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The daily Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1878-1???, December 16, 1881, Image 1

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DAILY
BULLET
CAIRO, ILLINOIS. FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 16, 1881.
CAIRO
I0B.
JOHN SPRO AT,
PROPRIETOR OP SPROAT'S PATENT
Refrigerator Oars,
uro
Dealer
Wholesale
in Ice.
ICE BY THE CAR LOAD OR TON.WEH
PACKED FOR SHIPPING.
Oar Loads a Specialty.
OFFICE!
fV rrTft1ffli RrrAof- find Tavaa.
vvi i i n vm v uu wv wuvt v I
' CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
MILL AND COMMISSION.
JJALLIDAY BROTHERS,
CAIRO, ILLINOIS.
Commission Merchants,
tiuuin
FLOUE, GBAIN AND HAY
Proprietor
EgyptianrionringMills
Richest Cash Price Paid for Wheat.
WOOD YARD.
Q W. WHEELER,
ANTIIHACITHi COAL.
Summer Wood and Kindling i
couiulUj os tint
STAVE CLIPPINGS
At Seventy-five cents per load.
StavoPrimminas
At one dollar per load.
Th trlmmlne" are coarse shavings and make
the beat summer wood for cooking purposes as well
k. K,.n..t ar sold lii Cairo. For black
,mitb-. iijoBuri..tt
Leave yoor otoets at ma leuiu m wUW .,u
INSURANCE.
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FEBETBOAT
QAIRO CITY FERRY CO.
THREE tEfl, STATES.
notice the ferryboat win mane tnpi as rouows;
JU IDQBIWr fltuulIBJj u. 11.", uu UM.ii .Mvi
LSATII UUTlS
UATBI
Foot Fourth at Mlaaourl Land'g,
Kentucky Ld g.
' 8:00 a.m. 8:80 a.m. 9 a.m.
10:00 a.m. ' 10;S0a.m. Ua.m.
11:00 p.m. 2:80 p.m. 8 p.m.
4:00 p.m. 4:80p.m. ' 6;00p.m.
B1JNDAT8
8 p.m. S:M p.m. I P.v
0AIE0 AND NIW MADRID PACKET. ;
flEaUMR PACKET
TO NEW MADRID.
STEAMER SILVEBTflORN.
W.J. TURNER. Master
: J. K MUSE, Clerk.
Leaves Cairo for New Madrid and war polnti
every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at 9 p, m.
Returning leaves New Madrid Wednesday, Friday,
and Monday at 7 a.m. .
COAL, WOOD ICE.
F.
M. WARD,
villi in
WOOD, COAL and ICE,
Big
Muddy ,
Coal
by tbs Ton or Car Load, delivered In any part of the
vity
WOOD OP ALL KINDS.
fW Leave orders it my Wood and Coal OtBce.
8TOVE8 A5D TINWARE.
QTOVT5S! STOVES!!
Kj ' '
ALL SORTS, SIZES AND STYLES1
AT
DAVIDSONS
, Manufacturer ot and Dealer in
TIN, COPPER & SHEET-IRON WARE
I ALL KINDS 07 JOB WORK DONE TO ORDER.
NO. 27 EIGHTH STREET,
Cairo. - Illinois
BANK.
T
HE CITY NATNOAL BANK
Oatro, illinotsu
CAPITAL. $100,000
OFFICERS;
W. P. HALLIDAY, President.
H. L. HALLIDAT, Vice-President.
THUS. W. HALLIDAT, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
s.staats tatlob,
bibby l. haluoat,
w. r. baludat,
B. B-CUBNIKeBAB,
ararBiH bikd,
CAVDSB.
,. (TUilABSOH,
i. a.
Exchange, Coin and United States Bonds
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Deposits received and a general backing business
conduced.
VARIETT STORE.
YORK STORE.
i xv '
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
The Largest Variety Stock
IN TIIK CITY.
GOODS SOLD VERY CLOSE
O. O. PATIER & CO..
Cor. Nineteenth street )
Cairo, HI.
Commercial Avenue f
jTM. M. BAXTFR & CO.,
Manufacturers of
PUEE LIQUID PAINTS, WHITE LEAD
Zincs, and Colors,
No. 62 Pearl Street, NEW TOEK.
Our Ltanld Paints are ready for Immediate nsoon
opening the packages, no oil, spirits of turpontlne
or drvera belnir reouircd.
rarity. we guarantee tneir aDsointe purity ana
their freedom from barvtoe. clay, alkalis. watr.
benzine, soap and othor articles which are used to
adulterate llama paints.
Gover ns tenacity.' 1 ncy weiun nrtcenwsix
and more surface than any chemical paints or those
containing barytos or clay, as these add weight
without body.
Permanency or woior wroai care nas neon laaen
in selecting colors for tinting, and we use only per
manent colors, consequently our tints do not fado.
Convenience. Any ono who can use a paint
brush can apply these paints, and being- ready for
use, there la no waste or excess of material, as is
the case often when lead, oil and turpentine have
to be purchased- The colors can always bo exactly
I matcbod and there is no necessity of having two or
three shades on the same building, aa is often the
case when tints are made experimentally.
unr rure Liqum nalnts are put up in sman cans
from 1 to S lbs., and also by the gallon. In packages
from cans of X. 1. . 8 and 5 galls., to kegs of 10, 15
ana 140 gaus., aim ddis. ot togans.
Sample Caidsand "i?:e List mailed to any ad.
dross. novia-dJm.
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
(J. M. ALDEtf , v
Conimission Merchant
Ton thk (alb or
Hay, Grain and
, Country Prodnce;
1 omu:
Room Vo. 1, up stairs In Cuhl's Building,
No. 80 Ohio Levee.
Blood PolHon'ngr, Scrofulous Ulcers and
" Itching Humors, Abscesses and
Glandular Swellings.
LEAD POISONING feTff;
H., troubled with bad humor ou bauds and nuck,
caused by lead poisoning, (lie's a paint r.) At time
It woulo break out, crack open, and tlie .kin ae pa
rale from the flush la large plrce. suffering great
con tin ii Hi itching and slinging. I'urchasea your
remedies; used Cuticura Resolvent Internally, and
Cntlcara and Cuticura Soap ezturnally, and in lens
than three montba efl'uc'.ed a complete cure, and baa
not been trembled ilnce. Corroborated by Bullard
fc Foster, dr ggtsts. Keene, N. H.
Greatest on Earth ,
J W Adams. Sew-
ark. O.. lava: "Cn.
tlcnra Remedies are the greatest medicine on earth
iiaa me worst came .alt rneurn in tbti county MV
mother bad It twenty years, and in fart died from it
I believe Cutlcnra would have aaved her life. My
arms, broaat aud head were covered for tin ee Tear,
which nothing relieved or cured until I usod the
Cuticura Resolvent Internally, ar.d Cioun tond
Cutlcara Soap wteraally.
PaniMflcna H K Carpenter, Etq , Henderson,
XbUlla.MS N.y , cured of Psoriasis or Lep
rosy, of 20 years standing, by Cuticura Resolvent
Internally, and Cutlcnra aud Cuticura Hoap extern
ally. The moat wonderful case ou recora. Core
certified to before a Justice of the peace and prom
inent citizens. AU afflicted with itching and acaly
diseases should send to us for this testimonial In
full.
Rolf PTiontn Those who have experienced
DtUL lUieULU the tonnenu of Salt Khenm
can appreciate the agony that I endured for years,
until cored by the Cutlcnra Resolvent Internally,
and Cutlcnra and Citleura Soap externally.
MRS. WM. PKLLINGTON, Sharon, Wis.
CUTICURA.
The Cuticura treatment for the cure of Skin.
Scalp and Blood diseases, consists In fie internal
use (if Cuticura Resolvent, the new blood purifier,
and the external nee of of Cuticura and Cuticura
Hoap, the great akin cures.
Price of Cuticura, small boxes, 50c; larje boxes
11. Cutlcnra Resolvent, tl per bottle. Cntlcura
noap, Kc. tatir.ora enaviu
ug soap, lac.
Hold by
all druggists.
Depot, WEEKS & POTTER,
Bolton, Mas.
CATARRH.
Sanford's Badical Cure,
Complete Treatment
FOR 81.
Clear head and volee, easy breathing, sweet breatV
perfect smell, taste and hearing, no couch, no cho
king, no distress. These happy conditions are
brought eneut in the severest cases or tatarrn, bv
tbat most agreeable, economical, speedy, safe
and never-falling spec fie, banford's Radical Cure.
Complete and infallible treatment, consisting of
one bottle of the Radiol Cure, one box of Catarrh
al Solvent and one Improved Inhaler, all wrapped
In one package, with treatise and directions, and
sold by all druggists for 1. Ask fur Sanford'i Rad
ical Cure. General Agents,
WEEKS & POTTER. Boston, Mass.
KATS, MICE, ROACH-
t, Wtttvr Bngs, and
lie" ai d Win a itpest
kiiiim PAKS0NS
FXTtl'HINAK'R and
die. .No fear of bad
smeils. Barns, grana
ri . and huuscholds of-
cn cleared In a single nlunt. Bent and cheapest
Vermin Killer In the world No failure In 30 years.
Every box wan anted. Sold by. alt grocers and
druggists. Ask for Pawns'. Mailed for 45c. by
Kblva rut l cn. duciuii, inane.
PHYSICIANS.
Q.EORGE H. LEACH, M. D.
Phvsician and Surgeon,
Soeclal attention oald to the Homeopathic treat
ment of snru'lcal diseases, and diseases of women
ana children.
Ottce : On Hth street, opposite the Post Office,
Cairo, III.
DENTISTS.
JR. E. W. WHITLOCK,
Derital Surgeon.
OracB No. ISA Commercial Avenue, between
lighth and Ninth Street
TIIK
EQUITABLE LIFE
Assurance Society,
120 Broadway, New York, ,
DOES TILE
LARGEST BUSINESS
of aay Life Insurance Company
IN THEWOItLU.
Why?
Because , ,
It alone issues
Inooutestiblej Policies,
stipulating that tho contractor Insurance "shall
not be disputed" after it Is three yeai
and that such policies shall be
years old,
Paid Immediatelv,
on receipt of satisfactory proofs of death.
Because
its policy Is clear and concise, and contains
NO ARDUOUS CONDITIONS.
n. b.-mcaT) Toim policies.
Compare the
short and simple form nsod by tho Bqultab
do Kaultable wlih
the long and obscure contracts loaded down with
technicalities Issued by other companies I
Because
Its CASH RETURNS
to poller holders are
Unprecedented.
N. B. Soo the many letters from policy holders
sxprseslng their gratification with the returns from
their XONT1SS BAVINUS f BHD l OLIOlJB,
Bvioauss of its
jyinanoial S trength.
0utsandinjr Insurance
.190 MILLIONS.
AssetSecurely Invested
Surplu Securely Invested, nearly -
1U M1LL1UJNS
u BURNETT, Agent,
Xlfflca. corner 12th and Washington. ,
NovAmhcrS4,1881.m3dw
CAIRO'S PRIDE!
THE NEW OPERA-HOUSE,
DEDICATED LAST
NIGHT.
A CRAND AFFAIR A SEA OF HAP
PY FACES BRILLIANT SCENES
AN ELOQUENT ORATION
FROM HON. JOHN II.
OBERLY ''THE MAS
COTTE," BY THE
FAY TEMPLETON '
TROUPE.
! THE EVENT.
Last night waa a memorablo one) in the
history of Cairo, becau of tho rand
event which occurred then. The amuse
ment loving penpla of Cairo and vicinity,
who formed the great throng in the spa
cious auditorium of the new opera house,
will not toon forget the night upon which
ita doora were first thrown open to them,
and will probably hold in vivid remem
brance every little incident connected with
it on that night. A thoughtful and 'ap
preciative observer, whose memory could
recall the days of the old rookery which
the new palace has displaced and dwell
upon tne many disappointments expe
rienced by the Cairo public, because of the
failure of similar grand enterprises in the
past, must have looked upon the complete
success of this undertaking with infinite
satisfaction. The history of the several
efforts, by representative citixena, to give
Cairo an amusement building which should
combine all the beauties and conveniences
of the modern theatre, is full of interest;
the more so now, that repeated failures,
much disappointment and long, persistent
struggles with the problem of the success
or failure ot the enterprise, have
finally culminated in the completion
of the palatial temple of Tbespis,
which was thrown open to the public last
night. )
A number of years ago the subject was
broached among several prominent gentle,
men in the city, the principal movers then
being Messrs. W. H. Morris, M. F. Gilbert
and H. H. Candee. The movement pro
gressed so far as to have a plan of the
building to be erected, prepared by a
prominent St. Louis architect at an
expense of fifty dollars. But hero the
movement stopped short and waa ere long
forgotten. Other attempts were made by
one or more prominent gentlemen, with
Mr. M. F. Gilbert and others in the lead,
to work up an interest eufficiently strong,
and induce sufficient number of monied
men to lend asaistarce, that the project,
once begun, might lie pushed to a suc
cessful issue; but these attempts also ended
in nothing and'the matter was allowed to
drop into oblivion. Tho latest unsuccess
ful movement, hut which was tho forerun
ner of tho successful one, began in the
spring of the presentyear. The prime mover
this time was Captain Thomas W. Shieldo,
one of Cairo's representative citizens, who
concieved the plan of purchasing and re
modeling the old Atheneum building in a
manner that if carried out, would have
given the people of Cairo a handsome and
comfortable little theatre. The Captain
communicated his plan to Mr. Daniel
Hartman, the lessee of the Atheneum, and
this gentleman entered heartily into the
captain's plans and offered to become a
partner to the enterprise, which offer was
accepted by the captain. Thus agreed, the
owners of the building end the ground
upon which it stood, who were' Mrs.
A. B. Safford, of this city,, and
Miss Barnes, of Baltimore, were consulted
as to the value they placed upon the prop
erty; but it seems that no satisfactory un
derstanding could be arrived at. At any
rate, nothing cams of this plan and for
little while the people of Cairo, who had
looked forward with much pleasure even
to a "remodeled" little old building, were
once again compollod to chew the cud o:
disappointment.
But it was ordained that the people
of
Cairo should occupy themselves in this
way but a little wile; Captain Shields was
determined not to be thwarted in his deter
minatlon. He was satisfied, as were other
prominent citizens, that Cairo stood great
ly in need of a new theatre building, ana
that those who would supply the need
would not only derive a fair pecuniary
hnefit therefrom, but would receive the
lasting good wishes of the amusement
loving portion of the Cairo public. During
a visit to New Orloans, with this
idea ever uppermost in bis mind, he made
it a point to examine the largest buildings
there, and was favorably struck with the
fact that some of the principal ones were
built in the rear of large business houses,
with one side running parallel with a street
so as to afford ample facilities for exits to
tho open air from all parts of the building,
On his way home, the captain decided upqo
enliitine the aid of ono or two othor
men of means and building
A HBW AND GRAND Ol'BBA HOCBK
upon any convenient sight that could be
procured in the city. Soon after his arrival
homo he laid his new plan before Mr,
Daniel Hartman, who vi a delighted with
it, and before Captain W. P. Halliday, who
also signified his approval of, and willing,
ness to enter into the scheme. Captain
Halliday subsequently broached the sub
ject to Col. S. 8. Taylor, who was also fa
vorably impressed. The Colonel consulted
with Captain Shields shortly after and sug
gested a stock compaoy, which suggestion
met with favor from Captains Halliday and
Shields and Mr. Hartman ; and it was de
cided between them to call a snooting of
persons feeling an interest in the matter,
said mooting to take place at the law office
of Messrs. Green & Gilbert. To this in
formal call the following gentlemen re
sponded : Col, S. 8. Taylor, Captain W. P.
Halliday, Captain T. W.' Shields, and
MessrS. Daniel Hartman, R. W. Miller, R.
II. Cunningham, M. F. Gilbert and J. A.
Goldstine. All present manifested a deep
interest in the object of the meeting; a
chairman and secretary were elected, and
the . project was thoroughly discussed.
Other informal meetings were held, at
which all questions raised were favorably
decided upon, In the meantime Captain
Shields opened a correspondence with Mr.
McElfatrick, a prominent architect of
Louisville, and obtained a rough estimate
of the probable cost of a building such as
bad been agreed npon by the gentlemen in
their meetings. The estimate was submit
ted to the gentlemen in the movement, at
a meeting held some time in tho latter part
of August, this year, and it was then that
the following gentlemen present, pledged
themselves to take a certain amount of
stock, each ; W. P. Halliday, T. W.
Shields, D. Hartman, Chas. Galigher, J. A.
Goldstine, H. H. Candee and M. F.Gilbert.
This may be considered the
FIRST STEP
taken in the grand nrovement which cul
minated yesterday in the completion of the
magnificent edifice, the opening
of which was bo brilliantly
celebrated last night This step
was considered a basis for more aggressive
action. The secretary of the meetings, Mr.
M. F. Gilbert, openod a correspondence
with the secretary of state, with reference
to obtaining a charter; a meeting was
called for the purpose of orffaniiinrr a
stock company; books were opened for the
subscription of stock; a board of directors,
consisting of Captain Thomas V. Shields,
Col. S. 8. Taylor, and . Messrs. Charles
Galigher, n. II. Candee, M. Gilbert, R.
W. Miller and Duuiol Ilnituinn, was fleet
ed, Mr. R- W. Miller subsequently with
drew aud Cuptain W. P. Halliday waa
chosen in his Btead, and a charter was ap
plied for, bearing the names df the following
gentlemen as incorporators: T. W. Shields,
S. S. Taylor, W. P, Halliday, D. nartmau,
M. Phillips, M. F. Gilbert, J. A. Gold
stine.
A meeting of the directors was soon
ftcr held, at which Captain Shields was
elected president; Mr. Frank Galigher,
treasurer, and Mr. Miles F. Gilbert, secre
tary of the company. Plans were advertis
ed for, and Messrs. I B. McElfatrick & Son, of
Louisville, were awarded the contract for
superintending the construction of the
building.
One of the difficult problems which pre
sented themselves was the site npon which
the building was to be erected. Several
pieces of ground, in various parts of the
city, were considered, chief among them
being the vacant lots, opposite Mr. Daniel
Hartman's store, on Commercial avenue,
and the lots occupied by the old Athe
neum and several other buildings. The
atter was finally decided upon and pur
chased by the company from Mrs. A. B.
Safford and Miss Barnes. They also pur
chased from the city a strip of land twenty
feet wide by one hundred feet long, along
Railroad street, thus giving a piece of
ground one hundred , feet wide by
about one hundred and twenty feet long.
The plan of erecting the building along
Railroad street, and several large store
rooms in front of it, as suggested by Capt.
Shields, was adopted and ordored, carried
out.
Bids for furnishing material and doing
the work were next advertised for, and the
call was responded to from many of the
large cities in the country, by some of the
largest contractors and best workmen.
Contracts woro signed on the 20th of Sep
tember; ground was broken on the same
date, and that the work waB pushed forward
with marvelous rapidity Is sufficiently do-'
monstrated by the fact that, within a little
over two months, the building was com
pleted in all its glorious beauty, and ready
to bo thrown open to the eager public. A
true idea of the magnitude of this great ac
complishment can only be obtained by
actual sight by a continual presence,
with tho toiling crowd of inon, who, un
derstanding thoroughly the work thoy had
before them, wore able to do it, and did it
dexterously and energetically; and by see
ing the massive walls gradually rise, the
internal arrangements gradually form, and
see the whole ultimately, evolve
from tude strength into the
present., pilo of external grandeur
and Internal beauty and comfort. But a
very imperfect Idea may be obtained from
a short statement of the extent of
' . ths surxDua '
and its points of especial murit.
The building was planned, and its con
struction superintended, as before stoted,
by Messrs. I. B. McElfatrick & Son, of
Louisville, Ky. The building is one bun
dred feet long , sixty feet wide and about
eighty -five feet high from the ground to
the top of the roof. Its walls are among
the strongest in the city resting upon a
foundation eight feet wide at the base, and '
consumed nearly nine hundred thousand
brick. It has thirty-six exits, the principal
entrance, which is very brood to avoid .
crowding, is from Commercial avenue,
from which one may enter the parquet or
either circle; the two other main entrances
are from Railroad street, through which one
may also reach tho outside from any part
of the house. The roof slants slightly to
ward cither side, was tinned by Mr. A.'i
Fraser, of this city, and is covered with a
heavy coat of paint. Tho internal arrange-'
ment is of the most approved modern opera
house style. The first floor, or parquet and
parquet circle, is sufficiently slanting to
ward the stage to givo an unobstructed
view of the whole stage from the farthest
corner, even though all the seats in front be
occupied. It is furnished with circular
rows of chairs made expressly for the com.
pany, by the Chicago Store Stool company,
the seats of which can be folded up when
not in use; and, underneath each seat, whoa
down, is placed a convenient hat rack for
the accommodation of gentlemen. The
parquet and parquet circle have a seating;
capacity of about six hundred. The dress
circle, which is above the parquet circle, .is
also furnished with seats of the description
given, and will scat about three hundred.
Above this is the gallery, which is furnish
ed with plain seats, and furnishes room for
not less than five hundred people. . Four
boxes, two on either side of tho stage, furn
ish room for about thirty more people,
making the entire seating capacity of the
house over fifteen hundred peoplo, which,
exceeds the capacity by soveral hundred,
of Wallack's new theatre, in-New York. '"
Over the ticket office at the entrance, is e
directory room for the use of the officers of
the company during their meetings. In
the south end of tho building is the Btagc,
large enough to accommodate the largest
troupe in tho country, easily. It is about
thirty-five by forty feet, with dressing
rooms on either side, and the height from A,
tho staA to tho atage ceiling is fifty-five
tecr. " '
The wood work is all of the most sub
stantial kind, and will bear, with the great
est siifetyy number of people that could
possibly be crowed into the building. The
plastering was doV. by Mr. J. W. Hodges,
of Paducah, Ky., and la perfect. The or- !
namental wood work was preparod ' i
on the ground, under the imndiate su- !
pervision of Messrs. J. W. Koplingeii Son, )
whoso raro artistic skill is seen ir ie
ornamental columns and fancy gingeVv
broad work in all Darts of the building. ' N : ;
The ornamental plaster-pans work con- "
sists of the busts of Milton and Shakespeare,
ono of which is placed over the boxes on
either side of the stage, and of numerous ,
other wall and ceiling decorations which
are appropriately placed in all parts of the
houso, aro.the work of Mr. Thomas Irwin,
of St. Louis.
The decorative and fresco painting is of
the latest pattern. It is of a uniform light .
color, with here and there bright, sugges
tive figures which have the appearance of
actual lifo. This is in agreeable contrast
with many other large theatres of the east,
which are of a dark, gloomy appearance,.
and tends to give this large room and every ,
corner in it a light and choerful appear-
ance. The painters, Messrs. Henry Range, , '
of Indianapolis, and Jeff Clark, of this. '. " ' t
city, are acknowledged artists In their line
of business.
There is, perhaps, no institution
of its kind in the country
which has a more perfect lighting appara
tus than has Cairo opera house. Gas pipes- y
extend to all parts of the building and
communicate with elegant chandeliers, ar
ranged with a view both to appropriateness
and to throwing a brilliant stream of light
n every corner of the auditorium and th
stage. Theroare half a dozen U-jot glass ,
globe brackets around the foot of the
gallery and dross circle and one one jot (
bracket in each box; there are also twe . ,
chandeliers of three jets placed at each side ,
of the stage and lost but most important of
all, thore Is a sixty jet chanduliur, with .
elegant porcolain reflector In the dome of
the ceiling above, which, when lighted sud
denly, throws its almost blinding rays of
light upon every person in the audience.
Thesojets are all lighted at once,-and in t
an lnitant after the gas is turned on by
moans of electricity. This ingenious sys- ,
torn of lighting Is the combined work of
the Western Electric Manufacturing Co., of
Chicago; Messsrs. Newmann, Stnus A Co.,
of St. Louis, and Messrs, Mitchell, Vanc ;
A Co., of Now York. -
The boating apparatus consists of asy"
tem of steam pipes, which penetrate every ,
part of the building and communicate with
elegant heaters in places were tbasewill
do the most good.. There is, therefore, '
no danger whatever from dre because of ,,
: V ... . CostiaaM Fourta Hi'.,"- .
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