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The Nevada picayune. (Prescott, Nev. County, Ark.) 1878-1885, December 25, 1884, Image 1

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VOL. VII. NO. 36._PRESOOTT, NEVADA COUNTY, ARKANSAS, DECEMBER 25, 1884,_SI.50 A YEAR.
NEVADA PICAYUNE.
W. B.' WHITE, \
j. W. UARHNER, I
Editors and Proprietors.
Entered at the Postoffice. Prescott, Ark., as
Second Clare Matter.
SUBSCRIPTION, fA.50 PKlt YEAR
BATES OF ADVERTISING.
I column, one ^'ar,.$100.
1 .. 0. M.
J . 30'
Professional Cards, 1 rquarn. 12.
Business Cards, 1 ,, 12.
Job Work Neatly exocuted.
PHYSICIANS AND SOffGEOHS
Dr. £. B. Armistead,
Respectf. ty tenders bis
PROFESSION \L SERVICES
tottio cttixen* of Prescott and vicinity. lie
mav be fouwA at his residenco.
I)r. J I). Jordan. Dr. J. T. Sloan.
/Jordan & Sloan.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
PRESCOTT, ARKANSAS.
Offline at the Dnlg Store of J. D. Jordan
& Co.
R. L. Hinton, M. D,
niYSICIAN AND SURGEON
PRESCOTT, ARK.
Office on Wert Alain Street and residence
on Hast Second Street.
Dr. J. A. Pipkin,
PRESCOTT, ARKANSAS.
Offer* liia professional services to the peo
ple of l’resnott and vicinity. Office Brick
2nd door, W. Main st. April 26, ’S3.
G. W. Hudson,
PHYSICIAN A Nil SURGEON.
rmisroTT, ARK.
Office at residence, on eat
Main St., Hr. Key’s building. I
mu prepared to extract teeth
DR. WOOD
Off r*hii» profonaioiml*prvh*os nil requiring
iiH'dii al or mirgtnal Attention, * >1U«h? at rur*
i den <*«*, Houghton Aakarun#.
LAWYERS AND NOTARYS.
^lo*. ||. UrMt'UIV. I.*81.IK P. Kt>*8
MeMullin & Boas,
Atttnejs and ConnselorOt Law,
Office over Hinton’s Drug Store,
MAIN STREET,
PRESCOTT, - - - - ARKANSAS.
Will practice In the Court* of the Ninth
Judicial Circuit, and in the SupremoCourt
and Federal Court at Little Rock.
Spin ini attention given to tlm investigation
of land title* and preparing abstract* of title
to real estate in Nevada county. Businessof
any kind entrusted to them will receive
prompt attention.
Correspondence solicited.
Ilucklcu's Arnica Salve.
The best salvo in the world for Cut*, Hrui*
c«, Sore*, Ulcer*, Salt Rheum.F evor Sore*
Tetter, Chapped Hand*, Chilblain*, Corn*
and all Skin Eruption, and positively cures
Piles, or no pay required. It i* guaranteed
to give perfoct satisfaction, or money refund
ed. Price26 cents per bottle. For talc by
* Moperief & Bro.
—^
Atkinson ft Tompkins,
Lawyers anil Insurance Agents
PRESCOTT, ARKANSAS,
Practice in th Courts of Nevada and adjoin
ing counties.
Collections a specialty.
Geo. P. Hinooto. fhos. C. McRae.
Smoots ft McRae,
ATTORNEY S-AT -LAW
Land and Collecting Agent?,
PRESCOTT, - - ARKANSAS
Practice in all tho courts and moke col
lection! in all parts of the state.
Arc agents for the following
INSURANCE COMPANIES:
German, of New Yorek.$2,592,136 09
Underwriters Agency, N, Y.,—4,957,112 '.*0
Npringtteld K. A M.2.685,632 83
Western Asitimnee Company...1.422,008 14
New' Orleans. 875,588 62
Risks written throughout the county.
HkjjC Gin houses mid farm property in
sured
We linvo associated with ns
Lucius K. Hinton. Attotiifj-at
Lnw, who will ifivesiHi'inl niton
to Collections unit Insurance.
DRIGGS & CO 'S BANK•
I>. I.. LATOt RKTTK, cashier.
Prescott, - - Arkansas
THE WORLD’S EXPOSITION.
The Prp*« Hires an Idea of Its .Tlag
nltiolo—Arkansas’ Exhibit.
—From the Arkansas Democrat Dee. 17.
i The World’s ‘Exposition mWI Cot
jton Centennial was dnened yester
day at 3 o’clock with imposing cer
! emonies. Telegraphic communi
j cation had been perfected between
the Exposition grounds at New Or
i leans and the White Uouse at
j Washington'city. President Rich
ardson. of the Exposition, deliver
ed an address, which was wired to
President Arthur, who replied in
the same manner and declared the
Exposition open. At 10 minutes
past 3 o'clock everything being an
nounced in readiness, President
Arther touched the key of tele
praph instrtunent'which waft'to ar
ranged as to start the|nmchinery in
the Exposition, thus inaugurating
le great Expofi'bion in a manner
to illustrate tliejnechanical inven
tion of our advanced civilization.
Our correspondent noted some of
the sights which greet the visitor on
entering the elaborate grounds—
the present scene of so much ac
tivitvity and splendor.
new Orleans, Dec. is, is»4.
Editor Arkansas Democrat.
Before entering the Exposition
ground at tho Magazine street en
trance the large*‘octagon building
to the right of for the exhibition of
the “Battle of Sedan,” and if size
and expensive structure is any cri
terion, this will form one of the
most attractive features outside the
grounds, as it is said to be much
more complete than the battle of
Gettysburg, as shown at Chicago.
We are now inside the grounds,
and before us stands the main
building, to tho left Mexican quar
ters, horticultural ball and the
Grand Rapids Furniture building;
to the right, close by, is the art
gallery, built entirely of iron, and
far away through majestic live
oaks and orange trees stands the
Dnited States and States building
which 1 regard the finest in ap
pearance of all the buildings,
though everything is so grand, so
much more expansive than ever
seen before, that to describe in lull
requires greater versatility than
your humble correspondent
professes to possess. Entering the
main building you find yourself in
Mexico, where all is life and activ
ity, and judging from tho manner
in which the Mexicans step around,
and the appearance of their dis
play, Mexico is not so far behind
our own dear republic, as writers
would have one to believe. The
minerals on exhibit verify tho
trsdltional reports of the great
wealth of the Montezumas, while
onyx, varde antique, serpentine
and other marbles far excel any
thing as yet seen by the writer.—
Their timber exhibit is very supe
rior, while the cereals shown are
creditable to any country with less
agricultural pretentions. The at
tendants are in uniform, and, 1 am
told, belong to the Mexican army.
I will now visit the Arkansas do
partuient in the l; uited States and
States’ building, to see what our
State is doing. All are busy at
work, and the energetic Professor
Thomas seems to he everywhere
giving directions; here to the car
penters, now helping roll the tim
bers in position, now looking after
the painters, one must think him
born for the work, he seems to man
age so well. Unless wo receive as
sistance from home, Arkansas, I
fear, will not excel many of the
States, and it is to be regretted,
for we all know the material is at
home to plaeo us in the front rank
if It was sent forward. Now, read
er, I appeal to you, to every otic,
to go to work with a will and eol
lect up everything worthy of eJt*
hibit, and send it at once to Prof.
W. 8. Thomas, for the World’s
Fair, Little Rock, aud it will be
forwarded here at once. This is a
duty you owe yourself, owe the
State, and especially the gentle
men here in chare, who are work
ing so hard to sustain tho reputa
tion our State won at Boston, Lou
isville and St. Louis.
M. B. L.
The Times-Democrat has this to
say for our State exhibit and our
commissioners:
ABKANBAS t)N HAM). \
From ITof. W. S. Thomas, of
Little Hock, Ark., who is in charge
. of the Arkansas exhibit, was ob
tained the following facts as to
what this State ia doing to display
the richness and vastness of her
| resources. Mr. Thomas stared
I Dr. C. M.^taylor and Col. James
I W. Corcoran were the commission
ers; Mr. Wm. W. Morrisson is thfo
; secretary; Dr. J. G. Lewis is in
(Charge of the mmeml department,
and E. F. Babcock, Esq., is super
; intending the horticultural display.
This State lifts now in process of
arrangement five car loads of ex
hibits, which will form no incon
siderable part of the display of
the contents of the building of the
government and State exhibits on
the 16th of December, the opening
day of the exposition. It consists
mainly\>f the natural products of
the State, such as minerals, cotton,
fruits, grains, grasses. The prin
cipal^syecimens of minerals con
sist of maganese, of which this
State claims the largest deposit in
the world. Also, of antimony,
which is ouly excelled by the de
posit in Borneo; magnetic iron
ores, zinc, lead, silver, tfeiui-an
thracite coal, rmttbles in variety,
gypsum, specimens of soapstone
said to be from the only locality
yet discovered in the Mirsissippi
valley, navaculite or the Arkansas
hone stone which is only equaled
by the Lavant or Turkish stono.
The hone stone is shipped to all
parts of the inhabited globe.
Seventy-five varieties of valua
ble timber useful in the mechan
ical alts and found in quantities
and locations adaptable for com
mercial purposes. The oak of
Arkansas has successfully compet
ed with that of other countries.
HORTICULTURE.
Over 175 varieties of grape* will
be shown and over KX) bushels
of choice fruit representing 200
varieties of apples, peaches and
pears, which are now in eoM stor
age. l’rof Babcock will show
samples of fruit preserved in al
cohol that will make the North
western States fear of losing the
pre-eminent position they have So
nobly occupied. In the last fair of
the Mississippi Horticultural As
sociation, the State" received the
gold medal for this”dopartment of
her exhibit.
In the cereals and grasses will
be found very large selections,
particularly of the latter; besides
all the native grasses are’thflse cul
tivated throughout the Mississip
pi valley. A sample ot the red
clover, grown iu the State, which
is a part of its exhibit, mCaktifes
seven feet in length. This is but
an outline of what Arkansas’ will
show. Iter exhibit will be admi
rably arranged for Tuesday, the
j opening day.
Kit Warren’s Observations on the
Street Pedestrians.
I am not exactly a mind-reader.
At least, t can’t read the a\erage
blind with such accuracy as to in
sert all the words and the punctu
ation where they precisely belong.
I can’t, like Asmodius, lift’the roof
of the brain ftitrl eavesdrop its
physical gossip. But sometimes
the leading thoughts and purposes
of the mind hang out like charac
ters on a sign hoard and are legi
ble even to a hasty glance^ To
try my skill at sketching a coup dc
oeil of a few of these, as they drift
along the sidewalk, I am seated
on the the marble block in front of
No. 42 Marietta street, pencil in
hand and scratch-book on my lap.
A man conies heading along as
industriously as if the assembled
world were waiting his arrival)
with breathless impatience, just up
the street. I can hardly cull him a
man; he is only a sample—ful
weight about ninety-five pounds
basket and all, and a large majori
: ty of him overcoat. Ills hat runs
up like a village stepld, bttt the
main disorder under which he la
bors is a palpitatiou of the feet.
As be bends to his task, With mi
anxiotts, earnest look I discovered
that he is a bailiff, burdened with
the weight of that oppressive and
responsible sense of duty which is
now driving him to fdlminate the
thunders of a cost fifa.
Here comes a man who wears
the prollle of the jack of hearts,
with radical points of ditlcreuce
the bust and facon. Ho seems to
hare graduated and taken tbo first
honors at a strutting school. His
garments fit bb well os if lie been
melted and poured in them; mud,
soft enough to bag a moonbeh.ni,
wofild not yield to the to'tich mbre
readily than that downy vest, and
the fly which dares to set foot on
thoco pants without first pulling
off his shoes deserves to be con
demned for saeriliege. Look at
him; he holds bis head as if in con
stant readiness to be drenched,
tries to keep straight until he has
become sway-backed and measures
each Btep like one who carefully
calculates the distance traveled.
I read that man’s thoughts as he
passes along—read all of them—
index, preface, introduction, con
tents and appendix, and all are
contained in these three short
words: “Behold the nf»n.”
“Extremes will meet,” as the"'pa
rent said when ho saw his baby
sucking his own big toe, and right
before me is a most contrastablo
anti thesis of the nim I have just
finished. The upper part of his
body sways and tacks like a pen
dulum or a ship, while the lower
half, hitched to a number 12 bro
gan, M-af n along without reference
!o anything in particular, His
eyes show they are in his headjand
that’s about all they do show, and
his manner indicates that he
is not pestered about the affairs of
this transient and fitful exisence.
It is evident that ho don’t care
whether Cleveland '’beats Hen
drick*'or McDaniel beats! Randall,
and no conceivable adjustment of
the vexed and complicated tariff
question can possibly rouse a sin
gle, solitary wave of trouble to roll
across his peaeeful^breast. llis
cares have folded their tents, like
the Arabs, and gone off without
leaving word when they will be
back. As I am not versed in liior
ology or dead languages I can’t
read that fellow’s thoughts and
must, therefore content myself
with having told what ho didn’t
think.
Next comes flic tall, stringy man,
with ‘An iidellgent eye and« dejec*
ed, long-metre look, lie walks with
a slow, scanning, poetical step, and
musings dry with each succeed
footfall. He seems to illuminate
the. world with his literary ckeg d
(Fuure. I think his subject Is “No
etical Dynamics.”
There goes a poor, homeles out
cast in rags and wretchedness.
Forlorn, friendless, forsaken, a
victim of the despotism of the bar
room and the gaming-table, lie
wanders aimlessly ohi waiting otily
for the opeuing earth and the de
scending clod. Far away are moth
er and sisters whose tears and
whose prayers and whoso affec
tions are tenderly and forever his,
and a brother whose arm is long
enough and strong enough to give
and whoso heart yearns to lift him
from his degradation. But death is
sweeter than the reproachful faces
in the loved and once happy home
cirle lie has so signally dishonored,
With a heart that is full of manly,
generous nob[e impulses; that heats
warmly for a world Which tuhis
coldly to him; that has sympathy
for the suffering, forbearaueo for
the wayward, charity for those
who err, and only kindness, hud
tenderness for all the creatures
that walk the earth—with such a
heart as this, yet pulsing its warm
blood, liko refreshing Sunlight
among mouldering ruins, he wan
ders, lie wanders on, feeling as if
lie word the last, lonesome guest
who lingers amid the desolation of
a‘‘banquet ball deserted.’*
Ah! hero (ionics the (Jolossu* ot
Rhodes—another man with a hi,,
head. A suit of clothes the size
of his feelings would be large
enough for a wagon cover—owing
probably, to the size of the ttagou.
Put him on oath and you may cov
er the value of his property with a
homestead, hut the homestad
would hardly reach far enditgh to
makes notirpdblo speck on the'
map ofhis wisdom. If Everyman
in the United States had the opin- j
ion of himself, in proportion to bis
merits, that this man has and if
caoli had to swear to the value of
his sense and pays a t*»* of one
cent on every thousand, the gov
ernment treasury would* soon be
so full that the clerks couldn't get
in the house without climbing
down the chimney. That gentle
man is ft Republican politician.
IIo still confidently believes lllaine
will be President during the next
four years, and is just now musing
npon the sublime grandeur of his
prospective mission as a minister
to the Court of St. Cloud.
Two youngsters next. Each
looks like he had just fluttered out
of a band-box and registered^as a
life member of the bean muude.
Bob flings himself on the responsi
bility of remarking, “Good morn
ing, Tobe," to which Tobe replies,
“That’s the>ery observation I was
going‘to have made myself. Yon
should havo^becn at the hop last
fit." “Yes, 1 intended to go, I
but I took and stumped my too
and got drunk, and you just ought
to have seen the old captain wheu
I came stumbling in the’ house.;
He is always eloquent on snch oc
casions,‘but ho did'his level dog
ondest last]night. He tookjne in
at the beginning of the Bible and
brought me through the apocliry- j
phy and the births and deaths and,
marriages, and carried me out at'
the Concordance. If it wasu’t for j
the^finaucial.department I should t
want fatlitr’ abolished. What
about the hop?” “Oh, we had a
roariug tilde, and I was the„belle
of the evening; I was a perfect
bridesmaid.” “Miss Ellen was the
star!” “Y'cs sir; you bet your
sweet lifc'she waR, and all the boys
honed and hankered and siged
for one glance of her eye-ball, and
I hitched on to her and we prome
naded, and I squeeze her hand and
she squeezed back. I tell you j
what, that girl's dead in love with
me; but 1 .wouldn’t marry her to
^Ave her’life.’’ “Why!” “because
her foot’s too big. but t told her
forty thousand lies about how pret
ty and sweet she was and how
much I loved her.” “Was Miran
da there!” “Yes,'and she looked
like an angel that had just lit. Na
ture acted with the prodigality ofa
spendthrift in loading ono little
creature with such a wealth and
luxury of charms; but, old fellow ;
you’ve got a formidable rival.”
"Formidable fiddlestick! Tom may
counton: when I get ready I can,
iu five minutes’ time, pull her
straighter thail a ten pound trout
ever pulled a fishing-lino. I could
marry'the whole family and not
half try,'if I wanted to. Say, bob
let’s rtioiStdn.” Exeunt omnes, be
hind the screen of the bar-room.
Here is a stout old gentleman
from the rural districts. He wears
a neat, cheap suit and has an hon
est face. He is a man who tells
the truth, pays his debts, loves his
family and discharges his duty.
He has all easy conscience and his
mind is at present engaged in no
weightier employment than that
of exercising his lips in the plucky
necessary for raising'the tune in
church next Sunday.
Tlierc goes a frying-size spring
chicken lassie, just a little to the
cradle size of sweet sixteen. She
is as fresh and lovely as a new
blown rose. She has a kissable lip,
a hugable waist,'and a sqitedzable
hand. She is going to a dry goods
store on Whitehall street, and
she’ll make the fur fly when she
gets there. Iter thoughts arc all
mixed up and messed up. She is
thinking of poetry and hangs ami
velvets and music, aud whether
the shoes shall he round-toed or
square-toed, and whether they
shall button or lace; and she’s
thinking furs and plush and pretty
boys, aud how she will show off
and shine out at the next german
and, I declare, I am not able to un
tangle the skein of her reflections;
besides, the live minutes are gone
aud I must step over to the office
and hand in lily manuscript;
An Agreeable Decision.

—From the Arknneft* Traveler. »
The people ot Horsehead coun
ty are very much exercised over it
recent attempt to defeat justice in
that part of the country. A young
fellow named Spare libs was arrest
ed for stealing a pair of home-knit
socks, aud was arrayed before Jus
tice Swash, a jurist in whom the
whole community imposes great
confidence. The blacksmith shop,
where the cchfrt usually meets, was
crowded with mules ou the day set
for trial; so 'in order that the
spanking hand of jnstico might
not bfc kept from its work, Juftge
Swash proposed that^thetrtlll take
place in an adjoining lot. The
Judge tookjhis seat on tlfo fence
and Spareribs climbed np on a
stump.
“Prisoner at the bar—”
“Prisoner on tho"8himp> your
honor,” suggested a lawyer.
“That's’a fact. Prisoner on the
stump, come up to the rack and
plead.”
“The prisoner “chawed” his to
bacco, but remained quiet.
“Didn’t ybii hear me, sir!”
The prisoner continued to
“chaw.”
•‘Look hear, prisoner on the
stump, if you don’t pay attention
to me, blamed.if I don’t call the
dogs and set ’em on you. Are yihi
guilty.or not gnilty!”
“I stole the socks, judge, if that
is what you’re driving at.”
“That’s what wo’rfc driving at,
and that’s what we want to find
oift, InA you aro such a liar, pris
oner on the stump, that I do hot
knotv ’whether or not to believe
you. Well, I never saw a man what
could not tell tho truth sometimes,
and I believe I’ll take yonr word
for it.”
•‘Well, judge, to tell tho truth I
did notjstea! them.”
“Prisoner on the stump, now 1
know you did. The witness says
that immediately after you went
through tho yard, tho socks was
missing off the lino.
“Well, jedge, you passed along
thar about tho same time, and gen
tlemen of the jury,” continued thtj
prisoner, “I move that wo sarcll
tho Squire.”
“Pm in for that, said one of the
jurymen, “for although I know the
judge to be honest iu a community
where everything is too heavy to
lift, but no longer ago than yester
day 1 heard him say that he needed
and would like to have a pair of
old-fashioned, home-knit socks.—
Suppose we sarch him fellers?”
The judge leaped from the fence
aud attempted to run away, but u
fleet-footed who for years had been
in the habit of running from the
grand jury, caught him. The socks
were fouud iri his coat-tail pock
et.
“I didn’t steal ’em,”he declared
when h*1 had been brought back
to the lot and arraigned against the
fence, “Spareribs put ’em in my
pocket.
“Then whar made you runf” ask
ed Spareribs.
“Because I didn’t kntfw that I
had the soeks till you fellers began
to talk about sarchiug me, then,
feolin’ ’round I found ’em. I
knowed then that 1 didn't have no
time to lose.”
“I’ll be thojedge,” said Spard
ribs, seating himself on the fence.
“Put the thief on the stump, Mr.
constable. I'll show you how I
can administer justice.”
“Boys,” said the judge, when lie
had been lilted up and jammed
down Brt the stump, “I did steal
thetn socks, but 1 didn’t mean to.
They was hanging so low I could
not help it. Now let mo make a
motion.”
“You mitdo one just now and
come mighty nigh .gifting away,”
said Spareribs.
“Hold on, Sparey, let mo talk”
said the justice. “I move that we
Hing the thing outeu court so fur
as it relates to all uf us, that we
flue the owner of the soeks ten
dollars for bangin’ ’em so low that
good [citizens bo tempted, alrter
which we’ll go [to my house and
get a snoot of fuss-class brandy.—
What do you say?”
The motion was unanimously
carried.
Several days afterwards, the Cir
cuit judge, bearing of the affair,
attempted to set aside the verdict,
hence the excitement concerning
the attempt to defeat jd stice.
The Boston V»st knows all about
a man by passing his house. If he
has a stone dog on the lawn that
settles it, ttud he is classed under
the head of eminent citizeu.
Dr. Burchard’s portrait now
adorns Grover Cleveland’s guber
natorial otlice. Kefuibiicans may
be ungrateful, Put Democrats are'
not.
FOSTER S UGAR
Hardware
Company*
WEST MAIN ST,,
Prescott, Arkansas
GENERAL DEALERS IN
flARDWARS
AKd
FARM MACHIRER1,
mnn wm,
& T
TINWARE,
AND FINK CUTLERY
First class Tin Sitor in connoo
lion with the store. Jan. la ’84
NEW
LIIMSMOSLE,
GILMAN t BR0„
PROPRIETORS,
PRESCOTT. ARK..
TjMNKST Buggies, Rinks ami Horae* ft
F/ southwest Arkuiisas. lluggies ami
Hacks all bran new.
FINEST OUTFITS FOR DRUMMERS.
Gentle saddle horses far lata
TERMS REASONABLE.
Good Wagon Yard A ttachea.
At White’* Stable, formerly Edwards and
Carr. Ka»t Main Street.
Stylish Suits.
Do Hot Send yout Orders away
but go to
JOHN WEBER
the Popular Taylor. He has just
received a lot ot new elegant
Cloths, French Worsted. Diago
nals, Fine Calnmerfcft—has thd
latest fasliian plates and gtirauteeg
PERFECT FMT
—AND—
First-Glass Workmanship.
in any style
Call and see his stock before
buying and you will be pleased.
HEADQUARTERS FOR
CHRISTMAS GOODS.
J. H. KERSHAW SCO.;
WEST FRONT STREET,
Have just received the Largest
{and Rest Selected stock of Christ
mas Toys ever exhibited in Pfes
cott. We have also a Well Select
ed stock of Fancy and Family
Groceries, all of which we pro
pose to sell at prices that defy
competition.
Nev. 13th.
J .M. MONTftOsfERY, C. fc. HAMMY,
l.iiml Agent; Notnry Public.
Montgomery & Hamby
ATTON KYS-AT-L AW,
REAL ESTATE ADD COLLECTS iEEHTS.
PUKSCO''IT, ARK ANSAS.
Practice in the' courts at Camden, Mag
India, Lewisville, Texarkana, Washington,
Arl.ndelplim ami Prescott; Supremo and
Fideral Courts at Little Rock,
Will Hssos and pay tuxes, invWtl^rtte ai*i
quiet land titles, eolleet claims iih\ where in
South Arkansas, especially aki’hif -he line * i
the iron Mountain railroad.
Otllce on Elm street, near Court SijltnrA.
W. L. GAINES,
BOOT5SHOEMAKEH.
WKST FRONT STREET,
IMM', SCOTT. - • AUR.

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