's something that'll make
you shrink into a still narrower com
pass."
Ho pulled a revolver from his poc
ket, and cocked it. I showed as bold
a face as I could muster.
"Don't forget that you'll havo to
answer for this," I said.
His hoarse laugh echoed all around,
aud intensified the utter dcsolntiou of
tho place.
"Aiiswor!" ho sail. "To whom
shall I answer?" To thoso stones? To
tho night? To whom, I repeat? There's
not a soul within ear shot, and not
likely to bo this sido of morning."
I realized the truth of his bluster.
Tho day had died suddenly, aud tho
mists wero growing uncomfortably
dense.
"Cornel" continued Scrubbs, "wo'll
strike a bargaiu, you and I. Swear—
aud mind you stick to it—that you
will leavo Nico to-night and not return
or communicate with any ono in this
town for threo months from this
moment! The alternative is—"
Ho explained tho unfinished sen
tence with an emphasized movement
of tho pistol.
I am not a bravo man, yet I am not
an abject coward. I had a decided
objection at that moment to be hurled
into eternity and leave Bertha behind.
In tho few available seconds allowed
me for consideration twenty methods
of attack and defense presented them
selves aud wero rejected. Theu, all at
once, my muscles acted involuntarily.
I sprang at my opponent and gripped
liini somewhere iu tho region of the
throat. Tho attack was sheer folly.
Ho was twico my weight, possessed
twice my strength, and learned iu
every art and trick connected with the
free-fight and the knock-down blow.
I thought on my foolishness as I lay
prone upon tho dirt and blinked up
timorously at Scrubbs's revolver,
which looked right dowu iny throat as
I gasped for breath.
"Now, you houud I" he said, "will
you come to terms now or will you
take a dose of lead?"
Tho reply startled me quite as much
as did Scrubbs.
It was the pop of a pistol, the whirr
of a shot and the cry of a wounded
man as Scrubbs fell forward right
across my lege.
I disengaged myself and sprang to
my feot just as Bertha Endcot sprang
from behind a pile of loose 6toucs and
stood before me.
"I winged him, didn't I ?" she asked,
breathlessly. "The coward ! Perhaps
the next tiino ho dubs my mother a
bumptious old woman ho'il remember
that an American girl can shoot."
Bertha had puta bullet into his leg,
and the shot cost her mother a few
thousand pounds, for Iris aud her
chaperono had left Nice—with Mrs.
Endcot's money—before wo managed
to get tho wounded man back to his
hotel.
Soon after Bertha consented to bo
mine.—lllustrated Bits.
SCIENTIFIC AM) INDUSTRIAL.
In Budapest, Hungary, they havo
put the trolley wires underground.
It is proposed to do away with tho
smoke uuisanco in Pittsburg, Penu.,
by erecting a inamtuoth electric plant
outside the city.
California diamonds aro found in all
the colors, from a brilliant white to a
clear black, together with rose, pink,
yellow, blue and green.
A chemist advises that canned fruit
be opened an hour or two beforo it is
used. It becomes richer after tho ox
ygen of tho air has been retored to it.
A lire was recently started in a Bos
ton store by ullowing an incandescent
lamp to remain for a few minutes on
a pilo of cotton cloth in tho packing
room.
Beautiful specimens of tho anchor
ite, or tourmaline, have boon found in
Maine and elsewhere in Now Engluud.
This gem is said also to havo beeu
found in North Carolina.
A use for compressed air in tho
foundry in addition to cranes aud
hoistp, which aro beiug introduced
everywhere, is in providing a sand
blast for tho cleaning of castings.
A railroad train was recently
stopped near Itlieims, France, by tho
number of caterpillars that fell on tho
railway. Tho rails grew too pasty
and slippery for tho wheels to adhere
until cinders wero thrown on them.
Tho German Government has offered
a prizo of for a .system by which
"the indications of tho compass-carl
of a ship's compass shall be automatic
ally transmitted to another location iu
the ship iu such a manner that tho
ship may bo steered."
Tho recent alarming mortality
among tho French soldiers iu tho gar
rison at Vitre, which was first ascribed
to the use of damaged canned fruit
from the United States, turned out to
bo tetanus or cerebro-spinal fever re
sulting from overcrowding.
Professor Max Muller asks for
monoy to photograph tho inscriptions
of tho Kutlio Daw, in Bnrrnah, a col
lection of over soven hundred temples,
each containing a whito marble slab
on which part of tho Tripituka, the
great Buddhist Bible, is engraved.
A nautical bicylo has been invented
by a Spaniard. The machine is com
posed of two cases of steel, which servo
as boats and aro connected by cross
bars. In the space between tho two,
and near tho stern, is a paddle-wheel
operated by pedals something like a
bicycle. The speed is about six miles
an hour.
An <*Easy Thing" lor This Solomon,
The Police Department may bo a
little shy when it comes to trailing
lost goats, but when pigeons aro in
volved there is a member of tho forco
who possesses all the shrewd attributes
of Solomon of old. It is like this!
On Friday Adolph Grenboldt, No.
1117 California avenue, owned $l9O
worth of "homer" pigeons, and tho
next morning they were not. Officers
Wieueka aud Heanoy, of tho Attrill
street station, wero placod on tho
trail. It load yo.ster lay ffrst to a Chi
neso laundry, aud thon to tho resi
dence of Stephen Spitza, where the
birds were found. Mr. Spitza was
po&itivo tho birds wero his. So was
Grenboldt.
"This is tho easiest thing I have
struck for a long time," Baid Officer
Ileuuoy.
Thon ho oponod the coop, turned
tho pigeons loose, watched tbom cir
clo ouco in tho air, and then start off*.
"Now," said this later-day Solomon,
turning to Mr. Grenboldt, "if those
bijrds are yours, they will bo homo be
foro you arc."
And thoy wero. One of tho stolon
birds lias tho 750-mile record from a
point in Mississippi to Chicago, win
ning tho ffrßt prizo last year. In all
fourteen of tho stolon birds havo boon
recovered.—Chicago Tribune.
A Survivor ol Waterloo.
Baillot, tho oldest of tho ihreo
French survivors of tho battle of
Waterloo, lives at Carisey, in tho De
partment of the Yonuo, where he was
born in 1793. Excepting his deaf
ness, he is still iu as good health as
ever, and is full of anecdotes of the
campaigning days iu Germany. lie
was struck with the sabro of an Eng
lish dragoon at Waterloo, hut it failed
to cut "through his shako, which was
stuffed with hrushos, pieces of bread
and many other articles.—Now York
bun.
It (lot the Jury.
Justico Vaughan Williams tells
many a good story, but tho following
is one of his best from tho bench. A
counsel for the defense only put one
question to all the witnesses called for
the othor side, and it was: "Have yoa
an umbrella?" Invariably the.answer
was "Yes." Even the policeman had
au umbrella. The counsel then said:
"This is very suspicious; every wit
ness has an umbrella;" and tho jury
acquitted tho prisoner without look
ing round.—Household Words,
Highest of all in Leavening Power.— Latest U.S. Gov't Report
Powder
ABSOLUTELY PHBE
The Highest Typo of Hunting.
ID uiy estimation, the pursuit of the
mountain sheep is the highest typo of
hunting our continent affords. To "col
lect" an old rani requires good lungs,
good legs, good Judgment, and good
shooting. In tlio doing of It you uro
bouud to rise in the world, to expand
mentally, morally, and physically, and
to como under the pell that nature al
ways lays upon the hunter who once
sets foot upon her crags and peaks.
I regret the disappearance of the moun
tain sheep even more than the passing
of the buffalo and elk, for it Is an ani
mal of finer mold and stronger and
more Interesting character every way
It Is much more alert than the moun
tain goat, and therefore more difficult
to shoot—so say the men who have
hunted both.—St. Nicholas.
How'i Tills?
We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for
any case of Catarrh thut cannot bo cured by
Hall's Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CHUNKY & Co., Props., Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. Che
ney for the lot 15 years, and believe him per
fectly honorable in all business transactions
and llnancially able to carry out any obliga
tion made by their Arm.
WEST SO THUAX, Wholesale Druggists, Toledo,
Ohio.
WALDINO, IVINNAN & MARVIN, Wholesale
Druggists, Toledo, Ohio.
Hall's Catarrh Cure in taken internally, act
ing directly upon the blood and mucous sur
faces of tho system. Price, 75c. per outile. Sold
by all Druggists. Testimonials froe.
Children in San Domingo wear no clothe ß
until after 12 yoars of ngo.
Tliey Cure the Cause*
Moat of tho discomfort In life comes from the j
stomach. You'll admit that without urgu- j
incut. The proof is in your own stomach.
A great nainy seemingly different diseases i
come from the common cause—a disordered .
stomach. Coming from one cause, it is natur
al that they should all be cored by ono medi- ■
cine. Kipans Tahule* not only cure thedis
eoso—tlioy cure the ouu*e.
They are good for dyspeps'a, biliousness,
headnclio, constipation, dizziness and all
troubles of tho stoinHcb, liver and bowels.
Druggists sell them.
Tobacco Tattered and Torn.
Every day wo meet tho man with shabby
clothes, sallow skin and shambling footsteps,
holding cut n tobacoo-puisied hand for tho
charity quarter. Tobacco destroys manhood
and the happiness of perfect vitality. No-
To-Uao Is guaranteed to cure just such eases,
and it's charily to mako them try. Bol<l
under guarantee to euro by Druggists every
where. Book free. Ad. Sterling llumedy Co.,
New York City or Chicago.
Odossa is said to be ibe prettiest and meat
European town in Russia.
Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for children
teething, softens tho gums, reduces inflam i
lion, allays pain, cures wind colic.2sc. a bott.lj
Homo say that tho Chinese know tho loco
motive 20J years ago.
Dr. Kilmer's SWAMP-ROOT euros
all Kidney and Bladder troubles.
Pamphlet and consultation froe.
Laboratory Binghuinpton, N.Y.
There nre said to bo nearly GOO ordors of
nobility In Europe.
Wife used "MOTHER'S FRIEND" before first
child—was quickly relieved; suffered but little
recovery rapid. E. E. JOHNSTON, Kulauln, Ala
The newest thing out is a hand-painted
shirt front.
Riso's Cure cured me of Throat and Lung
trouble of three years standing. —ls. C'ADY,
Huntington, hid., November 12, 18'J4.
r <
An elegant book for
your table and constant
reference. Send for it
\/ ■• j an NOW, It's New and
Yes, its ready! nice. .•. ■ .
OUR NEW CATALOGUE
brimming full of illustrations, and show
ing how the thousand-ar.d-one things
really look. You'll like that.
flig-Sent by mail on There are Guns, Rifles, Pistols —from
receipt of 10 cents in all over the world, and soma of our own
make—Fishing Tackle, Dog Collars and ;
postage Stamps or Chains, Tennis Sets, etc., etc.
money. You can see our LOVELL DIAMOND
BICYCLE—The Finest Wheel on Earth,—
the Williams Typewriter—you ought to
have one. There's lots of other things too.
JOHN P. LOVELL ARMS CO., J
Koln If. S. Agent tor "STAR" AUTOMATIC TAPER FASTENER. /
=LA
It's only a
/J question of time
I about your using Pearline. So it
// /fvUj I seems to us. It seems as if every
/ / 11 V) 0 bright woman must see, sooner or
fl 11 f \Jj/ p==i I ater > boxv much easier and quicker and
//, I ISSK{O / [V|f /— >. better and more economical is
I \ &")) Pearline's way than any
r'* (/ other known way of washing.
I You can't think of any draw
back or objection to 1 it that hasn t been met and
disproved, a thou- j ||i O sand times over. Millions of
women arc using jjj |J Pearline now. Ask some
one of them, who j|jl" l\ uses it rightly, how much she
saves by it. Manu- facturecl only by Jas. Pyle, N.Y.
"Forbid a Foo! a Thing and That Ke Will Do."
Don't Use
S A POLIO
Photographed Out of Focus.
Under the pretext of a conscientious
realism it has become the common
practice of latter-day writers to devote
their exclusive attentions to the drains
und dustbins of humanity, and then,
with supreme effrontery, to claim cred
it for the brave, beautiful and eman
cipating character of their labors.
Their accuracy of detail may be photo
graphic, but the result Is comparable
to a photograph in which one feature
or limb is preposterously out of focus.
And, as a matter of fact, It often hap
pens that this vaunted accuracy entire
ly falls to satisfy the touchstone of
science.—London World.
Both the method and results when
I Syrup of Figs is taken; it is pleasant
j and refreshing to the taste, and acts
! gently yet promptly on tho Kidneys,
Liver and Bowels, cleanses the sys
i tem effectually, dispels colds, head
aches and fevers and cures habitual
constipation. Syrup of Figs 13 tho
only remedy of its kind ever pro
duced, pleasing to the ta3to and ac
ceptablo to tho stomach, prompt in
its action and truly beneficial in its
effects, prepared only from tho most
bealtliy and agreeable substances, its
many excellent qualities commend it
to all and havo made it tho most
popular remedy known.
Syrup of Figs is for salo in 50
cent bottles by all loading drug
gists. Any reliable druggist who
may not have it on Laud will pro
cure it promptly for any one who
wishes to try it. Do not accept any
substitute.
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAN FRANCISCO, IAL.
LOUISVILLE, KV. FE IV YORK. NY.
v a u 33 '9i
US3 Jfy Hin.DH urn
Tra^-Worn night ami day. lias
Jr Bniallor to *ult changing
condition of RUPTURE.
PATENTED. Illii*. Cat. B''nt securely
scaled by O.V. House Mfg. Co. 7M Tlroadway.N.Y.Clty
Franklin Coliogo New Athens, 0., Board
tuition, room, and hooks. $'J a weokX'at. free.

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