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The constitutional union. (Des Arc, Ark.) 1860-1861, April 05, 1861, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87090585/1861-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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IwTH. RHEA, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR ^7of A , „ -^ - - gasr
--. .=---Letflie People Rule._§2 per ANNUM, IN ADVANCE;
10L- L__DESARC, ARKANSAS, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 186L ~ " NUMBER III
I flic <£ (institutional vlnion,
PRINTED EVERY WEEK, AT
J> e s Arc, Arkansas,
EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY
W ESTON II. JLIlIl^Y.
(lire on corner of Buena Vista and Lyon Streets, over
John Jackson A Co.
Subscription price, Two Dollars per annum,
invariably iu advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
One square, (eight lines of this size type.) for
bne insertion, $1; each additional insertion, 50
bents.
1 mo. | 2 ny>. , 3 mo. H mo. 1 1 yTcar
1 Square, $ 2 50 $ 50(1$ 800:$1000,$1500
2 Squares, SOOJ 800 10 00 12 00 17 00
!t Squares, 8 001 10 00 12 OOj 15 00, 25 00
I Column, lOOOj 1200 15 OOj 170OI 3000
J Column, 12 001 15 00 17 00 20 00 40 00
j Column, j 15 00 17 00 20 OOj 25 00 60 00
1 Column, • 18 OOj 80 OOj 25 OOj 30 OOj 00 00
Advertisers by the year will be restricted to
their legitimate business.
Advertisements displayed by large tvpe,
charged double the above rates.
Personal communications charged double the
rates of regular advertisements.
Legal advertisements will be charged, for one
square or lqss, first insertion $1, and 50 cents per
square for each additional insertion.
Announcing candidates for State and District
offices, $7; County offices, $5; Township offices,
$:], invariably in advance.
Political circulars charged as advertisements.
Advertisements not ordered for a specified lime,
fill be inserted till forbidden, and charged ac
.'jrdingly.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORT.
•fTOCKHS OF PHAIIUE iOLrtTl.
COUNTY AND I’BOBATE JUDOK,
.1 a in e ts I ^. Hun 19
CLERK,
WILLIAM GOOD 11 U M.
SHERIFF,
WILLIAM A. PLUNKETT.
TREASURER,
WYLIE LANKFORD.
CORONER,
LEVIN HARRISON.
SURVEYOR,
E. A. HOWELL.
COMMON SCHOOL COMMISSIONER,
W. P. PRESTON.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE,
B E N J A M l N F A W C E T.
ji stices or the peace.
Prairie—B. F. Coulter, E. L. Beard, B. V. Smith,
James Glover.
Caroline—G. M. Connor, W. K. Bobbins, James
Knight, Wm. Donnell, S.COzart, W.C. Robinson.
Pigeon Roost—Aser Pipkin, V. D. Robinson.
White River—II. P. Vaughan, T. B. Kent, L. C.
llemberf, D. I’. Black.
Centvr—S. C. Paine, B. Douglass.
Wattensatr—W. A. W. Mann, W. J. McCombs.
Hamilton—T. M. Gray, J. Tucker.
Jiieh Woods—T. F. Price, IV. It. Brautly.
Clear Lake—1Guinn Barber. James T. Morris.
La Grew—T. M. Belcher, Thomas Ilarville.
C O X S T AISLES.
Prairie—Q. T. Webster; Center—J. D. Steele:
Caroline—It. II. Frccling: Hamilton—E. Jarvis;
J'igeon Ronst—W. A. Harper; White River—(,’• T.
Oldham; Rich Woods—W. A. Barker; Waltemaw—
John Gales.
Constables of Clear Lake and La Grew Town
ship- tailed to till their bonds.
I>V9IBrE89 ( A It l»s.
F. LEPT1F.N, - F. KLEIN.
LEPTEIN & KLEIN,
DEALERS IN
(LOCKS, WATCHES and JEWELRY,
Itucna Vista Street,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
I I I AVISG ON If AND A NEW AND SELECTED
II. stock of Clocks, Watches-and Jewelry, wc
respectfully solicit a continuance of the kind pat
ronage of the people of Des Arc and surrounding
country. Wc arc also prepared to do till kinds of
"atch, Clock and Jewelry work with care and
despatch. All work warranted. dec7-tf
G. .MLARF.N'. - -- -- -- S. N. JACKSON.
M LAREN & JACKSON,
Successors to G. & J. McLaren & Co.,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
Dealers tn staple and fancy dry
Goods, Ready-Made Clothing, Hats and
Laps, Bonnets, Boots and Shoes, Hardware and
j CulUerjr. Bootes Stationery, etc. Also, Receiving,
I forwarding and Commission Merchants, nov 3.
»• C. It CABLET, SAMUEL R. BROWN.
McCARLET, BROWN, A CO.,
(Surcffsorj lo R. C. McCarley ,j- Co.,)
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
Dealers tn staple and fancy dry
Goods, Ready-Made Clothing, llats, Caps,
bouts and Shoes, Hardware, Cutlery, Saddles,
Trunks and Valises. Also, Forwarding and Com
mission Merchants. Teb 15, ’Gl-tf.
L M. ROBINSON, - - - - " O. J. BRANCH.
ROBINSON & BRANCH,
(Successors to G. W. Vaden.)
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Ki vocevics andProcluce,
lfc< FlVlXh, FORWARDING it COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
nov 3. DF.S ARC, ARKANSAS.
GARVIN, BELL & CO.,
IMPORTERS it WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Foreign & domestic dry-goods,
AKD
Manufaoltircrs of Chtlbiitg.
Nos. 112 and 411 Main Street, north side,
hov HWm. LOUISVILLE, KY.
A- STEWART, WM. STEWART, U. STEWART.
STEWART & BROS,
Receiving, Forwarding
AM) COMMISSION MERCII ANTS,
aov3. DES ARC, ARKANSAS
IMtOFUSNIONAL, CAR 1)N.
T J JOBE
Attorney at Law,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS,
WILL PRACTICE IN PRAIRIE AND THE
adjoining counties. Particluar attcution
given to Collections.
References.—T. J. & C. Powell, Knoxville,
Tenn.; Thos. II. Callaway, President of Ocoee
Rank, Cleveland, Tenn.; Moore & Marsh, Chatta
nooga, Tenn.; Hon. John 11.Lumpkin, Rome, Ga.;
Hon. William Daugherty, Columbus, Ga.; lion.
Joseph T. McConnell, Ringgold, Ga.; William 11.
Inman, President Northwestern Rank, Ringgold,
Georgia. nov8.
T7 B7 KENT,~
Attorney :i t Law,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS,
TTTILL PRACTICE IN THE COURTS OF
’ » I’rairie, White, Monroe, Arkansas, St.
Francis, Jackson and Independence counties. All
business intrusted to his care shall meet with
prompt attention. Office on Lyon street. no28-tf.
I >i*. J. .1. LANE,
Resident Physician,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS,
Tenders his services to the citizens
of Des Arc and adjacent country. From
his experience, lie hopes to share at least a por
tion of the patronage of the public. Office on
Ruena \ ista street, at ISalsly’s Drug Store, jy-y
E. T. SWEYER,
I>entist,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
VYTILL CONTINUE THE BUSINESS IN ALL
\ V its branches, including continuous Gum
Work. Office on-Ruena Vista street, up stairs,
Jackson’s new building. nov 10-tf.
RUSS EVANS,
REAL ESTATE & GENERAL LAND AGENT.
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
PROMPT ATTENTION WILL BE GIVEN TO
A all business entrusted to him in his
line. nov 3.
J. T. PARHAM,
.Ai-cliitect and 1 5 tiiltlei*,
DBS ARC, ARKANSAS.
SOLICITS CONTRACTS FOR BUILDINGS OF
every tylc. lie is also prepared to furnish
Designs, Estimates and Drawings of all the mod
ern orders of architecture; build, superintend
and furnish working plans for building at mode
rate prices. Orders left at the “Citizen Office,”
will receive prompt attention. tiov3-y
DR. H. ARMISTEAD,
Physician, Surgeon aiyl Accoucheur,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
U A VINO PERMANENTLY LOCATED AT
DES ARC. offers his professional services
to the citizens of the town and adjacent country.
Office on Lyon street. nov 3.
K. T. SUirstiX. - - - O. 8. PALMES.
SIMPS©* .V PiLMCR,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS,
A \ till PRACTICE IN PRAIRIE, WHITE,
YV Jackson, Monrac, St. Francis, and adjoin
ing counties. mh8-tf j
CUUS ANSO N’T”
(Office—South Side Buena Vista Street,)
A T T © R * E V A T I, A IV ,
I>ets Arc, Prairie Conut y, Ark.
AATILL PRACTICE IN PRAIRIE, WHITE,
\Y Jackson, Monroe, Arkansas and adjacent
counties. _ roll 2'2-tf
T. J. WOODSON,
Attorney fit Law,
DES ARQ ARKANSAS,
AT TILL TRACTICEIN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL
VV Circuit, and tkc counties of White, Jack
son and Monroe. All business intrusted to his
care will he promptly attended to. nov 3
A. W. MCNEILL,
Attorney n t Law,
DES AIC, ARKANSAS,
PRACTICES TN THE COURTS OF TRAIRIE
and adjacent cfuutics. Office, corner Erwin
and Lyon streets. , nov 3
C. A. JUDSON,
Carpenter and Joiner,
DEfl ARC, ARKANSAS,
Dealer in sash, doors, mantles,
Window and Door Frames, etc. Shop corner
Erwin and Park Strews. N. B.—Coffins made to
order, on short notice. nov 3-y
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS,
IMPORTERS .VXD DEALERS IX
Brandies, Gins, Wines, Cigars, Ac.,
ALSO,
DISTILLERS & MANUFACTURERS OF
Domestic AVincs anti I.iquors,
32 & 3-1 Second St.,bctw. Main & Sycamore,
nov 23-t f. CINCINNATI, 0.
east call
TV IT II O L T H « It E M «XE¥I
a LL THOSE INDEBTED EITHER TO THE
/V late firm Washer, Vauphan & Co,, or U C.
McCarlcy k Co., will make payment by the 15th
of April, or they will be sued without discrimina
tion. Pay your debts if you wish to save cost,
inh 29-tf. IL C. McCARLEV & < 0
AT1E\TI«¥! t’OMI'ATf “E.”
atou ark hereby commanded TO £1
L ajijiear in the Town ot Dcs Arc, on
Saturday, the Oth day o< Apnl, 180], armed
and equipped as the law directs. . |U
By order of the Captain.
AV. Vr. WAlil, Captain.
,i B F ITimax, Old Sei’igt uih2'J-2t
_w TEA M It <> V rr H.
LEAVES MEMPHirEVERY SATURDAY.
Memphis, White and Little Red
River Packet,
A. cl miral;
ABNER BAIRD, .... Master.
C. J. Campbell, ... Clerk.
millS FINE FREIGHT AND I'AS- ijpr.'y
L senger steamer, having been llinr-^- --1
ouglily repaired, will run regularly between Mem
phis and the various points on White river,
throughout the season, arriving at Dos Arc on
Mondays on her up trip, and down on Tuesdays.
For freight or passage, apply on board, mil 22-tf
LEAVES MEMPHIS EVERY FRIDAY.
Memphis, While and Little Red
River Packet,
33 racelet,
J. RILEY JONES, - Master.
B. L. Drscax, - - . Clerk.
millS FINE FREIGHT AND PAS
1 senger packet having entered the
above trade, nil make regular weekly
trips, leaving Memphis every Thursday evening.
For freight o-pa^snge, apply on board, mh 22-tf
Regular Yew Orleans, Wliite and
Little Red River Packet,
SljH-Wlieel Steamer
I A T A. 1ST;
II. S. EATflJ,.Master.
mills Flip: FREIGHT AND PASSENGER
JL packet Having been furnished with cotton
guards, auietherw'ise repaired, will run between
New Or least and the various points on Wliite
river, during the season, as a semi-monthly
packet. _ nov 23-tf
LEAY]f MEMPHIS EVERY TUESDAY.
Meniplfcj and White River Packet,
GOLDEX STATE,
IIICKS uNG, ..... Master.
J.J, Russell, ... Clerk.
rTlIIIFilNE PASSENGER STEAMER , flnr
.1. wKniakc regular trips from Men - *=£—
phis toDes Arc, Augusta and Jacksonport, on
White ircr. For freight or passage, apply on
hoard. I dec 21-tf
HIVES MEMPHIS EVERY FRIDAY.
Meutflii*, While mid Utile .Red
River Racket,
IVcw Moon,
J03J DEARIXG, - - - Master,
ill. Twomet, - Clerk.
rj’T NEW AND FAST RUNNING _
1 steamer, having entered the above *■*
tr ie, will make regular trips as above,t-s-.-i.
arrtnig at Dos Are every Sunday eveuing from
'I Btiliis; passing down, will leave Dos Arc every
M af ay evening. For freight or passage, apply
os yard. mar 15
ISSI SPRING & SUMMER TRADE. 1861

largest stock in tiie market.
HAYLEY & ERWIN,
[Corner Rt ena Vista a no Lyon Streets,
im:s aim, ark usas.
A RE NOW RECEIVING AND OPENING ONE
. \ of the largest assortments of
SPRING AND SIMMER GOODS!
[•Ivor bought for the trade of Des Arc and f-ur
rouiwmir couiury. riicrjr uiiu v\ nu hruis
Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Hard
ware, Oueensware, Cutlery, and
NOTIONS or ALL KINDS!
Can he supplied at prices too reasonable to be
grumbled at. Wc have also a general assortment
of Literary, Religious,
SCHOOL BOOKS & STATIONERY,
Which will be sold at cheap rates. Having
bought our goods in the most favorable markets,
wc arc prepared to supply the wants of purcha
sers at the most liberal rates. Call iu and look
for yourselves. mb 2!)-tf
HORACE P. VAUGHAN,
Real Estate & General Collecting Ag't.,
DES ARC, ARKANSAS.
Will give Prompt Attention all business entrusted to him.
OFFICE ON BUENA VISTA STREET, opposite
Dry Goods Store of Al’Carley, Brown & Co.
All persons indebted to the estate
of John W- Wallace, deceased, are hereby
notified to come forward and settle, or their
claims will be put in the hands of an officer for
collection, in twenty days.
HORACE P. VAUGHAN, Adm’r.
A LL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE ESTATE
j\_ of William L. DeWoody, deceased, arc here
by notified to come forward and settle, or their
claims will be placed in the hands of aa officer lor
collection, in twenty days.
HORACE P. VAUGHAN. Adm'r.
\LL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE LATE
firm of J. A. Jennings & CV, are hereby
notified that their notes and accounts are garni
sheed in my hands, and am instructed to bring
suit on them immediately; and it they do not
come forward iu twenty Hhys’ time and settle,
they will have to settle with an officer.
HOIl ACE P. VAf GHAN, Ag’t.
VLL PERSONS INDEBTED TO THE OLD
firm of Washer & Vaughan, arc hereby re
quested to settle their indebtedness by flic loth
day of April next, or they will bo sued
ndrl'j-if. HOI 1 P’E P. VAUGHAN.
AWEHfieN liATTALION!
rnilERE will be a Battalion I>lusl*>r ^
I on the Second Saturday in April, next,
at HICKORY PLAINS. All-persons belong- FV
ingtosaid Battalion Arc hereby command- \i\
. RySJ Ev.ISS, A.»’l
POETICAL __
YE flight of ye rayl-sflitter.
A BALLAD.
Of all ye flighls (hat ever were flown,
Ly several persons, or one alone_
Of Science, or Dr. Franklin’s kilo;
/ !*. \?Ur? Raymond, away from the fight;
1 (he flight of Professor Lowe's balloon,
riom here to England, one day at noon;
lhe funniest flight—of the dreariest bore_
Was Abraham’s flight through Baltimore!
Weary and worn, like a haunted moose,
Limbs like the wind-mill, hanging loose
(junking at heart, and flighty at head,
The old Hail-Splitter—lie went to bed;
Hut scarcely in his blankets enveloped was he,
A\ hen lie cried,, “1 am struck with a bright id'ec;
Procure me hither—and don’t be long—•
A hot rum toddy, and make it strong!”
Now, various dreams are like to eome
From a brimming beaker of good old rum;
And some of them, too, are just as bad
As any that Tam O'Sliantcr had.
And so, when Abraham laid him down,
To dream of doing the Southerners brown,
It chanced that a phantasy, bloody and grim,
Came sailing over, and lit on him!
Dead men tossed about like stones,
Broken bridges, blood and bones,
Grinning deaths-lieads, such as grace
Every antique burial-place;
Daggers, pistols, bludgeons, guns,
Thunder-showers of red-hot buns;
These he saw, or scorned to see,
All because of the “bright idee!”
Then suddenly, in from the murky night,
There came a messenger, wild with fright,
And he cried to Abraham, where lie lay,
“Get up, old fellow, and hurry away!”
f->o the dismal phantoms of sleep gave place
To a very practical view of the ease;
And the Rail-Splitter said, as lie looked at him—
“John,
Just wait till I get my trowsers on!”
So lie swore an oath, by the Kingdom Come,
That Satan was in that glass of rum!
And lie said. “May 1 never split rails again,
It 1 don’t run off by a special train !”
Then, shrouded closely, up to theeyes,
With a cloak and Scottish cap likewise,
He left his people dissolved in brine,
And ran away, as the clock struck nine!
owuuy aiong tne central Koad
Went the fiery liorsc with liis precious load,
And at every snort he seemed to say,
“’Tin a Western gentleman, running away!
The greatest hegira under the sun!
•See if it isn't a glorious run!”
Thus honest Abraham, safe and sound,
Stood at last on the Capital ground!
Ah, very noble it seems to be.
This modern standard of chivalry!
And very noble and very grand
Is the cjiiefest magnate in tlie land.
Abraham Lincoln, stalwart and tall,
Who ran away, quaking from nothing at all!
The “Ilonest Uncle” ih sixly-one.
Who skulked in the night to Washington!
-• - Cl -
[For The Constitutional Union.
TUB LOVE OF GOD.
When tossed on life’s dark turbid waves,
Where hope decays and prospects fade,
IIow sweet a thingfche charming melody
Of great Jehovah’s love is made.
IIow gloomy would this voyage appear
W lien loved ones die, and fri nd j prove false,
W i Mi roll
Our weary, sick and fainting hearts.
IIow hard to bear (lie bitter ills
Of life’s tempestuous sea,
The stormy Ida ts and wintry winds,
Without a hope of God in thee.
But when we their love possess,
There's naught disturbs us licrc;
It comforts when in deep distress,
And through every pathway drear.
This love can never be portrayed
By human pen or tongue.
In every heart of every grade,
Let this great love resound.
This love will bear the Christian o'er
The rugged sea of life,
And land them safe on yonder shore,
Where all is peace and calm delight.
That love will them their souls expand,
And every praise inspire;
And in that bright and happy land
rn.* 1 — iUaSw ovoim. Iifka
II. I. A.
Chbkb.yvii.le, Amc., March 25, 1801.
Diversion on Red River—It I’ropes
es to Flow to the G elf by a New Chan
nel—It lias for some years been evident that
by a sure and rapid process, the connection
between Red river and the Mississippi is be
ing cut off. The effect of the complete con
summation of the process, now going on with
extraordinary and alarming rapidity, will be
to divert Red river into the Atchafalaya,
which affords a channel for its waters and
compels it to flow to the Gulf at Berwick’s
Bay. Thus the whole of the immense and
productive region lying in the valley of Red
river will suffer the embarrassment, of being
shutoff from communication with its natural
market, while New Orleans will iosc the rich
trade which the river country annually pours
into her lap. These contingencies arc not
remote. They will surely happen within a
few years if something is not dune to obviate
it. For years the connection between Red
river and the Mississippi Has been growing
more and more precarious, till in low water it
is almost entirely last. In the high water
season the volume of water which pours down
the Atchafalaya exceeds the flow of Red riv
er .as the Mississippi actually backs up through
Old river, so that the current sets from, in
stead of into, the main stream. [N. 0. Delta.
-m m -
A Frenchwoman not Deceived by the
Splendor of a Uniform.—Count de Or
senne one day accompanied the Emperor on
a hunting excursion. The Emperor had been
complaining of thirst, and some one seeing a
woman at a little distance, called to her. The
woman did not know Napoleon or any of the
escort. She gave the Emperor a glass of wa
ter mixed wi th a little brandy, and then curt
sied for payment. “There, my good woman,”
: :ii 1 V-;-. .Icon, pointing to Count de Orsenne,
<-;i the I'bnporor, ask him for money;
he pays for us all.” The woman blushed, and
looked embarrassed; then turning to the
Count she scanned his splendid uniform with
the eye of a connoiseur, and said, “lie,
pooh, nonsense ! Do you think l believe that.
The Emperor is not such a coxcomb. You,
sir, look more like him yourself.” The
Emperor was much amused at the remark, and
uave the woman a double huiis.
As tv ell may wo see the sun, moon and
stars, through a London November fog, as
God’s truth through the atmosphere of a cor
rupt, a depraved,, and a degenerate heart.
Wliat men most need in order to be decided
j believers, is not greater light in their heads,
hut far greater grace m their hearts
4
[From The Vermont Journal of Nov. 4th, 17S9.]
A STRANGE STORY.
Remarkable and Extraordinary Narrative of the
Revivification of Young Joseph Taylor, who was
Supposed to have been Hanged to Death, (in Com
pany with that Notorious Highwayman, 1'iekpockct
and Housebreaker, Archibald Taylor,) on Boston
Neck, on Thursday, the 8th of May, 1788, fur a
Violent Assault and Robbery on the Highway,
Committed on the Person and Property of Mr.
Nathaniel Cunningham, Butcher, in October, 1787.
Iii a letter from said Joseph Taylor to his
kind friend and countryman, Mr. 1‘hclim
Dolace, in Boston :
Ego Harbor, Mouth of the Delaware, 1
May 12, 1789. J
My Bear Friend*.— You will, no doubt,
be greatly astonished at receiving a letter
from one whom you so lately saw to all ap
pearance, numbered with the dead, with all
the ignominy of a public and most shameful
execution. But, though strange as it may
appear, it is no less strange than true, that,
blessed be God for his infinite goodness, 1 am
now among the living to praise him. It was
my iervAnt desire that you should have been
made acquainted witli tlie steps which were
taken to recover me to life immediately after
my being hanged. But the doctor who man
aged the affair would not admit of more than
five persons in the secret, as he feared a dis
covery, and said a crowd around me would
be fatal, and prevent the air getting into my
lungs, and O’Bonnell and Tec-tor had been
told of it before I saw you, and they, with
the doctor, his young man, and a person lie
brought with him, made the five. I there
fore take this early opportunity to let you
know of my being alive, and in health, bless
ed by God, as I hope that these lines will
find you, as also the circumstances which at
tend my execution and recovery to life; as
also my present frame of mind and resolu
tion, through the grace of God, to sin no
more, hut endeavor after new obedience. You
remember that you, among other friends, had
great hopes of my being pardoned on account
of my youth; but when their Honors sat, 1
soon found I must be made an example of,
as they were determined never to par
nun niguwaymen. i men Megan to prepare
for death, hut must needs say, though I had
many affecting conferences with the reverend
persons who visited me in jail. I never, even
al'tcr niy condemnation, realized that 1 was
suddenly to die in so awful a manner,- until a
gentleman, who I afterward found was a floe
tor. came and talked privately with the late
unhappy sufferer, and my fellow convict.
Archibald Taylor, who, when the gentleman
was gone, came to "Tuc with money in his
hand, and so smiling a countenance that I
thought he had received it in charity. Hut he
soon undeceived me, telling me with an air
of gaiety, that it was the price of his body,
and then added a shocking speech, which l
sincerely hope is blotted out of the book of
Cod’s remembrance against his poor soul.
I his was the first time since my condemna
tion that I thought what it was to die. The
shock w;\s terrible, and Taylor increased it,
saying that the doctor had desired him to
bargain with me for my body also. The
thoughts of my houe&UOt Luipu oonujiUid to
re“;!!vT^iy poor mother had so often caressed
and dandled on her knee, and which had
been so pampered by my friends in my
better days, being slashed and mangled by
the doctors, was too much for me. 1 ha-1
been deal to the pious cXhoitution ol the
priests, but now my conscience was awaken
ed, and hell sermed indeed to yawn for
me. What a right of horror was the next
nieht! When the doctor came in the
morning to bargain for my body, 1 was in
a cold sweff; my knees smote together, and
my tongue seemed to cleave to the root of
my rnou'h- He perceived the agony of my
soul, axd asked me some questions of the
state *f my mind. I found iterance, and
poured out my heart to him. lie seemed
allowed at my distress, especially as my con
duct was so different from that of A. Tay
l<r’s; and, after pausing, he left me witli
)ut mentioning the sale ot my body, and
said lie would call again the next day. He
came and asked me privately whether 1 had
two or three friends I could depend upon
in anything for my benefit. He communi
cated his design of attempting to recover
i 1 ?/» IT 1 novri.'./l
mu tu mo * j ^ J --^
immediately after I was cut down, to some
convenient place,, out of the reach of the
people, assuring me, by all that was sacred,
that if he failed in his attempt he would
give my body a Christian burial. 1 closed
with it without hesitation. The doctor then
left me, and soon after Tector and O’Donnell
came to see me, to whom I communicated the
plan in confidence, The doctor came hack
to charge me not to trust more persons than
were sufficient to carry my body from the gal
lows to the place provided. 1 told him who
the persons with me were; and upon O’Don
nell’s engaging to procure a number of his
countrymen to remove my body to a private
place, who were not to be let into the secret,
upon pain of his not having to do in the af
fair as soon as it should be discovered, lie
gave them money to hire a small boat to be
in readiness at the wharf, nearest to the
place of execution, which boat l think was
hired of one Mr. Skinner or Skillings, near
Olier’s Dock. The doctor undertook to find
the place of execution, which was then re
ported to be in several places, and to procure
a two-mast boat with a good cuddy, which
was to he moored off the wharf at a conven
ient distance, all which was accordingly done.
The two-mast boat in which was the doctor,
his friend and apprentice, with their doctors’
instruments, was moored up the bay, near the
gallows, the morning of the execution day,
but fell down with the tide, about two hours
before the execution, toward Dorchester
Point, for fear of being grounded.
The state of my mind, after my conversa
tion with the doctor, until the day of execu
tion, it is impossible for me to describe. 'I his
glimpse yf hope—this mere chance of escap
ing the jaws of death, and ol avoiding the
eyes of an offended Judge, at whoso bar I
was noways prepared to appear, seemed but
to render my mind more distracted. I sonic
times indulged myself with the thoughts of
being recovered to life; and as 1 had fortu
nately concealed my real name, that 1 might
return, like the Prodigal, to my patents. and
live a life devoted to (Sod and their comfort.
Hut 1 oftener feared the moans might tail to
bring me to life, and then 1 wished that this
scheme had never been mentioned, as the
hopes of life seemed to prevent my conver
sion, and then,'to he surprised into another
world, totally unprepared, huw terrible! Thus
distracted, t£e time Hew, and the awful day
arrived. In the morning the reverend par
sons visited me. I was much softened by
their conversation, and really, at that time,
wished I had never seen the doctor, hut by
the near and certain approach of death, had
been prepared to live in those blissful n>-<u
sions which arc prepared in the world of
glory for the truly penitent. Soon after they
left us, the doctor’s young man came (umlor
pretense of a message from Mrs. Kanger, who
hail shown me much kindness in jail, the
Lord reward her for it) to renew the doctor’s
directions how to conduct my body so as not
to suffer the least shock, lie left me the fol
lowing paper:
Thursday Mousing, May Sth. 1789.
Taylor, everything depends on your presence
of mind. Item ember that the human machine
may be put iti time again if you preserve the spi
nal muscle from injury, and do not dislocate the
vertebras of the neck ; as the colli spinalis is de
duced from the transverse processes of the verte
bra; of the throat, and is latterly inserted in the
neck; its connection with the whole human frame
is material: so that you must endeavor to work
the knot behind your neck, and press your throat
uponthc halter, which will prevent the neck break
ing, and likewise the compressions of the jugu
lar, and preserve the circulation in some degree.
K'rp upyour spirit--..
My hopes were now raised, and my former
terror did not return upon me; which L doubt
not was observed by the reverend parson who
attended me, by the officers of justice, and
the multitude, who doubtless compared my
behavior with that of my fellow-sufferer, ft is
true, when 1 mounted the stage 1 dreaded the
pain ot hanging as l should any other pun
ishment, equally severe; but the far greater
distress of meeting an offended and inexora
ble Judge, and being consigned to endless
misery was done away. For the nearer the
time of my execution approached, the more
reliance on the doctor increased.
\ou were present at the solemn parting with
and warning to the people—at the excellent
prayer of the Rev. Mr. Stilman, and the
dropping of the traps, which, to all appear
ances launched me and my unfortunate fel
low-prisoner, Archieald Taylor, into a bound
less eternity.
Hut to return to my particu! ir feelings—1
preserved my presence of my mind ; and
when the halter was fastened, remembered
the doctor’s directions, and while the prayer
was being said 1 kept gently turning my
head so as to bring the knot on the back of
mv neck, nearly, as U’Doncll afterward in.
formed, and as you and others observed.
When the trap fell I had all my senses about
me, and though L have no remembrance of
hearing any sounds among the people, yet I
believe I did not lose my senses till some
minutes after. 31 y first' feelings after the
shock of falling was a violent struggling and
oppression for want of breath; this soon gave
way to a pain in my eyes, which seemed to
be burned by two halls of fire which appear
ed to be shining before me, and which seem
ed to dart on and off like; lightning; setting
ever and anon on my shoulders as if they
weighed ten hundred tons ; and after one
terrible fla.-h. in which iho two halls seemed
to join in one. 1 sunk away without pain, like
one falling to sleep.
A\ hat lollowe 1 after I was turned off you
know, as l was informed you kindly assisted
my other friends iu taking the body down as
soon as you were permuted, and conveying it
across the suit works to the little boat; I was
from thence carried on board the two-mast
in tK» itnntar tii nil J»»i1 ■
tor to cut andj loosen my clothes, and rub mc.j
throwing water on me, could perceive no life
in me, but told the doctor it was too late. Hut
the doctor was not discouraged ; and in one
hour and t weuty-two minutes after I was
brought on board the boat, making two hours
and forty three minutes after I was turned
off, he perceived signs of life in me, hv a
small motion and warmth in my bosom. In
twenty minutes after I gave a violent deep
groan. Here description fails! 1 cannot
describe the intolerable agony of that moment.
Ten thousand stranglings are trifling to it!
'flic first confused thoughts I had were, that
it was the moment of my dissolution ; for 1
bad no knowledge of my removal from the
gallows, but was (juitc insensible from the time
l first lost myself to that in which I recover
ed—except some faint glimmerings of a scene
which, faint and confused as they were, I
shall never forget, but which 1 feel impressed
upon my heart 1 ought to communicate to no
man living. 1 was soon after this violent an
guish made sensible where I was ; the doc
tor's stuff, and sight of my friends, restored
me in a great measure to my senses. The
1 1 1 1 11 ... A A. 11_ ...... 1. - 1, ..i
UOf 101 WUUKl UUl UU'JH Hiv nun Jiituu , KH.KK,
feeling fatigued, he permitted me to lie down,
having two persons by me to rub me with a .
brush while I slept. When 1 awoke it was
dark. I felt somewhat light-headed and con
fused from the dreadful scene 1 had passed
through. All hands were now called, and a
solemn oath was taken by all present not to
tell anything that had happened until they
should know that I was safe out of the coun
try; and then not to discover the doctor, his
friends or apprentice. I was then put on
shore, and went from thence on board the vcs-.
scl which brought me here.
I am engaged to go to Gottenburg, in Swe
den, and shall sail to-morrow in a ship which
is coming down the river from Philadelphia.
I shall take my family name, and return to
my parents A Prodigal Son indeed. God
grant, as 1 have severely eaten shucks, that I
may soon cat bread in my earthly parents
house ; and be prepared for such bicad as the
saints in glory love, and such as angels eat, in
that house which is not made with hands,
eternal in the heavens.
I remain your assured friend until death shall
indeed come, JOSEI’H TAYLOit.
-m -
How to do up Shirt Bosoms.—Take
two ounces of white arabic powder, put in a
pitcher and pour on a pint or more of boiling
water, according to the strength you desire ;
let it stand all night, and in the morning pour
I it carefully from the dregs into a clean bottle
and cork for use. A table-spoonful of this
omm water, poured into a pint of starch, will
give lawns—white or colored, a look of new
ness, to which nothing else can restore them
after they have been washed.
-—® — -
Tr, V'TTT is stronger than battalions ; a text
in the biblo will outlast the pyramids of Pha
riob, and outshine the brightest of all stars.
As soon may Canute repel the advancing
tides of tin ocean ; Xerxes restrain the waves
of Hellespont by casting bis chains over it;
or the Iloman Kmpc’ror Caligula prevail with
the clouds by commanding them not to rain
upon bis royal head, as for a scoffer, or any
opposer to resist successfully the march ot one
single truth that has God for its author.
- ,m» • mi -
The way to be mir/dless of the scoff of the
wicked, is to be mindful of the words (■! the
pro;diets and apostles spe-km before; the wa;,
to he sure, and to s* >nd fast, and not to be
shaken in our flu* or in our hope, is to tall
ba'-k upon what God has said, and to level
his w*'*At against all the probabilities and scoffs
.>nd all the sneers of a world that knows not
truth, and loves not Chriots appearing.
MRS. MIRA CLARK C A IKES.
Who Wi re Her Ancestors and How She
Came in Court—Interesting Particulars of
the (treat Suit.
The annals of litigation furnish no two
more infesting or peculiar cases than those of
Madame l’atterson Bonaparte and of Mrs.
Myra Clark Gaiues, both of which have for
many years occupied prominent positions be
fore not only the legal profession, but the eyes
of the'wliole world. These eases are singu
larly suggestive and peeularly illustrative of
certain phases of American society, and as
such possess other interests than those of a
merely pecuniary character. Each has, after
protracted struggles, reached a decision, the
one adverse to. and the other in favor of the
claimant—the one loses all she deemed worth
living for, while the other gains not only a for
tune of fabulous amount, but establishes for
ever the honor of her father. Had the im
perial court been more kind, the American
claimant of a kingly hand would now be ill
possession of a kingly estate, with Tier sori’.f
legitimacy acknowledged before the world,
while, as it is, these arc denied her, and per
haps forever.
In view then of theintcrcstof the celebra
ted cause which has been decided in favor of
Mrs. ( !aiue<, by a full bench of the Supremo
Court of the United States, a brief resume of
its material facts will not be misplaced.
Daniel Clark, who was one of the early set
tlers of the colony of Louisiana, was a very
remarkable person, llis sagacity, prudence
and bun ness tact so.rn placed him at the head
ot its m notary world, while his beauty of
person, popular character, and a greet) fc man
ner, afforded him a similar position iu the so
cial circle. I n 1 sf>2 ho became acquainted
in Philadelphia, with a lady of extraordinary
personal beauty, named Zulime Carefre. She
was burn in the old Frcuth colony of Biloxi,
her parents were emigrants from the land of
poetry, flowers and romance—Provence—
the favorite home of the Troubadours. When
Clark iii-.-t met her, she had been living in wed
lock with a man by the name of Jerome De
Grange, a swindler, who having dazzled her
. ... ... . • 1 V. .. __ 3
..—- **• “'r' iiuuuu'i uui ^ aii'i
then disclosed the astounding fact that he was
a confectioner and bigamist. Zulimc appeal*
| ed i->r protection to Clark, wlto at once espous
ed her cause, and alter being convinced that
Dot 1 range bad another wile living, espoused
her hiniscll. The marriagp was kept secret,
and in 1800 Myra was borilt. Being natural
ly delirious of having her connection with
( lark a puM'.ely acknowledged one. Zulimc*
went to New Orleans to obtain legal proofs of
her hrM Intsbsnd’s rascality. N\" Iiile she was
gone. ( 'lark, who had grown into an influen
tial politician, i ccamc enamored of Miss Ca
ton. ;t grand-daughter of Charles Carroll, with
whom he c attracted an engagement, though,’
when rep >rt's were brought to Miss Caton, al
leging her lover’s marriage to Zulime, she at
once insisted on a release from the engage*
m C • " hsul'sccjuently became the Murchoi
i . <. da
V V! ' tO
■ a <i ■ '-g.. •• • - If. v • ringe
1 v. 1 . ’••• >. t in at- i v. acherv.
'"•* « -hi> : a > ■ ‘ *. i3 '
» 1 ., j -
titm n>^—
ed the band m MTe-'mvciuu1 i
pe*s and generosity, united bis fortune wan
hers. Clark, in the nieantiine had become
penitent ; but, on hastening to find his for
mer love, ascertained that she was the wife of
another, lie took the child Myra, placed her'
under the care of a friend, and had her most
liberally educated. Zulimp lived a long time
after that, attained the age of seventy years,
and died a few years since in New Orleans.
Clark, whose business tact was proverbial,
amassed an immense fortune in Louisiana^
Missouri. Kentucky and Maryland, which lie
bequeathed by will, in 1813, to bis mother,
Mary Clark, naming Beverly Chew and Rich
ard Keif, bankers of New Orleans, as ex
ecutors. Charges have been preferred
against them of bad faith and mismanage
ment, hut however that may be, Myra—then
Mrs. Whitney—having discovered at matnri*
tv that her mother had been the wife ot the
deceased milliTJnare, with the impulse of hon
orable affection, for which she cannot be too
\ ’ 11. ... : 1 . ouenvt Iwm* rinrVlf
‘ ...... w - -- - c _ »
is the legitimate chill, and consequent heir
>ss to the entire property.
That she met with opposition and obstacles
)f all sorts may well he imagined, but she bat
led bravely for her mother's honor, and evinc
ed the most commendable spirit and persever
-uce, in spite of most fearful odds, llcr hus
jand died, but she re-married General Gainefs,
ind in doing so, enlisted a powerful auxiliary/
ivho believed in her legitimacy, and aided her
with all his might. It would be wearisome to
index the various legal struggles, the attempt
ed social ostracisms, the sorrows, the hopes,
the fears experienced by Mrs. Gaines in this
work of her lifetime. Vhe sued in various
courts, and with varied success, until her for
tune was gone, h6r friends convinced of tho
uselessness of further trial, and all but her
indomitable spirit fled. She still struggled on,
and as a last resort, brought the case, in am
plitude and its labyrinth of legal technicali
ties, to the Supreme Court of the land. There,
after a long and pationt hearing, she has ob
tained her victory. The court has decided
unanimously, that Myra Clark Gaines is the
only legitimate child of Daniel Clark, and as
such, she is entitled to all the property left,
by him. Nor are the years and energies of
the courageous woman too far spent to prevent
her enjoyment of her vast wealth. 3Irs.
Gaines, though now in her fifty-fifth year, is
represented as being an agreeable specimen of
what old people delight in calling “’ladies of
the old school.” Sho is in good health, and
an abundant flow of animal spirits, which
have buoyed her up for over thirty years, un
der circumstances of an unusually trying na
turc. _ * * i ■ i
Mr. Justice Wayne, in closing the decision
of the court, seems to have placed particular
emphasis on the words that the Supreme
Court would see that tho provisions of the
decision were carried into effect-—a statement
of more than ordinary importance wh'T.‘. vrc
reflect that possibly tho State /-1’,'r'u,si:ui:''
lnayMei-’ino to take cognizan t ■ >, <>r 1,0 b°nnd
by a deer- emanating from no less a tribu
nal than tho Su; .-emo Court of the late Lm,
ted States of’A■n. rtca.’_
U’nti.K we are cons<'i >rrs that individually
we must die, we all construct for ourselves a
poathumous existence, which keeps up the de
ception of a perpetual hie. "W eaic prone tot
say well, it l must die, m\ children liVo ,
and if i must leave my estates, those estates
will be given to my children.
The total expenses of the New York lira
department for the past year foot up the hand
some tun of O..0 ,'JUd

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