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The Port Gibson herald, and correspondent. (Port Gibson, Claiborne Co., Miss.) 1848-18??, October 27, 1848, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87090283/1848-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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OL. 7.
ftO. 9.
PORT UlBSOft, CLAIBORftE COUNTY, BISS., OCTOBER 27, 1848.
-THE PORT GIBSON HERALD
(\V, II. JACOBS, Editor and Proprietor.)
I« PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORXING, BY
WM. F. EISELY.
Payable in advance, for one year,
•* " " " six months,
« within six months, for one year 4 00
« at the end of the year
No subscription will be taken for a shot ter
prriuJ than six months; and no paper will be
discontinued until all arrearages are paid, except
the option of the publisher. A failure to
wish to discontinue will be considered &
$3 00
2 00
5 00
at
notify &
new engagement.
ADVERTISEMENTS,
be charged at the following rates: One
dollar per square for the first, and Fifty cents
lor each subsequent insertion. Twelve lines, or
less, in Ixong Primor. or nine in Brevier, consti
tute'one square, over twelve and under twenty
four, two squares, and every subsequent twelve
fraction of the same, an additional square.
Political Circulars or electioneering Cards
will be charged one dollar per square, payable
Merchants advertising by the year,
Will
or
in ndvam'tf.
per agreement.
Fees for Announcing Candidates.
for District and State Offices,
" County Offices,
" Members of Board of Police,
" Magistrates and Constables,
with a sufficient quantity of tickets.
Extra tickets, per 100
The fee for announcing a candidate must be
paid for. when the name is handed in.
Professional Advertisements.
For twelve lines or less, three months
n*
$15 00
10 00
5 00
3 00
2 00
$5 00
9 00
six
h >• «< •« " tw< Ive
Advertisements sent in without being marked
with llie number of insertions, will be published
until forbid, (except legal advertisements, for
which the law prescribes the time,) and charged
according to the foregoing rates.
Anv alteration made in an advertisement after
ti e first insertion, will subject it to an extra
charge.
The bill for each advertisement is due at the
maturity or discontinuance of the same.
All letters or communications, to insure atten
ten'ion, must be post paid.
15 00
Aosncv.— George t ratt. Esq., office of the
(Xew York) Morning Telegraph, is our autho
rised agent, to receive advertisements and sub
scriptions, and receipt for the same.
0"11. S. Fulkkbson, Esq., is our authorised
Agent, to receivo subscriptions and advertise
ments and receive payment for the same, at
Grand Gulf.
« Wail tirrangcmenls
OF THE
PORT GIBSON POST OFFICE.
The Northern mail arrives every Monday
Wednesday and Friday, at Ii) o'clock, A. M.
and departs same days at 1 o'clock P. M.
Southern mail, every Monday, Wednesday
and Friday, at 12 o'clock, M., and departs same
day* at I2j o'clock. M.
G ilDtin Mail arrives every Tuesday evening
and departs every Wednesday morning.
The Northern mail closes at 12 o'clock M.
ar.d the ! e outhern ut half past 11 A. M.
Offico open from sun rise to sun set (Sunday
exeepted.) J. C. MELCHIOR. P. xM.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
Grand Gulf, Oct. 1, 1848.
NORTHERN »MAIL, via Raymond, leaves
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, at 4 A. ML
Arrives same days at 8. P. M.
SOUTHERN MAIL, via Fayette, leaves
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at 6, A. M.
Arrives samo days at 6, P. M.
.NORTHERN xMAlL, via Louisvilla, per
rirrr, arrives twice a week, irregular, and is
made up on Wednesday and Saturday, at 5.
P. M.
SOUTHERxN MAIL, via New Orleans, per
river, arrives four times a week, irregular; i«
made up on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday
and Saturday, at 5, P. M.
MILLIKIN'S BEND, once a week. Arrives
en Monday at 12, M. and leaves same day ai
1, 1'. M.
Office hours from 8, A. M. to sundown—Sun
days from 8 to 10, A. M.
Win. DOWSE. P M.
A. GILKEY,
Clirap Cash Grocer and Pro
duce Merchant,
No. 7, Stamps' Row,
PORT GIBSON, MI.
T HE subscriber has opened a neAV and
fresh stock of Groceries and Produce,
suitabl# for family and plantation use, and
Mill keep constantly on hand, a good as
sortment of articles in his line, Avhich he
'▼ill sell at a very small profit for cash, viz:
Yrown, Loaf and Crushed Sugar; Coffee;
Tea; Molasses; Sperm and Star Candles;
Boston Soap; Lard Oil; Mackerel; Coarse
and Fine Salt; Pickles; Ketchup; Ground
Pepper, Spice and Cinnamon; Mustard;
Sardines; Almonds; Figs; Raisins; Boston
Crackers; Soda Biscuit; Tobacco Rice;
Powder; Shot; Macaroni; Nutmegs; Cho
colate; Salaratus; Nails; Matts; Brooms;
Crockery Ware;
Flour; Lard; Bulk Meat; Dried Beef; Pota
toes; Applss; Cheese; Stone Jars, Churns,
Milk Pans and Jugs, «fcc. «fcc.
His friends and the public are invited to
call if they wish to buy their supplies cheap
for cash. March 4. 27-ly
Fresh Flours.
ORLEANS and St. Louis brands
A. GILKEY,
jVfEW
ii just received by
Dried Beef.
A good article received, and for sale by
May 26
A. GILKEY.
Fish, Fish
S ALMON, Herrings and Mackeral i
Kits, tor sale by A. GILKEY.
in
Fresh Raisins.
FRESH article received and for sale
A. GILKEY.
A
Loaf and Crushed Sugars.
A superior article of above Sugar for sale
_ low by A. GILKEY.
R Coffee,
IO Havana Coffee, for sale low by
May 26_ A. GILKEY.
J Smoked Tongues.
F ST received and for sale Ioav by
May 26 _ A. GILKEY.
S n Candles.
PRRM, Star Candles, for sale low by
May 26 A. GILKEY.
9oet. Thoft. B. HAGRIJDER,
( ' FERS his Professional services to the
y citizens of Port Gibson, and to those of
l ' ie adjacent country. His residence at the
Bank of Port Gibson.
Ja» 21 1848.
21-ly
SPRING GOODS
ft. ROSEftBERCr,
Ao. 5 STAMPS ROW j one door above
Moody's Drug Store,
R espectfully informs the public
that he has just returned from New
00
be
to
&
00
00
Orleans with a very handsome assortment
season, among
of Goods suitable to the
which are
00
Dry floods.
Comprising a fine assortment of Bareges,
Painted Muslins; Sheetîhgs and Shirtings;
Calicoes, Ginghams, black and fancy Silks;
Irish Linens and Lawns, Linen Cam
brie, Silk and Cotton Hdkfs., Swiss, Book,
and Cambric Muslins, Blanket, Silk, and
Thibet Shawls', etc.,etc.
or
Clothing'.
Cashmere and Merino dress and frock
coats; black and fancy Cashmere, Merino
and Linen Pants; Satin and Fancy Cash
mere Vests, Shirts, Drawers, Suspenders,
Gloves, etc.
Hats and Caps.
Fine Silk and Beaver Hats, Oil'd Silk
and Glazed Caps, for men and boys.
Boots aod Shoes.
Men's Calf Boots, Calf Brogans for men
und hoys, coarse, black and Russet Brogans,
Ladies Morocco and Seal Shoes and Gait
ers, Child) ens and Misses Shoes and Gait
—ALSO—
An assortment of Crockery and Glass
Ware, Knives and Forks, Scissors, Razors,
Penknives, Candlesticks, Looking Glasses,
Tobacco, Cigars, etc., etc.
Those who desire to purchase articles in
his line are requested to call before pur
chasing elsewhere, as his stock has been
carefully selected, and will he sold at very
small advances on cost for Cash.
April 28, 1848.
ers.
35-tf
NEW GOODS!!
CALL AND SEE.
rpiIE subscribers have just received a
.L splendid assortment of Fashionable and
Seasonable Goods, consisting in part of the
following articles, viz:
White and colored Linen Drillings,
Cottonades, Hickory Checks,
Blue Plaids «fc Stripes for womens dresses.
Brown Linens, Irish Linens,
Assorted Calico Prints,
Colored Jaconet Muslins,
White
Cross-barred Muslins,
Swiss Muslins,
Linen and Cotton Diapers,
do do do Sheeting.
Table Linens, Linen Lustre,
Brown and bleached Domestics, Lowels,
4-4 5 4 and 6-4 Matting,
Mahogany Oil Cloth,
Grass Skirting
Silk, Thread and Kid Gloves,
Hosiery, assorted, «fcc.
French Marino Dress Coats,
do do Frock do.
English and German Dress Coats,
do do do Frock do.
Grass Linen Sack Coats,
Brown do do do.
Linen Check Dress and Frock Coats,
Cottonade do do do do.
do.
do.
is

Colored Alpaca Sack Coats,
French Marino pants,
White and colored Linen Drilling Pants,
Nankeen Pants, Cottonade Pants,
Linen check Pants,
White and colored Marseilles Vests,
Black Satin Vests,
Linen and cotton Drawers,
Linen bosom Shirts.
Hats.—Panama, Leghorn, Campeachy
and Straw Ilats. Beaver and Silk Hats,
and also a good assortment of
HARDWARE AND CROCKERY,
to Avhich wc invite the attention of our
friends and customers.
BROUGHTON «fc WRIGHT.
34-tf.
Apri l 21, 184 q.
B agging & Rope, just received by
the undersigned and for sale.
50 pieces Bagging,
50 coils Rope,
5 bales TAvine.
Broughton «fc Wright.
September 1,1848.
ftew and Fashionable
SPRING GOODS.
E would call the attention of our friends
and customers to our importations of
new and fashionable Spring Goods, which
we are noAv opening, received per ships
Ashland and Thetis, direct from NeAv York.
These goods have been selected Avith taste,
are many of them of neAV styles and pat
terns, comprising a general assortment of
Summer Silks; Bareges; Fig'd French Ja
conets; French Ginghams and Gingham
La\A'ns; Organdys; Foulard Silks; Brazilli
ans, «fcc. Handsome Embroidered worked
Collars; Chirnesettes; Reveire Bordered
Linen Cambric Handkerchiefs; Ladies' H.
S. Gloves, assorted; Long White Kid do.;
Herman and Borege Shawls; Berege and
Satin Scarfs; Cravats <fc Neck Ties; SAviss,
Cambric, Jaconet and Nansook Muslins,
and a very handsome assortment of new
style Spring Ribbons. We have a new
stock of Gentlemen's Clothing, made up in
fashionable style and of good material, all
of which Ave are prepared to sell on mode
rate terms. J S MASON & Co.
March 17, 1848.
W
tf
Liusey & Jeans*
BALES Linseys,
Jeans
6 s
«
J S Mason & Co.
47-6t
for sale by
July 21, 1848.
nagging, Rope and Twine,
X) 100 pieces Bagging,
1 Bale Twine
J S Mason, <fc Co.
48-6t
for sale by
July 28,1848.
Blue-Lick Water*
BARRELS just received and for sale
J. S Mason & Co.
47—4ts.
10
by
Jnly 21
C UTLERY—A lot of fine Pocket Knives
and Razors, just received and for sal» by
Nov. 26 HP MBimatB.
Robert Potts.
John G. Hastings.
POTTS » MJtSTIJVGS.
GROCERS.
Court House Square,
Port Gibson, Miss.
POTTS dp HASTINGS
H AVE opened at their store, an entire
new stock of Groceries and Produce,
consisting in part of
Brown Sugar,
Crushed,
Loaf,
Pulverised
Havana Coffee,
Java,
Molasses,
S. H. "
New Bedford Candles, Rice,
Adamantine,
Soap in «nail Boxes for family use,
Coarse and Fine Salt, Lard Oil,
Wine Vinegar,
Green «Ik Bl'kTea
Pickles,
Ketsups,
Syrups,
Lemons,
Pepper,
Sardines,
Powder,
Shot,
Lead,
Claret,
Porter,
«
«
4<
Soap, Boston No. 1
it
Table,
Cheese,
Candies and Fruit,
Cigars, Mackerel,
Tobacco,
Sweet Oil,
Mustard,
Spices of all kinds,
Raisins,
Almonds,
Filberts,
Old Rye Whiskey,
Rectified
It
in
Hanis, Lard, Flour, <fcc.
Together with a%ood assortment of Cas
tings, Nails, Brushes, Wooden and Crock
ery Ware, and variety of other articles.
Just Received.
S HAY'S Superior Family Hams,
Sugar Cured " "
Clear Sides,
Dried Beef,
St. Louis and Ohio Flour and Lard,
Potts «Sc Hastings.
June 9,1848.
41—3t
For Families.
S
ODA Biscuit,
Boston Crackers,
Pilot Bread,
English Dairy Checsp,
Western,
Call at
a
•i
Potts <fc Hastings.
Fast Received.
S ANDERS' 'Harry of the West' Tobacco,
Myers' "Phœnix" "
Price's, Rogers' and other Brands,
Large assortment ot Cigars,
Also, Shot Pouches, Powder Flasks,
Game Bags, and Walker's Percussion Caps.
Potts <fc Hastings.
To Families.
H AVANA Sugar especially for preserves
A superior article of Imperial Tea,
Mackerel in Kits,
Soap in small Boxes.
Potts «fc Hastings.
FOR SALE.
fPHE family residence, at present occu
pied by J. T. Marye, Esq., is now of
fared for sale This is the most desirable
situation for a family, in the Town of Port
Gibson, embracing the whole of square
No. 7, all enclosed, being the third square
immediately West of the Female Academy.
The main building is a large
I
I
to
it,
so
TWO STORY
■ » «ii
■ •is
»'cjsje:«
Avell finished in eA'ery respect; having a cir
cular stair-way leading to the sky-light
from the centre, Avith galleries running
the entire length, and a twelve foot passage
through the middle, east and west.
Also a tAA'o story brick kitchen, with ser
vant's rooms, attached to the south end,
and galleries entire, affording ample room
for lodging, washing, ironing and all culina
ry affairs, with a good
WELL OF WATER
at the door. This property has been
repaired the present year, and put in good
order, and well painted.' The out buildings
all that could be desired, furnishing
every requisite for convenience and com
fort. It has also a good garden and orchard
attached, and the main yard handsomely
decorated with select shrubbery.
Any person Avanting such a property
will do well to examine it, as it will be sold
low for cash- Possession given the 1st of
January, 1849. Any information required,
will be given by Mr. Wm. O'Kelly, of
Port Gibson. JAS. COTTE'X.
September 29, 1848. 5—12t
are
of
of
TRUST SALE. ^
A CCORDING to the provisions of a Deed
of Trust executed by Charles T. Miles,
the 30th of October, 1840,1 will sell at
Public Sale for cash, at the Court House in
Fayette, Jefferson county, on the
Twenty-third day of March,
1849.
betAveen the hours of 11 o'clock, A. M. and
2, P. M., the following named slaves to wit:
Asa, Dolly, Ella, Martha, Angeline, Mat,
Jim, Poindexter, Reuben and Rowan, or
many of said slaves as will be sufficient
for the payment of the debt in said Deed
mentioned due to Charles Clark, at whose
request the said sale will be made.
f GEO. TORREY,
Surviving Trustee.
3-6 mo.
on
so
September 15, 1848.
# Port Gibson Herald copy for six
months and send account (with proven ad
vertisement) to this office for settlement.
Southern Watch 'Power .
* *
CHEAP STORE.
IIE undersigned are now opening, at the
old stand, formerly occupied by James
G. Martin, corner of Stamps' Row, Main
St., a large assortment of
% DRYGOODS: .
Clothing; Hats; Boots; Shoes; &c., fee.
Which they offer to the citizens ot Part
Gibson and the neighborhood, at very loir
prices. Please call and examine before
purchasing elsewhere. Our terms are
CASH. LEVY & MORRIS.
September 29, 1848. 5-3m
GEORGE V. MOODY,
Attorney at LJlW,
T
PORT GIBSON,-Miss,
and near the Court-House.)
13-ly
tit
iff
k\1
\ -
POETRY.
The Broken Heart
He seemed to love her, and her youthful cheek
Wore for a while the transient bloom of joy;
And her heart throbbed with hopes she could not
Bpeak,
New the delight and new the ecstacy;
He won that heart in its simplicity.
All undisguised in its young tenderness,
And smiling saw that he, and only he,
Had power at once to wound it or to bless.
1
She gave to him her innocent affection, *
And the warm feelings of her guileless breast;
And from the stora.s of life she sought protec
tion
In his dear love, her home of early res';
In this sweet trust her opening days were blest,
And joyously she hailed her coming years;
For well she knew that ever, ifdistrest,
There would be one kind hand to dry her tears.
He left her, and in trouble she awoke
From her young dream of bliss; but murmured
not
Over her silent sufferings, nor spoke
To any one upon her cruel lot.
You would have deem'd that he had been forgot,
Or thought her bosom callous to the stroke;
But in her cheek there was one hectic spot—
'Twas little—but it told her heart was broke.
And deeper and more deep the painful flush
Daily became; yet all distrust seemed o'er,
Save when the life-blood gave a sudden rush,
Then trembled into silence as before.
At once too proud, too humble to deplore.
She bowed her head in quietness;—she knew
Her blighted prospects could revive nc more;
Yet she was calm, for she had Heavan in view.
She loved, and she forgave him—and in dying,
She asked a blessing on his future yerrs;
And so siie went to sleep, meekly relying
Upon that Power which shall efface all tears.
Her simple turf the young spring flow'ret wears;
And the wild primrose grows upon her tomb,
And when the storm its simple blossou tears,
It bows its head—an emblem of her doom.
Together.
The elm-tree old. felt lonely and cold,
When wintry winds blew high,
An«l looking below, he saw in the snow,
The ivy wandering nigh;
And he said, "Come twine with those tendrils of
thine,
My scathed and frozen form;
For, heart and hand, together we'll stand,
And mock at the baffled storm—
Ha! ha! together."
And so, when grief is withering the leaf,
And checking Hope's young flower—
And frosts do bite, with their teeth so white,
In disappointment's hour,
Though it might overwhelm the ivy or elm,
If alone each stood the strife—
If heart and hand together they stand,
They may laugh at the trouble* of life—— \
Ha! ha! tegeiher.
of
MISCELLANEOUS.
[Correspondence of the N. O. Crescent.]
Chaparral's Visit to Corpus Christi —
The Buffalo Hunt— 1 Trade of Corpus
Christi— Its Advantages—New Ex
pedition-Interesting to our Mer
chants, etc.
Corpus Christi, Texas Oct. 1,1848.
Friend Crescent: After a silence of two
or three months on the part of your Army
Correspondent, it is quite natural that you
should feel some interest a6 to his occupa
tion and whereabouts; the latter is answered
by the date line above, butas to the former
it is a little mixed. You know that when
I arrived in New Orleans from Mexico and
Yucatan, (the latter of which place I visited
in a semi-official capacity, only to find that
the peninsula would revert back to Mexico,
and that the Indians were more than half
right in opposing force to the Spaniards,)
I was in search of some field of excitement;
for which appetite had grown for what it
fed on in Mexico. There were no troops
ready for California or Oregon, and the only
enterprise that presented itself to me was
the "Buffalo Hunt" on the Rio Grande,
which was in everybody's mouth, and of
which a few Aviseacres pretended to know
more, much more, than they unfolded.
The matter struck me as being quite an
affair, and although I could not there find
out whether the Mexicans in the Northern
Provinces had acted in the premises, it took
such hold of me that I could not shake it
off, and I determined to look and enquire
for myself. For this reason I pondered
over the map for some central point near the
frontier, where the communication would
enable me to receive constant information
from the Provinces, and at last hit upon
this as the most feasible point. So, leaving
your goodly city, I landed here a month
ago, and took up quarters until affairs
should develope themselves. The flfst
Aveek there were arrivals from Leon, Coa
huila, and Tamaulipas; hut there came no
neAvs of any movement on the part of the
people. This struck me as being rather
strange conduct in thqse Avho had avoAved
their determination to set up a Government
on their own hook as soon as the Yankees
marched out of their country, and I began
to lose faith in the movement. Another
week rolled around, and brought Avith it to
Corpus Christi a well informed Mexican
gentleman from Tamaulipas. From him I
expected, of course, to receive some items
favorable to the movement, as he himself
had been known to favor it. He spoke of
it, it is true, but it was only to discourage.
He said that things had settled doAvn quietly,
and unless there was some change in the
administration of federal aflairs, he believed
the people in the Northern provinces Avould
remain quiet for the present.
About this time some two hundred men
came down from your city, and landed at
St. Josephs. Their object was to join in a
"Buffalo Hunt" on the other side of the Rio
Grande, but as those who owned the range
had not invited them, thqy Avere in a dilem
ma, from which they were only extricated
by the liberality of two er three of the mer
chants here, who kindly sent them provi
sions and many of them back to New Or
leans. Their pilot whs unfortunate in
bringing them this wags, and he was equally
so in the season, which was much earlier
of
of
at
in
than the most sanguine friends of the "hunt
had expected the herds upon the hunting
grounds. A short time after the departure
of the hunters, further advices were re
ceived from the other side of the Rio Grande,
which convinced me that no move would be
made there at an early day. Tampico, I
thought, might strike a blow for separation,
but it would be a disastrous one—not only
to her, but to the cause in future.
The time had arrived, then, for me to look
out for something else, and I immediately
went about it. The great "hunt" having
for the moment left my mind unoccupied,
I began to look about Corpus Christi, and
was no little surprised to find the business
and excitement around. Here and there
parties of Mexican traders from Camargo
and all the points above it, unloading their
wool and hides, and then packing on goods
purchased from the merchants here. I had
not previously noticed this briskness in
trade around me, and on examining into it,
was, surprised at its extent. In a few days
more, the stocks on hand were exhausted,
and whilst I write this, no less than five
parties are here patiently awaiting the ar
rival of vessels.
To move a little back of these trading
houses I found new buildings going up,
and the Surveyors laying off lots for the
purchasers who are coming in from neigh
boring towns and counties.
These tilings induced me to believe that
I had hit upon a place in my "owl" spec
ulation, and I determined to make more
minute inspection—not only of the town,
but of^he surrounding country. For this
purpose I got into a buggy (there are such
things here) and rode to the different ran
chos in the vicinity. It is not in the power
of my pen to do justice to the country over
which I passed. The prairies gradually
sloping towards the Nueces, and slightly
rolling, were covered with cattle, sheep,
and goats, feeding upon the musquit , the
best grass in the world, and with which the
prairies are green. So delighted was I
with the prospect before me that I would
have at once yielded the pen for the shep
herd's crpok. With me, of course, this
sentiment was but of momentary duration,
and although I would still like to possess a
rancho near here, and occasionally to look
upon my herds browsing on the lovely prai
ries, I have not sown enough wild oats to
settle down to it.
The only thing wanting to render perfect
this great grazing and agricultural section,
is a little more water, and to procure this,
Col. Kinney has a large company of Ar
tesian well-diggers here with all their im
plements for boring, and in a short time he
will have the water spouting into, the air
in every direction. These wells will not
be confined to the vicinity of Corpus Christi,
but will be bored on the road at convenient
travelling points where there is not perma
nent water, to Laredo, Meir, "Rio Grande
City, etc. The object of thvse wells on
the roads is to facilitate transportation to
those places, and to have water at all points
where pack mules and wagon trains may
wish to halt. And Corpus Christi should
do this, for she now enjoys pretty much all
the trade from the upper Rio Grande.
I was surprised on going into the Sur
veyor's office here, to find the central posi
tion Corpus Christi enjoys as the depot for
the upper Rio Grande. The crescent form
in which this runs, makes it about equi
distant to five important points—that is, to
Camargo 150 miles, to Rome 148, to Meir
142, to Guerrero 145, and to Laredo 1381.
To these points the traders from Leon,
Coahuila, and Zacatecas come for their
goods, and sending runners to Corpus
Christi, purchase and smuggle across at
the different points, without paying any
duty to the Mexican Government. To all
the points enumerated, a regular transpor
tation line of wagons run, carrying freight
more than 50 per cent, cheaper than what
it costs to get it up by the Rio Grande, and
so much quicker, too, that all the trade is
centering here. A route having been sur
veyed to San Antonio, and found to be
nearer than from Port Lavacca, has induced
the above line to extend a branch to that
place, and wagons are now loading with
flour, lard, potatoes, onions, to proceed
there. Thus, goods landed here by any of
your merchants for any of the above men
tioned points, will be shipped off at once
for their destination. Though vessels
'drawing 4 and 5 feet can come up to Cor
pus Christi, the enterprising proprietors of
the place are not satisfied, having sent on for
a steam dredging machine, with which to
clear out the entrance of the bay so that
vessels coming in at Aransas, the best bar
on the coast, may come up and discharge
here.
But now, friend Crescent, comes the
part of this letter which truly interests me,
and probably will be interesting to you.
Qcij. Oazneau, who lias been a successful
trader to Laredo for some time, emboldened
by the success of former enterprizes, has
gone North for the purpos# of laying in a
large stock of Mexican goods for the Chi
huahua market, and so soon as he returns,
a large train of wagons will leave here for
that city. Others have joined in with him,
and in all probability the train will be a
large one. Chihuahua is so near this point
that the General believes he can sell goods
there at such low prices as to keep those
entirely out of the market which come
down by the long route from Independence
ma Santa Fe. With this train you may
be sure your humble servant will go, as he
is desirous of being loose on the prairie
once more, and of seeing a little more of
Mexico. The expedition will be right into
my hand, and I will keep you well advised
of its progress, and of the nature of the
country over which we will pass. It will
be a new route, and no doubt full of subjects
for the pen. I must close.
Adios,
Chaparral.
A very worthy, though not particularly
erudite underwriter, was conversing one
cLy with a friend on the subject of a ship
they had mutually insured. His friend
observed—
'Do you know that I suspect our ship is
in jeopardy!*
'The devil she is,' implied he; 'well l am
glad she has got into some port at last.'
From the St. Louis Republican.
Political Statistics.
The importance of the approaching Pre
sidential election and the interest felt by
all parties in the result, has induced us to
collect together the following statistics for
the information of the public, as well as for
our own satisfaction. The facts furnished
in this condensed form, are those which
have a most immediate bearing upon the
canvass, and are intended to save the labor
of search and reference:
AGGREGATE VOTES.
1,162,418 1840,
1,290,498 1844,
1,501,289
2,402,658
2,702,549
1828,
1832,
1836,
At the same rate of inupase, the aggre
gate vote of the present year would exceed
three millions.
POPULAR VOTE OF 1844.
Polk over Clay,
Clay and Bimey over Polk,
ABOLITION VOTE OF 1844.
4,835 New Jersey,
4,161 Pennsylvania, 3,133
Ohio,
Michigan,
Indiana,
Illinois,
39,340
22,983
131
Maine,
N. Hampshire,
Massachusetts; 10,830
3,954
1,943
15,812
8.030
3,632
2,106
3,750
Vermont,
Connecticut,
New York,
13
23
6
6
g
g
7
3
6
3
4
4
,
Of the fifteen Locofoco States, nine are •
slave and six free. |
Of the twelve Whig States, five are ■
slave and seven free. I
Without an extraordinary change of j
opinion—such as cannot now be presumed
or foreseen—it would, in our view, be un
practicable to fulfil the constitutional requi
sition in the present state of parties in the
House of Representatives. We see no
means consistent with the political senti
ment of that body and of the different
States, which would in such a contingency
compose the electoral college, by which a
President could be chosen before the 4th
of March next. The death, defection, re
signation or absence of a single Whig,
would give the majority to the Locofocos.
Should there be no election by the
House, the Constitution provides that the
"Vice President shall act as President."
The election of that officer is prescribed
as follows:
"The person having the greatest number
of votes for Vice President, if such number
be a majority of the whole number of elec
tors appointed; and if no person have a
majority, then from the two highest num
bers on the list the Senate shall choose the
Vice President. A quorum for the pur
pose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole
number shal^ be necessary to a choice.
The stete of parties in the Senate after
the 4th of March, will probably stand
this order: Locofocos, 33; Whig, 24; Abo
litionist, 1; Doubtful, 2. The two last
are from Pennsylvania and Florida, where
elections for the Legislature are yet to be
held. ~
62,322
Since 1844 the electoral College has in
creased 15 votes as follows:
NEW STATES.
4 I Texas,
3 Wisconsin, 4
4
Iowa,
Florida,
15
c>
FULL COLLEGE.
9 Kentucky,
6 Tennessee,
12 Ohio,
4 Louisiana,
6 Mississippi,
6 Indiana,
8 Illinois,
17 Alabama,
Missouri,
36 Arkansas,
7 Michigan,
26 Florida,
3 Texas,
Iowa,
10 Wisconsin,
12
Maine,
N. Hampshire,
Massachusetts,
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
Vermont,
Maryland,
Virginia,
North Carolina, 11
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
South Carolina, 9
Georgia,
12
290
Necessary to a choice, 146.
By an act of Congress the Presidential
election takes place on Tuesday, the 7th
day of November, throughout the Union.
All the States vote directly for electors,
except South Carolina, which elects by the
Legislature. An extra session of that body
will be convened to meet the requisition of
the law.
In the event of their being no election by
the people—a contingency not contempla
ted by the friends of Gen. Taylor—then
the Constitution provides a remedy in
these words:
"The President of the Senate shall, in
presence of the Senate and the House of
Representatives, open all the certificates,
and the votes shall be counted; the person
having the greatest number of votes for
President shall be the President, if such
number be a majority of the whole number
of electors appointed; and if no person have
such a majority, then, from the persons
having the highest numbers, not exceeding
three on the list of those voted for as Pre
ssent, the House of Representatives shall
choose immediately, by ballot, the Presi
dent. But, in choosing the President, the
votes shall be taken by States, the Repre
sentatives from each State having one vote,
a quorum for this purpose shall consist of
a member or members from two-thirds of
the States, and a majority of all tne States
shall be neeessary to a choice. And if the
House of Representatives shall not choose
President whenever the right of choice
shall devolve upon them, before the fourth
day of March next following, then the
Vice President shall act as President, as in
the case of the death or other constitution
al disability of the President.
Should the election devolve upoa the
House of Representatives, parties would
stand as follows:
If
Tied.
N. Hampshire,
Rhode island,
Locofoco.
Maine,
Virginia,
S. Carolina, Georgia—3
Alabama,
Mississippi,
Louisiana,
Texas,
Arkansas,
Whig.
Vermont,
Massachusetts,
Connecticut,
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
Maryland,
North Carolina, Tennessee,
Florida,
Ohio,
Kentucky—12. Michigan,
Missouri,
Iowa,
Wisconsin—15.
Indiana,
Illinois,

in
PRESIDENTIAL VOTE IN 1844.
States. Clay. Polk.
Abo. Clay.Polk
Maine, 34,378 45,719 4,835 —
N. Hamp., 17,866 27,160 4,171 —
67,578 52,346 10,830 12
26,770 10,041 3,954 6
7,322 4,868
'J
6
Mass.,
Vermont,
R. Island,
Connecticut, 32,832 29,841 1,943
New York, 832,482 238,588 15,812 —
New Jersey, 38,318 37,495 131 7
161,203 167,535 3,128
6,258 6,971
35,944 32,676
43,677 49,570
4
6
36
26
Penn.,
Delaware,
Maryland,
Virginia,
N. Carolina, 43,232 39,287
S. Carolina, chosen by Leg.
Georgia,
Alabama,
Louisiana,
Tennessee,
3
8
17
11
9
10
42,100 44,147 - —
26,084 37.760 —— —
13,083 13.788 - —
60,030 59,917 - 13
155,057 149,717 8,030 23
31,251 41,369 -
61,255 51,988 -
24,238 27,903 3,632
57.867 70,184 2,109
9
6
Ohio,
7
Missouri,
Kentucky,
Michigan,
Indiana,
Mississippi, 19,200 25,126
Illinois,
Arkansas,
12
5
12
G
9
45,528 57,920 3,750
5,504 9,546 -
3
1,288,533 1,327,325 62,263 105 170
From the N. O. Picayune.
Prospects of the Cotton Market.
The unfavorable advices from England
for our great staple, which continue to
reach us by almost every packet, have
duced us to give the subject some attention.
During nearly the last twelve months prices
have been gradually receding, contrary to
the expectation of parties on this side, most
of whom believed that they had reached
their lowest point when the quotations
given were much above what we have seen
them for some time past.
Looking to the business of last year, we
find that the good demand for export and
the quantity taken on speculation had ad
vanced prices to 7j|d. for fair Orleans. In
July the accounts which were then at hand
regarding the growing crop not being favor
able for a large production had also some
influence, and the market was kept tolera
bly firm until September. About that pe
jiod the trade in Manchester and the manu
facturing districts became so much de
pressed that many spinners had either
closed their mills or were working only
three or four days a week, so that the con
sumption was greatly diminished, and the
tightness of money matters precluded spec
ulation. The commercial embarrassments
and failures of banks aiid individuals, which
soon afterwards occurred, placed the hold
ers of cotton in a position which compelled
them to sell at any price, and as the article
was out of favor among the parties it is not
to be wondered at that between the 16th
July and the 21st January we find the rates
had declined 2fd., or upwards of five cents
per pound. This downward tendency had
been partially arrested, and affairs were
beginning to assume a more healthy ap
pearance when the revolution in France
again caused much embarrasment, from the
effect of which the trade has not yet recov
ered.
A few words as to what in our opinion
is the main cause of the continuation of low
prices. We see nothing to complain of as
regards the consumption, nor have the
stocks in Liverpool accumulated to so great
an extent as to glut the market, as in for
mer years. In neither the matter of supply
or consumption do we see any reason for
prices ruling under what has been gener
ally considered a fair remuneration to the
planter.
But the trade in cotton seems, however,
to he dependent on other than these circum
stances. In former times a person with
100 or £1000, could buy and hold as many
bales of cotton, the brokers in Liverpool be
ing very willing to facilitate and sustain
such operations. The failures and embar
rassments of 1847, with the railway mania,
have swept away most of the capital which
used to be invested in this manner; and
since the Bank of England, as .well as the
principal money lenders, determined to
have low prices, discourage all speculation
by refusing accommodation to those inter
ested in cotton, there is no immediate party
between the importer and manufacturer.
Consequently the latter can buy at their
own price, without regard to the current
demand for goods, yarns, &c.
To the absence, therefore, of this inter
mediate party, as well as te the condition
of many of the merchants, who are repre
sented to be so poor that they cannot hold
stocks, do we ascribe the unfavorable ac
colants which continue to reach us, although
the unsettled state of continental affairs has
also exerted a baneful influence.
In this connection we might remark that
the losses sustained by capitalists in the
depreciation of railroad stocks, many of
which have fallen 60 and 70 per cent., is
y e t pressing heavy upon capitalists. No
one can sa y w h en the money market will
recover froaf the effects of a mania, or the
general trade of Europe cease to be inter
mpted by political disturbances. The tenor
0 { English correspondence does not solve
question of time—and this is the main
inquiry with capitalists—but sooner or later
an improvement must take place. As yet
jj would be hazardous to venture a predic
tj on w hen the markets will assume a settled
an d satisfactory aspect,
These topics are of grea
cotton-growing States, and
them more at length as occasion serves,
m
iterest to the
I will treat of
Locofoco Dictionary. —"Clear and un
questionable."—That which is in dispute.
"The whole or none."—-A little more
than half.
"A bloodless achievement."—The sacri
fice of 30,000 lives.
Indemnity for the part."—Losing $150,
000,000 in a fight with Mexico.
Security for the future."—Paying 15,
000,000 more.
"Aid and comfort."—Giving the Mexi
cans a General.
"Government economy."—$52,668,049
per year.
"No National debt."—Advertising for
loans. % »i
U
ii
Hard money."—Treasury notes.
"WiU of the people."—Veto and ditto.'
"Revenue tariff."—Protection to British
Manufacturers.
An unsullied Demo« rat."—One Who
wore the bkek eockade.
'

ii
44
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