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The register. (Monroe, La.) 185?-1861, December 22, 1859, Morning, Image 1

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THE REGISTER.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MOKHINQ,
BY JAMES O. LAND.
JEvery description of JOB PRINT
ING executed with Dispatch and Matnm
Cuur— for CASH.
Tema of >nb*cripti«n.
8®- Invariably in Advance,
Three Dollars per annum, or FnrK Dollars
lor two years.
Two copies, (one year,) $ 5 00
Four " " " 10 00
Ten " " . « 20 00
Single conn...... *....10 cents.
Professional Cards.
COMPXON à BAUD,
Attorneys at Law,
Ofiat at Monroe and Bastrop, La.
Practice in all the Courts of the Twelfth
Judicial District, comprising the Parishes of
Ouachita, Morehouse, Union and Jackson.
referunoes:
Brown, Johnston & Co., New Orleans,
Geo. M. Pinckard & Co., New Orleans,
J. F. Wych&& Co., New Orleans,
Hon. Tbos. T. Land, Supreme Judge.
Hon. Lewis Selby, Provideuce. La.
francis p. stübb8. r. w. jemison.
Monroe, La., Vernon, La.
STÜBBS & JEMISON,
ATTORNI ES AT LAW,
Practice in tlie
Parishes of Ouachita, Jackson, Union,
Morehouse, Caldwell, Franklin, Bien
ville, Claiborne and Winn.
April 14, 1S59. ly.
" R.R1CHARDSÖN,
Attorney & Counselor at Law,
Monroe, La.
Will practice in ail the Courts of the 12th
Judicial District and the parishes of Caldwell
and Franklin.
Oct. 13, 1859. If.
A. H. MARTIN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Monroe, La.
Will attend the Courts in the
Parishes comprising the 11th and 12th
Judicial Districts.
esg" N. B. Office next door below
the Post Office
Nov, 1st. 1858. lj'.
c. h. morrison, ceo. «jrvis
MORRISON & PURVIS,
Attorneys at Lu« ,
[mayS7-ly.] MONltOE, LA.
JOHN McENERY,
AttoriK'y nt Law,
Monroe, La.
Nov. lltli, 1858. ly.
J. ». T. RICHARDSON,
ATTORNEY ANÎ) COUNSELOR AT
LAW,
Monroe. .. .La.
JAS. D, McENERY,
Attorney at Law,
Jilonroe, La.
Nov. 11th, 1858. ly.
EIOBËKT RAY,
Attorney & Counsellor at Law,
M onroe .... L a.
P. II. TOLEPi,
AÏXOBSEÏ AT LAW,
WiNSBono', F ranklin P arish , L a.
Will attend the District Cotirt of
Franklin, Ouachita. Catahoula and
Morehouse Parishes, and ulso the Su
preme Court at Monroe.
June 10, 1858.—ly.
f. a. f. iiarver, m. a. w1iyte.
HARPER & WHT TE,
ATTORNEYS Sf COUNSELORS AT LAW,
IVinnsboro, Franklin Parish, La.
WILL attend promptly to all busi
** ness in the 11th und 12th Judi
cial District Court«.
May 12„1859. ly.
J. B. Mathews. Wsi. McFke.
32 ATM EWS & McFIÎE.
Attorneys Counsellors at Law.
Bastrop, La.
Will attend to all business entrusted
to them in the 12th Judicial District,
and also iu the Supreme Court at Mon
roe.
DR. D. G. TEMPLE.
OPERATIVE, SURGIOAL
AND
MECHANICAL DENTIST,
Monroe, (La.)
March 21, 1853.—ly.
j. i» byknk....,
£S Y a IV E
. ...L. A. SHIELDS.
& SHIELDS.
Receiving and Forwarding
Merchants.
MONROE, LA.
Refer to Filchcr & Goodrich, New Orleans.
Oct. 6, -59.-tf.
FELLOWES & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
149 COMMON STREET,
NEW-OULEANS.
Refer to C. H. Morrison, Esq.
Scientific and Practical
WATCH AND CLOCK
MAKER.
JOHN MILLER,
Monroe, La.
Every description
of Watches, Clocks,
fecial Music Boxes aud
r"*!» Jewelry, carefully repaired.—
■ " Twenty-two years of practical
experience in the business, entitles him
to give the assurance that his work
will not be surpassed by any establish
ment iu Louisiaua.
An assortment of Watches, Clocks
and Jewelry, of all descriptions; also,
Watch Chrystals, Fine Gold and Steel
Keys, Hands, and all other articles, in
his line, always on hand. Old Gold
and Silver exchanged for new articles.
January 1st, 1859. jT ly
:r»« i
•JAMi$ 0. LAND
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE PARISH OF OUACHITA.
PUBLISHER.
VOL. X.
MONROE, LA., THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 22, 1859.
NO. 4.
Nero (Orleans HHtectotjj.
b. bloomfiei.ü. edgar steel
BL00MFIELD & STEEL,
Publishers t Booksellers, Stationers,
and dealers in
PAPERS AND SCHOOL BOOKS,
Law, Medical, Theological and Mis
cellaneous Works, in all styles of bind
ing ; Libraries supplied on liberal
terms;Cheap Publications, Periodicals,
Magazines, received soon as issued
from the press.
Juvenile and Toy Books of every
description, Games, Alphabet Blocks,
Transparent Slates, and ABC Cards.
Blank Book Manufacturers, Printing,
Book Binding, Engraving and. Litho
graphing Visiting Cards neatly exe
cnted.
BL.OOMFIELD, STEEL & CO.,
BOOK SELLERS AND STATIONERS,
60 Camp Street, New Orleans.
Jan. 20, 1859. ly.
H. KENDALL CARTER & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 15 St. Charles Street,
N ew Orleans.
—o—
N. Bi.—IT. K. C. & Co.. are agents for, and
keep constantly ou hand, Pratt's improved Cot
ton Gins.
March 25, 1858. ly.
PILCHER, GOODRICH & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
88 Factor's Row,
new orleans.
Doc. 9, 1858. ly*
J. F. WYCHE & CO.
COTTON FACTOR,
—and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
119 COMMON STREET,
new-oiu.eans.
Dec. 9, 1858. ly*
J. B. BEES & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS
ANli—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Union St.—Over Bank of New Orlean
NEW ORLEANS.
JSrRefers to Juo. Ray, Esq. Monroe
La.
Mardh 15th 1858. ly.
Drugs, Chemicals, Faints,
Oils, Window Glass.
O. O. WOODMAN,
WHOLESALE DRUGGIST,
Corner Commerce and Magazine Sts.
NEW ORLEANS.
Jan. 4, 1859. ly*
' JUJRTON & WORK,
TOBACCO AND GENERAL COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
95 Gravier Street,
New-Orleans.
New OrleAs.
J. II. Buuton,
G. P. W OIIK.
Un. J. C. Massig,
in Commenduui.
Oct. 13, 1859.
Houston, Texas,
i j
i. >1. ai.bbrtsox. D. I.. MÏIME
ALBERTS N <5- MUDGE,
Agents for the sale of Mill and Plan
tation Machinery of every description.
Clemens,- Brown & .Co.'s Single and
Doublo Cylinder Cotton-Gins, gates'
I'atent Steam (luages, No'. 8 Union
Street, New Orleans, La. »
Oct. 13, 1859. ly.
If. JOItDAN JAM. BREWER W. M. OILLASPIE.
GILLASPIE, BREWER h CO.,
COTTON FACTORS.
—and—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
No. 38 UN ION STREET.
NE W ORLEANS.
Mr-Refers to Dr. C. H. Dabbs, Mon
roe, La., and Maj. James H. Brigham,
Morehouse Parish, La.
September 15, i859. ly.
JAMES F. MUSE. UEO. W. MUSE
MUSE & BRO.,
COMMISSION, RECEIVING
—and—
FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
No. 10 Fulton, and 2 Front St.,
new orleans.
July 9. ly.
B . L . LYNCH,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
No. TS Camp Street,
new orleans,
Front Office ever Home Mutual In
surance Co., entrance on Natchez St.
Oct. 6, 1859. ly
DRS. D E HART & SMITH,
dentists,
17 Baronne St. near Canal St.
new orleans.
All operations entrusted to them ^11
be performed in the most skilful man
ner and warranted.
19* Dr. Smith will be in Monroe on
the 25th of September next, to attend on
professional calls and remain three
weeks.
May 12, 1859. ly.
New Fall and Winter Goods 1
BYRNE & SHIELDS,
ARE now receiving and opening their exten
sive stock of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS,
comprising everything needed in this section,
in the way of Plantation supplies, Dry Goods,
Groceries, Hardware, Queensware, Clothing,
Boots aud Shoes, Hats, Caps, Ac.
We have made our purchases entirely at the
North, and cau afford to offer a
Considerable Réduction
puicKS. We would bo glad to have our
friends aud the citizens of Ais and adjoining
parishes, come and sec us and examiue our
stock.
Monroe, October 6, lS59.-tf.
local UtoerUsemcnts.
Fresh Groceries & Provisions.
WE have now in store the largest and most
complete supply of Family Groceries and
Provisions offered in this market, which we can
guarantee to be fresh—as follows :
F lour —Extra St. Louis and Superfine lu
barrels and half-barrels.
Sugar —Common. choice and crushed.
Molassks —Barrels and halves.
Hams —Sugar-cured. Dufficld and Stagg and
Shay's.
Bacon —Clear and ribbed sides and shoulders.
Pork, coffee, pepper, spices, lard, rice, can
dles, soap, wines, brandies, «te., for sale low by
BYIINE & SHIELDS.
Oct. 6, '59.-tf,
Boots, Shoes and Russets.
MEN'S thick double sole, calf, water-proof
BootB, grain horsemen's Boots, tine pump
sole calf boots, boys' calf halt-welt and double
sole boots.
Russe »— 10 cases men 's nnd boys' No. 1
oak tauned, which we are Belling lower than
ever before offered.
Heavy brogans for men and boys.
Women's brogans and boots.
Men's fine calf Congress gaiters.
A large assortment of misses' and children')
shoes of all kinds.
Ladies' goat, morocco, kid and cloth lace
heel boots, buskins and slippers, in every vari
ty, at BYRNE & SHIELDS'.
Monroe, November 3. 1859.
Tobacco ! Tobacco ! !
 LARGE supply of the above article, of
every quality, on band, which we bay di
rect from manufacturers, and can furnuh to
planters and the trade generally at unusually
low rates.
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. C, '59-tf.
Bagging, Rope and Twine.
A FULL supply of India bagging and best
machlue-uiude Rope on hand and for sale
ReadY-Made Clothing.
OVERCOA-TS—Black cloth, black and blue
beaver, pilot cloth and seal saques and
frocks.
Fine black cloth, dress, fancy cass, satiuet and
tweed saqueB and frocks.
Vests —Black and fancy silk, satiu, cassimerc,
black and fancy colored plush velvet.
Pants —Fine black doeskin, fancy cassimerc,
jeans and kersey.
Shirts, drawers, under-shirts, cravats, gloves
mid gentlemen's furnishing goods generally.
nov.3. BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Storage ! Storage ! !
HAVING a commodious Warehouse and
Cotton Sued , all cotton or merchandise
consigned to our care for storage or shipment,
will receive the most prompt attention from
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. 6, '59.-tf.
m
H. GERS0N, Jr. & Co.
NEW LARGE BRICK STORE.
ITAVING removed to their new and
spacious fire proof brick building,
have now opened and are still receiv
ing their new Fall and Winter stock,
consisting of plantation supplies, such
Kerseys, Ky. Linseys,
Jeans, russets, blankets,
llats, negro clothing,
Satinets aud casiuieres ;
Gentlemen's furnishing goods and
clothing —overcoats, -
Dress and frock coats,
Pants and vests,
Boots and shoes, drawers
and shirts, linen and
Silk handkerchiefs,
Cravats, linen and
Flannel shirts, Hosiery and
Gloves, hats and caps.
A complete assortment of youth aud
children's clothing •
A new and fresh quantity of
general groceries, saddleiy,
hardware, porks, cutlery and
stationery, medicines and cigars.
Also a very large assortment of
Ladies' Ooods,
Selected from the largest and most
popular importing houses of N. York,
Boston aud Philadelphia, consisting of
Fine and fashionable dress silks,
Cashmeres, merinos, delaines^
Woolen ghartts, cloaks,
Bonnets, ribbons,
Embroideries,
Hair dresses, corsettes,
Trimmings, perfumery, hosiery,
Gloves, gauntlets,
Slippers and gaiters.
Also a large and well selected stock of
Gold and sUver Watches,
Guard chains—new styles of jewelry,
consisting of coral sets, Comco aud
Mosaic, ear rings, pins, rings, shirt
and sleeve buttons, all of which will
be guaranteed to be what represented.
Their whole stock is one of the lar
gest und best selected ever brought
to this place, and will be sold at much
cheaper prices than heretofore.
A call and examination of goods
and pricos will satisfy all that wa have
the ability to please and suit.
Strict and particular attention will
be paid to orders from our friends and
customers residing at a distance.
Monroe, La., Nov. 3, 1859—6m.
WANTED. — 200 Subscribers to pay
their snbserlpüon to the Registtr.
£ocal AdoettMemcnt« Contnncb.
~THE NEW BRICK STORE
IS THE PLACE TO BUY GOODS At
A BARGAIN!!
DO YOU WANT NEW GOODS !
CALL AT THE NEW BRICK STORE!
DO YOU WANT CHEA1* GOODS:
CALL AT TUE NEW BRICK STORE!
DO YOU WANT GOOD GOODS?
CALL AT THE NF.W BRICK STORE.
Where they arc constantly receiving,
and keep always on hand a well se
lected stock of
STAPLE it FANCY DRY GOODS,
of every description. Ilats and Caps,
Boots and Shoes, and a splendid lot of
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
from the Most Fashionable Houses in
New Orleans.
Also, a fine lot of JEWELRY such
as Watches, Breast Pins, Rings, &c.
Also, a small lot. of Choice Furniture.
Also, a large and choice lot of Cut
lery and Hardware, Bridles and Sad
dles, Books and Stationery. Also, a
new supply of
FAMILY GROCERIES,
and a full Stock of Plantation Goods,
such as Bagging aud Rope, Lowels
and Kerseys, the very best article of
Oak-tanned Russets, Blankets, &c., &c.
All the above articles we will sell
at low prices and on libei'ul terms, to
those who may honor us with their pa
tronage.
The undersigned protend not to sell
their goods at cost . They could not do
that and live. Their object is to do a
fair, legitimate and honorable mercan
tile business. They do not profess to N
undersell everybody el-e ; but pledge
themselves to give satisfaction to
every one who is willing to allow a
reasonable profit. Call, and see us.
S. WEIL & BROTHER.
Oct. 14th, 1858. oH-ly.
Copartnership Notice.
The undersigned have, this
ay, formed a copartnership in this
town, under the firm of Herring &
Eudom, for the purpose of carrying on
the Harness and Carriage shop, op
posite the Bailroad Hotel. We put tip
any kijid.of
C a n ines
Buggies
and
Rorkavtays ;
in any style, and supply our customers
with any kind of Harness of Saddles
which they may call for. Carriages
warranted for one ycaï.
We also do Horse-shoeing and plan
tation work. Upholstering and paper
hanging done here. We have engaged
good Eastern workmen.
HERRING & ENDOM.
Feb. 3d, 1859. ly.
F. BERNHEARDT,
Merchant Tailor,
Monroe, Lu.
TIJ OULD respectfully inform SU
the citizens of Monroe and if 1 ?
vicinity, that he has commenced the
Tailoring Business in this place. He re
spectfully solicits your patronage, He
flatters himself, that from his practical
experience in his business, he will
render entire satisfaction to those
favoring him with their patronage. He
has a very fine assortment of Goods on
hand, which he will sell very low for
cash. His prices will be moderate, and
ho hopes that by doing the very best work
at low prices and a strict attention to
business to merit a liberal share of
patronage.
Iiis shop is on the corner of Grand
and De Siard Streets.
Monroe, La. Jan. 3d, 1859 ly.
NOTICE!!
George Koehler, Gunsmith,
/~J.1VES notice, that lie has permanent
ly located in Monroe, and is pre
pared to make or repair
Guns, Pistols, he.
An experience of fifteen years in the
most celebrated manufactories in Ger
many, enables him to do work superior
to any to be found in the South-west.
His work is already known, aB a
residence of six years in Farrnerville
has given his work much celebrity,
All his work is warranted, and with
proper care' will last a generation.
He keeps on hand
Guns, Pistols,
and
Hunting Apparatus
Generally.
Office—Two doors South of P. O.
Monroe, March 10, 1859.
D. D. TURNER, Prnprittt/r.
AND
TRENT'S LIVERY STABLE,
H. J. TRENT, Proprietor.
These establishments
are now open for the
accommodation of the
public, and the proprietors hope by
proper attention, to obtain a liberal
share of public patronage.
Trenton, La., Dec. 18, 1968. lj-*
H:
N
From the New Orleans Picayune.
THIRTY-SIXTH CONGRESS.
House Representatives Still Unorganized,
W ashington , Dee. 12.
The House of Representatives met to-day at
the usual hour, and immediately resumed the
discussion of Mr. Clark's resolution touching
the unfitness of such candidates an had endorsed
the treasonable seutiments of the Black Re
publican circular. No vote was taken for
Speaker, nor was any attempted.
It is now believed that another week will be
consumed by political disputes aud personal
explanations. *
Proceedings of the Sknatr.
In the Senate Mr. Ivcrson of Georgia made a
personal explanation. In the course of which he
said that in the remarks he made the other day
upon the nnsouudness of the Democratic party,
North, ho had not intended to charge Senators
or leading meu of the party with complicity in
the Johu Brown foray, but he merely intetided
to say that the position of Senator Douglaa in
regard to the territorial rights of the Southern
people was not sound, and a large portion of
the Democrats, agree with Douglas upon that
question.
Mr. Bigler defended the Northern Democracy
from the charge of leaning towards Abolition
ism,
Johnson, of Tennessee, made a speech against
the Republicans aud in defence of the Union.—
He denounced John Brown and his connitators
as thieves and murderers, lie also criticised
Senator Seward's Rochester speech very severe
ly, alter which the Senate adjourned.
Washington , Dec. 13.
In the lluti6c, yesterday, Mr. Stuwart, of
Maryland, made a firm and temperate speech
in defence of Southern rights.
Messrs. Ilaskin, of New York, and Hickman,
of Pennsylvania, made brief speeches in justi
fication of their refusal to act with the Demo
cratic party in the organization ot the House.
Another ballot for Speaker of the llouso was
called for, but Mr. Clarke, of Missouri, pro
tested against it, and said ho would resist to
the \i I most any attempt to proceed to the elec
tion of Speaker.
u. S. Senator from Kuntlckv.
Washington , Deo. 12.
A dispatch from Frankfort, Ky., announces
that Vice I'residcut Breckinridge was to day
elected by the Legislature of Kentucky as I 1 .
S. Senator from that State.
Breckinridge's majority on joint ballot was
29.
Gen. Scott's Health.
W ashington , Dec. 13.
Private letters, received here from Gen. Scott
say that his health has greatly improved by his
journey to I ho Pacific.
Boston Municipal Ei kction.
BosfoN, Dec, 12.
Mayor Lincoln was re-elected Mayor of tlii*
iity to-day by about liiuO majority. A majori
ty of the Common Council of the Lincoln stripe
are also elected.
A Great Cry and Little Wool.
From the day on which, iu the month of
April last, a meeting was called at Odd Fel
lows' Hall in this city, by one hundred and one
individuals styling themselves Democrats, until
that ou which our late general election was
held, the people of this Parish, and of ihe State
at large, have been amused with the antics of
insignificant handful of political adventurers
composed of one or two disappointed aspirants,
aud a tail of ungrateful office holders, who have
years past been growing fat on office ob
tained at the hand.s of the Democratic parly of
Louisiana, aud whom much prosperity has driv
en to the hallucination that they had the desti
ny of their benefactors iu their hands, and
could shape the action of a great aud powerful
political organization to their caprices or their
pecuniary iuterests. That assemblage, while
clamoring against the ancient and well known
usages of the Demeeratic party in this city, and
denouncing in ribald and shamefully false
terms, the wise aud patriotic Administration of
Mr. Buchanan, also nnnouueed a policy—if so
pitiful a squad could be supposed to have i
policy—with regard to the legislative poweri
existing in the inhabitants of the organized ter
ritorics of the United States, which brings its
propounders so near the Black Republican par
ty that practically there is no difference be
tween them, so far as the equal rights of the
slaveholding Stales in the common property of
the Federal Union is concerned.
Nevertheless, the concocters of this scheme of
defection and disorganization, trusting either
to the forbearance of the real Democracy, or to
the liberal credulity of our'population, had the
boldnerw to proclaim themselves the States'
Rights Democracy of Louisiana, and to enter
into a contest with the friends of the Adminis
tration on the issue which they had framed
against it. Their first essay was to elect a del
egation to the State Democratic Convention,
held at Baton Rouge on the fourth Monday i
May ; their delegates were refused seats in its
deliberations, and their leader, denied the sym
pathy of any portion of the country Democracy,
quitted Baton Rouge in dudgeon aud disgust,
aud returned home, to use a homely old exprès
sion, " with a flea in his ear." But defeat and
the repudiation of hi« policy by those to whom
he had fondly looked for aid and encourage
ment, did not teach him either common sense
or moderation ; for he next proceeded to the
establishment of a club, which, in order to en
trap the unwary, was called *' the titatcs' Rights
Democratic Club," which, it is to be supposed
he harangued in his most eloquent manner, in
order to prepare and discipline it in his darling
project ot killiug off a party whose only offense
as regarded himself was, that ho was denied that
measure of honors and influence iu its councils
which it accorded others, whom it took the lib
erty of believing better qualified for high sta
tion, and more reliable in the performance of
their duties. Small as were its numbers this
club was c oon divided, a-it is rumored, bccause
the self-elected leader was too tyranical and
imperious in hi* temper aud demnnds to be lon
ger endured by those who retained any spirit
of independence or any lingering feeling of at
tachment to their former political association*
Hencejhe formation of the Louisiana Demo
cratic Association, and the division of the al
ready diminutive force of the Olsorganiseis into
two separate camps.
The States' Rights Club, sometime in the
summer, enacted the farce of nominating a can
didate for Congress, representing Us very pe
culiar views, in the person of a worthy and os
inablc gentleman in private life. From the
lime he accepted the nomination, conferred un
der such auspices, the public car was repeated
ly assured that his election was next to certain;
nnd w hen the true Democrats of the District
imbled inCouveutiou, and put forward
candidate representing ils views, the soi diMant
•States' Rights men affected much amusement
at such temerity, and ridiculed the Idea of the
success of the nominee, piirticuluriy in the par
ishes or JMaiiuemines aud St. Bernard, thu for
mer of which, it was alleged, wt uld give the
States' Rights nominee an overwhelming ma
jority. During the cam ass Mr. Thos. Jefferson
Durant, the Opposition candidate for Attorney
General of the State, in one, at least, of those
turgid harangues which he evidently thought
to be modeled upon the most graceful nnd pow
erful orations delivered by Cicero in the old
Roman days, wert so fur as to assert that hud
the Democracy, which stood by its old colors,
dared to meet the forces of the Odd Fellows'
Hull meeting on the snme tiny and at the same
places, the latter would have beaten tlicin two
votes to one In the election of delegates to the
Baton Rouge Convention. Coming from a
gentleman whose every day professional life
teaches him the grout value of facts iu argu
ment, this assertion fell rather slurliiugly o.
the curs of those who remembered Die numbe
of voles polled at the respuilve elections fo
those delegates ; and hud the distinguished or
ator been nsked l'or a moment to suspend his
declarations ol rhapsodical enthusinsm, in his
new character as an Opposition orator, and his
poetical quotations to back them, and to bring
forward facts (o verify his assertions on this
point, we venture tu believe that he would
have been sadly at a loss to cuinply with the
demand.
Having thus shown what were the preten
sions of Hie virtuous '• rurlllculors " of New
Orleans Democracy before the election came
>11, we come now to the result; and hero wo
ulll confine ourselves lo the First Congression
al District, as affording the oient-est proof of
llielr strength, for in the upper portions of the
ly they ran no candidates, and most likely
merged their vote In that of the Opposition,
Beginning with the Eighth City l'reoincl, we
And tile following to have been the respect!
otes of M cimi & Emile LiiSeri, the regular Dé
mocratie, and Charles Bienvenu, the "filuUV
Rights" nominee for Congress: there being
two polls iu inch precinct ;
Bienvenue, S. R. Dem.
Eighth
Ninth :
Tenth
Eleventh :
Twelfth :
Thii teen th :
Fourteenth
Fifteenth :
Sixteenth :
Seventeenth
Eighteenth:
Nineteenth:
Twentieth :
Twenty-First
Algiers :
Total :
LaSere, Dem.
213
1329
Total :
It will thus bo
city of New Grl«
213
1329
n that In the parish nnd
I, thu vole of Mr. LaSere
was more than six timku us great as that of his
so called Slate»' Rights opponent. In the par
ish of St. Bernard the figure« stood, as well
wc remember, (having mislaid the returns) La
Sere lull, Bienvenu 44, a proportion or more
than three lo one. From ritupieiniucs purisii
the uDIcial returns of this cleollou are still most
unaccountably missing, but from the accounts
which have come to hand as lo the result I
most of the precincts, Mr. jÄSoro's majority
over Mr. Bienvenu is in almost as great, if nul
renliy as great, a proportion us it was in the
cily. We do not believe tlmt the latter genllc
man obtained lour hundred votes in the entire
District ; and, from information we have .
tallied, not n few or those actually cast ror h
were given In fulfillment or promises mntlc be
lore Mr. LaScrc wus nominated, und not through
sympathy with the Odd Fellows' Hall move
ment.
Before concluding, we wish to bring lo the
notice or the Democracy or the Slate another
significant tact. The Odd Fellows' llall Puri
fiers not finding in the city any one witli a po
litical character sufficiently unspotted and pur«
Tor their purposes, sent down to l'luipieiniues,
anil round, at Deer Range .Plantation, another
Cinclnnatus, in the person of Maunsel White,
and brought him up lo town lu preside at their
meeting. One would have thought that (his
venerable gentleman possessed, in an unlimited
degree, the personal anil political esteem of Iiis
fellow parishioners, nnd they would be glad to
sei7.e any occasion to do him all honor. What
then was the astonishment or the general pub
lie, at finding that lie bad obtained from them
less than sixty votes, although he was nomina
ted for the State Senate by this same virtuous
and powerful States' Kighls party, being badly
beaten by Ihe regular Demoeratié nominee, Mr.
Lawrence.
We trust that these rucls will not be without
weight ou the minds ofDimocrats. particular];
of our country friends, and (hat hsi cal
M
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Liberal discount made to quarterly,
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Announcing candidates for office (to ba
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double rates, aud paid for In «francs.
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will be inserted until ftjrbld and charged ac
cordingly.
one among them will be for a moment deceived
by the noisy declamation aud specious preten
sions of the little band of disorganize» who
have been making themselves eo conspicuous!/
ridiculous for the past six months.—Atw OrUtnt
Courier,
Telegraphed to the N. O. Picspuue.
Laier from California.
Tuk otkrlan» Mail at St. Louis.
The oveHand California mail, from Sah
Franoisco the 18th ult., has arrived in thlaoitjr
with four days later Intelligence from th«
Pacific.
Business at San Franoisco is very stead/ an4
firm, although money is scarce.
The otvrland mail fVoni St. Lou 's to CalUot«
nia, with St. Louis dates to the 21st ult., was
passed by the return maii at Malloy statlou.
Gen. Scott has arrived,at Sau Francisco (Vom
Vancouver's I«land. % île was enthusbutlcally
received by all classes of cUitens.
The stealer Cortes, from New York, with
passengers, has not arrived at San Fraiicisoo up
to the 18th ult.
The Cortes left New York on tho 20th of
October, und had had full time to reach her
destination. Very serious npprehcusioni art
entertained for her safely.
The steamer Northerner has beensetcfal days
overdue from Pnget's Sound.
The case of Boggs vt. The Merced Mining
Company, which ease has been in court for some
length of time, lias been decided in favor
Boggs, which substantially gives the gold aa
well us the land to J. C. Fremont.
Latkii from Sonoiu.
* St. Louis , Dec. 1Ï.
By way of Arizona, the overland mall brluga
news front Stfuora that Captain Ewall has bM*
successful iu his interview with Pesquiera.
Stone's surveying party hate been allowed to
proceed In their laboiy, which had been sus
pended by Pesqulera.
The new Juarez government has beso rs
cognized by Pesqulera,
Later from Caiison Vallk*.
St. Louis , Dec. If.
The overl and mall brings news from Carsou
Valley of the election of Juo. J. Musser, as
delegate to Congress, from tho Territory of
Nevada.
A very large and rieh silver lode has been
discovered in Carson Valley, which Is supposed
to be a continuation of the Comstock vein.
A Tribute to Washington Irving*
The following graceful tribute to tho la
mented In lug appours iu tho Boston Courier,
aud is probably from the peu of Mr. George S.
Hillard :
Irving has long been the most populur of our
American authors ; and on this account there
Is leas ueed of dwelling at length upon the
peculiar characteristics of his exquisite geulu».
Wo can hardly llatter ourselves that these words
of ours will lu» rend by any one not familiar
with his delightful writings. We should bu but
telling a thrice-told tale if we should attempt
to do justice to the magic grace of his stylo,
his easy and flowing narrative? his delicious
humor, and hit* tenderness aud sweetness of
B'uliment. Besides these peculiar literary
merits, there is au indefinable charm in his
writings, infused from his own personal cha
raeler. With him the style was Indeed the man t
His works are penetrated with that kindliness,
gentleness and cordiality which were reeognized
in his manners aud bearing, by all who hud the
privilege of approach to his person. There was
no gall in his ink, because there was none iu hia
blood. Knvy, malice aud hatred never knock"
ed at the door of his heart. Mo lYovcr lost M
friend, or made an aneiny. His nature was
genial, sympathetic and sweet L. soured by no
disappointments, wanted by no stormy passion«.
And esteem and respect followed him no less
Few men of letters had ever led rnoro honor
able and reputable lives than he. In his carcer
there was nothing for a friend to suppress, nor
an cucmy—had lie had one— to proclaim, Hlr
had none of the Irregular Impulses by which
men or genius are so often led astray, and no*
thing of that weakness of character which nol
»infrequently accompanies the most brilliant
endowments. Heir to all tho graceful genius
and delicate humor of Addison and Goldsmith,
he escaped the coldness of the former, and stlܫ
more the moral obliquities of thV» latter', /hid*
his life, now that it has been brought to a close,
may be pronounced (o ImVn been eminently
lmppy. Fame was his, ah'J love and honor; hi
his latter years, exulted iritd reverencc. How
serene aud beautit\il Wero his declining years;
how graced and dignified with everything that
should accompany old age I tho favor wttfe
which his countrymen received Iiis latest pro
ductions was an earnest and'antldlpfillbn of the
unbiased judgment of posterity, lîven in bis
lifetime, the spot where he lived became an ob
ject of interest second only to Mount Veruon.
And now that he has gone to the grave, iu th®
fullness of time, ;• like fruit seasonably gather
ed, ' his work done,. Iiis harvest «Heaves all
reaped and bound, we can mourn for him only
with that natural sorrow which is tho just tri^
bute to departed worth. Gently and kindi/
has the immortal spirit been released from tho
mortal tenement that was beginning to feel tb*
touch of decay. Who that loved hira would,
have kept him longer here ? Hail and farewell (
EnWAKDjSVBUKTT IN PoUTLANl), M e.—On' Hi
evening of the 6th inst., Mr. hvcrett delivered
his great oratiou on the Life and Character of
George Washington, under the auspices of i
Mercautilo Library Association, of Pos' 1
Me,, for tho benefit of the Mount Ve«"'
Association, to the largest au v
assembled iu that city.
wasuis.oton Im^"* Estatic. Wo sco it
stated lhatJl^" B * ,url '' vi " K lc * v< -'» " lBr K»
f')rt U [i»»*<"!u' v " k " J amongst his nephews i a I
For the Inst eight or ten years he hau
'obably received from bin books alouc an*
5e annual income of S'-'O OOQ.

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