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Tensas gazette. [volume] (St. Joseph, La.) 1886-current, January 12, 1917, Image 1

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THE TENS GAZETE
Gauette Pblibhiag Cmpauy, Ltd. Official Paper of the Pri Beard and Fift Leisiana Levee District. $1.5 hr Am
NEW SERIES.VOL. XXVI ST. .708 IANA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1917 NUMBIR 15
nm ·111n m nmmn1 • n/ n uII· nnn mmmm u n· mmn(- 11·· III · 11· 1 I· · · 1 1·1
PBOf ESSIONAL CARDS
Ui. L. A. MURDOC
It. Jiup L.
St. amp Idsa.
O? hak i~r bpjffgit
Phm ea4 Pjadi sam
U IfLLY AND TRICK
waasaa N ln LA y " AdS
It. 3m.ph, LmaishaI
Omce, Bank Bldg., up stales.
G H. CLIITON
Attorney-at-Law
W. JOSEPH,- LA.
WE oseo ta East ofeTen. Xad4sm%
trs. Coneordla, and the Bupremn
ad Idera Court.
DR. GEORGE N. CLARK
Dents
W. JOSPH, - LOUISIANA
In NiMil· 3fd Mak Nood
W. D. NOBLE, M. D.
Pylolan and Surge.o
Offie Phone No. U.
Reeldenoe Phone No. tL
NWELLTON, - - - LOUISIANA
THOMAS M. WADE, JR.
Attorney-at-Law
Wl aotiLe in Tenss and adJoin
I Parishes, the Supreme Court t
o State and the Federal Cowra
Lons negotiated n real saits.
5. JOSEPH, - - LOUISIANA
KATCHEZ CONFECTIONER1
Confeotione and SweetL
Of All Kinds.
CANDIES, CAKES, ICE CREAMS
WE SOLICIT
WEDDING AND PARTY
ORDERS
Our Restaurant is now open and w
lrrloe is unexcelled.
NATCHEZ C6NFECTIONERY.
NATCHEZ, - - MISSISS11PPI
3'TR. "SENATOR CARDILL"
Uý Pt- _. 41111 iNO Master
0. Y WILDS, ask
Regular Tri-Weekly
NATCHEZ & VICKSBURG
PACKET
Leaves Natches Sundays. Tussday
aid Thursdays at 12 aoo.
Lmeaves Vlcksbug Mondays. We.
•eedays and k'ridays at aon er
arrirval of ezresa trai.
i. ,. .,.y, I. .1. Jourph hi V aker. M. 1)
Phone 70 Phone 71
DRS. LILLY & WIIITAKER
Physicians and Surgeons
ST. JOSIi1PH, LOUISIANA
Office, Bank Building, Upstairs
Phone 34-3.
A. J. KISNER, M. D.
Specialist
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
GLASSES FITTED
(Buccessor to R. C. French)
5O2L MAIN STREET
Natchez, - - Mississippi
O. M. FOWLER
Surveyor
312 ARLINGTON AVTM
Natchez, - Mississippi
PiHONE NO. N2
I offer my services to the Tense
psFhlle, anil wIll b, glad to answer
calls hy nall or i-Ire.
Tlos.. I W it'. Jr. |Pre'ldent.
TIlE TENSAS AIBSTRACT C(;
( Ilnorlora Ted)
ST. JoI~I'Il. I.OU'ISIANA
Complete end corr.'ct Ahstracfs o
and I':L di. endt V I. lil w.ith c.ri|l.
IlivI .IUt:,II.
Bt iGood jard
American dol
lars brow on the
advertising tree.
THI' PPFR G;,, 'Ii RFSILTS
Sale . yo" iatead
to hver • sae [
Bills -et our prices
PRINTED[
Sdubleqgckt 6m.
''4 ~ ~ f ___ __ __ __ __
'. i/r : -
flistoric
dnd
Mysteries
oWall Mhsx S
HOW BALFOUR MISSED THE
MAIDEN.
A I.EXANDER BALFOUR was born
at then seat of his father, Lord Bur
leigh, nlar Kinross, in the year 1]("7,
and in all Scotland there was no infant
with fairer prospects. llis fathr was a
great man, there were grert people
among his lnucles and (iusins and
aunts. Among his distinguislhed and
powerful relatives were the duke of
Argyle and the earl of Stair. So Al
exander, as he grew up. a braw gal
lant, dreamed dreams of glory.
In the fullness of time lihe went to
the University of St. Andrew, where
he distinguished himself for intelli
gence and zeal. His teachers admllired
him so muca they predicted great
things for him, and said he would
have been destined to greatness, even
had be been born a plebeian. Then
one day the university shut down for
a brief season, and Aleek went home
for a vacation. And, having reached
his ancestral hall, the first thing he
did was to fall in love with Anne Rob
ertson, the governess of his little sis
ters. The chroniclers say that Anne
was passing fair, and as wise as a ser
pent. She tried to discourage Aleck's
infatuation. She handed him the ice
tongs in every way she could, but the
young man was determined to marry
her.
Then his father, old Lerd Burlelgh,
got wise to what was going on and
put in his oar. He lischarged Miss
Robertson and told his Pon to pack
up his traps and take a tour abroad,
staying away until summoned home.
This was a standard antidtte for love
Sickness in those days. Forei-n travel
Was a cure for many ills \ hich now
are reached by patent medicines. Al
exander went away, inmaginting him
self broken-hearted. But he wrote a
ii -' II
"Very Calmly Alexander Balfour
Aimed a Pistol and Fired."
letter to Miss Robertson, telling her
not to niarlry before his return. If she
did so, he would nmake it his business
to kill her hlushlnd. Then the young
muan sailed away to foreign parts, iindI
the months rolled on, and eventually
a ?l". yi cauiie wooing Miss Rt bert
son, andli found favor in her eyes.
Shi went with himi to the altar. and
the twain settled down to live happy
.ever latter. .Alexatll ders tlreatlt t(':itiu d
no lnte:t-iness iin Anjle'' gentlte hi oiom.
I)oubtle s1 liti' young man had forgot
ten her by this time. Tle t lreats of
lat' elrci slring:this are is idle i s the
windtls. So tit, monthns kept rolling
alongl, andt it mite to pass that onie
day Anle was seated by a wind iOw
nursing her tirst-horn, alntid a shadow
fTell ion hre. Loi iing ip, she fund
h|irsaef faee to face with Alexatndir
Il1ilf.tir. 'Thbire was nmurder in his
eyes. She read his fell iitietion lat
a g it ce, and .-iuri,-ke ,I. lh ir hu-etn d.
who wxas iii a I,:ck rian, rus hed to her
side to see \hat distrtmsed her. Very
ctlIily. Alexonder Ufour a iii imed a
pistol and fired, and Syme fell dead.
Then was Balfour taken to a jail,
antd shortly afterwards he was tried,
and sentenced to death. All the pow
er and pull of his intluential relatives
could not avail him in this evil case.
There came an evening when he knew
that the next sunrise would be the
last he'd ever see. From the barred
window of his dungeon he could see
the instrument of death, the maiden,
which had been erected that afternoon
by whistling workmen. It stood upon
1 knoll, so that,the plain people would
be able to see every detail of his eze
eution.
The maiden was the ancestor of the
guillotine. The inventor of the latter,
whose name has become immortal,
was a mere plagiarist. Every salient
feature of his machine was embodied
in the maiden. This admirable con
trivance was Introduced in Scotland
by the regent Morton, who encouraged
labor-saving devices of every kind.
Morton, who was the most unpopular
man in his kingdom, had the satisfac
tion of being beheaded by the machine
he so greatly admired.
The maiden consisted of two ups
rights with grooves down the inside.
In these grooves there slid a heavy
ax, weighted with lead. There was a
cross-bar four feet from the ground,
and upon this the patieht laid his head
at the directio of the executioner.
Then another crossbar descended
upon bh3 head and held it down. Ev
eryt4iag being in readiness for the op
eration, the executioner requested the
patient to look pleasant, please, pulled
a cord, and the ax descended. There
never was any botched work with this
imachire, as often happened when the
headsman swung an ax by hand. The
maiden was largely used In the agri
cultural districts, where the stealing
of live stock was a popular diversion.
\\hen the thieves were convicted and
brought to execution, a touch of po
etic justice made their end seem more
pleasant. If the condemned had stol
en a horse, the cord which released
the ax was pulled by that animal; if
a cow or a sheep, a cow or a sheep
sent him into eternity.
It was upon this ghastly machine
that Alexander Balfour was looking
when the sun went down, and there
was despair In his face when he
turned away from the window--and
confronted his sister Jennie. She had
her finger on her lips, warning him to
be silent. She whispered that she had
come to save him. They were much
of a size, and in a little while Alexan
der was wearing his sister's dress and
bonnet, and she was blushing in his
unaccustomed raiment. The Burleigh
pull was of no avail in Alexander's
emergency, but it seems probable
that the Burleigh money was not so
futile. For everything moved like
greased clockwork. The sister re
mained In the dungeon, and the broth
er walked out of the prison, turnkeys
and jailors paying no attention to him
whatever. In a bosky dell not far
away he found a fleet horse, all sad
dled and bridled, with money and
weapons convenient to his hand. So
he sped away, and gained a foreign
shore.
Even at this distance of time one
must sympathize with the unfortunate
executioner when he arrived on the
knoll next morning and found there
was nobody to execute. He had looked
forward to this affair as the crowning
achievement of his career. Perhaps
he figured on taking the lecture plat
form or making a tour of the Chau
tauquns, and all his hopes were shat
tered at one blow. So he had to take
his little old maiden away and maybe
he used it for slicing turnips for the
cows.
Lord Burleigh and the various dukes
and lairds and other great relatives
of the escaped murderer never wear
led of working for a pardon for Alez
ander, and when Queen Anne came
to the throne she was induced to ex
tend clemency to him, and he returned
to his ancestral halls and lived there
in opulence and honor for 50 years.
His story is a familiar tale throughout
Scotland, but nobody seems to know
what became of poor widowed Anne
Robe:tson Syme.
Up Through Difficulty.
Tell me the name of one man who
has really made good without hard
ships, struggles and suffering. Any
time you make up your mind that there
Is no use in further trying, and that
you will wait for some opportunity to
come along, call out the reserves and
have the whole force club you into ac
tion. If you have any idea that you
can make a success sitting down, while
men of mental energy and great physi
cal strength are working for all they
are worth, you have one more guess
coming. If you are not ready and
willing to fight, and fight hard, you are
in the middle of the stream, near the
falls. It's all easy with you now,
and will het--until you strike the rock
-Silent PI'artner.
Oh! Shining Shoes.
"In a democracy it is titting that a
man slhould sit on a throne to have his
shoes polished or, to use a brighter,
gayer wordtl, shined. WVe are all kings,
and this happy concelt of popular gov
ernment is nicely symbolized by be
ing, for these shining moments, so
niany kings together, each on his sim
ilar throne and w ith a slave at his
feet. Tihe demlocratic idea suffers a
little from the dilliculty of realizing
that the slave is also a king. yet gains
a little from the fair custom of the
I livelicer monarchs to turn from left foot
to right andl from right to left, sc
that. within huuman limbs. neither shoe
shall he undemocratically shined
tirst."--Italph Bergengren, in the Cen
tury.
Harbor of Rotterdam.
Rotterdam harbor In s,,me ways is
more picturesque than the harbor of
New York. There are no fringing
skyscrapers, but there is as much life
and movement, more color and con
trast, a finer sweep of line and group
ing of detail. The many canals that
surround it, the quaint craft that ply
up and down, the flying bridges that
close many of the distant vistas, all
these combine with the rich color of
sky and water to make a whole that
smacks more of the seafaring of we
mane. and less of the sesfaruag ed
commeree that is the keynot of ea
bkbomr eany.
nperlngs in
Metropolis
Tip i Wampum Doesn't Go in New York
lEW at the time when the stock of gold In the United States
hIa ,000,000. which Is a large pile, there arrived in New
York mpum, coinage of 1682, with which the Indians down
aroundti Eighth and Chestnut streets,
Philadelphia, guaranteed their treaties
with William Penn, years and years
before the town became famous for Its
- scrapple.
The belts now belong to the Mu
seum of the American Indian.
The arrival of these belts has
started some talk about what would
happen if we were on a wampum f
fi nancinl basis again and the bank roll
"was In shells. The price of hard
clams, out of which much of our 18
karat wampum used to be colned, would jump from 40 cents a hundred to a
figure that would make a clam worth as much as a pearl.
On the old basis, with 40 fathoms of nw:tipuum on deposit to his credit, a
man would be on easy street now. A wonlanl ns:l .hopplng could wind a
few hundred feet of cash arriound her nec.k under her furs and snip off as
near as she could the price of her purchasis at the various counters and see
her wampum go dancing on the overhead trolley to the cashier, and after a
pleasant wait see a short string of chance corme hack.
It is Impossible to put over wampum just at present. Waiters will not
take it. At the Majestic hotel a string which had a face value of CO cents
was tendered by a dinner guest as a tip. WIhl it :-l, vent a few explan:atory
remarks. The guest said the itdea was to re-cst::hlikh the good old Indian
money in circulation and by degrees have it adlo,,id around town. The
waiter said he didn't object to having the ln I:il adopt,, l. but until everybody
carried his money on a string he would hold to the two-bit pieces.
Municipal Marriage Chapel Proves to Be Popular
S INCE the city opened its new mnrriage ch:apel,. P. J. Scully, who, In his
capacity of city clerk, :acts as (hif Ilyin. li, h:is beel wrapped in an
idealistic dream. Over the fresh hbeauties of the chapel Mr. Scully beams
pridefully. Peach and nectarine co,,r
ng figures in the side panels. In the
ornamentation of the frieze and ceil- T/r' ElRE
ng the imagination of the decoratorrs Ao r I TLE "
to the borough president has run riot. HAPPE Y
Rosy garlands constitute the frieze.
rhe ceiling ornamentation includes a
large wreath of these blossoms, sur
rounded by gold-colored leaves, witht
the torches of Hymen placed fairly
close together. In the extension, !-_ .
where the brides and bridegrooms en
ter, there is a rectangle of lilies of the
valley. Couples pretty well clog the way to the marriage chapel. Everybody
Is on the lookout for them in the municipal building, wlhere the chapel is
situated. Even the elevator man when he stops at the fateful floor makes a
specialty of pausig after announcing "Clerk's office, coroner's office," before
he adds "marriage bureau."
A good day In the marriage bureau accounts for between 50 and 00
couples. On one day Mr. Scully's knot-tying proclivities flourishcd so success
fully that 68 happy pairs issued from the chapel. S:turd:ay is a favorite with
Jewish couples. They arrive on the half holiday afternoon, are nmarried, and
are thus able to open the shop together on Mondaty without any loss of time.
Everything is decorously arranged in the i:arriiage chapetl. The couples
waiting in the anteroom have given their nnames to tilnl ,fficial who calls theta
into the chapel In turn. The system provides that they shall enter under the
lily of the valley decoration, proceed to center under thel rose wreath, deltoulr
around two princely chairs, bridegroom to the left arnd bride to the right, and
arrive in a standing pose in front of Mr. ScullyS or F. . Goodwin. first deputy
city clerk, who takes turn and turn about with Mr. Scully in the promotion
of matrimony.
Greenwich Village a Quaint Bit of Gotham
EAR the heart of Greater New York is a quaint little community that hna
stubbornly refused to be concerned or even ilterested in the marvelous
development and advancement of the now largest and most prosperous city
in the world. Greenwich village! with
Sits narrow streets, winding alleys and
oll-fashlioned holies and business
places, set lip a quiet resistance to tile
/ oonward march of progress that could
Snot be broken down. It has kept its
character and individuality ald today
is the much-sought-for retreat of the
" artist and seeker after the quaint and
curious.
The village of Greenwich has haif
'l its tides of prosperity, with the result
ant t'bb and flow. For a time ii
shared the fate of the other downtown districts anti became the abode of a
foreign population. Then the title turned anti a group of artists discovered
it. Because it was old and rambling, with a polyglot poptlation, full of little
old shops, quiet retreats and crooked passagewvays, artists, sculptors and
writers fell In love with It at once.
They searched out vacant shops and hous.es and even the stables of a
past aristocracy and cleaned anti renovated theta, hbit every old wvindotw pane,
door knocker and quaint porch pillar was preserved. These beauty spots
suggested others and the tone of the village rapidly chanetid. For a time
the artists had the place to themselves anti enjyetl their quaint re.staurants.
philosophized in their garrets aiid talketl art in novel little hack rooms sug
gestlve of a long-forgotten past. It was truly an artists' retreat. When the
seeker for novelty in New York city discovered the quaint village of artists
It became necessary to increase the number of basement and backyard resy
taurants to aecommodate the interested visitors.
Bill Teaches Sister the Bear Hug and Trol
T HE bear bug, the bear kiss and the, bemr trot wvere displayed for the edifica
tlon of "Bill" Snyder, keeper of the· an!rzttmls in Cetntral park. when a sir
months-old Russian brown bear, looking for all the world like a chow dog,
arrived at the park in an automobile.
The bear came fro~m tht' esta~te of /i ~~
John D. Crimmins at Noroton, Conn., to --'A-. (ftf
join his sister, who h:idl beecn st-nt to IAnlWAY I '-'y" ~&Z
the palrk two months ago. , l
The other Rulssialn brow\n beanr,
who has been named Sister, wvns put
in the cage with three ordinary brown r _ -
bear culm because the weather was q,_ ---...
had. When Bill, as the new arrival is " '"-
called, was frt placed in front of the
cage he gave two or three question
ina sniffs and then began to mutter
bear languapb. Sister. grunting and muttering, came to the bars. Bill stood
np on him hind legs and reached his nose through. Sister touched his nose
with her ow., giving him a great, big, sisterly bear kiss. After that she so'
up a howlnl and began walking back and forth as if aching to get out.
"BSll" bler's heart was touched; the bears wanted to greet each other,
as weilboed bielber and sister bear should. He opened the bars and let Sister
out to Jon 311. They seized each other by the paws, threw their forepaw.
arond e* riher's walis in a genuine bear hug, and then began danein
-bout--- ait e bear-trot which, according to 8nyder, should be very populau
1a uodei1L U winter.
Bm in Lb biar who escaped from the country home of Mr. Cummins, a'
nem.  bear when dlovered on the estate of the late Seymom Hyde
b-- t llll l. Anthony Thompson of Oreemnwch and Edward Nelson 01
_ -- ~d into a best and Thompson eamed e In laioln thi
hew as R' Iss Iblnd.
EDISON'S
LATEST STYLE CABINrT-HORNLSS1'
PHONOGRAPH ,
UQUlPPMD Wi
The Diamond Reproducer and the Blue Amberol R.ed
The nw Blue Ambeol Reoord I practically hddestzus.
When played with the Edismm Diamond Reopodueer t nhe m
and ertune of the ouginal muao ue faithfully prsenvd.
the reroduction Is free trom mechanical quality. atalog D2
JOHNSTON'S CHOCOLATES HAVE BECOME INTERNATIOMNL
FAVORITES, AND ARE RECOGNIZED AS THI
WORLD'S FINEST CONFECTIONS.
Somo of the Most Popular Sellere Ares
INNOVATIONS SWEET, TRIAD, QUINTETTE,
MALTED MILK, CHOCOLATE BRAZIL NUTS IN CREAM,
THAT PACKAGE, EXTRAORDINARY, B.
Put up in dainty packages, from 80c to $5.00.
Hugo Jereslaw,
NEWELLTON, - - LOUISIANA
Hot Springs, Ark.
THE NATION'S FASHIONABLE PLAYGROUND
NATURE'S GREATEST SANITARIUM
QUICKEST TIME AND BEST SERVICE
VIA
----IRON MOUNTAIN---.
Pr Full Information as to Schodules, Rates, Etc, or for Fre
I:luatrated Booklet, See Your Local Ticket Agent, or write
A.G.P.A.
Akandria, . . . . . u.
AGENTS FOR: PLWS
Pe Via. Rakee
Thomas Hay Rakes and Momwe
Allen's Planet Jr. Cultlvaters
Winchester Arms Co.
Colts FIre Armos Co. HARROWS
Howe Scales
Smith A Wesson Revolvers
Mllburn A Hickman Wagons
Champion Mowing Macine CUTIVATORS
Hartig.Beckor Plow Ce.
Vulvan Plow Co.
Banner Buggles
Mollne Plow Co.
St~rrtt's Fine Tools PLOW GEAR
Sterling Emery Wheel Ce.
LEWIS HOFFMAN HARDWARE
Hoffman Block - Vicksburg, Mir,
Thos. J. lolmes,
Tin and Sheet iron Worker,
LESPEDEZA SEED PANS FOR SALE
By the use of this pan attached to the cutter bar
of Mowing Machine, you can save from one to two
bushels of seed to the acre.
IEI c t e 1 "J at o b1 e z"
Has all the best features a first-lams hoteL
RAIBER SHOP, BATH ROOMS, AND AN ElXCELLUI
BILLIARD ROOM
A favorite stopping plc for Tesase peopk.
JAS G. SMITH, - - - Proreto
Are You Going to Build?
If mo cary out he ides under the mos favorble conxftlUos
by seeing us about the lumber required for the purpoe.
To build economically, build weL
FOR HIGH-GRADE, WELL-MANUFACIURED ROUGE
AND DRESSED LUMBER,
mIngle Fleng, Ceilng, Compestlomt Reoohg,
Door, Blind., Pine Intrior Finish, Etc,
Cll e us. We make a speidalty of Iong Lesa Yello PIe
Bridge Flooring. Always gt our prce and lmvestlga ew
fdlites before pcng yor order.
L A. ENOCHS, The Lumberman
NATCIE, mISS
JOB PRINTING _. d.o
Usmis -i i~e ler kio. Um,, Ismwse lesyr.
-.~~~~~SU a· lili dsr mm ms·1 sle

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