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The Southern reveille. (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1876-1890, April 11, 1890, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87090151/1890-04-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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Southern Jititillc
10 @11
tftick of tho N.
Our Alliance friends are reported
to be discussing the question wheth
er jndges should be elected by the
people or appointed by the govern
or. This is a very > UI P°£iiiM9i
ter, and the faru^^^M
cept ddibra&^^éjgHH
h I j 111 # » ^
FRIDAY MORNING. APRIL 11, IWlT
A^C. TBASI5H, Editor ui Proprietor
S ulmrr mtioH Per Year. $2.00
[Entered at the Poatoffice at Port
bson, Mian., ns second class matter ]
Ui
MARKET REPORT
Wednesday, April », 1890.
IT«» Orleans
Boat flour ... $4.00(^6.00 $3.00® $4.46
Meal . $2.00■
MessPork .. $11.60
Bacon, long clear 6J
Dry salt long clear 06
Corn
Oats
fe'.imns
S^I-ard
Bugwr,choice vel. 5(
Molasses,choice 29
Coflee good. 21
St I "ilia
$1.70
$ 10.66
f> I
40
29
32
24
St
M
LOCAL WEATHEB BECOBD, 1890.
Temperature noted specially for the Revsii.lb
at 8 p. iu. daily, from best self-registering
instruments, exposed in the open air.
For the Week Ending April 10.
MONTH. THBKMOM.
art. MAX MIN.
WKATUSR.
4
;;
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
'
75 49
84 48
83 56
85 64
7» 63
71 43
6
7
8
hb
U
Fair
to
Ctaer
FOR CONGRESS.
We arc authorized to announce
HON. GEO. S. DODDS
of Copiah, as a candidate for Repre
sentative in CongrcM from this, the
7th Congressional District.
T
The Mississippi State Medical As
sociation will meet in Jackson on
the 16th of April.
The Natchez Democrat mentions
the death of Mr. Louis Winston, a
prominent citizen of that county,
aged sixty-six years.
Brookhaven officials receive the
following, salaries : mayor, $300
per annum ; marshal, $-180 per an
num ; secretary, $90 per annum.
The New» is the name of a week
ly paper just established at Utica,
limds county. Mr. D. Q. Grilling,
formerly of this county, is editor
and proprietor, and the Reveille
wishes him success in the enter
prise.
Reports ake again in circulation
to tho effect wat
L-.J.& C.railroal
ittfre
mjoo
on to be changed
■standard gifege width fromHarris
■ to Jackson, with a probability
Hn extension of the road beyond
raj latter point.
prln Pettis county, Missouri, judge
(Hyland lately instructed the grand
jury that church raffles as well as
the fashionable parlor game of pro
gressive euchre must be considered
gambling, and that persons engag
ing iD them must be indicted.
The farmers in the neighborhood
of Grand Island, Neb. t are going to
begin the growing of beets for sugar
making. A beet-sugar factory to
cost $500,000 is now in course of
erection there. It appears that the
jnaking of sugar/mt of sorghum cane
lYoin knjiich Kansas farmers expect
ed great ihings, has not succeeded
well, and the industry is in a de
pressed condition.
The Utica Neirg says that "Dr.
Roving Bill," the street vendor of
medicines, who was in Port Gibson
some weeks ago, lately went to
Utica and induced a young woman
living near there to go to Raymond
with him. The New» says :
"The supposition is that he is
going to marry the young woman.
As he has already, it is said, several
wives, indignation is very great
against the low bred adventurer,
who would thus wreck the life of an
unsuspecting girl.
91
IM'
A Good Speech by Mr. Allen.
The Reveille has a a deep-seat*
ed antipathy to copying speech
es into its columns ; but representa
tive Allen, of Mississippi, lately
made one on the pension question
so good that we cannot refrain from
giving a few extracts. Mr. Allen
•aid :
"I am the last mau to depreciate the
achievements of the Union soldier; to
do so would belittle my own work, for
involved iu the task of putting down
the southern Confederacy was the task
ot putting me down [laughter], and
that was a big contract of itself.
[Laughter.] Of course, Mr. Chairman,
1 am sorry it was necessary to put me
down, but 1 do take some pride iu the
fact that it required a great effort to
doit. [Laughter.]
"I believe it was the present execu
tive of this great uatiou who said that
"iu measuring out pensions to the sol
diers of the late war uo apothecary's
scales should be used." Il is conceded
tliat more than *100,000,000 will be
paid out iu pensions this fiscal year,
more than $.'>3.000.000 having been
paid out the first half of the year. I
do not think that any apothecary's
scales are being used in this matter;
we are using the standard Fairbanks
railroad car scales [laughter], aud yet
we are told that we are not doing half
enough, and some of my Democratic
friends arc vying with our Republican
friends in insisting ou measures that
will iucrease this expenditure hun
dreds ot millions of dollars.
"1 know, Mr. Chairman, this is a
great government. Of course, sir, I
feel mighty bad about having tried to
destroy it [laughter] ; but when 1 listen
to the demands made in the name of
the soldiers for saving it, and see the
disposition to comply with those de
mands, l think sometimes we had best
stop aud have an accounting and sec
if we had best try to pay this thing out
or let the soldiers take it. [Laughter.]
"I listened with interest to-day to
my friend from Indiana (Mr. Chcadle)
iu his appeal in behalf of the soldiers.
There is a bond of sympathy between
Brother Chcndlo and me—we were
both privates. [Laughter.] I believe
lie is honest and believes what he says.
1 do not doubt that he was a good sol
dier, and I know something of how
close a real soldier teels to his com
rades; but l noticed in a morning pa
per that the Six O'clock Club met in
this city last night aud the distinguish
personages present were required to
confess on what, subjects they were
erauhs. Now, if my friend Cheadle
had been there and had made an hou
«t confession be would have said he
was a crank on the subject of pen
sions. [Laughter.]
I am not going to take issue with
him about our obligations to the sol
diers. The difference between us is
how the obligations arciobc discharg
ed. It probably grows out of a differ
ence in temperament. I am very sen
timental, while lie seems to be quite
practical. I believe in paving off these
obligations partly in honor, while he
wants it all iu cash. [Great laughter
and applause.] I have taken occasion
once before to warn you gentlemen
who saved the Union, and now I re
peat the warning, that if you do not
hold up on this business of paying
yourselves for your expenditure of
patriotism duriDg the war, the first
thing you know the country will not
owe you anything. [Laughter.] 1 do
not want this donc ; I waut to reserve
some of this debt of gratitude to talk
about on Fourth of July occasions.
[Laughter]
The gentleman from California (Mr.
Morrow), in ebargo of this bill, iuforms
us that he thinks we will reach the
limit in 1894, that w e expect increases
until then ; but that by that time the
increases will stop. Mr. Chairman, I
must confess to being skeptical about
these predictions. To show bow un
reliable they are and how wide some
of our friends have gone on this sub
ject, I will call your attention to a
speech of the late president Garfield.
On this floor, Gen. Garfield, in discuss
ing the pension appropriation bill for
that session, which carried $28,683,000,
said that the limit had r'-eady been
reached.
This was
en
of
tho statement of the gallant
Union general, high in the councils of
ily
his par te ; a ii
•nver
II
; .Vî
IMjp
Brief Mentions for the Reveille.
BY O. PIERRE.
The call published in the last Reveil
le for Hon. J. McC. Marlin as a del
egate to the constitutional convention,
is echoed from this vicinity.—Bishop
Thompson will preach at Epiphany
church and administer confirmation on
the 16th of this month.—On the 6th ot
April, 1867, we had a hard freeze.
Look out, farmers!—We have recently
read a letter from Dr. Byrnes of Mem
phis wherein he alludes to his auto
matic mallet being largely advertised
in the United States, and being in
troduced into Mexico and Canada. He
is corresponding with members of the
dental profession in Germany and Aus
tria with a view of introducing it o
cross the waters.—is uot the guessing
game, now so much in vogue and so
largely encouraged by some of the
newspapers, a species of gambling ?
Each guesser pays for the privilege.—
The negroes in this neighborhood are
waging war on the martins by destroy
ing their nests, on the plea that they
are a destructive bird on the cofleo
plantations, thereby causing an ad
vance iu tbc price ofthat article. Won
der how many ofthat race know where
coffee is grown, and why they do not
kill the crows first which are destroy
ing their corn extensively.—The fruit
crop will be a failure we fear. No
signs of leaves on the peachtrees as yet,
aud but few on the peartrees.—Some
few of the planters are offering great
inducements to laborers who are now
homeless aud houseless. Plenty of idle
land on the line of the Little J.
For the Rkvbilu ]
Many persons are impatiently a
waiting the advent of this bcok, not
being aware that Stanley has not
completed his writings. The New
York £*» of March 26th, in aus wer
to an inquiry about the book, says
that 1 'it will not be published for a
month or more.'' Meanwhile the
publishing houses in nearly every
city are sending out thousands of
circulars and employing agents to
sell the Stanley book or ''Heroes of
the Dark Continent" purporting to
give, not only a history of Africa,
how Stanley found Emin Pasha, but
a history of all the former explorers
of said country. Each one of theso
publishing houses claims to have the
only reliable Stanley book aud warns
the credulous public against a rehash
of the old Stanley work. Their book
claims to bave G00 pages, with 400
or 500 illustrations, many of them
full page, and nt least one half, if not
more, are half page illustrations;
to say nothing of the introduction,
the pages devoted to contenta, &e.,
Ac. But the question naturally aria,-*
where does the reading come in that
gives so much information about Af
rica and its explorers. Many of these
books were being issued while Stan
ley w*s yet in Zanzibar confined to
bis bed from a fafl.
It ia safe to Sftv that when the true
Stanley book comes out ibere will l>e
as great a dis-iimlsrity as there is be
tween a bright day and a sUrl«*s
night. Meanwhile »g-nU'will sei
many of these books locreduh u< i oi
sons.
,
K.
From Hermanville.
IIkkmanvii.lr, Miss., April 8, 1890.
Mr. M. A. Mitchell and family
are resident of our town, occupy
ing the Bryan house.
T. O. Smith has opened a restau
rant and beer saloon on Railroad
Avenue.
There will soon be a barber shop
orj Main street, opposite Moore
Shields, under the supervision of
Jos. Gettis and Oliver Baker, both
respectable colored men, whose aim
will be to please.
Miss Susie Nelsonhas left for her
home in Clinton. She has been
teaching near here and is quite a
favorite, and will be very much
missed. Some say she carried with
her the heart of one ot our to.rm
men, and I suspect it is so.
Some of us are invited to eat
wedding cake, Ac., next Sunday.
Our friend, Mr. C. S. Lobdell,
was in town on Saturday. He has
not killed many wild turkeys this
seasou,owing to the fact that "tame
turkeys are scarce in the vicinity of
his hunting grounds.
The store of Isaac Fife was brok
en into on Saturday night. The
thief seemed to be thirsty, as he
only took two or three dozen bot
tles of beer.
Mrs. Bodenheimer is visiting in
Natchez.
Mr. Bodenheimer is in tho store
of B. Adl6r, taking items prepara
tory to going in business for himself
raxt year. His genial and cour
Qks manner will win him many
y y
to
to
his
ot
in
up
in
k
d la grippe are raging
torhood.
slowly conva
Rfcuuo attack of
Sun
V ; it
n.
mm

LOOK AT THE NEW ARRIVALS
At
WILLIAM CAHN'SI
-CONSISTING OF THE
LATEST STYLES OF DRESS GOODS,
-seen as
Cheviot Suitings,
Broche Zephyrs,
Glasgow Zephyrs,!
Plain andStriped Albatross,
Mousseline,
Ginghams.
And Prints in Immense Quantity !
White Goods of Every Variety.
LACES,
RUFFLING AND iUJCflES.
FONT LE ROY A BRUSSELS POINTS,
EMBROIDERY,
FLOUNCING,
PERSIAN VANDYKE,
Valencia all over* and Flouncing.
And a great many other novelties.
GENTS' & BOYS' CLOTHING
1
Hats of all Styles.
Moie to Gome in by Every Train !
Please remember the above articles are for sale at low prices
WILLIAM CAHN.
-
PORT GIBSON, MISS.
all the same.
That little speech of Spencer's on
the warehousejike himself,was* short,*'
but it was a gem.
The tall member from Scutchelough
did no» speak often, nor were his pe
riods rouuded off ala Blair ; but held»:
, 1 ..'l>uir*.T. e>*ry llmfc
The lean brother from Nero#} lias
an exalte.! opinion of -The Modern
Mr Jacob," and his «pecei.es empha
sized his conviction«.
Tl,c sage from Martiu bristled with
statistics and anecdotes.
Russtim had the handsomest widow
iu the whole Alliauec, and he knew
how to talk, too.
Tbc smiling Irish member from J
Beeehgrove came up every time with j
his vote, on the right side. 1
Spencer ato two pounds of pork, and ;
told a delegalo confidentially it was 8
the best "mutton" that he had ever
DM that reverend brother ever find, f
ent his status as a member ? |
Those profouud amendments to the. a
constitution arc excellent. |
Those two dinners were tnagnifi-iand
cent; that is Calhoun's opinion; and i
the rest say amen to it.
Rising Star ought to be proud of
her delegation.
Bro. Crews must hold on to hia last l
resolution until "we meet again" ; it is
good and will keep. |
The brother from Tillmaa fired an j
effective shot into the judiciary.
Atr.t '1 t^mjlo^i
t'h'c 'J&; «id nipped them in
the hud. I
Did the brother from Jefferson ever
get to state his question of privilege?
Owen's views are lovel on that last
proposition. Jle is a wheel-horse, any
to
■o
s
ly
er
way.
The secretary was kept busy, but he
turned bis battery loose occasionally.
Oak Ridge was not demonstrative;
but when any of her members spoke
to a question they carried conviction
to the Alliance.
Ouly four for "appointing"; broth
ers, don't you feel lonely on that side?
was the only dele
gate who carried off any feminine sou
venirs. He had a flower garden on
his coat.
"Mr. President, I rise to a question
ot privilege ; what became of that bill
in the senate T
Rockv Springs was modest and kept
quietly In the back-ground, while her
guests did the talking; but she showed
up gallantly at dinuer.
That assistant lecturer was tireless
in bis atteutions to the visitors,
k The M. D.froru Pattons sounded the
M'-note in that resolution of his.
^■Bro. Ike" came up to the scratch
\ time with his votes and speech
Johuntc M
we
of
ed
|of
some
I-lone
dose
f"'.
Caiiforiia and ths Mississippi G of
Coast.
The following extracts arc taken
from a letter to the Pass Christian
Deacon written from California bv a
fon ncr resident of Mississippi :
M fr ,„„ g,,,,
-, . * , ...
Francisco> has been telling;y»u some
wonderlul stories about California,
I am sure this country dors not
compare with the gulf coast. I was
reared in Ocean Springs and Biloxi;
loft there in 1869 and went to San
Francisco, where I have lived for
twenty years. I am now a resident
J of Los Angeles.
j "Talk about summer resorts in
1 California ! This is a sample; The
; p e0 p] e g () ^ p ac jfj c ocean and
8 r on a gandy beach,in the hot sun,
looking ut 0 { herf bathing in the
f urf ' They can't go out any dis
| *".<» « "»Jg " f the K**»"/ 88
a , d e ptn of the ocean. Therefore
| thev have to hold on to the ropes
jump up and down pretty
i in the same place. There is noth
ing in sight but the dark blue oectn
—no islands, no ships or boats—
foossibly a stray one once in a while.
l n the first j lace we cannot venture
ou ( j n a Br nall boat, either sail or
| roWi aa vou can on the g U ]f coaP t.
j q-h e hest Q f swimmers are drowned
almost every season. It makes me
to«e the crowd, of p«>|>le th.t
?° lhere * nd "J 1 " P' ea ' u ™- H J V ;
I '"K ^ en re * red °" * b f. K". lf «!"* 1
cannot see it in that light. hat
would these people think of the
iiississippi gulf coast, with its boats,
row boats, schooners, etc. .beautiful
i-lands to visit and sail round, and
to bathe and fish in perfect salety ?
And last but not least, the finest
oysters and fish in the world. I
have been in California twenty-one
years and have been pretty near all
over the state. The climute is not
■o good in the northern as in the
s <uthern portions. The people that
come to Los Angeles arc principal
ly from the north and east. They
call this God's country because they
haven't been used to as good. It is
true that the climate is good, but I
am sure I left a better one on the
gulf coast of Mississippi. There are
many southern people here, but the
majority of the population is from
other sections."
near
From a report read before the Pres
byterian congregation Sunday night,
we take the following : Membership
of church, 119; received during tho
year, 7 by letter, 20 upon confession of
faith; contributions, from September
1st, 1889, to April 1st, 1890, $1,240,
which does not includo $900 subscrib
ed on church debt and $250 on repairs
|of parsonage. The Sunday school haa
[Mofflcers aud teachers and 90 tchol
B^The narrative reported great in
size of tho congregations
S:|^MkinsUllation of Rev. (\ K.
..•iSaii as P «»lor iu October.-^
HEILMAN UHIE PLOW
-A-ll Sizes..
HEILMAN CHILLED STEEL! PLOWS
- A FELL AND OONFLITI LINE OF
Bridles, Harnes, Collars,
Trace Chains. Back Bands,
Hardware, Slones, Tinware, Oils, Ammunition, Wood 4 Wiiiowware, Fence Wire
Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Work, Plorobing and Gas Fitting in all tbeir
branches promptly attended to.
HI. IB. BBT7SER,
Store, 120 Washington Street.
Shop, 111, 113, 116 Mulberry Street
THE HOLLOW 8TEEL PLANET JR. I
BEST IN USE.
With many imitators and no aivals.
Boy no ether, but poet fo urteil
ON THE MERITS A PRICES OF
3 PLANET JR.
THE KING OP ALL CULTIVAT'
The eighth euccssful sensou in Clai
borne aud tta
IncUspensilole
■ j
Now na the Plow.
Full Stock of Scrapern, Sweeps, Gen
uine and Imitation LyndonHoei
and Form and Garden Tool*
_ generally. _
0
Remember wc are headquarters for Wagon Material, Tools,Iron Sa*u Dl
and Blinds, aud'Builder*' Hardware.
Schwartz Hardware Stoe, Nat ehe
CAPITAL, $20,000,000
SOUTHERN HOME
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OIE " 1 ATLANTA,
esurxr r.
Ex-Treasnrrr Slate of <*»or»ta.
Präsident ExpufeUtoli Cotton Ml.Is.
Vice President and Director A tient« tonkins Company.
Vl-e President and Director 1.allrange tonklug and Trust Oo.
Director Ueontia R. R and tonkin« Company.
Director Atlanta and Wert Point R. R. Cont|waiy.
Director Newman National Bank
Preside at, D. N. SPEER,
Vice-President, R. 1J HARDEMAN, Treasurer State of Georgia.
Treasurer, C E. CL'KRIER, Cashier Atlanta National Bank.
fift Mat Atet Altai- ta Keening Journal
) A j» l*i at it 'century of Senat» of State of Georgia.
tocn-laiy, II. It. CABAXISü,
Attorney, ROBT. L. SIBLEY, Aittirney at Law.
- - --*- of a .rendu* •' W ' 0 P ' 8 ' H Pi''* Gl Agent New York Life.
Baptriutrndcn.a of Agendas ( VV J WILLINGHAM Jr . Real Folate Dealer.
THE StCRET.i R T AXD TREASURES AHE HE A F//.I BO.XDAlh
CFF1CZRS OF THE PORT GIBSON, MISS., BRANCH
(Elected March 15th, 1890).
Southern Home Building and Loan M
Of -A.tlo.nta., Get.
President, Capt. Win. W. Moore.
Vice-President, Judge L. N. B ldwin.
Secretary and Treasurer,
Attorney,.
Capt. N. S. Walker, R. L. Evans, C. 8. SU
Geo. W. Wheelyss, Capt. A. K. Jones, Il l
MRS. O. A. HASTINGS, Local Agent!
{
Directors,
E. II. POWER.
General Agent f >r Louisiana, Arkansas, West Missis^
Kansas; No. 104 C -mm -ii Street, New OriJ
MMES MEANS' S3 4
4-CMitrtltlMtotk« Lift af Tra*«," mm! If you h**» not
bow tlT.ly
teams»
as. tajoor
PsrttlTsir
hSTtii«o«r
win «appt/ yea wtta «toss so sUmpad If yon
■nr i lie» « nrq
• *4
13 SHOE
UNEXCELLED IN
lSTYLE UNEQUALLED
Wp* DURABILITY
vtv-a* AND
I »
CANN
SAT
«xenon TO HOI
or FIT. fAStld
£ami
5 7
s
I
If 70a will irr aa a pair
o«n am th. t* ml *4
la
with aa (■ qartttr ot
af tba
I ■try. W« will pliiw
JAMES MEANS AGO.,
A
rvu LIN KM or T
HEIDENREICH
Fort O
MASON'S J
C. S. M À
Opposite S. Ber&hei&cr ; l:uM
I
A Fresh Supply of Dri
eles, Garden ^emla Ac. i
on hand. i
ry it a q
Staple

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