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Daily Arizona silver belt. (Globe, Gila County, Ariz.) 1906-1929, November 13, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87082863/1907-11-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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A SILVER BELT
MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS
NEVER IN
Want If you use a Silver
BUWant AJ. to let the
people know what you
WANT
Volume II. No, 29,
GLOBE, GILA COUNTY, ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1907
PRICE FIVE CENTS
" 9f -r. J 1
DAILY
i -s-
ARIZON
American Federation of Labor Takes
MIT SHORTER DM
DF 1U.
IE
ave Manufacturers' Associa
tion with a Fund of Millions
to Combat in Struggle,
COMMITTEE NAMED TO
TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION
.- Ask for Relief at Law to
Navy Yard Employees in
Case of Accident Same as
Against Private Corporation
NORFOLK, Va., November 12. Tlio
mericnn Federation of Labor in its
sventy-soventh annual convention, to
.a took aggressive steps toward tho
stablishmcnt of a universal eight-hour
working day in America. It began ac
. in by looking to tho raising of a suflii
ent fund to fight tho present war ro
, -rtcd begun through tho Manufactur
es association with a navailablo fund
$14,500,000 to wngo battle against
rganized labor, tho particular aim of
.1 Manufacturers' association against
efforts of tho federation for tho
. 'f horation of conditions of the work
. class.
The Federation authorized Prosidont
.mpers to appoint a special committee
' tho consideration of botu quostious,
up committee to report during tho
present session.
V resolution was passed calling for
a report by tho committee of tho bill to
t" presented to congress, giving tho
uino relief at law to employees in tho
ojted States navy yards who may bo
j cabled by accidents or to heirs of
oj v yard employoesillcd while in the
jrsuit of their occupation iih. that
fc ven persons employed by private cor-
- rations. Another resolution was
jpted asking congress to legalize half
f .hdays on Saturdays, during tho
. oths of July, August and September.
Important features of tho annual rc-
rt of the executive council wore on
. revocation of tho Brewery Workers'
arter becauso of their alleged refusal
relinquish jurisdiction ovor the brew-
engineers, firomen and toamstcrs,
tho report of court proceedings
fich had been brought at Washington
r..ugh the Manufacturers' association
restraining members of the executive
nnl from placing goods of a ccr-
o stove concern on tho "Wo don't
,tronizo" list. This, tho report de
ares, was an effort by tho "arch one-
s of labor aftor a failure to disrupt
o labor unions, to discredit tho honesty
I integrity of tho American Fedora-
o and its officials and to doprivo
m of freedom of speech, of the press
t of personal liborty."
The report doclaros tho Federation
thout sufficient funds to meot tho war
it tho Manufacturers association will
ablo to put forth and asked for
.on by tho convention for tho mis?
fa' of tho same.
The Federation at present has only
j.er capita fund of $G per year for
fting all oxponscs and emergencies.
In behalf of. tho electrical workers
- ntion was called to the alleged dis
mination and unfair treatment by tho
o.i-ncan Telephone & Telegraph com-
"V.
HARLES RILEY BLOWS
OFF TOP OF HEAD IN
FIT OF DESPONDENCY
OLE-FIELD, Nov., November 12.--
ules Riley, superintendent of tho Sil-
Pick and Lono Stur mining propor-
pommitted suicide this morning by
,ng oft the top of his head with a
'gun. Riley had been drinking heav-
'ooently and was despondent becauso
no closing of tho Silver Pick.
NEGRO TO BE APPOINTED
a VSHINOTON, D. C, November 12.
imcs A, Cobb, a negro, is to be
inted special assistant to tho Unit
stages attorney for tho District of
imbia.
'2,000 MYSTERIOUSLY
DISAPPEARS FROM A
STAGE AT TRINIDAD
TRINIDAD, Colo., November 12.
-Checks and currency to tho
11
mount of $22,0007 intended to
iy tho wages of tho Carbon Coal
i Coko company and tho minors
mkdalo, was stolen yestorday
hilo iu transit in a stago from
ho railroad to tho camp, n dis-
jnco of two miles. Charles Mc-
ombor, driver of tho stago, has
ecu arrested on suspicion, but :
"clares that ho knows nothing ;
bout tho supposed thoft. Tho
money packago had been carelessly
rown with other express matter ;
nto tho stago.
.". ". j', J' o. v .V. ' "- i"- " "- -" '
'If - ' 'if W f 'l? 'if '" " I? "
HORACE M'KINLEY
ESCAPES FROM THE '
CHINESE OFFICIALS
PEKINO, November 12. Horace Mc
Kinloy, wanted in Oregon in connection
with tho land fraud trials, was arrested
by tho Manchurinn authorities at Muk
den October 5, and incarcerated pend
ing tho arrival of nn officer from Amer
ica, escaped from custody yesterday.
Tho Chinese government is making
efforts to recapturo tho prisoner. Tho
cseapo of McKinlcy will probably do
feat tho first nttemnt of tho Chinese
Jn, co-opornting for tho extradition of
(criminals without a treaty. It is hoped
tno attempt would succeed in order to
discourairo numerous American crimin
als and ndventurors from taking refuge
in China.
CHICAGO WILL NOT
ISSUE CLEARING HOUSE
SCRIP AT PRESENT
CHICAGO, November 12. Tho clear
ing liouso association announced today
after a meeting that no clearing houso
checks will bo issued in this city im
mediately. In its opinion tho local
bunking situation will right itself with
out compelling the banks to resort to
clearing houso scrip and a plan will be
proposed by which tho bank embargo
against tho payment of currency can
bo lifted gradually. .lust what policy
is to bo followed will" bo declared in a
fow days.
ERICH
SILK WAn IS OFF
Unfair Methods of Oriental
Traders Have Been En
tirely Overcome
NEW YORK, November 12. Tho war
botweon Japanese and American silk
dealors, .which tho dealers say arose
from an attempt on tho part of tho Jap'
aneso to control tho trado and even
tually drive Americans out of tho silk
commission houses, lias been amicably
settled, according to a cablegram re
ceived today, Tho American firms
Maim they forced a deal through the
Japanese middlemen to pay higher
prices than tlio Japanese concerns who
bought directly; also their orders were
laid aside until those of their competi
tors were filled. To corect this condi
tion American dealers organized and
rofused to buy from Japanoso agents
in this country. Tho trade was affected
for sovcral montlis, but through tho
efforts of tho Japanoso ambassador at
Washington and tho American embassy
at Tokio the difficulty was finally set
tled. COINED PURE SILVER
INTO HALF DOLLARS
AND MADE A PROFIT
NEW YORK, November 12. Tho arl
rest of Herman Henzeo on a chargo of
counterfeiting has brought to light what
tho secret service officials regard as
ono of the most important finds in that
lino in recent years. Henzeo was held
to await tho grand jury's action. Hen
zeo was held to await tho grand jury's
action. Henzce, it is alleged, produced
half dollars of puro silver. His plant
is said to bo in a secluded spot in tho
mountains. Tho present prico of silver
mado possible tho purchaso of silver
with which to make tho coins of stand
ard weight and fineness and make a
profit of about 50 per cent.
GROCERY COMPANY FAILS
"SELMA, Ala., Novombcr 12. Tho
Gary Grocery company, ono of tho larg
est wholosalo firms in central Alabama,
was declared bankrupt todny. E. La
mar was appointed receiver. Tho lia
bilities aro estimated at moro than
$100,000; assets arc yet unknown. Bad
collections aro given as tho cause for
tho failure.
INDIAN TERRITORY BANK FAILS
SAPULPA, I. T., November 12. Tho
Farmers and Merchants bank of this
city, capitalized at $50,000, suspended
business today. Tho bank announced
that business would bo resumed and de
positors -would bo paid in full. Tho
bank is heavily interested-in oil prop
erty and was unablo to turn them into
money.
NO CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA
SAN FRANCTSCO, Cal., November
12. "Unless somo unforeseen change
occurs within tho next few days! mater
ially relioving tho monoy stringency, I
shall call n special session of tho legis
lation to conveno on tho first of noxt
year," said Governor Gillott today bo-k
foro ho left for Sacramento. , t
WILL' ACCEPT JAP BID
WASHINGTON, D. C, Novcmbor 12.
Stato. department officials favor nc
copting tho invitation of tho Japanese
govornmont to participation in tho ox
position at Tokio in 3912. If approved
by tho president tho mattor will bo
called to tho attention of congress with
a viow to an appropriation for tho pur-poso.
-1
R DAY
First Formal Steps
HER TESTIMONY WILL "
CHANGE COMPLEXION
OF THE THAW CASE
Pittsburg, Pn., Novcmbor 32. Miss
Ida Veronica Simonton, whoso, name
was frequently mentioned during the
first Thaw trial, returned today aftor
spending a year and a half in tho jun
gles of Africa. Concerning tho second
trial of Thaw, Miss Simonton said:
"I will go'to Now York to testify in
tho Thaw case. I luivo not boon sub
poenaed, but will anawor n summons
from either side. My testimony will
change tho wholo complexion of the
enso. Tho story told by Mrs. Charles
J. Holman of her being deserted in
London is not true. I .will not say
which sido my testimony will favor."
UTE INDIANS AND
TROOPS MIX AND SIX
RED MEN ARE DEAD
DURANGO, Colo., November 12. A
roport reached hore tonight that a bat
tle occurred at McElino canyon between
tho Uto -Indians and United States
troops in which six Indians wore killed.
No soldiers wero killed or wounded.
McKlmo canyon is in the Montozuma
country, close to tho Navajo reservation.
Tho Utcs had boon resisting tho at
tempts of the soldiers to compel them to
return to the reservation. Tlio roport
of tho battlo cannot bo verified, but is
believed here.
CES OF COPPER
ARE UNCHANGED
Stock Market Drops Down the
Scale and Settles at Sat
urday's Prices
NEW YORK, November 12. Copper
was lower in London with spot closing
at JlCO Cs and futures at 50 15a. Lo
cally tho market wns dull 'without fur-
ther changes. Lake, 33.50 to 33.75;
Electroyltic, 13.25 to 33.50; Casting,
13 to 33.25.
Lead was quoted 5s higher at 17 5s
in London, but unchanged locally at
1.50 to 4.75.
Spelter was unchanged at 21 10a in
London and weak and lower at 5.05 to
5.15 in tho local market.
Iron was higher in the English mar
ket and cocally firm and quiet.
Stock Quotations
The following closing quotations were
posted by tho II. II. Bru company last
night:
Bid Asked
Amalgamated .. ... ... 40.75
Anaconda .. 31.75
American Smelters 02.00
Erio . . 37.50
Reading , 81.00
U. S. Steel common 24.02
Bingham 5.50 0.00
Calumet & Arizona 103.00 101.00
Copper Rango 53.50 54.00
Grecnc-Cananea .: .. 5.C2 5.87
Norfti Butto 38.75 39.00
Old Dominion 22.00 23.00
Shannon 10.12 30.37
Trinity ..2..;.C 31.25 11.50
Utah Consolidated -... 33.25 33.75
Helvetia 1.50 2.00
Denn-Arizona 3.00 3.25
Globo Consolidated 4.50 5.00
National Expleation 35 .36
Superior & "Poston 2.37 2.75
Superior it Pittsburg 9.12 .37
SMAIiL FAILURE
CHICAGO, November 12. Tho Ba
venwood Exchange bank, a small insti
tution, has closed its doors. It has de
posits of $35,000 and lias been declared
solvent.
& " mi THE FOOTBALL TEAM. , f
1 " ' I
W ' z , ' "Here thoy comol" ' f .'
IS
A'GAIN AFTER
' FISH'S SCULP
Intimates that His Opponent Is
Technically Guilty of Com
mitting Forgery,
ADDRESS HOT LETTERS
TO THE STOCKHOLDERS
Thinks if Fish's Contention that
Corporations Cannot Vote in
Illinois that All Corporations
Will Be Greatly Injured,
CHICAGO, Novombcr 12. Prcsidont
Harnhan of tho Illinois Central railroad
today reoponod an activo campaign for
proxies to bo used at tho postponed an
nual meoting of tho company on Decern
bor 18.( Ho issued two circulars to tho
stockholders', in ono of which, after
narrating the facts regarding tho pro
curing of injunction by Stuyvcsant Fish
restraining the voting of certain shares
of stock,. ho says:
"Of KnilPsn if V.iul. o olnS... it.nl ., -
w ..fuaai., fc UDU O WU11M WiUl WUl-
porntions cannot vote or hold stock in
Illinois corporations bo sustained, then
ovory insurance company, trust com
pany, savings bank or other company
which liris invested in Illinois corpora
tions will suffer a disastrous loss and all
persons interested as policy holders or
stockholders ,in such companies will like
wise suuor.''
Traffic arrangomonts with tho JJnion
Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads,
now in force, aro thoso which mado
Fish president. The circular concludes
as follows:
"In these days when public senti
ment with regard to corporations is so
disturbed, heavy responsibility ought to
attach to hiking an unfounded chargo
of fraudulent conduct amounting in law
to forgery, against the management of
railroad corporations. Such a chargo,
if believed by tho pvercrcdulous, in
jures and discredits not only tho officers
of the company, but tho corporation it
solf." EARLY MPRNING
Lfe&,DAMAGES
- BANK EXCHANGE
A fire of mysterious origin, which
wns discovered about 7:30 o'clock yes
terday morning, damaged tho Bank
Exchange saloon to the extent of about
$200. Fully covered by insurance.
Tho fire was first detected burning
briskly in tho ceiling and in close -proximity
to a stovopipo, running parallel
with tho ceiling, and an electric wire
which traversed the immedinto point of
tho blaze. It is quite ovident that the
firo originated from the overheated
stovepipe or from a short Circuit.
Tho fire department responded prompt
ly to the alarm, and .stringing a line of
hose from a near-by hydrant, boon had
tho blnzo under control. Considerable
damago wns done by water. Tho build
ing is owned by Charles Nesbit.
SENATOR PLATT STILL
INSISTS THAT MAE-C.
WOOD ISN'T HIS WIFE
NEW YORK, November 12. Counsel
for Senator Piatt today asked tho su
preme court to make an order that the
certificate and alleged admission in
writing, said to havo been signed by
Tlatt, that Mao C. Wood is his wife,'
lin snnl nn flln iti lin onunfv nlnrVa
office. An affidavit by Piatt was filed
setting forth that tho certificate is a
forgery and that ho will prove that the
letter purporting to havo beon written
by him, acknowledging her as his wife,
"was manufactured by tho plaintiff."
Tho decision was reserved.
"There .they go!'?
LAC
e
J
State is Introducing
JUDGE THOMAS TO
HOLD SESSION OF
JUVENILE COURT
On chnrges of disturbing the pcaco
and swearing and using vile nnd ob
scene language, John Clark, Fred Davis,
Ed Hendrickson, Harry Temple Jr.,
Jack Bowman, Guy Witt nnd Bernico
Jones wero arrested yesterday and their
cases continued until today in Justice
Thomas' court.
Tho boys, a number of whom havo
been in previous trouble, make a play
ground of West Push street, just off
Broad, and cngago in very rough play
in which vile language is often used
in the presence of passing ladies nnd
littlo schoolgirls. Yesterday in addition
to their other "frolics',' tho boys took
possession of a Chinese hukstcr's wngon
and engaged in a battlo of tomatoes,
much to tho annoyance and loss of the
celestial. Tlio court has made a prac
tice of allowing youngsters to go with a
reprimand, but it is quite likely in these
enses he will give tho boys a chance to
pay a fine or serve time in jail.
FRIGlNEOl
FALSE RUMORS
TO IKE A RUN
Solid Bank of Portland Forced
to Close to Check an Un
warranted Run
PORTLAND, -Ore., November 12.
Tho Merchants Nutional bank of this
city failed to open this morning as a
result of a quiet, but none tho less
deploting run which has been going on.
While strictly solvent, tho bank was
obliged to close temporarily awaiting
advice from tho comptroller of tho cur
rency, who has been notified. On Au
gust 22.thodcposits'ainounted-to nearly
five and a quarter millions. It has since
liquidated over two and a quarter mil
lions, of which a million and a half has
been withdrawn since tho holidays be
gan October 2!). Knowing tho Mer
chants National was solvent, three New
York banks offered assistance, but tho
nntional banking act stood in tho way.
For a long time before tho trouble com
menced tho bank held a larger reserve
than any other bank in the city.
J. Frank Wilson, president of the
Merchants Nationnl, said: "Since tho
failure of tho Oregon Trust & Savings
bank last August wo have paid out $2,
300,000. Of this sum we havo liquid
ated moro than a million and five hun
dred thousand dollars since tho holiday
season commenced. We attribute tho
special run to tho fact of vicious ru
mors about" the bank started at that
timo nnd kept up continually ever since
tho holiday season began. In fact, wo
havo been informed by somo of our
depositors that they received anonymous
lotters nnd messages by tolephone from
anonymous sources advising tho with
drawal of funds from the bank. The
clearing house association has loaned us
up to the limit permitted by tho nat
ional banking act of $250,000."
Of ( fc( J' ?( tr ti't 't . $' J .'" ?' ! Mf
" r 'r ?C v " "( (P -a p ( w ii ic
UNOLE JOE WILL BE
NOMINEE, SAYS TILLMAN
DANVILLE, 111., November 32.
In an interview today Senator
Tillman of South Carolina declared
that Roosevelt would not accept a
third term and that Cannon would
bo tho republican nominee.
rsr
-rTrlggs In New York 'Press.
D
USE AROUND ADAM'S NECK
Damaging Testimony Against Accused
BOY BITTEN BY
SNAKE TUCSON HAS
SISTER LIVING HERE
John Pike, tho youth who was bitten,
in a tent show at- Tucson, by a mocca
sin snake, is a brother of Mrs. Charles
Glenn of this city.
Brief mention of tho accident was
made in the territorial news of yester
day's Silver Belt, which conveyed to
Mrs. Glenn tho first intelligence of the
mishap. Tho lad was in ouite a serious
condition at, last accounts, but as lato
'lucson papers do not mention tho case
it is presumed the young man is out of
dpngor.
Pike is a lad 17 years of ago and
until embarking in the show business
lived with his parents in Pueblo, Colo.
Ho was persuaded a number of months
ago to leavo homo nnd go on tho road,
appearing in femajo attiro as the "Aus
tralian Wild Girl," tho snako charmer.
It is doubtful if tlio parents of tho
young man know his whereabouts or
of his present condition. Mrs. Glenn
is considerably worr.ied by the report
and may decide to go to Tucson to care
for her brother.
GOLD PLATE
King Edward ' Entertains Emperor-Williams
and the
German Party
WINDSOR, England, November 12.
In the Historical hall at Windsor castle
King Edward and Queen Alexandra
gave a state banquet this evening in
honor of the German visitors. Tho hall
which for centuries has been associated
with the Order of the Garter, was dec
orated with bonners of tho principal
knights of the order, while tables were
adorned with the famous golden plate,
one of the great heirlooms of the sover
eigns of England.
Departing from the custom, King Ed
ward and Emperor William sat side by
side with the queen on tho right and
tho empress on tho left. Around the
tables, which were tct for 130 guests,
there gathered a most brilliant com
pany, including the many members of
the British royal house, suits of visit
ing sovereigns, cabinet ministers and
former cabinet ministers, ambassadors
and other diplomatic representatives.
Among the ambassadors was White
law Reid. The king proposed the health
of the emperor, who made acknowledg
ment in a short speech, closing with a'
toast to tho king.
The specches mado by the king and
emperor were formal in tone. They con
sisted of reciprocal expressions of the
pleasure the visit afforded and a mu
tual desire for tho maintenance of the
friendship between the countries. The
emperor alluded gracefully to his happy
childhood under tho roof and within the
walls of Windsor castlo and expressed
the earnest wish that the close friend
ship existing between tho royal families
should be reflected in tho relations of
tho two countries.
AMERICAN INTERESTS
ARE SUFFERING IN
KOREA SAYS HURLBUT
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., November
12. Tho local chamber of commerce
has received a communication from II.
II. Hurlbut, who claims to represent tho
interest of tho deposed emperor of
Korea, stating that American interests
aro suffering under tho present admin
istration in Korea. It has decided to
refer tho communication to tho Califor
nia delegation at Washington, who are
instructed to ascertain if tho American
interests are being discriminated against
in Korea.
TENNESSEE PLANTERS
MISTREATED BECAUSE
OUT OF ASSOCIATION
CLARKSVILLE, Tcnn., November 12.
Four mnsked men held up 'J. M. Wndo
and two sons near Guthrie, Ky., last
night and ordored them to leavo their
homo within forty-eight hours. Wade
with his sons had raised a crop of to
bacco, but had not joined the associa
tion. Tho men called him from his
home, ono held a revolver over him and
another struck him with a stick. His
sons, Thomas and Claude, were upstairs
and camo down to see what was tho
trouble. They wero struck several
times. Claudo and his father received
sovcral bruises. They left the placo
and camo to Clarksvillo today.
PUSHING CORPORATION REFORM
BATON ROUGE, La., November 12.
Corporation reform began its progress
through the extra session of the general
assembly today whou tho proposed new
laws wero favorably reported to tho
state senate. The expulsion from tho
stato of foreign corporations which
carry state cases to federal courts and
increased powers for the stato railroad
commission were measures reported.
1
U
DETECT I V E WELLS
TELLS OF ALLEGED
CONFESSION
Said Tyler Was Led from Place
of Confinement to Secluded
Spot arid Then Shot,
STEVE ADAMS CLAIMS
. KILLING JUSTIFIABLE
Detective Naturally Took a
Shot at Western Federation,
Being a Member of Colo
rado Mine Owners,
SPOKANE, Wash., November 12.
Butler Wells, former adjutant general
of tho state militia of Colorado, occu
pied the witness stand in the Steve Ad
ams trial at Rathdrum, Idaho, this af
ternoon. Ho testified as having seen
Adams May 27, 1906, at Orchards,
Idaho, on the Oregon Short Line about
thirty mil.es from Boise. He went there
to meet him and go to Colorado with
him. Adams told the witness of a num
ber of crimes in which he had partici
pated. They had somo conversation at
the time in reference to crimes in St.
Joe county in North Idaho of the kill
ing of a man named Tyler and a man
named Boule. No one but Adams and
tho witness were present during tho
conversation. The witness positively
stated that at the time or prior to that
time he had offered no immunity or
reward to Adams to mako a statement
to him, nor did he make any threats '
to Adams.
Nothing of importance was brought
out on cross examination. On re-direct
examination tho witness said he found
the body of Barney at Telluride Junc
tion, where Adams had mapped out for
him to go.
On cFoss examination Wells, who is
a member of tho Colorado state railroad
commission, said hq was in charge of
tho special train that took Moyer, Hay
wood and Pettibono to Boise from Den
ver. He said as a member of the Mine
Owners' association and being manager
of a mine then at Telluride, he had an
interest in tho prosecution of these men
as he believed from what had been
said by Adams and Orchard that they
were guilty of instigating the murder
of Steunenberg. Wells said that ho
and the guards were armed, as ho said
Adams expressed somo fear lest they
meet with somo members of the Western "
Federation.
"Why!" he was asked.
"Because Adams said if any member
of the organization recognized him he
would bo violently dealt with for state
ments ho had made in exposing the offi
cers." E. I. Whitney, warden of the state
prison at Boise, was called wlien Wells
had finished and retold tho story of
Adams as to tho killing of Boule and
Tyler. About tho only new features
added wero that Newt Glover, Alvah
Mason and Adams had fed Tyler out to
die the morning following the night
they kept him a prisoner, and while
trying to ascertain who sent him into
tho country and who wero his relatives,
thoy had a rope around his neck. Whit
ney said:
"Ho told me when the men had
reached a certain spot ho stopped and
said:
" 'This is good enough for him,' ,
Ho said they cached the body there and
went away and left it." Jt-
Whitney said afterwards Adams re
told him tho story and said bo believed
tho shooting of Boule and Tyler was
justifiable, as they had been sent into
the country by someone to jump claims,
and ho had met his just fate.
At tho last hours of court Adams'
confession was read to tho jury. It was
the confession made to James McPar
land, a Pinkerton detective, soon after
Adams was arrested in February, 190G,
and put into tho Boiso penitentiary. It
was admitted by Judge Wood during
McParland's direct examination. Dar- -row
objected on tho ground that it had
not been mado voluntarily, but that in
ducements and promises of leniency had
prompted it.
GEORGE F. HARDING
ON THE CARPET ON A
CHARGE OF CONTEMPT
CHICAGO, November 12. Judge
Landis today cited Gcorgo F. Harding,
Georgo F. Harding Jr.,. A. J. Joyner and
William Ammon to appear tomorrow
and show cause why they should not bo
punished for contempt. Harding, last
June, applied to havo a receiver ap
pointed for the Corn Products company,
' a tanuuru Ull cunnunjr buujiuiui; w-
I poration. Tho judge denied the appli-
I cation and issued an injunction restrain-
!ing Harding from further proceeding
along that line. Despite this, Harding
I . .. it. :.i: Ani.- ! i.a
uieu anouver uppiicuuuu imuuuj "
stato supreme court for tho appointment
of a receiver. Harding Jr. and Joyner
Ammon were parties to the second proceeding.
"1
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