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The daily Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1878-1???, November 15, 1879, Image 4

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THE DAILY CAIRO BULLETIN: SATURDAY .MORNING, NOVEMBER 15, 1370.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS-rHTSICUN'R.
yy H. MAREAN, M. D.,
Homeopathic Physician ami Surgeon,
Offlr 140 Commercial avenue. Residence corner
Fourteenth HI. aud Washington avenue, Cairo.
DENTISTS.
D
R. E. W. WHITLOCK,
Dental Surgeon.
Ornon No. 13 Commercial
glgath - Ninth Btreeu
Arcnue, between
J)R. W. C. JOCELYN,
DENTIST.
OrPIC Eighth 8treet, near Commercial Avenue
NOTARY PUBLIC.
IJUIOMAS LEWIS,
Notary Public and Conveyancer.
OFFICE: With the Wldowa' and Oorpnani' Mu
mal Aid Society.
ATTORNEY8-AT-LAW.
JINEGAR & LANSDEN,
Attorneys-at-Law.
OFFlCE-No. US Commercial Avenue.
FERRYBOAT.
QAIRO CIT FERRY CO.
FKRHYBOAT
THREE jrta STATES.
On and after Monday, June 16, the boat will make
the following trlys: ,
LliVBS L-AVI8 LIAYI8
Foot Fourth at. Missouri Land'g. Kentucky Ld'g.
8 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m.
3 p. m. 2:40 p. m. 4 p. m.
4 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m.
SUNDAYS.
a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m.
Sp.m. 3:30 p.m. 4 p.m.
STEAMBOATS.
POR METROPOLIS AND PADUCAH.
The P.'iegantSldewhcel Passenger Steamer
CHAMPION m
NEWMAN Master.
A. J. BIRIi Clerk.
Leave Cairo every afternoon at 3 o'clock, for
Vadurah, Metropolis and wav landing. For
rri-ight or passage apply to SOL. A. SILVER,
Agent.
NEW ADVERTISES! EXTS-M.ISCEI.LASEOUS.
1
JRS. C. MCLEAN,
Has without a doubt the finest line of
3Iillinery and Fancy Good
In this city, aud
They Must
isorae
be SolU
JrTlce.
at
The
Ladles, are requested to
Hoods aud
call aud cxuniluo
Prions Will be Made K-UisflK-tory.
B1GHTI1 STREET, NEXT DOOH TO STUART'S
DRY GOODS HOUSE.
(3 W. WHEELER,
Dealer In allkludsof
Cord Wood. Stove Wood.
Coal, Etc.
EIG MUDDY COAL
A SPECIALTY.
WOOD AND COAL YARD:
Tenth Street, Between Washington and
Commercial.
DAIRY.
JJCIIO DAIRY,
70 OHIO LEVEE.
Ho dirt or(diit by measures being exposed to air.
Milk delivered twice a day,
SEALED IN PINT BOTTLES.
Try It and aee lor yourselves.
30 PINT TICKETS ONE DOLLAR!
Cash on delivery of ticket.
CAino. . iijunois,
BOAT STORES.
GJ. WILLIAMSON,
70 Ohio Levee,
Dealer In
Boat-Stores and Groceries,
Of til kinds.
opjcn Niairr and day.
I: l
VMMk Dairy and Gilt Edge Butter. Oysters and all
ktiuJn H fruit whoa In oatin, on hand aud deliv
cki promptly at residences free. Oysters delivered
THE DAILY BULLETIN.
ENTERED AT TIIE POST OFFICE IN CAIKO, IL
L1NOIS, A3 SECOND-CLASS MATTEH.
OFFICIAL TAPER OF ALEXANDER COUNTY
Only Morning- Daily in Southern Illinois.
GENERAL LOCAL ITEMS.
NOTICE.
During the sickness of Mr. Harrell, Mr.
Efnest Thielecke has been installed local
editor of the Bulletin. Any favors shown
him ia the way of local or city news will
be duly appreciated. E. A. Burnett.
That "OWly" is far-tetched.
Leave orders for glazing, at Blake's.
How do compositors like being loaned
out like other goods or chatties ?
One laundress and two scrubbing girls
wanted at the St. Charles this morning.
We never but once attempted to get an
item from the Argus. In so doing we got
the same item twice in The Bulletin.
Capt. James Laning, accoraDanied by
lis daughters, Miss Laning and Mrs. Cor
nish, is in the city visiting his daughter,
Mrs. II. H. Candee.
Window glass, at B. F. Blake's.
Our informant was mistaken in the
name of the purchaser of the Clancy prop
erty. It was purchased by Mrs. Jane
Clancy; not by Dick Fitzgerald, as stated
yesterday.
-A great benefit has been secured to
the poor by the introduction of Dr. Bull's
Cough Syrup; for it now takes only 25
cenU to cure a cough, when formerly Doc-'
tor bills alone amounted to dollars.
A pretty picture is a healthy looking
and well cared for Baby. By the use of
Dr. Bull's Baby Syrup you can keep the
health of your Baby in splendid condition.
Price 23 cents a bottle.
The Bulletin might have been the
"official paper of the city" had it been
mean enough to bid fifty cents under a
competitor after his bid had been made
public.
Blake will glaze your windows, on
short notice.
A nun may smile and smi'.e, an 1 yet
nothing but a nine pound boy be the mat
ter with him. That was how Wa'.t CundiJ
acted yesterday. Born at 7 a. m., Thurs
day. Mother and child doing well.
The milk sickness is very bad in the
country, near Vandalia. The wild turkeys
are affected with it so much as to bescarce'y
able to fly, says the Vandalia News. Our
friends need not sen J us any wild turkeys
from that region.
A sixty mile an hour wind for ten min
utes is a pretty fair average storm at any
time, but when accompanied by hail, rain,
thunder and lightning as it w?u yotorlay
afternoon it becomes too much of a good
tl.img.
Rev. David A. Bonnar lias accepted the
call of the Vestry of the Church of the Re
deemer of this city, and will start from
Rochester next Monday. It is expected
that he will be here in time to officiate at
the wedding in thechurch next Wednesday.
We regret to hear of the serious ill
ness of Moses B. Harrell, editor of the
Cairo Bulletin. Mr. Harrell was one of
the original settlers of Mound City; he was
its first Mayor and published it first news
paper. He has been a Democrat of the'old
school, and one ot the few vigorous intel
ligent editors in the southern part of the
State. I'Carboadalc Observer.
Glu.ing done on short notice, by leav
ing orders with B. F. Blake.
Which is the same size as the Bulle
tin; contains on an average two or three
times us much reading matter; is furnished
to subscribers 40 per cent cheaper; has a
circulation very much larger than tlie Bul
letin; has inside pages devoted to the
choicest miscellany aud latest news items,
(not to clipped general editorials palmed
off as original); will be one year old on
Tuesday next, and is the official paper of
the city. Argus.
"How we apples swim."
Another of your bulls, Mr. Bulletin.
You know your local news' columns are
made up from the Argus, aud you borrow
our compositors to set them up for you.
I.ArgU3.
A mistake; we have not had 'a single
swingiug-on-tlie-gtc-itoui in the Bulle
tin, and we pay the borrowed (?; compos
itor for futir hours work at a rate that
would bankrupt the Argus in a month.
POLICE NEWS.
As Mr. Harrell would say, we failed to
get a sight of Squire Osborne's shapely
form yesterday, and hence did not get the
proceedings of his court.
Last night, about 0 o'clock, two rous
ters commenced "squabbling" with each
other in front of Lancaster & Rice's lumber
office. They tried their skill on each other
with their fists, ufter which their love for
each other and emotion caused them to em
brace. They were frightened off by a
wicked boy with a tin whistle.
Eleven gentlemen of leisure -called
"tramps" by the unknowing and vulgar,
were yesterday, through the kindness and
earnest solicitude of officer Schuckers,
furnished with tree passes over the river.
Mr. Schuckers' solicitude for their welfare
caused him to accompany them to the land
ing of the ferry, from whence he saw them
sail tor "furrea" parts.
Delia Holmes got on a "bender", yes
torday and believing herself to bo a "gay
girl on a plank road," did then and there
get Independent, insulting, indecent, etc.
She was brought before Squiro Comings'
who, after casting his shy glanceS ut tier,
made up his mind that the aforesaid Delia
having imbibed too much of tlio "straight"
instead of smoking Korsmeycr's faultless,
ought to be taxed therefor. She was ac
cordingly fined fivo dollars and costs.
Mr. Thomas O'Brien, a gentleman of
the "green isle" was taken beforo tho ven
erable Squire Robinson on a charge of dis
orderly conduct yesterday. The evidence
against Mr. O'Brien not being "too thin"
and ho having tho appcaranco of having
lots of "tin" about his pataloons, the Squire
fined him five ddllars and costs, Thomas
produced the necessary "sugar" and thus
was Jailer Cain robbed of nu ornament for
his palace.
It was Chas. Williams so tho story
goes, that got "tipsy" and being .so, fell
into tho kind and loving arms of officer-
somebody. Charley was taken before his
honor Squire Robinson under the gaze of
whose eagle eye ho admitted the "corn."
He was therefore, for the benefit and use of
the city of Cairo, fined one dlolar and costs.
Not having the necessary "chink" he was
pleasantly invited to join the speckled street
brigade for healthful exercise and free
board under the sanitary care of the gal
lant Cain for threo days.
CAIRO TEMPERANCE REFORM CLUB.
Tho crowd which met at the Reform
Hall last night was not a large one, but
owing to the darkness of the night and the
continuous rain which fell, it was a surprise
to us to see a crowd, either large or small.
present. Although no extra attraction had
been advertised home talent betas util
izeda goodly number of men wcrj pres
ent and not a few ladies graced the !.'.!.
The meeting was called to order by Mr.
Geo. S. Fisher, at about $ o'c'.xk. Ttic
Rev. Mr. Whittaker led in prayer, and &
song w as sung, when a Mr. Wall &;(-, of
Du Quoin, wacalled upon for an address..
Mr. Wallace spoke somewhat ever half
aa hour, entertaining his hearers idl and
Siying many good things for the cause of
temperance. He ws followed by Mr. M.
Easterday. who. in the coarse of his, rt
aurks. referred to the financial condition
of the club. When the present administra
tion took charge of the afiirs of the club,
said Mr. EasterJav, the club owed (1".0: in
that shor. rime the debt had been reduced
over half and there was a tine prospect of
nising the balance in the near future.
Mr. S. B. Penn was next called
upon and ad dressed the clubia his usual
practical and straightforward maaaer.
Rev. Whittaker followed 3Ir. Penn, and
as is the invariable custom of that gentle
man, made a sensible and effective speech
and received the applause of the audience.
Signers being next in order, six gentle
men came forward and signed their names
to the pledge and received the red ribbon.
A g'ood showing, this, for so unfavorable a
night as was last night.
Mr. H. B. Doolittle, of Doolittle Mills,
Ind one of the signers, then spoke for a few
minutes, after which the club adjourned
well satisfied with the work accomplished.
TORNADO.
THE TERRIFIC STORM YESTERDAV ONE LIKE
LOST CONSIDERABLE OA MAO E IN DIFFER
ENT I'ARTS OK THE CITY.
It is unnecessary to give an iicconnt of
the terrific storm of yesterday, for the
benefit of our Cairo readers, fur most all of
them were eye witnesses to the awful spec
tacle. But for the benefit of our outside
subscribers we will attempt to describe the
indescribable.
Shortly after dinner, dark, muddy clouds
began to gather north of the city. The
wind, which had been blowing from vari
ous directions during the fore part of the
lay,' now came from the north, slightly
scattering the massive clouds but driviii":
them rapidly toward our city. And soon
a murky canopy, shutting out all sunlight
and rendering the lighting of gas ueces
sary in nearly all our business houses was
stretched over the entire city and suburbs,
and seemed to be resting heavily upon
every house-top. The rain fell softy at
first, but soon broke forth in torrents; ami
then for fully ten minutes, the storm king
reigned iu all his fury. Streams of water,
loaded with hail, and by sudlen
gushes of wind, whipped into a
foaming, seething mass drove every living
thing under shelter. All space seemed to
be obstructed by an impenetrable and irre-
sistable combination of wind, water and
hail, lashed into fearful ugitat'on by an el
ement traveling at the rate of sixty miles
an hour, sweeping through every street,
striking terror to many a heart and scatter
ing destruction with a liberal hand,
Among the minor incidents ami acci
dents, we may mention that fences and
trees were blown down; shut
ters, doors and gates were torn
trom their hinges; windows were
broken; pedestrians were suddenly lifted
from their feet out into tho middle of the
streets or over fences; partitions were torn
out, and houses were swayed to and fro
like sapplings. But first among tho
moro serious results of the storm
was tho killing of little eight year old Alice
Morris, who was found by her niotlTer,
lying under a door, which had been
broken from its fastening and fallen upon
her. She lived but fifteen minutes after
hying discovered. No other lives were
lost or physical injuries sustained so far
as we could learn. ., ,
Tho destruction to property was great.
A house standing against tho Mississippi
Leveo was rolled over several times and
landed in tho commons. Rev. Jacob Brad
ley's church on Fifteenth, between Waluut
and Cedar streets, was blown down; tho
Eighteenth Btrcct colorcdJMethodist church
was, in a twinkling, transformed into kind
ling. Tho windows were blown out of tho
colored High School, the doors wrenchod
from their fastenings, and tho partitions
blown out. Tho scholars who were in the
building at the time escaped unhurt by tho
back way.
A portion, ten feet squaro, of tho roof of
the custom house, on the w est side, was torn
off ; the roof on the west side ot the gas
house was damaged ; a tenement house ou
Seventeenth street was blown off its founda
tion; tho south fire wall and brick chim
ney of the hub factory were blown down ;
tho chimneys on Mrs. Webb's and Mr.
Harrell's residences were blown down, as
were those of many other houses in the city ;
tho tin roof and front portion of Mr. Smith
Torrance's machine shop were badly dam
aged, and a portion of the court house roof
was taken off; four barges and a grain ele
vator were torn from the levee, but they
drifted down the river unhurt.
In all probability this is not all the dam-
ago done, but it is all we could learn of
yesterday. The total loss we could not
with any degree of certainty, ascertain. The
storm was of not less than ten minutes dur
atjon, and it is admitted by all to have
been one of themost terrific and "long
winded" elementary eruptions of which
there is auv record.
COMING TO CAIRO.
AS INTERVIEW WITH MR. MARTIN (il.ADDES,
THE COLORED REPRESENTATIVE OF I) XIE'S
POOR AND DOWNTRODDEN VOTERS.
Hivinj; Kva repeatedly asked by some
o! our eiri.-ens ia regard to the inunigra
tlon'of EfTv to this county and con
vsjor.a! district, id having Wen more or
less in the dirk concerning the matter, we
rejo.-red TfsttrJjv u iaterru-w the leading
spirit ia the ifsir aad lay the result ln-fore
our readers a view of clearing away
some fif the mystery which enshrouds the
subject. Accordingly we set out yesterday
-ftera.vn for the house of Mr. Marti n Glad
den, l colored mm. who, it was said, was,
more t). an any other man. instrumental in
causing the negroes to come to Cairo and
neighborhood. We found Mr. Gladden at
home and in a "sweet temper." He is a mul
atto of slim build; a man of apparently
good education and a fluent and agreeable
talker, but his over-caution in his speech
eclipsed some of these good qualities on
the occasion of which we write. After due
formality, we stated the object of our visit,
when Mr. Gladden at once entered
U)n a history of his doings.
He wa3 a citizen of Mobile, he .said;
had been traveling in the north with the
object ot nnumg nomcs for the
people of the south. He had traveled, ot
late, particularly in Illinois with .that ob
ject in view. He had been in Cairo for
several months; had traveled over the coun
ties composing the Eighteenth congression
al district; had found that the people in
the various counties and towns were not
opposed to the immigration of sober and
industrious negroes; and he had received
encouragement not only from Republicans
but also good Democrats in his efforts to
bring about an immigration of his people.
Reporter Are you acquainted with Com
missioner Raum?
Mr. Gladden I know of him; but do
not know him personally.
R Raum, I believe, is particularly in
terested in the immigration of colored
voters to this district.
G I read an interview a friend of mine
had with Mr. Raum in which he expressed
that desire. Beyond that I know nothing.
R How many men have you 1 .
catcd in Cairo up to date?
G About thirty some ate men of fam
ilies. All are known to me personally and
I know them to bs honest and hardwork
ing men.
R Are they men of trades anl have you
found employment for all.
G Yes; I have found employment for
all. Among those here now arc three car
penters, one mason, one plasterer and one
blacksmith. I could find employment for
twenty-five blacksmiths up the Illinois
Central road a piece, but blucksmiths who
want to leave the south are scarce.
R Since you spend a good deal of time
iu finding homes and situations for the
men who arrive here from tho south, I pre
sume you receive sotno pecuniary remuner
ation for your trouble from some source?
G I air? a member of a secret organiza
tion of Mobile who have for their object
the good of tho colored man, and it is under
their instructions and at their expense that
I do what I am doing.
R It is but natural that tho prominent
Republicans of this city and congressional
district should feel interested in your work,
and it would, perhaps, not be amiss should
they lend you necessary assistance.
G While I am acquainted with Col.
McKeaigand other prominent Republicans,
I have received no assistance from them. I
have received advice and have been offered
aid from various sources; but have not re
ceived and will not accept pecuniary aid.
R How do you manage to get those
men to Southern Illinois who express a de
sire to come but havo not tho means ?
G We let thorn remain where, they arc.
R Why have you chosen Southern Illi
nois for the immigration of your people ?
rpiIIS SPACE BELONGS TO
A.- MARX, Clothier,
61 Ohio Levee,
He is too busy to write
LOOK OUT
FOR MAUD
O For several reasons. I have traveled
all over this state, and I regret to see that
even the white Republicans in the northern
part of the state are prejudiced ogainst the
colored man. For instance, in Ashley,
Washington county, I found only one col
ored person in the county, and that was a
negro cook ; and although I was well
treated there, yet I was told that
colored people were not tolerated
there. I find the people in Southern Illi
nois more reasonable in that regard. An
other reason is, I find the climate here more
mild than the northern climate, and hence
more suited to the colored man. I have
priced soinp ot the lands along the Illinois
Central railroad the land is good, and I
find that the company is willing to dispose
of it on easy terms. This is another in
ducement. R- How do you bring these advantages
to the ears of your people?
O In person. I represent two hundred
families of Mobile. ' I go to them and tell
them. They know me, have confidence iu
me, believe me and come. I have been
employed in the custom house of Mobile
for several years (am not now connected
with it), and therefore had an excellent op
portunity to become acquainted with the
people of that city and gain their confidence.
R The names of the counties in South
ern Illinois you have visited are what?
G Johnson, Perry, Jackson. Massac and
several others. In Metropolis we have an
organization of colored men, who have, so
far, succeeded in finding employment for
fifteen immigrants.
R I presume you intend to locate some
of tlic families that come up hereafter, in
different portions of this county.
G I have been to Thebes and find that
I can easily locate" twenty-five iu that burg,
and tho people are apparently glad to have
them there. I expect some more men up
next week and believe I can locate some of
them in Cairo. .
R-J'he cause. Can you tell me the
cause of the colored men's desire to leave
the south?
G Well work is very scarce. This is
one of the principal causes.
R Since so many workingmen have al
ready lelt the south for Kansas and other
places, it is but natural that work should
be very plentiful.
G The colon! people of the south are
afraid they are afraid of the "solid south,"
ami afraid that a Democratic president
will be elected in lsO. Outrages are
committed in the south and tolerated, which
would be instantly frown downed in a
northern state. The Democratic "machine
politicians" are responsible for this state of
affairs.
Thus, after we had been requested by
Mr. Gladden not to enlarge on anything he
had said, ended our interview with that
gentleman. Apparently he has had deal
ings with reporter, before, and we left him,
fully convinced that he was as cautious
nbout what lie said as General Grant.
LKTTF.Jl LIST.
A LIST OK LETTERS It EM AIM NO I'.NCAI.I.ED
FOR INTIIEPOSTOFFK'E AT CAIRO, ILL.
VEMI1ER 15TII, 1871.
LADIES,
NO'
HiiKI'. Ailalinn
ilriiilly, l.urlinla;
I'rown. Mirv;
Kerry, AiUie;
Ilrnwn, Miirv;
llaille. Lottie:
Lawsuit. Adeline;
Miller. Mollle;
Spencer. Siillle:
Spencer. Knielle;
White, I'ar.i.
mimes, iiiii ii l. .
Colti'l, l.lmla:
Kelly, Mary. A.;
I.eroy. Rattle;
Hire. IV,
shea. Minrtiii1 :
Watkliis.Joeeplilne;
GENTLEMEN.
Render. Clins. A.;
IIhvIs, Small I,.;
(rllllll, ,1 times 8;
Junes, Lucius;
Kohler A Co.;
Lucked, Win. ;
Marshall, lieu;
Miller. Lewis;
M'Aullir, Patrick;
O'Leary, John;
Rlcliesoti, Monroe;
Smith,, Inh n W.;
Schick. Henry;
Scion, Put. K. ;
Williams, II. M.;
Itru.lf.jrd. I'. M.j
iili"oii, Knock;
Johusuu. James S,;
Kim;. Joliu;
Holder, Pete;
Lain. E. M. ;
Marshal. Llire:
.Vtintnomery, R, E.
Newman, N.;
Oweu. M.;
Schmidt, J. (J. ;
.Schick, 11 ;
Sliuler, K I)
Slome, RicUanl;
Whltllasey, II, 8 ;
White, Richard;
walker, John;
Wilson, T. II
Please say advertised, when calllni for the above
letters. O. W. Jii KEAUt. Postmaster.
FINE OYSTERS.
If you want n good dish of Oysters served
in any style, or a hot cup of coffee, go to
00 Ohio Levee, next to I. M. R. R. office.
Open day and night. Families supplied by
tho can. Selects 50 cents, mediums 40
cents per cun. A. T. DwTlAtiN,
Proprietor,
a better Advertisement,
PAN PRICES.
OYSTERS IN ANY STYLE.
Harry Walker has just received a large
assortment of Fresh Oysters, and will serve
them up in any style. You can go and get
them any way you want them. The oyster
counter is under the management of
Henry Mvkiib.
LADIES' CLOAKS.
Elegant Ladies' Cloaks opened to-day, at
Stuart's popular dry goods house. We offer
a Cloak elegantly trimmed for It 00, equal
to any f 0 00 Cloak in this market.
C. R. Su'art, Eighth St.
WHERE WILL I GO.
To get a good pair of Boots or Shoes madcf
to order, from the very best material? Go
to R. Jones, Commercial avenue, Atheneum
buihrfng. Workmanship and satisfaction
guaranteed. No fit, no pay. Trices to suit
the times.
A NEW SCHEME.
A fine silver tea set will be drawn for at
Ticheman's billiard parlors on Chris'mas
eve. Every person paying for a game of
billiards will receive a ticket entitling him
to a chance in the drawing. Tickets can
not be obtained in any other way.
Old time prices at the barber shop of
J. George SteinhouJe, on Eighth streetnear
Alexander County Bank. Good barlx-rs,
easy chairs, sharp razors, clean towels, etc.
Shave 10 cents, haircut 25 cents, shampoo
".5 cents, and other work proportionally low
Remember the place.
HOUSEKEEPERS, ATTENTION I
There are only two weeks left in which
to secure useful aud ornamental articles for
your kitchen, previous to our holiday dis
play. We show new articles on our 5 and
10 cent tables to-day. We also show on
our 2i cent counter new and useful articles
never shown before in this city. A visit of
inspection will amply repay you.
C. R. Stl'art, Eighth Street.
SMALL ADVtBTWEMKNTs.
J. V the lines enrh or will b- pnl.lisl,,-,! ,, T V-
iml !..,... .w. . " '"""MIB Willi
.. . , . ... per HiDRin. fi tl
additional
. in-, nuuauons waufd fr
FOR RENT.
..,! ""'iie'l b'droom. references 4,..,:i!rH. For
particulars Inquire on the premise? J?. TciitU
, TO LET.
Thr'C bedrooms-funiijh.vl or unfurr.isiw.Uone
lar?.;. Iront room, two eimll-r room. For fi.rllier
particulars enquire of .MRS. A. A. HARK3LL.
... , ARTIST'S PROOFS.
Vr cnVv. fr . fiinnot lie
u- r k 0f bJ Plll,,li"h'-' f"- less than $!3.0O each.
$H. Enquire at Tuk Ht-UKTiN bindery
Owkrm and purchaser of Heal Estate In C airo
nr"S VT t,1","y ,haVe H -"'' itle I am now
prepared to furnish abstract- at r.-nsnriah'e rules.
M. EASTEKKAY
Offlee In Court H.mko,
t , ,x. FOR SALE
A series of No. 8 (iothic cups aud lower cae
i;.y,W(,,r'1'-.'1't"'ii,'Hhl? f'": I""f,'r "r prL'!'Mim
wcrk.Cciliflhtlliifof brevier, ioi.f primer, pin. ureal
primer. Narajou ami rf-t.v i-.n-v. i.
iv'i-- iuii uuu i-ouipie: , WItUOUt
sp ice aud
.... r'l'K SALE.
- l,U?,nl,' f'rm '? f"' ''"m',v' on t!" Imnk
'l the Ohio river, aud 4 miles from R. R station
no :iere-. acres under f.-i.ce. Orchurd of about
law. H afrsnie uw'!i'iii;iif fi rooms. Hood
cistern. At a baruaiu. Apoly ear'v
-M. J, HuWLKV. R E. Agent.
GROCERIES.
THE
'OLD HOUSE
J. T. WARREN & CO.
G4&G6W. Second St.
CINCtNNTI.
Forelpi and Domestic dried and canned FrulU and
Vegetables. Cauned.drledand saltFish. Tick
les, Sauces, Oils and Condiments. Soup
Huffs, Baklna Powders, ground and
w'-ulc Spices. Toilet and Laundry
Soapa. Seeds, Jellies, Preserves
Fancy Groceries and Oro
cers' Sundries.
Stock unparalleled in the West.
SEND FOR OUR "GROCERS' MANUEL.
t i
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