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The Port Gibson herald, and correspondent. (Port Gibson, Claiborne Co., Miss.) 1848-18??, October 06, 1848, Image 3

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THE HERALD,
AW,
CORRESPONDENT.
•OCTOBER 6 , 1648.
FRIDAY,
FOR PRESIDENT OF THE IT. STATES.
ZACHARY TAYLOR
FOR VICE FRBSIDENT.
MILLARD FILLMORE,
OF NEW YORK.
Electoral Ticket.
FOR THE STATE AT LARGE.
A. K. McCLUNG, | WM. R. MILES,
DISTRICT ELECTOR8.
First District -ISAAC N. DAVIS.
Second District — W. L. HARRIS.
Third District —WILLIAM A. LAKE.
Fourth District —DAVID W. HURST.
do
ed
TO THE PATRONS OF THE
FORT GIBSON CORRESPONDENT.
The undersigned respectfully informs
the patrons of the Port Gibson Correspon
dent, and the public generally, that he has
disposed of the press, type, fixtures, and
title of said paper, and that its future pub
lication will be merged in that of the Port
Gibson Herald.
He will immediately commence the
publication of the Natchez "Free Trader,
with which paper the former subscribers
to the Correspondent will be served, until
the expiration of their terms of subscrip
tion.
W. B. TEBO.
Port Gibson, Sept. 26th, 1848.
ILTWe call the attention of our readers to
the able comparison between Generals WASH
INGTON and TAYLOR, which will be found
on our first page.
Rough and Ready Club!
The Rough and Ready Club of Claiborne
county, will hold a meeting at the Court House
to-morrow night at half past 7 o'clock. Several
addresses will be delivered, and the citizens
generally are requested to attend.
upon
those
proof
we
that
that
had
to,
the
that
ID* We will again remind our readers that on
Monday morning next, Col. A. K. AlcClung and
Hon. J. W. Chalmers, will address the citizens
at the Court House, on the subject of the ensu
ing Presidential election.
Democratic Barbecue.
A Barbecue will be given by the Democratic
association, at Port Gibson, on the 19th tust,
to which the citizens of Claiborne and the ad
joining counties are invited. Able speakers are
expected to attend on the occasion.
O'We learn from a telegraphic dispatch to
the Aleinphis Appeal, (a Democratic paper) that
those Whigs who recently got up a meeting in
New York to nominate Mr. Ciay for the Presi
dency, have called a second meeting for the
purpose of withdrawing his name, in compliance
with his wishes. Thus ends the last dissention
in the ranks of the Whig party at the North,
whose undivided vote will now be cast for
Taylor and Fillmore.
mot
wh,ch
h.s
the
the
That
ries,
ETThe Locos are quite rejoiced to find that
Mr. Webster, in a recent speech in Mass.,
avows that he supports Gen. Taylor with some
reluctance. They have been so much disheart
ened by the open opposition of a large number
of prominent Democrats, both of the North and
South, to the election of Gen. Cass, that this
ewdence of a reluctant support of Gen.' Tayl
by a man why three months ago was not expect
ed to support him at all, affords them as much
gratification as the Irishman felt at finding a
mare's nest.
The fact is, however, that Cass' prospects
so bad, that they are thankful for very 6 mal!
favors, and only afford another proof of the truth
of the adage that "drowning men catch at
at straws."
setting
were
cussed
ject
dance
,,
.. ■
thirds
étalons
o sit
o tee
lieu
the
aversion
for
or
are
...
VV
ply
«rose
orm
kenng
pairs,
eral
got
proves
ments
with
ger
W
ical
We
.
*
°L ■
The N. Y. Tribune after a long period of in
deti-ion, has at last run up the Taylor flag- We
cannot say that we are particularly rejoiced at
this, except as an evidence that Horace Greeley
found it impossible to stem the current of popu
lar opinion which sets everywhere so strongly in
favor of old Zack.
The Discussion on Clonday.
We believe it is generally known that Sen
ator Foote made his appearance in our town on
Monday last, and took advantage of the occasion
to address our citizens on the subject of national
j«,lilies, and was replied to by Wm. T. Martin,
Esq., of Natchez. In consequence of our ab
sence from home on that day, we did not attend
the meeting,but have been furnished by a friend
with brief -otes of the arguments advanced
both sides, from which we shall attempt to
pile an account thereof.
on
com
Gen. Foote, like all Southern Cass orators,
made his first attack upon Mr. Fillmore, and at
tempted to piove him in favor of the free soil
movement, and hostile to the institutions of the
South, assertions which have lost their weight
with those who have perused the letter of Mr.
Fillmore to Gen. Gayle, of Alabama, and his
correspondence with the Rpugh and Ready Club
of Raymond,Miss.
After exhausting the asserted evidence of Mr.
Fillmore's hostility to the South, he attempted to
prove Gen. Taylor a Free Soil man also, by
quoting from hie second Alison letter, that
slave
the
upon
tentive
appear
litionists
pects
gaze
cord
for
ponents
of
so
and
not
retary
with
and
guilty
por
tion in which he so highly eulogises Mr. Fill
more'e
conservative politics, and his ability to fill
with honor the first, instead of the second office
in the gift of the people.
This praise ol Mr. Fillmore waa thus tortured
hnd bent from its true meaning to supplv the
place of more sound argument, which, unfortu
nately for the Cass men, they are entirely with
out. Feeble, however, as was this effort to con
nect Gen. Taylor with the Northern opponents
of slavery, it was clearly surpassed in weakness
by the second, which was neither more nor less
than this—that John McLean of Ohio,
free soil man, Gen. Taylor's brother had married
McLean's daughter, Gen. Taylor regarded hi»
brother with fraternal auction, he in hio turn
loved and cherished the daughter of McLean,
and he, McLean, favored the free soil movement
and advocated the Wilmot Proviao, with which
political measures Gen. Taylor was thus identi
* fied by the chain of family connection! This
argument forcibly reminds ua of the story of the
interesting event* connected with tbe history of
was a
"the house that Jack built!" Since the day that
Wm. M. Smyth, announced to the peopfe of
State of Mississippi, that they oughfrto brbigWy
flattered at the election of Mr. Dallas to the Vice
Presidency, because Ms uri/e teas an aunt of R<h
hert J. Walker's 'wife, we have not heard of so
ingenious an argument in elucidation of the in
fluence of family connexions.
Gen. Foote then attempted to prove that Gen.
Cass was opposed to the Free Soil movement,
by reading from his Nicholson letter that por
tion in which he expresses a doubt of the power
of Congress to legislate upon the subject of sla
very in the territories, but neglected altogether I
to read the part in which he clearly asserts, and
quotes from Messrs. Walker and Buchanan to
snstain bis position, that the object sought to be
accomplished by the Wilmot Proviso can be more
easily and security effected in another manner!
Gen. Foote, however, acknowledged that as
matters noic 6 taml in the new territory, runaway
slaves cannot be recovered from thence without
legislation from some quarter. And from whence,
let us-ask, shall we seek it? Gen. Cass in his
Nicholson letter, declares that Congress has no
right to legislate on the subject, and proves by a
lengthy argument that a large majority of the J
citizens of ti^t territory will never in.any way
legislate in favor of slavery, "as the African does I
not, in their opinion belong to a degraded race!"
How then does Gen. Foote propose to extricate
the slaveholders from this strait? Why, he
•ays forsooth, that if the people will "shut their
eyes and go it blind" for Gen. Cass at the coming
election, that he—Gen. Foote—and Mr. Doug
lass , of Illinois, have laid their heads together,
and intend to "fix things" at the next session of
Congress, by passing a compromise bill! This
might all do very well, if the people of the South
felt as strongly convinced of the sincerity of Mr.
Douglass and other Northern Democrats as they
do of that of Gen. Foote. But we doubt their
willingness to take such pledges. They have
already been deceived by one in whom they
placed the most implicit confidence. TheyTiave
seen the WILMOT PROVISO, against the un
constitutionality of which, the whole South rais
ed its united voice, receive the sanction and en
dorsement of PRESIDENT POLK—a most to
striking exemplification of the truth of that war
ning of Holy writ—"Put not your trust in Prin
ces." Thus deceived and betrayed, they will ed
remember the forcible declaration of Genera*
Taylor, that "he who cannot be trusted without
pledges should not be confided in merely on ac-1
count of them.
After Gen. Foote had concluded, VVm. T. I
Martin, Esq., of Natchez, who was here on bu
siness, w ithout any expectation of engaging in a
political debate, and without any previous pre
paration therefor, yielded to the wishes of the
audience and rose in reply. Mr. Martin showed
satisfactorily that the opinions of Mr. Fillmore
upon the subject of slavery, were identical with
those contained in the Baltimore Platform, in
proof ofwhifth he cited his late letters, to which
we have already alluded. Mr. Martin argued
that the South had no other protection than |
that secured by the Constitution. The North
had the majoiity and if legislation were resorted
to, she would use it, pledges and promises to
the contrary notwithstanding. Mr. M. shewed
that Gen. Cass had been on all sides of the Wil
ty"
. . * I h
mot Proviso—was equ,vocal tn Ins N.cholson \
vu! WaS Under S° w S a change,
wh,ch change m.ght never be undergone. That ably
h.s party had bartered away Southern rights :.r , ra ,
the Oregon bill— had given another morsel to
the North, to whet their appetites for
That unless Congress passed a law entirely ab
rogating the present codes of the New Territo
ries, slavery could never be introduced there.
Mr. M. men read from numerous influential
• I
cian,
' [
ing
at
more
Democratic journals of the North, articles
setting that the princ iples of the Free Soil party
were entertained by Gen. Cass. He then dis
cussed the position of Gen. Taylor upon the sub
ject of the veto, and showed it to be in accor
dance with those of Jefferson and Madison.
as
then
sing
,, ,, u j . . .. , . , , i
He then alluded to the adoption of the Iieo n
.. ■ , , . n 1 • * by
thirds rule by the Baltimore convention, as an
4 . effect
eudenc. of Ihei, want of confidenoe the de- thlt
étalons of. Repoli, can tn.jonty, and their wish tion
o sit .tnute a p at orin erected by a ch'jue of no t
o tee 10 er 6 , as a ru e o. party guidance, in done
lieu of the only true "platform" of American Re
publicans, the Constitution of the United States.
Mr. M. them concluded with a comparison of
the pliant character of Gen. Cass, with Taylor's
independence, his Republican simplicity, his
aversion for all that was low and contemptible_
for all intrigues and combinations.
ties,"
and
ity
very.
trol
not
... . f , , ,
VV e are ,«formed by those who were present, | no
rr , 6 ' V3S by th# re -1 0,M?
ply of Mr Martin and when he had concluded, the
«rose in defence oi the positions which he had i„
previously assumed. He found his rickety "plat- wher
orm so badly shattered however, that after tin- vote
kenng at it until dark, he suspended further re- us,
pairs, and lus audience adjourned, with the gen
eral impression we believe, that Mr. Martin had |
got much the best of the argument. The result
proves that our opponents have no solid argu
ments to base the claims of Cass upon, and their
ingenuity is so severely taxed to supply its place I l„
with sophistry that were the election much Ion- timents
ger deferred, Gen Foote and other able advo- b y
desiri Th W0U ffrCa ! y , ,mPa ' r ,fn0t entire * wil1
ical debaters^ * ^ " S ' repuUtlon as P° ht ' [ *»ds
high
the
* j uttered
We CODV entire .h- w . v. 0 • I
1 - ? ?
' .W. J A ^ iammi ' un, i"'*- amM
°L ■ - " J "? * 6ener0U " 0U
.lot,because of his intimate connection with the
n Wlin ine w «e
Courts
that
ing
ted
part;
and
South!
men
a
Southern Allies of Northern Abolition
ists.
slave institutions of the South, which is worthy
the «ttention of this community, and we call
upon all who are slave owners to give it an at
tentive perusal. Strange as it may seem, it will
appear that there are men among us reckless and
unscrupulous enough to conspire with the abo
litionists of the North, to blast the political
pects a gallant Southron, by holding up to the
gaze of the South's most deadly enemies, a re
cord of his association with her dearest interests,
for no other purpose than to arouse against him
increased hatred on the part of the fanatical op
ponents of slavery In the North.
Reckless as we know many of the parti zans
of Gen. Case to be, we did not before dream that
so base an act as that exposed by the Natchez
Courier, could have been perpetrated by men
holding, as these individuals do, poet, of honor
and profit in the State of Mississippi! We did
not dream that SAMUEL STAMPS, our Sec
retary of State, sod RICHARD ELWARD
postmaster at Natchez, could thus have plotted
with the mad fanatics of the North, to defame
and defeat Gen. Taylor, by showing him to be
guilty of holding slaveB,tnd working
plantation in Jeftrson county, Mississippi;
pros
^
dent
a
2
made,
arena
a cotton

that to the other parties implitated in the matter, we
the'could expect no better things of them-nheit
previous hlefory would warn ue of their dirty
Vice trick«.
R<h Plantera of Mississippi! Read the exposure
so the Courier, and ponder well upon it Remem
in- ber that these men, Stamps, Elward, Smyth,
&c., and their political associates, have for
months attempted to make you
Cass a safer man for the South than Gen. Tay
lor, and have been accusing the latter of a sym
pathy with the Wilmot proviso and Free Soil
agitation of the North. Failing in this, they di
I rect their efforts to another quarter, aud basely
obtain from the records of Jefferson county,
to copies oUGen. Taylor'slitle deeds, and a list of
be his taxable property, in order to enkindle the
flames of Northern fanaticism against him. Can
yon tamely submit to this7 Can you ignobly
consent that the private affairs of a Southern
citizen shall be tampered with, and thus held up
to the public gaze of hostile factions, and urged
as a good and valid reason of his unfitness for
the highest office in the gift of the Republic?
If you do, then are you not true to the rights
and interests of the South—you are indirectly
J aiding and abetting those who would exclude a
slaveholder from the Presidential chair—if you
believe Lewis
I tamely consent that a neighbor shall be thus de
nounced because of his Southern interests then
are you no longer true to those interests. We
fee! confident however, that you will not thus
submit, for we bave already seen the eyes of
honest Democrats flash with indignation as they
perused this expose of the dishonorable trick of
those ill-judging politicians,
When you find such means as this resorted to,
for the purpose of defeating Gen. Taylor, can
you hesitate as to whom you will support at the
coming election? Will you approve of this
gross insult to THE SOUTH, by Southern of
ficials, and, passing by the villified old soldier
and cotton planter, who is your neighbor and
friend, cast your vote for the "Northern man
tcith Southern principles, No. 2 ," the leader and
patron of these allies of Northern abolitionists—
these men whose action in this case, proves that
they can stoop to any trickery to bring sticcess
to a sinking cause, which can only be upheld by
such duplicity and double dealing?
One of these parties, Mr. Elward, has publish
ed a letter, in which he avows most unblushing
ly, his connexion with this most ignoble trans
action, and affects to believe that he has done
nothing but what was right and propel! But
of
a
we feel assured, fellow citizeno, that you will
I take a very diffèrent view of the matter, and by
your voice and votes will most indignautly
huke these men. Let the voices of all honorable
Southrons cry shame upon them, and let them
henceforth be known as panders to Northern fa
naticism—as men who care not what the means
employed may be, provided they can accomplish
their own selfish ends.
It may be proper to state that no blame can
attach to the officers of Jefferson county for fur
nishing copies of these records. It was their
duty to do so when they were demanded,
re
For the Herald and Correspondent.
How can the Planters Stand it?
Gen. Cass, in his celebrated "quintuple trea
ty" protest, says, "we are no slaveholder, we never
h are hem, we never shall be, we deprecate its ex
islence tn and pray fj ils aboM(jn
everywhere, when this can be effected justly,peace
ably and eastly fur bolh {es „ Thjg £ [ ^
ra , quotalion from the pro , est .
Now I ask the planters of Claiborne county,
what they would think of a merchant, a physi
cian, a lawyer, any tradesman, candidate for the
legislature, or other State or county office, ask
ing for their patronage or votes, and expressing
at the same time, such a sentiment as the above,
quoted from Gen. Cass?
What would the most moderate man among
then *ay to the individual using such language?
Would he not very justly say, "You are expres
sing sentiments that are dangerous to us, not
withstanding they may be honestly entertained
n . ■ . .
by you, stih you are doing us an mjurv. The
. r u . . . , . . "
effect of what you say, is to bring into dispute
thlt wl , ich is „, laraiiteed t0 ns bi e , he c< , n ,i ilu .
tion uiu!er w | lich we live . Th ' h
no t wish to aee slavery abolished, until it can be
done "justly, peaceably and easily for bolh
par
ties," yet your sentiments are injurious to us,
and I would like to know where you find author
ity for naming any terms for the abolition of sla
very. The Constitution gives us exclusive con
trol of the matter, and though you say you do
not want it done uniil it can be done "justly,
peaceably and easily for both parties," there is
no merit in such a Proviso, because there is but
0,M? P**? 10 thequçstion. So you are left with
the naked declaration, "I deprecate its existence
i„ principle, and pray for its abolition every
wher e." Sir, I cannot trade with you, l cannot
vote for you, your sentiments are dangerous to
us, you want to interfere with what belong ex
riusively to us "
Wouïd not such be the conclusion of
l„ the foregoing imaginary interview, the
timents of our obscure individual are combatted
y our moderate Southerner. To what pitch
wil1 not our 'moderate Southerner' rise when he
*»ds the same sentiments uttered by one already
high in place, and seeking the highest office in
the gift of the people of this nation? Of one who
uttered this sentimenf in the hearing of all Eu
wh ° e P° ke il 60 ioud tbat Brit " h Abolition
I»" "• Tbi. sentiment i. ,„t tost
amM the "noise nnd confusion" of nor assembly
" * snntitnent contained in one of the „Um!:
c
«e greatest State papers of the country—a
parchment document carefully filed away in the
archives of our own nation, and those of all the
Courts of Europe. And we have no evidence
that the writer even thinks "that a change is go
ing o.i in his own mind" as to this important
sentiment. Be it remembered that this celebra
ted protest was made in the name of this gov
ernment, of which the slaveholding States
part; that the writer assumed to speak for all
and not for a part. Did he truly represent the
South! Can he, entertaining such views, be a
Présidera of the whole nation ? Let Southern
men look to it, before they cast their
General Lewis Cass.
Claiborne co., Sept. 3071848.
as
$
not
pera
it
t
has
be
find
the
and
rh«
ohîl
him
even
has

Pie?
ton
of
hie
every
individual in the community? Who would give
diffèrent answer, unless it were a much
harsher one?
sen
are a
votes for
CONSISTENCY.'
ETThe Hon. George M. Dallas, Vice Presi
dent of the United States, recently presided
Democratic meeting in Philadelphia.
The Baltimore Sun, an
significantly asks:
fRCt °A- the Vice Présent of the
2 presiding over a party meeting,
««»other evufonce of progress? This is one step
made, and there is but one step more—to see
arena "" dent hWMelf de6cendin « to party
over
independent journal,
tram the Natchez Courier.
we
dirty
of
Remem
Smyth,
for
Tay
sym
Soil
di
basely
county,
list of
the
Can
ignobly
Southern
up
urged
for
rights
a
you
"The Trôaflon to the Sooth."
•'More in sorrow thin in anger" we place
before the people of the South the details of a
transaction eo utterly atwar with every princi
pie of fealty to southern iistftutions, that, it seems
to us, those southerners engaged in ft can be
looked upon only as men whom it is dangerous
to trust—upon whom puBic opinion must stamp
the brand of treason, it is proper, in this con
nection to remark that vw have no personal feel
ing of ill-will to subserve Our private relations
with some of those persans to whom allusion
w ill be made have ever bten a friendly character.
But our daty as a citizen and an editor—our al
legiance as a true southerner, demand that we
should not shrink from tie duties and responsi
bilities of our profession We have to unfold
a scheme treasonable to the south; one calcula
ted tp sap the foundation of her institutions and
visit her with disaster and ruin. We give to
the world the names of those who, to effect a po
litical object, have conspired with the Aboli
tionists of the North! These men are Sou
thern (?) Cass-men and efficeholders, and the
election of their candidate is the object they de
sire to gain by fanning the prejudices of northern
fanatics and arraying the north against the. south.
This scheme projected months since has assumed
various ramifications, an! in order to connect the
whole matter properly, we refer to the action of
Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, Col. Boone, of
the Mississippi Stale Senate, and Joshua R.
Giddings, the notorious abolition member of
Congress from Ohio. What a combination! An
abolitionist, bitter in his hatred to the Soutli and
every thing southern, conspiring with two lead
ding Cass democrats of the South, to defeat the
southern candidate! In the Courier of the 6 th
instant, we published an extract from the speech
of Giddings, made before the Buffalo Convention,
as reported in that strong democratic paper, the
Buffalo Republic, of the 11 th August, 1848
Here is the extract. It shows, as clear as sun
light the mutual understanding.of the parties to
defeat Gen. Taylor, by any means, foul or fair.
Lewis
de
then
We
thus
of
they
of
to,
can
the
this
of
and
man
and
that
by
done
But
"I will tell you of another letter, written by
Col. Boone to the Hon. Jacob Thompson, mem
ber of Congress from Mississippi. 1 have the
words of Air. Thompson for saying that Colonel
Boone's integrity was never doubted and never
will be denied. He said to me that 1 was at
full liberty to say that he, Air. Thompson, fully
endorsed him as a man of truth and unsullied
honor, ft will be remembered that Col. Boone
was one of a committee of five deputed by the
legislature of Mississippi to invite Gen. Taylor
to visit that body. The conversation detailed
in the letter was had in the presence of that
committee two of whom were Whigs. These
w higs having seen the letter in print, have suf
fered it to pass as true and correct. Col. Boone
says in the letter that Gen. Taylor expressed
himself in favor of the w ttt and of prosecuting
it until we could obtain territorial indemnity,
And that the SOUTH OUGHT NEVER TO
SUBMIT TO THE WILAIOT PROVISO!!
Do you believe this? I know you will admit its
While Gen. Taylor nor his whig
friends who were present and heard the remarks,
dare not deny its accuracy, you wil! give credit
to Col. Boone's statement. And if any Taylor
men undertake to say that he is opposed to the
extension of slavery, just ask them to get. Gen.
Taylor's denial, or the denial of his friends, of
the statement of this letter."
Tiinmvirate of infamy, whose course should
be "embalmed in hate and canonized by scorn!"
A Mississippi State Senator, a leading Cass man,
the chairman of a committee of the legislature
of this State, appointed to wait upon Gen. Taylor
at his own house, to invite him to accept the hos.
pitalify of the State, wrote to Thompson, a lead
ing Cass member of Congress, that Gen- Taylor
had during their interview given utterance to
the opinions noticed above. This letter
handed to Giddings by Thompsqp, and was by
him paraded before the Buffalo Convention of
democratic abolitionists. Southern men, what
think you of the alliance? Slave-holding Cass
men and northern abolitionists "fraternizing" to
defeat the noble old hero, whose heart*is large
enough to embrace the varied interests of the
whole Union, and who "engages in no schemes,
no combinations, no intrigues."
In order to follow up the connection between
these parties we now call attention to another
branch of this secret organization,
of the 16th instant, we charged that certain
professing to be southerners, had procured a cer
tified copy of Gen. Taylor's deed to his land and
negroes in Jefferson county Mississippi, from the
Probate Clerk of that county,and the assessment
of taxes upon the land and negroes from the
Assessor, a:.d had forwarded them to Northern
Abolitionists who published them with disgrace
ful comments.—Thus had southern men held up
the simple facts of Taylor's being a slaveholder,
a means and with the view to injure as pure
a man and as true a patriot as an American
ever shone upon.
We publish now those comments, together with
the copy of the deed, &c. Men, to whom the
constitution has guarantied the enjoyment of
your domestic institutions, read them!
a
in
of
him
to
the
give
the
not
the
one
men
day
try
of
best
long
the
to
to
talk
will
by
fa
can
fur
re
corrcciness.
ex
was
.
over
In our paper
men,
man
as
sun
lack,
for
I
if
From the Boston Republican.
this,
Gen. tavlor a buyer of
men and women.
People have not forgotten the blustering and
affectedly indignant manner in which the Taylor
papers denied that their candidate had bought
$ 10 , 001 » worth of slaves in Washington fora
plantation on the Rio Grande. Zachary himself
appeared not only to regret that the story
not correct—that tie had not the money to ex
pend—but the virtuous.Taylor papers talked in
very violent fashion about the infamous slanders
upon the old General. Now if a loafer is con
victed of stealing a grey mare, and the newspa
pera report him as having stolen a black horse,
it is not considered »hat the mistake of the
newspapers is much of s slander. So, it will be
t hard matter to convict tbe opponents of Gen.
Taylor of doing him injustice by saying that he
has bought slaves in one market for one planta
tion, when the truth happens to be that he
bought them in another market for another plan
tation. That Gen. Taylor bought slaves cannot
be denied. 1 be proof is at hand. Here it, as we
find it in the Columbus (Ohio) Standard.
Cincinnatis and his farm.—T o a friend in
the south we are indebted for the information
and documents below. Gen. Taylor appears in
rh« e pJ nt / re8l,ng r P ,° ,ition ' The candidate for
mnrtM* ldenC K °- f ,h ! 8 fre8 countr y 'n the slave
market, purchasing human beings with money
drawn from the National Treafury. On the
thern dou Tf 6 ' "'"k ,outhern Cullies and noj
ohîl H ghf A*ü* * re 00 lheir wa y to Philadel.
snen'ill il c « n d'dste they in their purity select,
pends the day in negro auctions examining the
AnS^ÄIv^frä 6 eoundne8s of hi » Purchases.
Anj this slave trader, even northern men have
been sacrilegious enough to compare with Wash
ington, have been di.ho ne . t enoughTo c!afo.
him a position similar to JefTmL'. Cla, ro »or
even argued that Henry CUyTwhose'noMe îife
has been one continued exertion in the cause of
freedom, 1 . no better than he. CaU *° ° f
Uf the numerous letter« Taylor has written.
o7GrÆrr b, "' *" f *-" Ä2?
?n"br.ij"v nd tir:r.*r,
IfthÄn""' ° f,hci " Mn,.. Si'S?,
h« r;„r p — :ab ° r ** h"
mV„ni^o\^LK^: hat r ou / rf --"
Pie? No, he is a . .v^ ,fT mUn,tJ ' of frM P«°
ton planter, with rilih« t , der,m • ugar and cot *
of his peculiar situation 'VJc* 1 " V " 1 P re judicet
fussed, an KSSu.. tr. A™' he ;}* n<i ' «»».
hie nomination to the fmadulenr^u'oTi^
is
and
South.
been
of
ceived
of
speaks
was
To
tbe
son^
I
.letter,
Stamps,
of
file
forms
address
of
in
and
engaged
ward
posed
mail.
the
formed
a man
whose
a
applied
the
and
Assessor
"r„K°,
was
men
Louisiana delegation, and trusting to conceal
ment and deception for success.
Nfiw Orleans, Aug, 4, 1818.
Dpsa St*: I herewith transmit to you a copy
of the deed oi sala from John Dagan Sr,, to Gen.
Taylor, of a plantation, boraes, and slaves, See.
» * * Since Gen. Tsybr'a return from Mex
ico he haa also purchased slaves. In Met last
lie also purchased tfaves of Win, W. Williams.
On the fiih of June last he purchased ol B. M.
Campbell two slaves for the sum of $1500. He
inspected them to see if they were sound. Gave
his draft on the Canal Bank of this city. * *
a
be
DEED OF SALE.
Rac'd for Record
16th Fob. 1842.
John IlAOAN.Br.
j Deed j
to
Zachary Taylor
THIS INDENTURE made this twenty-first
day of April, eighteen hundred and forty two,
between John Hagan, Sr. of the City of New
Orleans, State of Louisiana of one part, and
Zachary Taylor, of the other part, Witnesses,
that the said John Hagan, Sr., for and in con
sideration of the sum of Ninety*fi
ve Thousand
Dollars to liim in hand paid and secured to be
paid, as hereinafter stated by the said Zachary
Taylor, at and before the sealing and delivering
of these presents, has this day bargained, sold,
delivered, conveyed and confirmed, and by these
presents docs bargain, sell deliver and confirm
unto suiJ Zachary Taylor, his heirs, and assigns,
forever, all that plantation and tract of Land:
• * • • *
ALSO, the following Slaves—(here follows
a list of 82Slttves)— Also, all the Horses, Mules.
Cattle, Hogs, Farming Utensils and tools now
on said plantation, tec.
Here follows condnions, 9c c. .
In testimony whereof, the said John Hagan,
Sr., has hereunto set his hand and seal, the day
and year first above written.
State of Mississippi
Jefferson County, ss.
Mckey, Clerk of the Probate Court in and for
said county, do hereby certify that the within
and foregoing instrument of writing is a true
and perfect copy taken from (he Records, as
Recorded in my offico in Book E. of Deeds, ^rc.,
pages 220 , 221 , 223.
SEAL.
!
I, Edwin
Given under my hand and Seal of
office, this 24th day of July, 1848.
EDWIN McKEY. Clk.
By A. W. Ford, D. C.
!
[Signed,]
Taxable proporty of Zachary Taylor for the
year 1846, being in Jefferson county, Mississippi,
as estimated by the Tax Assessor of said county.
Number of Slaves 111 Tax $100,44
" " acres of
Taxable land
2100 Tax 84,80
I Certify the foregoing estimate of the State,
County ond SchoolTax on the above mentioned
property in Jefferson County, State of Alisa.,
for the year 1848, to be true nnd correct.
[Signed.] O. S. All LBS.
Tax Assessor, Jefferson County.
The New Orleans correspondent of the Boston
Post confirms the statement, making an unim
portant variation in the name. He say
"I perceive that Gen. Taylor has come out in
a letter addressed to Col. Mitchell, denying the
statement that ho had sent on to Washington
810,000 to purchase slaves. Well, I do not
doubt his statement; but what difference is there
in expending front time to time, targe sums of
money in New Orleans, in the purchase of
slaves, or sending it to Washington for thesame
purpose—it is as broad as it is long. It is well
known that Gen Taylor is constant engaged
thus, and invests every cent he can in purcha
sing la ltd nnd slaves. Since hts return from
.Mexico, he has settled the suit between himself
nnd John Hagan, Sr, ot this city, for the pur
chase of a plantation and slaves, for which he
paid $05,000; besides he has purchased a number
of slaves since his return, independent of those
from Air. Hagan. Wilt he or his friends deny
that? They dure not as the proof is on hand.
Was the denial of one $10,000 intended as a
cover for the other purchases?—Duplicity, it is
said by his friends lorms no part of his compo
sition. I atn afraid they arc eo dyed in the wool
themselves, that they cannot distinguish the
difference between duplicity and a correct manly
course. They should blush for themselves—if
they indeed can—as also for Gen. Taylor, when
they examine and read hi* numerous letters now
before the country, and hereafter hold their
peace."
Now we suppose that there are many men
who oppose TtfVlor on anti-slavery grounds,
who do not make it an insuperable objection to
him that he holds slaves. They w»u!d be willing
to vote for a slaveholder as much as they dislike
the employment hois engaged in, if he would
give them security that he would not consent to
the extension of the institution. But for all
this, we think these men will admit, that it is
not a very respectable thing for the Republic of
the United States, to elect as its great man,
one who is engaged in this business of buying
men and women! Does it not look a little im
proper for this free enlightened nation to pass
of pure character, great mind, and
republican, democratic ttahils, for the purpose of
selecting a man to rule over them, who every
day in his life outrages the very idea of democracy
which they ail love—rejects it, spurns it,
men, women and children in the markets, en
slaves them, and puts them upon a plantation to
labor there, and dik; that his pockets may be
filled? How does this look! Cannot the coun
try do a more respectable thing than this?
It will be well for the laboring men to think
of these things—the tillers of the soil, the
chanics the manufacturers. Is it altogether the
best thing they can do, to give their votes for a
w hen lie wants an agriculturist, buys him;
when ho wants a blacksmith, buys him—pay«
several hundred dollars for him, uses him aa
long a* he pleases, and then sells him again! Is
the laborer of the Northern Free States likely
to advance the cause of labor every w here, likely
to increase the "dignity of labor" which they
talk »0 much about by css ing a vote for this
Zachary Taylor? Hosca Bigelow somewhere
remarks:—
Folks that mokes black Slaves of niggers
Want to make white slaves of YOU.
A
of
in
ty
over men
DUVS
me
man
no
are
a
most
has
ic
and
are
the
look
they
ot
of
pend
very
not
likely
at
the
of
to
This is true. The man who buys Peter and
lack, and Nelson—black men
for him, would just as readily buy Johnson and
hompson and Smith, and Jones—white men—
he could do so.
to work and die
What sort of a'President is
this, for a free Republie of laboring men?
Who is the southern correspondent of the
Columbus (Ohio) Standard, and the New Orleans
correspondent of the Boston (Mass.,) Post? It
important to know, for, our property, our rights,
and lives are threatened by such combinations,
intended now to defeat Gen. Taylor—calculated
hereafter to destroy the best interests of the
South. Three applications and only three, have
been made at the office of the Prolate Clerk of
Jefferson county for transcripts ol General
Taylor's deeds.
The following statement, which will not be
contradicted and defies contradiction, was re
ceived by us a few days since from a gentleman
the highest respectability.—This statement
speaks for itself:
a
the
and
by
say
vote
To the Editor of the Natchez Courier;
Dear Sir—I give you below a full account of
infornfetion received in relation to the per
son^ who have been procuring copies of General
Taylor's deeds to negroes, &c., in Jefferson
county, Mississippi.
I have already sent you a certified copy of a
.letter, purporting to have beeu written by Wm.
Stamps, the hand writing of which bears the
strongest,reseinblance to that of Samuel Stamps,
Jackson, Mississippi. The original ieona
in the Probate Clerk's office of Jefferson
county—The Deputy Clerk in that office in
forms me that he sent a copy required, te the
address of Samuel Stamps, Jackson, Miss.
About tbe first of this month, Richard Elward,
Natchez, as the said Clerk informs me, applied
person for a copy of Ihedeeffabove mentioned
urged upon said Clerk, who was then busily
engaged in writing, the importance of his, El
ward s, obtaining said copy. The Clerk pro
posed to prepare it and send it to Natchez by
mail. Elward objected, and was furnished with
transcript and paid for It. I am further in
formed by the said Cierk that early in July last,
man who said he was from New Orleans,
whose name Was not known, in company with
brother of Wrn. M. Smyth, late of this State,
applied to him in Fayette for a like transcript of
same deed—that this «tas prepared for them
paid for—and that t ey then applied to the
Assessor of that county fora copy of the assess
"r„K°, f ^ e "j God and negroes, which
obtained by them, and that neither of those
registered their namefct the Fayette tarera.
Yeuse, truly,
of
sident,
«re
can
a
crats
rule
Here is the copy of the Stamps letter referred
.nJ
rect
port
or
never
tion,
of
by
life
which
people
Cass,
mg
berty?
and
ed
to
to
the
party,
secure
tence."
conceal
copy
Gen.
See.
Mex
last
M.
He
Gave
*
to in the above statement:
Jackson, ftfieaiaerppi, Aug. 34lh 1848.
Edwin Me Key Etq, i
Dear Sir—! wish you tu send in« at this plaee
a certified copy of the deed and conveyaanee by
aonte gentleman to twenty-one hundred acre« of
land, one hundred and «even odd, negroes, made
aomotime in the year 1843 to Major General
Zachary Taylor, now orç, record in your office,
aa Clerk of the Probate Court of Jefferson coun
ty, and the fee shall be forwarded you upon the
receipt of the record, by your sending the bill k
accompanying the same. You will pleaae make f
out the transcript above desired at vour earliest
convenience': By $0 doing you will oblige me,
besides paying you the money.
Very Respectfully,
(Signed) . WILLIAM STAMPS.
P. $.—Direct the deed to Samuel Stamps,
W. S.
two,
New
and
con
Jackson, Mississippi. (Signed)
The intention of the writer is evident, although
he attempts to avoid responsibility by signing a
name partly fictitious and partly genuine. There
is no such man as William Stamps in Jackson.
We have known for several years a yonng man
living there by the name of William //. Stamps
—a near relative of Samuel Stamps, to whom
the clerk is directed to send the copy alluded to
—aud who is Secretary of State for Mississippi,
and an ardent supporter of Cass. Reader, what
did Mr. Stamps want with this transcript? Gen.
Taylor owes him nothing, does not with to sell
him any of his negroes, and Mr. Secretary of
State has no interest in those negroes. He
wanted it to pander to norfiiern fanaticism to
Gen. Taylor s prejudice.
Richard Elward, referred to in the statement,
is a citizen of Natchez—a strong Cass democrat.
Dr. Woodson Wren, a consistent democrat, not
in arrears to the government, and a faithful offi
cer, has just been displaced, and Mr. Elward has
succeeded him as postmaster. What has been
done with the copy he procured, we know not.
Doubtless, at a time when it can most injure
Gen. Taylor, it w ill make its appearance, if it
has not already done so in some abolition jour
be
sold,
these
Land:
now
day
for
true
as
^rc.,
of
less
the
to
ry
Florida,
virtues
to the
wrote

of
lor
ic
by
'Free
scribers
very
not
would
The
in the
port
surrender
the
the
nal.
The third copy spoken of in the statement,
procured by the brother of William M. Smyth,
who has been for several years in the employ
ment of the government, is evidently embodied
in the Southern correspondence of the Columbus
(Ohio) Standard inserted above.
Southerners, of all parties, what think you of
this scheme? Will you countenance this unho
ly alliance? Are you prepared to assist in es
tablishing a precedent by which all slaveholders
are to be covered with obloquy, to be banished
from the hopors and offices of government, and
driven from the post at which Southern rights
couid be best defended? Will ye not rather
stand by the slandered hero who "never surren
ders," and visit with defeat and disgrace the two
parties who have coalesced to arm one portion
of our glorious confederacy against another?
We hold up these dark transactions to the scorn
of all honorable men, of all sections, of all opin
ions. The abolitionists have pursued their usu
ai game, but what will ye say of the leaders of
that other party who have proved themselves to
be their "natural'aHies," and who seek to Crawl
into power by outraging the sanctity of private
dwellings, and adding fuel to the elements of
civil war?
in
the
not
of
of
he
a
is
er
delphin
thing
holding
terous
gation
But
and
and,
holdii
bat
the
can
their
anti-slavery
as their
From the N. O. Commercial Bulletin.
Gen. Cass' Northern Face.
We give the following extracts to show tHfe
manner in which Mr. Cass' claims are urged at
the North, and the ground on which support is
claimed for him by the Democratic party.
The Michigan Legislature, Cass' own SState,
passed the following resolution, 53 to 3 :
" Resolved, That whenever the Government
of the United States shall acquire auy territory
by conquest, cession or purchase, in which sla
very shall, by law, exist at the time of such
quest, cession or purchase, it would be repug
nant TO THE MORAL SENSE OF THIS NATION, AND
A VIOLATION OE THE CLEAREST DUTY OF CON
GRESS, TO PERMIT THE INSTITUTION OF SLAVERY,
IN ANY FORAI, TO BE INTRODUCED THEREIN."
Resolution of the Cass Convention, in Michigan.
" Resolved, That hostility to thk extension
of human slavery, is vow, and ever has been,
one of the PRINCIPLES OF TIIE DEMO
CRATIC CREED, and that to abandon it at
the present crisis, would be a crime against the
principles upon winch our institutions are based."
Resolution of the Cass Democratic Convention,
in Vermont, July 11 , 1848:
" Resolved, That the Democratic party of this
State, by repeated resolutions in State and Coun
ty conventions, stand pledged to oppose by every
lawful and constitutiuJial means, the extension of
slavery into any Territory of the United States,
>u)w free, and that we here reiterate that
pledge."
The
aon
True,
mot
which
the
that
con
%
The
on the
29th.
The
sailed,

The
We
which
are now
and are
the
rumorti
ex- the
the
on both
by ferry
were
and
encamped
bably
the
ing an
Berlin
termined
The
* Tuscany
Leghorn
New Haven Register. been
that t ^D D o m0Cn ' J Cy . w .' n , continue The
no other ticket?which presents^ttnythtng'HkeTso dopre86ed
strong claims to the support of these men who hands
are really in favor of "free soil." Gen. Casa is quotations,
a native of a free State. He has resided, for al
most his whole life, in free communities. He
has no interest in slavery, and has expressed his
opinion against that, institution in most emphat
ic terms U* Gen. Butler is not a slaveholder
and has ever been among those Kentuckians who
are favorable to emancipation, Such is the
Democratic ticket, and such are its claims to
the support of the friends of freedom. If we
look at the other ticket, what do we see? Why,
they are composed of men who are, either from
passion or past acts, the friends and supporters
ot slavery. General Taylor id a large slave
holder, and holds at least a quarter of a million
of property, the security and value of which de
pend upon the integrity of the institulion of ala
very being preserved intact. He certainly can
not be claimed as being friendly to any principle
likely by its triumph to prevent eitherThe ox
SS ° r 10 h " t ™
Resolution passed at the Democratic meeting
at Champlain, New York:
" Resolved, That, as Democrats, we are in fa
vor of the personal, political, civil and religious
liberty of all mankind, and will do all that is in
our power, consistent with the Constitution of
the United States, to secure it in all the territo
ries of the United States; and that any attempt
of the faction known as "Barnburners," to fasten
upon us the stigma of being in favor of the
tension of slavery, is a base slander, and known
to be such by its authors."
The Hartford Times says:
"A northern man, particularly a Democrat, or
a "Free Soil" man, must be beside himself, who
will vote for any other man than Gen. CASS,
and, by withholding his vote, indirectly aids the
election of Gen. Taylor, who is identified with
the institution of slavery in its very worst form,
and whose nomination was indisputably procured
by the slavery interest."
"Every Democrat who refuses to vote for
Gen. Cass, will aid in electing Zachary Taylor,
who is a slaveholder, and whom the Southerners'
say they know with them, and of them, and on
questions touching slave extent-ion. Free soil
therefore, cannot 1» sustained by refusing
vote for Cass. Reflect."
to
POST
Tuesday,
Arrives
Monday,
Arrives
river,
roade up
river,
made up
and
on Monday
1, P. M.
Office
day« from
The Bay State Advocate says:
„r'JJj 1 lh< f e * ho wish to advance the cause
of freedom sh ouid vote for Lewis Cass for Pre
sident, is a point so clear to our mind, that
«re at a loss to comprehend how the n6w party
can hope to draw any liberal minded men into
a support of their pie-bald ticket.-lfthe Demo
crats are defeated, the successful party must
rule in tendance with Whig priSple., and
C
Hats,
Just
we
September
how favorable these principles .reTTf**
.nJ ho* likely .fcck (wnCi^. J*t»
cure/'free sell for free mettre ÏÏJïS
requires no small amount of f*| ew 'k
rect opinions on. As every nte Ja ." 1 *•
from the Democratic ticket to be '7*"a
Buffalo nominees indirectly side |L i,rk
follows that any Democrat who <
port to Van Buren, lends Lia assit »,*?' 8
advancement of the only real slavery *
werhave in the United Stales, 1
Again the same paper remarks:
"Gen. Cas. is the real "free si.jr*
Unlike Gen. Taylor he is not the ow^
slaves and plantations, and therefore he T
interest in keeping up the Institution 0 f Ju"
or in providing for its spread. Unlike N»
gentleman, he is not the leader *
chalnpion of a conservative party which
change its very nature, and do that ,
never yet been done by anv political ra -
tion, before it can take p»'n *n ptornJiTa
spread of free institutions. He j, , f
of a great free region, in which slavery u,*!"**
existed—in which its existence is forbidden
by peremptory laws and a public opinion ,h„ '
human power can change. Sj xtv 7^
life have been passed in those commun«, 11 »
which free labor has supported and made » t
people prosperous. Is it rational to beW ,
entertain the idea for a moment—that' tT ta
Cass, a man of judgment—aud capable ol^T*
mg correct conclusions, can prefer slaver. ,
berty? that lie desires to see slave labor p n J
and free labor forbidden in our new terror,
Madmen may believe so, and knaves m,yl
misrepresent Ins op,„ions; but every sound Ï
ed man will see at once that the Dem«*™!
candidate must be favorable to "free soil " . 4
to the spread of free labor in every region f ,Î 7
to the daiing and enterprise of the human Tu
And again:
"The only hope of freedom is t„ be found i„
the continued ascendancy of the IWr -,,1
party, if that party cannot be relied upon
secure -free soil," such soil can have noeri.
tence." a '
k
f
*
C"r.
*»p.
H,
P ait J tig
DO
«Ï.
'irr..
arid
cho*j
ini„ ;
»bk«
Mr. Cass' supporters in the Northwest
less candid in their avowals.
*re w*
fhe ClevvisnJ
Plaindealtr, one of his special organ*, sa V s:
"Every day brings us new subscribers from
the South. Our circulation is no longrr limite-»
to Mason & Dixon's line. It has been a tm« J
ry to us how simultaneously subscribers fr Wfl
Florida, Mississippi and Texas should see such
virtues in our paper. Yesterday we got a c ue
to the mystery A gentleman from Mississippi
wrote to a friend here tosend him the Plaindrai
■ From that friend we learned thecliarartw
of these Southern subscribers. They are Tav
lor Whigs who want to show to their Democrat!
ic neighbors the free so.) articles in this paper
by way of comincing them that Gen Cass il a
'Free Soil' man. Well, now, gentlemen *»b.
scribers of the South, you who will read this
very article, let im say to you in all candor and
frankness, if you want to support a slavery pm
pagandist, vote for Gen. Taylor— Gen. ('ass h
not your man! Were he so the Pluindeakr
would not support him!"
The Indiana Dem<rat denounces Gen. Tayl
in the strongest terms, as weil as those who
port him, and says that his election will be a
surrender of the country to the slave power of
the South.
er
r
Slip.
Look at facts, says this paser In the Plula
delphin convention the slaveholders had ever:
thing their own way. The President was »
slaveholder; and delegates from several *(«»»•
holding States flocked there in scores ss did
slavehnWing members of Congress. A prepos
terous claim w as set up by the Louis»! a dele
gation to cast the vote of Texas, and allowed.
But one delegate was present from Arbamu,
and he cast three votes all the time for Ttyk
and, on the fisst ballot, 106 votes from slave
holdii g States were cast for Gen. Taylor, and
bat four for all the other candidates. Wer»
slaveholders blind to their interest? Nenne
can accuse them of stupidity. They knew
their man; they clung to him with the grip of
desperation, and succeeded in forcing «youth«
anti-slavery friends at the North a slaveholder J
their candidate."
The South reels under the blows of her own
.—Natchez Free Trader.
True, for you. Polk's approval of the Wil
mot proviso has given the South a blow fmo
which she may never recover. And yet you «4
South to support the man for whose begent
that blow was given.— Vicksburg Whig.
LATEST NEWS.
W-.
sm
Arrival of the America.
The steamer America, which left Liverpool
the 16th * ult., arrived in New Yurkontlis
29th.
The coiton market was depressed when she
sailed, aud prices of lower qualities had receded
The potatoe crop has proved a total failure.
We copy below that portion of the despatch
which gives the political news:
Charleston, Sept+ZQ.— The Irish insurgents
now encamped 7000 strong near Clonmel,
are liberally furnished with provisions bj
farmers. The Cork Examiner publisher
rumorti of a rising at Waterford. At Portland
police were attacked by armed peasant*, but 4
latter were repelled with considerable losi
both sides. Bridge at Waterford and Grin
ferry burnt. Isaughall [Youghall 7 ] barracks
sent by"%teamcr to the disturbed districts
Kilkenny. Four thousand insurgents ar#
encamped on Loughall hill. O'Gorinan is pro
chief commander.
Cavaignac is much alarmed at the prospectscf
Bonapartiste. France is determined on send
an army of observation to the Rhine.
Berlin is very ext Med. The Germans are de
termined on establishing an empire. [?]
The Neapolitans bave captured Messina.
Tuscany is the scene of frightful disorder. Io
Leghorn upwards of one hundred soldiers ha *' 4 1
killed in a conflict wish the people^_
The New Orleans cotton market was rath«
dopre86ed on Monda y- 2000 ba ' M
al price* a shade lower. No chang* >"
quotations,
59
OFFICE DEPARTMENT,?
Grand Gulf, Oct. 1, 1848. J |
NORTHERN MAIL, vie Raymond, !»«'£
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, «t 4 A- »"■
Arrives same days at 8 . P. M.
SOUTHERN MAIL, vis Fayette, le«»«»
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, st 6 , A. •"
same days at 6 , P. M.
NORTHERN MAIL, via Louisrille, P«
arrives twice a week, itreguler, and j* j
up on Wednesday and Saturday, » l *•
SOUTHERN MAIL, via New Orleans, p «
arrives four times a week, irregular; ! '
up nai Monday, Wednesday« Thure» 8 )
Saturday, at 5, P. M.
MILLIKlN'S BEND, once a week. Arrir 4 *
Monday at 12, M. and leaves same dsy
M. . I
Office hours fro» 8 , A. M. te sundown—* un '
from 8 to 10 , A. M. „ j
Wm. DOWSE, P *•
LOTHING,
Hats,
Boots,
Shoes. '
Just received and for «fie by
W. O'KELLY
&
September 29,1848. m

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