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Port-Gibson herald. (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1842-1848, September 29, 1848, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87090149/1848-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 7.
i
\
POET GIBSON, CLAIBORNE COUNTY, MISS., SEPTEMBER 29, 1848.
NO. 5.
THE PORT GIBSON HERALD
{ U . II. JACOBS, Editor and Proprietor )
IS rUEUSHCD EVERY FRIRÀV MORNING. BY
WM. F. EISELY.
Payable in advance, for one year,
"•« " " " six months,
" within six months, for one year 4 00
" at the end ot the year
Ko subscription will be taken for a shoiter
period than six months; and no paper will be
discontinued until all arrearages are paid, except
at the option of the publisher. A failure to
tu ,;if V ' a wish to discontinue will be considered a
new engagement.
ADVERTISEMENTS.
Will be charged at the following rates: One
dollar per square for the first, and Fifty cents
for each subsequent insertion. Twelve lines, or
less, in Long Primer, or nine in Brevier, consti
tute one square, over twelve and under twenty
tour, two squares, and every subsequent twelve
( r traction ot the same, an additional square.
Politisai Circulars or electioneering Cards
id be charged one dollar per square, payable
in advance. Merchants advertising by the year,
as per agreement.
Fees rot Announcing Candidates.
Fcr District ani State ütfices,
" County Offices,
" Members of Board of Police,
" Magistrates and Constables,
with a sufficient quantity of tickets.
Extra tickets, per i 00
The fee for announcing a candidate must be
en the name is banded in.
$3 00
2 00
5 00
U
$!5 00
10 00
5 00
3 00
*2 00
paid for
Professional Advertisements.
velve lines or less, three months, $5 00
9 00
MX
" " " " " tvvt Ive
Aiivcrtispmf'nt* sent in without bring marked
with the number of insertions, will be published
until forbid, (except legal advertisements, for
which the law prescribes ihe time.) and charged
according to the foregoing rates.
Any alteration made in an advertisement after
ti e first insertion, will subject it to an extra
charge.
Tue U'i for each advertisement is due at the
maturiiy or discontinuance of the same.
All letters or communies ions, to insure atten
t et»; ion, must be post paid.
15 00
.firm v.—George * ratt. Esq., office of the
New York) Morning Telegraph, is our auiho
r «*d agent, to receive advertisements and sub
«■o'i
:
- ;
1
n*, and receipt fur the same,
teil. S. friKKRSo.N, Esq., is our authorised
igent, to receive snbscri plions and advertise
ments and receive payment for the same, at
Crm d Gulf.
I
. Kail .Irrangcmeais
of Tin;
PORT GIBSON POST OFFICE.
The Northern mail arrives every Monday
Wednesday and Friday, at 10 o'clock, A. M.
and departs same days at 1 o'clock P. ,M.
Southern mail, every .Monday, Wednesday
and Friday, at 12o'clock, M., and departs same
days at 12^ o'clock. M.
Gillitin Mail arrives every Tuesday evening
and dépars every Wednesday morning.
'1 be Northern mail closes at 12 o'clock M.
and the Southern ul half past 11 A. M.
Oiliee open from tun rise to sun set (Sunday
rxsepted.) J. O, MELCHIOR, P. M.
A. GILKEY.
Cheap €a*h ftrocep mid Pro
duce Merchant,
No. 7, Stamps' Row,
PORT GIBSON, MI.
T IIE subscriber has opened a
fresh stock of Groceries anc
new and
1 Produce.
suitable for family and plantation use, and
will keep constantly on hand, a good as
sortaient of articles in his line, which he
will sell at. a very small profit for cash, viz:
Brown, Loaf and Crushed Sugar; Coffee;
Tea; Moiasses; Sperm and Star Candles;
Boston Soap; Lard Oil; Mackerel; Coarse
and Fins Salt; Pickles; Ketchup; Ground
Pepper, Spice and Cinnamon; Mustard;
Sardines; Almonds; Figs; Raisins; Boston
Crackers; Soda Biscuit; Tobacco Rice;
Powder; Shot; Macaroni; Nutmegs; Cho
colate; Salaratus; Nails; Matts; Brooms;
Crockery Ware;
Flour; Lard; Bulk Meat; Dried Beef; Pota
toes; Applss; Cheese; Stone Jars, Churns,
Milk Pans and Jugs, &e. &c.
His friends and the public are invited to
call if they wish to buy their supplies cheap
for cash.
to
March 4.
27-1 y
Fresh Flours.
TVFEW ORLEANS and St. Louis brands
Ii just received by
A. GILKEY,
S.
of
Dried BceF.
A good article received, and for sale by
May 20 * A. GILKEY.
Fish, Fish
S ALMON, Herrings and Mackeral in
Kits, tor sale by
A. GILKEY.
Fresh Raisins.
FRESH article received and for sale
A- GILKEY.
Loaf and Crushed Sugars.
superior article of above Sugar for sale
low by A. GILKEY.
A
b J
A
Coffee,
T) IO Havana Coffee, fbr sale low by
i Y May 2ß
A. GILKEY.
Smoked Tongues.
TUST received and for sale low by
J May 20 A. GILKEY.
Caddies.
S PBRM, Star Candles, for sale low by
May 26 A. GILKEY.
Great Arrival of
6
SPRING GOODS!!
for
Come here Everybody!!
Fresh and Seasonable Dry Goods offered at
lower prices than ever heard of before.
D SELIGMAN & Co. have just receiv
. ed a complete and extensive assort
ment of Fancy and Staple Dry Goods, of
all sorts, descriptions'and qualities, such as
Muslins; Lawns; Ginghams; Bareges;Cam
hrics; Linen, Jaconet and Plaid Muslins;
Curtain Muslin and Gauze; Collars; Capes;
Ribbon; Parasols; Calicoes; Leghorn Hats;
Cottonades; Drilling; Linen and Linen Bo
som Shirts; Domestics; Clothing; Hats;
Boots and Shoes, &c. «Sic.
All of which will positively be sold at
the most reduced cash price»; they purchase
for cash, consequently they are enabled to
pell cheaper than anybody else, especially
as they intend to do only a cash business.
They invite community at large to call
and purchase. March 4 21-1 y
H
of
for
)
SPRING GOODS.
N. ROSEXBER«,
No. • S I AMPS HOW, one door above
Moody's Drug Store ,
R EiPECTFULLY informs the public
tht lie has just returned from New
Orleas with a very handsome assortment
season, among
a
of Gods suitable to the
wh ici are
Dry Gffods.
Coiprisinga fine assortment of Bareges,
Paintd Muslins; Sheetings and Shirtings;
Calices, Ginghams, black and fancy Silks;
Irish Linens and Lawns, Linen Cam
brie, .ilk and Cotton Hdkfs., Swiss, Book,
and Cunbric Muslins, Blanket, Silk, and
Thibe Shawls, etc., etc.
Clothing'. '
Caomere and Merino dress and frock
coats;black and fancy Cashmere, Merino
and Inen Pants; Satin and Fancy Cash
mere v'ests, Shirts, Drawers, Suspenders,
Glove, etc.
Hats and Caps.
Fite Silk and Beaver Hats, Oil'd Silk
and (lazed Capis, for men and hoys.
Hoots and §hoes.
Mn's Calf Boots, Calf Brogans for men
und bys, coarse,black and Riftset Brogans,
Ladis Morocco and Seal Shoes and Gait
ers, Childrens and Misses Shoes and Gait
ALSO
Ai assortment of Crockery and Glass
War, Knives and Forks, Scissors, Razors,
Penlnives, Candlesticks, Looking Glasses,
Tobeeo, Cigars, etc., etc.
Tose who desire to purchase articles in
his lue are requested to call before pur
chasng elsewhere, as his stock has been
careilly selected, and will he sold at very
sma: advances on cost for Cash.
An il 28, 1848. *
era.
35-tf
SEW GOODS!!
CALL A AD SEE.
ifTUE subscribers have just received a
: L splendid assortment of Fashionable and
Seasonable Goods, consisting in part of the
folhwing articles, viz:
Vhite and colored Linen Drillings,
Cottonades, Hickory Checks,
; Hue Plaids&Stripes for womens dresses.
1 Bmvn Linens, Irish Linens,
assorted Calico Prints,
Colored Jaconet Muslins.
Vhite
t'ross.barred Muslins,
Swiss Muslins,
linen and Cotton Diapers,
do do do Sheeting.
"able Linens, Linen Lustre,
irown and bleached Domestics, Levels,
44 o 4 and 6-4 Matting,
Aahogany Oil (.'loth,
Crass Skirting,,
Sîlk, Thread and Kid Gloves,
I osiery, assorted, Ac.
Bench Marino Dress Coats,
do do Frock do.
Inglish and German Dress Coats,
do do do Frock do.
Crass Linen Pack Coats,
Irown do do do.
Linen Check Dress and Frock Coats,
Cottonade do do do do.
Colored Alpaca Sack Coats,
Bench Marino pants,
Vhite and colored Linen Drilling Pants,
Jankeen Pants, Coltotiade Pants,
linen check Pants,
Vhite and colored Marseilles Ve«ts,
Lack Satin Vests,
linen and cotton Drawers,
linen bosom Shirts.
Fats.—Panama, Leghorn, Campeachy
and Straw Hats. Beaver and Silk Hats,
andalso a good assortment of
HARDWARE AND CROCKERY,
I ;
do.
do.
to vhich wc invite the attention of our
frierds and customers.
BROUGHTON & WRIGHT.
34-tf.
April 21, 184g.
New and Fashionable
SPRING GOODS.
S would call the attention of our friends
ind customers to our importations of
new vnd fashionable Spring Goods, winch
we are now opening, received per ships
Ashlind and Thetis, direct from New York.
Thesj goods have been selected with taste,
are many of them of new styles and pat
terns, comprising a general assortment of
Summer Silks; Bareges; Fig'd French Ja
conets; French Ginghams and Gingham
Lawns; Organdys; Foulard Silks; Brazilli
ans, &c. Handsome Embroidered worked
Collais; Chimesettes; Reveire Bordered
Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs; Ladies' II.
S. Gloves, assorted; Long W hite Kid do.;
Herman and Bcrege Shawls; Berege and
Satin Scarfs; Cravats & Neck Ties; Swiss,
Cambric, Jaconet and Nansook Muslins,
and a very handsome assortment of new
style Spring Ribbons. We have a new
stock of Gentlemen's Clothing, made up in
fashionable style and of good material, all
of which we are prepared to sell oil mode
rate terms. J S MASON & Co.
March 17, 1848.
W
tf
Lfnsey & Jeans.
BALES Linseys,
Jeans,
6
44
J S Mason & Co.
47-6t
for sale by
July 21, 1«48.
S. RÖMER & BKO.,
DRYGOODS AND VARIETY
MERCHANTS,
Carroll and Farmer Sts.
PORT GIBSON, MISS.,
H AVE now on hand a general assortment
of Spring Summer Fanoy Dry Goods
of the latest styles and best qualities. Also,
Ready made Clothing, Hats, Boots, Shoes,
&c. They respectfully invite the public^
call and examine their stock. They sell
cheap for cash. April 7, 1848.—32 6m
Corner of
Lumber!! EnmberüJ
on AAA FEET White Pine Lumber,
OU,UUU clear stuff, assorted, tor sale
for cash only, by HP Mjerbifield.
Feb 4. 33'tf
Robert Potts.
Joiin G. Hastings.
POTTS Or MrJtSTI.VGS,
GROCERS.
Court House Square,
Port Gibson, Miss.
POTTS df HASTINGS
H AVE opened at their store, an entire
new stock of Groceries and Produce,
consisting in part of
Brown Sugar,
Crushed, "
Loaf,
Pulverised "
Havana Coffee,
Java,
Molasses,
S. H. "

<4
New. Bedford Candles, Rice,
Adamantine,
Soap in small Boxes for family use,
Coarse and Fine Salt,
Table,
Cheese,
Candies and Fruit,
Cigars, Mackerel,
Tobacco.
Soap, Boston No. 1
41
Lard Oil,
Wine Vinegar,
Green & Bl'k Tea
Pickles,
Ketsups,
Syrups,
Lemons,
Pepper,
Sardines,
Powder,
Shot,
Lead,
Claret,
Porter,. .
4*
Sweet Oil,
Mustard,
Spices of all kinds,
Raisins,
Almonds,
Filberts,
Old Rye Whiskey,
Rectified "
Hams, Lard, Flour, Sic.
Together with a good assortment of Cas
tings, Nails, Brushes, Wooden and Crock
ery Ware, and variety of other articles.
Just Received.
S HAY'S Superior Family Hams,
Sugar Cured " "
Clear Sides,
Dried Beef,
St. Louis and Ohio Flour and Lard,
Potts & Hastings.
41—3t
June 9,1848.
For Families.
S
ODA Biscuit,
Boston ( rackers,
Pilot Bread,
English Dairy Cheese,
Western,
Call at
a
Potts & Hastings.*
.Fast Received.
S ANDERS' 'I tarry of the West' Tobacco,
Myers' "Phoenix" "
Price's, Rogers' and other Brands,
Large assortment ot Cigars,
Also, Shot Pouches, Powder Flasks,
Game Bags, and Walker's Percussion Caps.
Potts & Hastings.
To Families.
AVANA Sugar especially for preserves,
A superior article of Imperial Tea,
Mackerel in Kits,
Soap iu small Boxes.
II
Potts & Hastings.
W. P. KIKKLAXD
?
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
ZEES ES
AND
Western Produce.
[McComb's Corner ,]
PORT GIBSON Mi.
Fresh Produce.
HE SUBSCRIBER respectfully informs
the public that, he has on hand, and
will regularly receive from Cincinnati, a
general assortment ot Western Produce,
which he pledges himself to sell as low as
can he obtained at Grand Gulf, with the
addition of one half the us.ual price for
hauling, and many articles sold without
additional charge for hauling. Having pur
chased, and intend purchasing from first
hands, with the ready cash, enables him to
sell at reduced prices. Terms cath or
New Orleans acceptance.
July 1, 1848.
T
W. P. KIRKLAND.
CHEAP PRODUCE.
lbs. best plain Hams,
3000 lbs. best Sugar Cured Hams,
2000
200
Clear Sides,
Leaf Lard, and
25 kegs
25 barrels and half barrels recti
fied Whiskey, lor sale for cash at Grand
Gulf prices. W. P. Kirkland.
P. S. AH orders must be accompanied
by the cash, otherwise, they will not he
filled.
M v motto is "cash or no sale "
W. P. Kirkland.
September I, 1848.
FRESH FLOUR.
BBLS. of St. Louis and Ohio Flour,
made of new and old wheat, for sale
at Grand Gulf prices by
40
W. P. Kirkland.
September 1, 1848.
Wanted.
POUNDS DRIED HIDES, for
which will be paid the highest
W. P. KIRKLAND.
-5000
jnarket price.
July 1
Clear Sides.
CHOICE article of Clear Sides in
store and for sale at Grand Gulf prices,
W. P. KIRKLAND.
A
by
' July 1
Hams.
AVIS' Family Hams, an excellent
article of iamily Hams, can be
purchased at Grand Gulf prices, of
July I W. P. KIRKLAND.
D
€hesse.
LBS. BEST Western Reserve
CHEESE, can be had at Grand
Gulf prices, by applying with the ready
W. P. KIRKLAND.
500
cash to
July 1
goap and Candles. ;
A NO. 1 article of Boston Snap and
Star Candles can be had at Grand
Gulf prices, for cash, by c= Hihg on
W P KIRKLAND.
July 1
Daggin?, Rope and Twine,
_D 100 pieces Bagging,
1 Bale Twine,
J S Mason, <k Co.
48-6t !
for sale by
July 9*, 1848. '
V
N*
i%\T
LV
POETRY.
"The Old White Horse."
A WHITE HORSE WITH THE ANCIKKTS, WAS
THE SYMBOL OF VICTORY.
In the noisy war of factions,
And the eager race for spoil,
The Old White Horse kept quiet
And went about his toil;
But when the foe's Annada
Came looming o'er the brine,
The Old White Horse was ready %
And in the foremosCme.
And when the trumpet sounded
To other fields of fame,
The Old White Horse went down of course,
And conquered where he came.
At well-fought Palo Alto,
And the bloody Palm Ravine,
The boldest foemen scattered
Where the Old White Horse was seen.
For he'd thought the subject over
Before the fray begun,
And when he's fixed things in his mind
They're just as good as done,
"If the enemy opposes me—
On the left or the right—
Whatever be his numbers,"
Said the Old While Horse, "77? fight!"
So the Old White Horse went inarching
And conquering day by day,
From the walls of Matamoros
To the towers of Moulerey.
And for the crowning straggle,
When outnumbered and hemmed round,
On the heights of Buena Vista
He took liis fighting giound.
A summons to surrender
From the hostile ranks they send—
But that's a branch of tactics
That he does'nt mmj rebend;
So Iip sent a pithy message,
By the beanr of the flag,
And then replied more hilly
In grape from Captain Bragg.
When the doubtful battle wavered.
And the foe was gaining ground,
The old White Horse stood cilmly
Where the balls were crashing round;
And all who saw him rallied,
Andjeit their spirits stirred—
The Ohl White Horse was m the spot
And Victory i was ti e word.
The Old While Horse is steadfast
Arid of the staunch old breed;
We've often proved bis me tle
And now we'll try his speed;
As he's always done his duly,
And with honor filled his place,
Though never known to run before,
We'll start him for a race!
So clear the track good peoplf,
Against the racing day;
You know fie "asks no favors"
But a lair field and lair play!
And won't there be some polling
And flying from lhe «ourse.
When the Locos see the running
Oi our gallant Old White Horse!
MISCELLANEOUS.
Lesson to Newspaper Borrowers.
Time: Saturday morning, eight o'clock.
Scene: the breakfasttable. A rap is heard
at the door, and the newspaper is for a few
moments opened before the fire. "Come,
John, it won't do to dry it long, for I see
neighbor Snooks is sending his son after it."
Another rap at the door.
"Father wants to know if you will just
lend him the newspaper five minutes; if
you ain't done, he will send it right back.
He only wants to see if the brig Star has
been heard from, what our Tom went in."
"Tell your father the brig is not reported.
Home he trips, and speedily returns.
"Mother wants to know who was buried
yesterday, can't you lend it to her just two
minutes?"
"Tell your mother that all the deaths
, and a child of Mr.
this week are Mr.
In a few moments another tap.
"Sister Susan wants to know if anybody's
married this week, and uncle Josh wants to
know if there is any auction to-day, and
father wants to know what the news is from
Virginia, and aunt Snooks wants to know if
there is any pretty stories about that Jarvis
woman—if you can't spare the paper, why
can't you just write down what there is,
just cause I don't want to keep running
back and forward so—.
"Here, my lad, take this paper to your
father, and round to all your uncles and
aunts, and have it back, whatever is left of
it, next Saturday morning, at eight o'clock,
precisely, when you come to borrow the
next."
tl
Ten applications on Saturday by borrow
ers, all sent to neighbor Snooks, with a par
ticular caution to return it there when
done with.—Monday morning, a rap at the
door, and the boy with the paper is ushered
in.
"Mother says it is too much plague to
keep the paper all the week, people keep
rtthning arter it so.
Looking Ahead.—O f all the look-ahead
people that we ever heard of, a certain
lady, who was in the habit of buying arti
cles that she did not want, merely because
she could get them cheap, bears off the
palm. On one occasion, she brought home
an old cast off door-plate, with a name en
graved on it.
"Do tell me, my love," inquired her
husband, on being invited to applaud her
purchases, "if it be your intention to become
a dealer in old brass? Of what possible
use can this he?"
"Bless me!" replied the wife, you know
it is always my plan to look ahead and buy
things against the time of need. Now,
who knows, my dear, but you may die
and I marry a man with the same name
as that on this door plate? Only think
what a saving there would be!
The argument was unanswerable, and
the husband, of course, was silenW-but he
probably thought to himself, "this is look
ing ahead with a vengeance."
Pope says, 'the greatest advantage I
.know of being thought a wit by the world
is, that it gives one the greater freedom of
playing the fool.*
From the New Orleans Picayune.
The Taylor Barbecue.
Pass Christian. Sept. 17 , 1848 .
Yesterday, agreeably to announcement,
the grand Taylor Barbecue came off at this
place. It was emphatically a grand affair,
such, I venture to assert, as Mississippi
never witnessed before. I have been ac
customed to see barbecues in various parts
of the country, but this was unlike any
other I ever attended. The site chosen for
the occasion was in a beautiful live oak grove
on the grounds of F. B. Hiem, Esq., near
the hotel. 'The day was most lovely, and
the arrangements extremely unique. A
more picturesque spot could not have been
selected any where in the vicinity of the
Pass. All who have ever visited Pass
Christian, must remember the beautiful
Indian mound in the grove alluded to.. On
the top of this mound a neat and comforta
ble tent had been pitched for the special ac
commodation of Gen. Taylor. This was
surrounded by a number of our national
ensigns and other colors, politely loaned
for the occasion by several shipmasters from
New Orleans, to whom much is due for the
effect given to all the proceedings here in
honor of "Old Zach.
Near by the mound, and beneath the
overspreading branches of evergreen, was
placed the table on which was to be
spread the barbecue. At about 12 o'clock
the people began to assemble on the ground,
and a little after 1 P. M., Gen. Taylor was
escorted from the hotel to the scene of fes
tivity by the Board of Selectmen and other
citizens of Pass Christian, together with
crowds of others from the country and the
gentlemen boarding in the house. As the
old soldier approached his tent, a fine band
of music struck up "Hail to the Chief!"
which was spiritedly executed. This com
pliment being over, nearly the whole mul
titude advanced to shake hands with the
distinguished guest of the day.
The introduction of the company to Gen.
Taylor having been gone through with, he
was conducted to his seat at the centre or
head of the table, which was so selected as
to give all those on each wing of the table
an opportunity to see him from their places.
Over the chair of the General was a neatly
arranged canopy formed of the star spangled
banner and boughs of green trees. He was
supported on his right by Maj. Waggaman,
and on his left by Maj. Garnett, of the U.
S. Army. Before the company took their
seats, John Henderson, Esq., welcomed the
General in behalf of the people of Harrison
county to the hospitalities of the day in an
eloquent and appropriate address, to which
Gen. Taylor responded most happily.
And now I come, as hastily as possible,
to the dinner. But such a repast! Such
meats, and so excellently cooked! Have
you ever eaten barbecued meats? If so,
let your mouth water at the recollection,
and sigh that you were not here. Think
of fine fat venison, of mutton and lamb and
kids; think of barbecued pigs, beef, veal,
and fowls of various kinds? And what
shall I say of the chowder—a regular Down
East chowder? It would puzzle Daniel
Webster to heat the chowder which we had
at the Taylor Barbecue yesterday at Pass
Christian, in the State of Mississippi.
There are other places besides "Marsh
field," where they can make chowders, and
other people besides the "God-like," who
know how to mix in the onions, potatoes
and salt pork. Of this affirmation let all
be assured. When I tell you who were
the presiding spirits over the barbecue and
chowder, you may not be so loth to credit
my praise of these respective departments
of the feast. In the superintendence of ihe
first, Old Kentucky had her representative
in the amiable and generous Harry Law
rence, while New England lias the honor
of claiming as her son, the king of the
chowder, the rotund Spencer Gloyd, both
estimable gentlemen of your city. As you
know, a sight of either, with his full and
cheerful face and contented look, to say
nothingofaldermanic proportions, is enough
to suggest the idea of good living and sump
tuous fare. What wonder then our dinner
was "done brown? ' But I must proceed.
"After the "cloth was removed I beg
pardon, they dont use table-cloths at barbe
cues after the eating was over, I mean,
F. B. Heim, Esq., proceeded to read a few
regular toasts, which were received with
great applause, followed by appropriate
music and the firing of cannon. I send
a copy of the toasts, and request you to add
them to my communication.
A\ hen the crowd had retired from dinner
they adjourned again to the temporary
seats which had been placed in tne shade
of the grove, where they amused themselves
awhile in conversation—the time being en
livened with music by the hand, singing,
dancing &c. Yes, we had dancing, too—
the regular bran-dance included.
if
to
if
bran-daftce, as it is called, is a funny affair.
Whence its peculiar name I know not,
unless it be that those who take part in its
merriment dance on bran. Be that as it
may, we had no bran here to dance on, but
in its stead nice clean sawdust. Around
the base of the mound were strewn quan
tities of tins sawdust, and on this the dan
cing took place. I suppose I should, in
strictness, have called it the sawdust dance;
hut whatever its appropriate flame, one
thing, is certain, I ne ver saw a greater dust
raised by any other dancing. Little hoys
and girls, old folks and young, all joined
in it, and I noticed one of the blackest, yet
happiest looking sons of Africa, a short dis
tance off, "going it on his own hook." His
shuffles and double-shuffles and shakes
would have put "Jim Crow's" steps com
pletely in the shade. He went it, as the
ug is, with a perfect, an entire abandon .
»»uen he had danced all the sawdust away
from the space three or four feet in circum
ference, he 1 continued* digging away into
the ground, and if the music had not ceased,
there is no telling how big a hole he would
shuffled out. A* it is, I have no doubt his
master is in for anew pairofstoutbrogans.
I find I am extending my account of the
barbecue, which is doubtless uninteresting
to many of your readers. But allow me
one more word of the bran-dance. I know
'no better way to describe it than by
comparing it to what is called the Old Vir
ginia reek It is like it in figures, like ll
This
>M
I
of
this
ac
parts
any
for
near
and
A
been
the
Pass
On
ac
was
from
the
in
the
was
be
was
fes
with
the
the
band
com
mul
the
he
or
as
table
was
U.
the
an
so,
and
had
and
who
all
and
ihe
the
you
and
say
in zest, and is danced to the same music.
So much, then, for the barbecue, the singing,
music, dancing, &c. That I have railed
to do justice to these, 1 am fully sensible.
Persons from a distance of thirty-five and
fofty miles were on the ground; persons of
different political sentiments; of different
grades and rank in society; yet all was har
mony and friendship. Ail was courtesy
and good feeling. Not one single inciden
occurred in the whole routine of hilarity
to displease or give offence. All was free
and easy. In a word it was one of the best
arranged and best conducted affairs of the
kind that could posssibly have been seen
any where. The people of Pass Christian
and Harrison county cannot receive too
large a share of praise for their public spirit,
hospitality, good sense and politeness, in
viein^ with each other to manifest their
respect and admiration of one who has done
so much to shed lustre upon our national
character at home, and increase the splen
dor of our country's fame abroad.
As the sun went down, at the close of
one of the most delightful days of this sea
son of the year, the band struck up "Hail
Columbia," concluding with "Yankee
Doodle," when the stars and stripes which
had floated gaily over the mirthful pageant,
were hauled down amidst a perfect<oraado
of huzzas. Thus ended the proceedings
of the Taylor Barbecue at Pass Christian
—an event not soon to be forgotten by any
of those who were fortunate enough to wit
ness it. Yours, &c.
F. A. L.
TOASTS.
1. The President of the United States.
Music — "Hail Columbia."
2. The Army and Navy of the United States.
Music —"Star Spangled Banner."
3. The Volunteers of the State of Mississippi
and their brave officers, Davis and McClung.
Music —'Yankee Doodle."
4. Major Gen. John A. Quitman—He has
proved himself as efficient in the field as he was
learned and unbiassed on the bench. In what
ever situation lie is placed he challenges out
respect and admiration.
Music —"Grand March.
5. Gun. Zirhary Taylor, our honored guest—
Groat in his incorruptible honesty, strong in his
inflexible firmness; invincible in his steady inde
pendence; as a snldier, deliberate and cool in
action, wise in council, and a successful con
queror; a man who has done his whole duty as
a citizen and as a soldier.
A sentiment by the ladies of Pass Christian:
Gen. Tavlcr—Husband, father, friend; gentle
man, warrior, Christian. The free women of
onr land will bear him on their htarts to the
highest seats of honor, giving to the world their
appreciation of a man.
Gen. Taylor's Address.
The following were the remarks of Gen.
Taylor in reply to the Address by the Hon.
John Henderson:
It is with emotions of no ordinary em
barrassment, Mr. Speaker, that I find
myself called upon to respond iu the cordial
reception with which I have just been met
by the authorities of Pass Christian and
the citizens of Harrison county. I cannot,
indeed, expect to do justice to the occasion;
and feel especially less able to offer in ade
quate terms my acknowledgments for the
flattering language in which this greeting
has been tendered by the talented citizen
who has just addressed me. I can only,
therefore, offer you my warmest thanks,
and assure you that the style of my reception
here is particularly grateful to my feelings.
This simple and republican manner of
meeting my fellow-citizens carries me back
to the pleasant scenes of my early life. I
was reared from infancy to early manhood
in the West—among men of the most
primitive tastes and republican simplicity.
We there frequently met on occasions like
this, to exchange freely opr opinions on
National and State affairs, and to devise
measures for the defence of our borders,
which at that day the General Government
was sometimes unable to protect. On these
occasions were often collected, too, those
men of lion hearts and iron nerves who
had not only aided the Father of our
Country in achieving our independence,
and stood by his side in many of his hard
I fought battles; but who afterwards filled,
w [th. honor to our country,, conspicuous
beg places in our legislative bodies, both National
an d State. I have been educated in the
s jmplc and republican habits so happily
few . illustrated in this scene, and do not expect
to change them in my old days. You will
t } ien understand me when I assure you
j a g a j n? that the manner of my reception
add h ere j s more'"agreeable to mv feelings and
| taste than could be all the pomp arid pa
geantry of a reception at the most splendid
.Court of Europe.
The complimentary language in which
I you have been pleased to allude to my mil
en- i ta ry services, which now embrace a period
of more than f orty years , an d especially to
t he actions in which I have been en
ged
during that time, commencing with the
(] e f ence G f Fort Harrison, in 1812, and
not, en ding with the battle of Buena Vista, has
its awa kened in me the most grateful emotions,
it j f ee i particularly gratified at the just tri
but ^ ute of praise which you have paid, in
speaking of these services, to the gallant
men whom I commanded on those occasions,
an{ j ( 0 vvhom I feel deeply indebted for* our
in success. I claim nothing save the good
f ortU ne of being the leader of such men opt
one occasions referred to; and to their zeal
j n sustaining me, and to their held hearts
an( j strong arms, are we Indebted for our
victories. The manner in whichybu have
yet a {l a ded to my being stripped of my troops
dis- on t jj e Ri 0 Grande, and to my being left,
as might seem, at the meroy of the enemy,
j us t before the battle of Buena Vista, reri
(j ers it proper, probably, that I should make
the a few remarks in relation to that matter. I,
. received at Victoria, while on my way to
Tampico—a movement which, I had advised
the W r ar Department I should make for cer
tain reasons—an order from the General-in
Chief of the army, stripping me of the
greater portion of my command, and pas
his ticuiarly of regular troops and volunteera
: we ll instructed. This order was received
the by; me, with much surprise, and I must
confess, produced the strongest feelings of
me regret, mortificatiort au '
I knew that Gen. Santa Anna was within
by striking distance of my'line, with an army
of25,000, probâbly the best appointed men
ll evfer collected in Mexico. After putting
as
SS
most of the troops then with ïne at Victoria
en route for Tampico—-the larger p
the commands at Monterey and Saltillo
having been already withdrawn for the
same ultimate destination—I was instructed
to return to the former place, where it was
expected I would remain on the defensive,
with the small force then under my orders.
A few days after reaching that point
learned that the greatest alarm prevailed
among the advance at Saltillo, in conse
quence of the capture at Encarnacion of
Majors Borland and Graines, with their party
of about eighty picked men from the Arkan
sas and Kentucky cavalry—followed a few
days afterwards by the capture of a detach
ment of picked men under Capt. Heady,
also of the Kentucky cavalry.
About the same time I received a com
munication from Gen# Wool, then comman
ding at Saltillo, ufging me to join him with
all the troops at my disposal, stating that
Gen. Santa Anna was at least preparing,
if he was not already en route, to strike a
blow at Saltillo! I immediately joined
Cîen. Wool with 700 or 800 men, and a few
days afterwards concentrated all the troops,
which were generally encamped by regi
ments, and took my position at AguaNeuva,
in order that all the officers might become
better acquainted with each other and their
duty, and that generally a more thorough
system of discipline and instruction could
be adopted to prepare all hands for service.
While here, I was advised by the War
Department and the General-in-Chief to
occupy Monterey. This advice I believed
then, as I do now, was given at hazard, and
in ignorance of my situation, of that of the
enemy, and of the country. I declined to
adopt it, and determined to fight the Mexi
can General immediately after he crossed
the desert country which lay just in my
front, and before lie could have time to
fresh and reorganize his army, which I
knew would be much worn out and disor
dered by a march of 150 miles across this
desert without sufficient provisions and
supplies, and with a great scarcity of water.
In this determination, so far as I know, I
was most cordially sustained by the officers
of my command. About two weeks after
taking my position at Agua Nueva, it was
ascertained by my advanced parties that
Santa Anna was at hand with his army.
W e then fell back to Buena Vista, a ranch
some six miles in front of Saltillo, where
we took up a strong position, and where we
could easily communicate with our depot
in the latter place. Upon this ground I
determined to give battle,
arrived in our front on the morning of the
22d, and summoned me to surrender at dis
cretion about 1 o'clock the same day. The
summons was declined, and about 4'o'clock
on that day the battle of Buena Vista com
menced. The result of that affair is known
to you all, and I shall not, therefore, trou
All tried dio
charge their duty to their country on that
occasion, and some even did more than their
duty. It would then perhaps he invidious
to draw comparisons, but I must he permit
ted to say that, led on by their distinguished
commander, the gallant Mississippi Volun
teers, of whom you have just spoken
highly and so justly, performed well thoir
part. They were the only volunteers with
me who had met the enemy before—havin
acted as would become veteran troops in
the conflicts about Monterey, I therefore
calculated much upon their assistance
that eventful day, and I am happy here to
say that my expectations were fully realized.
Their ranks thinned by the enemy's bullets
are much more conclusive as to their good
conduct than anything that I could now say.
The battle of Buena Vista, under the
circumstances under which it was fought,
was one of the most trying occasions in
which a soldier can be placed. I may say
indeed that I fought that battle with a halter
about my neck. I had been advised to fall
hack and occupy Monterey, which, as be
fore stated, I declined, and had I been un
successful this advice would have been
brought up in judgment against me. I
declined that advice because I believed the
result would have been as disastrous as a
defeat. Had I fallen back to Monterey, the
whole country about me, upon which I was
greatly dependent for forage, would have
flown to arms. Once confined in Monterey,
the volunteers, to say nothing of the effects
of the retreat upon them, would have become
sickly and dispirited, and deprived of nil
means of obtaining supplies, and particu
larly forage, I should soon have not had a
dragoon or artillery horse in my command,
and would therefore have been compelled
ultimately to surrender, unless the siege
could have been raised by the return ot
Gen. Scott from Vera Cruz with the troops
under his command.
The battle of Buena Vista was fought on
our side by about 450 regular troops and
something upwards of 4000 volunteers,
while they were opposed by at least 20,000
of the enemy; and had we lost the day, I
feel that the whole responsibility of the
misfortune would have fallen upon my
shoulders. Yet I do not wish here to cen
sure those who placed us in that critical
situation: whether they deserve blame or
not I leave for others to determine. Those
who had control over my fate in this trans
action may have friends here present in
whose good opinion I would not harm
them. For my own part, I am satisfied to
hope and believe that it was all the result
of accident rather than of design on their
railed
!
and
of
har
free
best
the
seen
too
in
their
done
of
sea
any
wit
ortlon of
I
has
was
what
out
rc
his
inde
in
con
as
of
the
their
The enemy
em
find
met
and
ade
the
of
I
like
on
who
our
the
will
and
pa
to
blc juu with ita dotaile
so
<T
on
the
and
has
tri
in
our
opt
our
I,
to
cer
the
of
part.
In conclusion, I beg to return to you, to
my fellow-citizens of Harrison county, and
particularly to my fair countrywomen here
assembled, my heartfelt thanks for the cor
dial reception which they have extended to
: t ' ' *
me.
"I promise your Honor, if y
a light sentence "on me, I will
become an honest man," said a criminal,
who had been cônvicted of theft. The
promise made a» impression on the Judge,
and he passed as light a sentence as possi
ble. "May the hangman choke me,'but that
Judge is a fine old fellow! I must send
him something!*' exclaimed the criminal
as he, left the court; and behold the next
day the Judge received from an unknown
hand a valuable gold watch, of Which he
had,been robhad two years before.
ou will pass
reform and
as

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