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The register. (Monroe, La.) 185?-1861, December 29, 1859, Morning, Image 1

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THE REGISTER
rpblished every thursday morning,
BY C. TELLES.
.J*®* Every description of JOB PRIi\T
JUSO executed with Dispatch and Neatness—
/Cheap —for CASH.
Torrn» of Subscription.
8&• Invariably in 4'lcance.
T drek D ollars per annum, or F ite D ollars
<«r two years.
i Two copies, (one year,) $ 5 00
Four " " " 10 00
Ten « " " 20 00
Single corona 10 cents.
REGISTER.
SAMUEL BARD,
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE PARISH OF OUACHITA.
EDITOR.
VOL. X.
MONROE, LA., THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 29, 1859.
NO. 5.
; à è" " /
ADVERTISING RATES.
For one square of tkx lines, or less, for flfil
insertion $1 0®
For each additional insertion, per square 60
«ET Liberal discount made to quarterly,
semi-annual and yearly advertisers.
Steamboat Notices, for the season. .$15
S- ft" Announcing candidates for ottlce (to be
paid in advance) $10
Professional and Busineß Cards, (not to
exceed atx lines,) published twelve mouths. .$10
JSC*- Cards of a pkksonai . character can only
be published in this paper as advertisements, at
double rates, and paid for in advance.
Advertisements not marked on th« Copy
will be inserted until forbid and chargea Ac
cordingly.
. Professional GTarùs.
H. COMPTON,
f Bottrop.
COMPTON & BARD,
Attorneys at Law,
Offices at Monroe and Bastrop, La.
Practice In all the Courts of the Twelfth
Judicial District, comprising the Parishes of
Ouachita, Morehouse, Union aud Jackson.
REFERENCES :
ßrown, Johnston & Co., New Orleans,
fcrco. M. Pinckard & Co., New Orleans,
J. P. Wyche & Co., New Orleans,
Hon. Thos. T. Land, Supreme Judge.
Hon. Lewis Selhy, Providence, La.
francis p. stub bs. u. w. jemison.
Monroe, La., Vernon, La.
STUBBS & JEMISON,
ATTORNIES AT LAW,
Practice ill the
Parisbea cf Ouachita, Jackson, Union,
Morehouse, Caldwell, Franklin, Bien
ville, Claiborne and Winn.
April 14, 1859. ly.
IL RICHARDSON,
Attorney & Counselor at Law,
M onroe, L a.
Will practice in all the Courts of the 12th
Judicial District and the parishes of Caldwell
aud Franklin.
Oct. 13, 1839. iy.
A. H. MARTIN,
„ ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Monroe, La.
Will attend the Courts in the
Parishes comprising the lltli and 12tU
Judicial Districts.
HâS~ N. B. Office next door below
the Post Office
Nov. 1st. 1858. ly.
C. h. morrison, geo. purvis
MORRISON & PURVIS,
Attorneys at La*v,
[may27-ly.J MONltOE, LA.
JOHN McENERY,
Attorney at Law,
Monroe, La.
Nov. lltli, 1858. ly.
Nov. lltli, 1858. ly.
J. IV. T. UE1I1 lRI)SO\,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR A'
LAW,
M oxkoe . . . .L a.
JAS. D. McENERY,
Attorney at Law,
Monroe, La.
Nov. lltli, 1858. lv.
KOIIEÜIT KAY,
Attorney & Counsellor at Law,
Monroe .... La.
1\ II. TOLEK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Winsboro', Franklin Parish, La.
Will attend the District Court of
Franklin, Ouachita. Catahoula and
Morehouse Parishes, and also the Su
preme Court at Moliroe.
June 10, 1S58.— ly.
i'. a. f. nAIIl 'er, W'SI. a. w1iyte.
HARPER & WHITE,
ATTORNEYS Sr COUNSELORS AT LAW.
Winnsboro, Franldin Parish, La.
WILL attend promptly to all Imsi
'* ness iu the 11th and 12th Judi
cial District Courts.
May 12, 1859. ly.
J. B. Mathews. Wh. MoFee.
MATllEWS & McFEG.
Attorneys i$- Counsellors at Law.
Bastrop, La.
Will attend to all business entrusted
to them in the 12th Judicial District,
and also in the Supreme Court at Mon
roe.
DR. D. G. TEMPLE.
OPERATIVE, SURGICAL
and
MECHANIC A Jj DENTIST,
Monroe, (La.)
March 21, 1858.—ly.*
J. L. BYRNE
BYRWE
l. a. siiield3.
SHIELDS.
Receiving and Forwarding
Merchants.
MONROE, LA.
Refer to Pilcher & Goodrich, New Orleans.
Oct. 6, '59.-tf.
Oct. 6, '59.-tf.
FELLOWES & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
149 COMMON STREET,
NEW-ORLEANS.
Refer to C. H. Morrison, Esq.
Scientific and Practical
WATCH AND CLOCK
MAKER.
JOHN MILLER,
Monroe, La.
Every description
of Watches, Clocks, [Çlj
Music Boxes and
Jewelry, carefully repaired.—
^Twenty-two years of practical
experience in the business, entitles hi
to give the assurance that his work
will not be surpassed by any establish
ment in Louisiana.
An assortment of Watches, Clocks
and Jewelry, of all descriptions; also,
Watch Chrystals, Fine Gold and Steel
Keys, Hands, and all other articles in
his line, always on hand. Old Gold
and Silver exchanged for new articles.
January 1st, 1859. j* ]y
Ncra (Orleans Oitcclorn.
b. bloomfield. edgar steel
BL00UFIELD & STEEL,
Publishers, Booksellers, Stationers,
and dealers in
PAPERS AND SCHOOL BOOKS,
Law, Medical, Theological and Mis
cellaneous Works, in all styles of bind
ing ; Libraries supplied on liberal
terms; Cheap Publications, Periodicals,
Magazines, received soon as issued
from the press.
Juvenile and Toy Books of every
description, Games, Alphabet Blocks,
Transparent Slates, and ABC Cards
Blank Book Manufacturers, Printing,
Book Binding, Engraving aud Litho
graphing- Visiting Cards neatly exe
cuted.
BLOOMFIELD, STEEL & CO.,
BOOK SELLERS AND STATIONERS,
GO Camp Street, New Orleans.
Jan. 20, 1859. ly.
H. KENDALL CARTER & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 15 St. Charles Street,
New Orleans.
—o—
N. B. — II. K. C. & Co., are agents for, and
keep constantly on hand, i'ratt's improved C ot
ton G ins.
March 25„ 1858. ly.
PILCHER, GOODRICH & CO-,
COTTON FACTORS
—and—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
38 Factor 's l!ow,
new orleans.
Dec. 9, 1858. ly*
J. F. WYCI1E & CO.
COTTON FACTOR,
—and—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
119 COMMON STREET,
new-orleans.
Dec. 9, 1853. " ' ly*
J.B. BltES & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS
—and—
C OMMISSION M13RCI1 ANTS,
Union St.—Over Bank of New Orlcau.
NEW ORLEANS.
ßäs-Kefei'S to Jno. lia}', Esq. Monroe,
La.
Murfli 15th 1858. ly.
Drugs, Chemicals, Paints,
Oils, Window Glass.
O. O. WOODMAN,
WHOLESALE DRUGGIST,
Corner Commerce and Magazine Sts.
NEW ORLEANS.
Jan. 4, 1859. ly*
j. m. ai.bebtdon. ii. i.. mlllue
ALBERTS N <?• MUJJGE,
Agents for the sale of Mill and Plan
tation Machinery of every description,
demons, Brown & Co.'s Single and
Double Cylinder Cotton Gins, Bates'
Pateut Steam tillages. No. S Union
Street, New Orleans, La.
Oct. 13, 1859: ly.
BURTON LÛ WORK,
TOBACCO AND GENERAL COMMISSION
fll E JR. C HANTS.
U3 Gravier Street,
N ew -On leans .
Orleans.
"SicIÄ }
Oct. 13,1859. ly.
ii. jordan jas. brewer w. m. qillasl'ie.
GILLASPIE, BREWER & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS.
—akd—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
No. 38 UNION STKEET.
NEW ORLEANS.
JgyRefe'rs to Dr. C. H. Dabbs, Mon
roe, La., and Muj. James H . Brigham,
Morehouse Parish, La.
September 15, 1859. ly.
September 15, 1859. ly.
JAMES F. muse. ' oeo. W.wJU.'Sl
MUSE & BRO„
COMMIS S ION, RECEIVING
FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
No. 10 Fulton, and 2 Front St.,
SEW ORLEANS.
July 9. ly.
B . L . LYNCH,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
No. 78 (Jump Street,
new orleans,
Front Office over Home Mutual In
surance Co., entrance on Natchez St.
Oct. 6, 1859. ly
DRS. D E HART & SMITH,
DENTISTS,
1? Baronne St. near Canal St.
new orleans.
All operations entrusted to them will
be performed in the most skilful man
ner and warranted.
UST" Dr. Smith will bo in Monroe on
the 25 th of September next, to attend on
professional calls and remain three
weeks.
May 12, 1859. ]y,
Eoc.il attiertisemntts.
New Fall and Winter Goods!
BYRNE & SHIELDS,
ÂRE now receiving aud opening their exten
sive stock of
FALL AKD WINTER GOODS,
comprising everything needed iu this section,
in the'way of plantation supplies, Dry Goods,
Groceries, Hardware,' Queensware, Clothing,
Boots and Shoes, Hats, Caps, Ac.
We have made our purchases entirely at the
North, aud cau alford to offer a
Considerable Reduction
ix prices . We would be glad to have our
friends aud the citizens of this aud adjoining
parishes, come aud see us and examine our
stock.
Monroe, October G, 1859.-tf.
Fresli Groceries & Provisions.
WE haf-e now in store the largest and most
complete supply of Family Groceries and
Provisions offered iu this market, which we can
guarantee to be fresh—as follows :
F lour —Extra St. Louis and Superfine in
barrels and half-barrels.
S ugar —Common, choice and crushed.
M olasses —Barrels aud halves.
H ams —Sugar-cured, Duffield and Stagg and
Shay's.
B a<:ox —Clear and ribbed sides and shoulders.
Pork, coifoe, pepper, spices, lard, rice, can
dies, soap, wines, brandies, &c., for sale low by
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Oct. G, 'oO.-tf.
Boots, Shoes and Russets.
MEN'S thick double sole, calf, water-proof
Boots, grain horsemen's Boots, fine pump
sole calf boots, boys' calf halt-welt and double
sole boots.
R ussets —10 cases men's and boys' No. 1
oak tanned, which we are selling lower than
ever before ottered.
Heavy brogans for men and boys.
Women's brogans and boots.
Men's fine calf Congress gaiters.
A large assortment of misses' and children's
shoes of all kinds.
Ladies' goat, morocco, kid and cloth lace
heel boots, buskins and slippers, in every vari
ety. at BYRNE & Sill ELDS'.
Mouroe, November 3. 1C59.
Tobacco ! Tobacco ! !
LARGE supply Qf the above article,
of
:ry quality, on baud, which we buy di
rect from manufacturers, and can furnish to
planters and the trade generally at unusually
low rates.
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. 6, '59—tf.
Bagging, Hope and Twine.
4 FULL supply of India bagging and best
1\. machine-made Rope on hand and for sale
low by . BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. 6, '59.-tf.
Ready-Made Clothing.
OVERCOATS—Black cloth, black and blue
beaver, pilot cloth and seal eaques and
frocks.
Fine black cloth, dress, fancy cass, satinet aud
tweed saques and frocks.
V ests —Black and fancy silk, satin, cassiniire,
black aud fancy colored plush velvet.
P ants —Fine black doeskin, fancy cassiincre,
jeans aud kersey.
Shirts, drawers, under-shirts, cravats, gloves
and gentlemen's furnishing goods generally.
nov,3. BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Storage ! Storage ! !
HAVING a commodious W arehouse and
C otton S ued , all cotton or merchandise
consigned to our care for storage or shipment,
will receive the most prompt attention from
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. <J, '59.- tf.
Monroe, <J, tf.
H. GERSON, Jr. & Co.
NEW LARGE BRICK STORE.
O" A VING removed to their new and
spacious fire proof brick building,
have now opened and are still receiv
ing their new Fall and Winter stock,
consisting of plantation supplies, such
Kerseys, Ky. Linseys,
Jeans, russets, blankets,
■ Hats, negro clothing,
^ Satinets and casiincres ;
Gentlemen's furnishing goods ami
clothing —overcoats,
Dress and frock coata,
Pants and vests,
Boots and shoes, drawers
and shirts, linen and
Silk handkerchiefs,
Cravats, linen and
Flannel shirts, Hosiery and
Gloves, hats and caps.
A complete assortment of youth and
children's clothing ;
A new and fresh quantity of
general groceries, saddleiy, SM
hardware, porks, cutlery and
stationery, medicines and cigars.
Also a very large assortment of
Ladies' Goods,
Selected from tho largest and most
popular importing houses of N. York,
Boston and Philadelphia, consisting of
Fine and fashionable dress silks.
Cashmeres, merinos, delaines,
W< jlen shawls, cloaks,
Bonnets, ribbons,
Embroideries, »
Hair dresses, corsettcs,
Trimmings, perfumery, hosiery,
Gloves, gauntlets,
Sllppers and gaiters.
Also a large anil well selected stock of
Gold and silver Watches,
Guard chains—new styles of jewelry,
consisting of coral sets, Comeo and
Mosaic, ear-rings, pins, rings, shirt
and sleeve buttons, all of which will
be guaranteed to be what represented.
Their whole stock is one of the lar
gest und best selected ever brought
to this place, and will be sold at much
cheaper prices than heretofore.
A call and examination of goods
and prices will satisfy all that we have
the ability to please and suit.
Strict and particular attention will
be paid to orders from our friends and
customers residing at a distance.
Monroe, La., Nov. 3, 1859—6m.
WANTED.— 200 Subscribers to pay
their subscription to the Register.
total ÛVbucrttocmrnts Centime!).
THE NEW BRICK STORE
IS THE PLACE TO BUY GOODS AT
A BARGAIN!!
DO YOU WANT NEW GOODS Î
CALL AT TUE NEW BRICK STORE!
DO YOU WANT CIIEAP GOODS?
C. ILL A T TUE NE 11' BRICK STORE!
DO YOU WANT GOOD GOODS?
CALL AT TUE NEW BRICK STORE,
Where they are constantly receiving,
and keep always on hand a well so
lected stock of
STAPLE & PASCT DRY GOODS,
of every description. Hats and Caps,
Boots and Shoes, and a splendid lot of
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
from the Most Fashionable Houses in
New Orleans.
Also, a fine lot of JEWELRY sue!
as Watches, Breast Pins, Kings, &e.
Also, a small lot of Choice Furniture
Also, a large and choice lot of Cut
lery and Hardware, Bridles and Sad
dles, Books and Stationery. Also,
new supply of
FAMILY GROCERIES,
and a full Stock of Plantation Goods,
such as Bagging and Rope, Lowels
and Kerseys, the very best article of
Oak-tanned Russets, Blankets, &c., &<•
All the above articles wo will sell
at low prices and on liberal terms, to
those who may honor us with their pa
tronage
The undersigned pretend not to sell
their goods at cost . They could not do
that and live. Their object is to do a
fair, legitimate and honorable mercan
tile business. They do not profess to
undersell everybody else ; but pledge
themselves to give satisfaction to
every one who is willing to allow a
reasonable profit. Call, and sec us.
S. WEIL & BROTHER.
Oct. 14th, 1858. ol4-ly.
Copartnership Notice.
The undersigned have, this
day, formed a copartnership in this
town, under the firm of Herring &
lindom, for tho purpose of carrying on
the Harness and Carriage shop, op
posite tho Railroad Hotel. We put up
any kind of
C uirings,
Buggies
and
Rocknvrays ;
in an} 7 style, and supply our customers
with any kind of Harness or Saddles
which they may call for. Carriages
warranted for one year.
We also do Horse-shoeing and plan
tation work. Upholstering and paper
hanging done here. Wo have engaged
good Eastern workmen.
HERRING & ENDOM.
Fob. Sd, 1859. ly.
P. BERNHEARDT,
Merchant Tailor,
Monroe, La.
TXT OULD respectfully inform SE
the citizens of Monroe and _J
vicinity, that he has commenced tho
Tailoring Business in this place. He re
spectfully solicits your patronage. Ho
Hatters himself, that frum his practical
experience in his business, ho will
render entire satisfaction to those
favoring him with their patronage. Ile
has a very fine assortment of Goods on
hand, which he will sell very low for
cash. Iiis prices will be moderate, and
he hopes that by doing the rery best work
at low prices and a strict attention to
business to merit a liberal share of
patronage.
His siiop is on tho corner of Grand
and De Siard Streets.
Monroe, La. Jan. 3d, 1859. ly.
NOTICE!!
George Koehlcr, Gunsmith,
r^J.IVES notice, that lie has permanent
ly located in Monroe, and is pre
pared to make or repair
Guns, Pistols, &r.
An experience of fifteen years in the
most celebrated manufactories in Ger
many, enables him to do work superior
to any to lie found in the South-west.
Iiis work is already known, as a
residence of six years iu Farmerville
has given his work much celebrity.—
All his work is warranted, and with
proper care will last a generation.—
He keeps on hand
Gnus, Pistols,
and
Hunting Apparatus
General!}.
Office—'Two doors South of P. O.
Monroe, March 10, 1859.
wwmsraa i tmstssm»
D. D. TURNER, Proprirtor.
anb
TRENT'S LIVERY STABLE,
H. J. TRENT, Proprietor.
These establishments
are now open for the
accommodation of the.
public, ami the proprietors hope by
proper attention, to obtain a liberal
share of public patronage.
Trenton, La., Dec. 13, 1858. ly*
A Thanksgiving Hymn.
BY PARK BENJAMIN.
Creation's Lord 1 to Thee we raiso
FiXJUi grateful hearts a hymn of praiso
Thy mercies morn and eve bestow,
And in the night, Thy love we know. .
All times, all seasons, every place,
Are blcss'd and hallow'd by Thy grace $
Abroad, at home, on land or sea,
Our footsteps arc sustained by Thee.
Abuudant harvests crown the soil,
And man rejoices in his toil )
The sunshine glows, the rain descends,
Thy constant bounty never ends.
These States, these Empires, broad aud free
Iu nnion bound are held by Thee ;
Aud Discord shall not break thu chain
Which links theui tost from main to main.
Thou wast our fathers' Od and Guide,
And with their sons wilt long abide ;
And, therefore, to Thy name wo raise,
Our souls lu gratitude and praise.
Kentucky for tlic l-iiion.
Gov. Mugotlln, iu his rcccnt message to the
legislature of Kentucky, discusses at length
and with uaieh power, tho lnischcvious ten
dencies of northern fanaticism, nnd In refer
ence to tho status of his own State uses this
emphatic and encouraging language :
"What says Kentucky? Calmly and r
lutely looking the-danger in the face, she feels
that she is able to protect herself In any emer
gency. With 700 miles ol free -Foil horde
line, and having more cause of Complaint than
any other State in the Union, because lier ai
nual loss Iu slave property is over $100,000
the theatre of abolition embsaiies, robbed of
her properly; without threats, without excite
ment, with the full responsibilities that devolve
"Pons lier In the present momentous crisis, she
wi.l act with the dignity, moderation and wis
dom that becomes fier. Undcr the broad shield
of the Constitution, she will stand by the
Union. Ever true, ever loyal, she is rendyto
-dlßas8he-hfts-lh'cd;-fOTimit~GdvcnünUnt that
protects Iter. She slnnds fortified by the his
tory of the past, doubly entrenched by her
impregnable opposition, and that is, to stand
by tho compact or the Constitution as our
each State uluiuld be the judge of, and régulât
its own domestic institutions, without inter
ferencc. Asking nothing, she would not con
cedo. She will keep her present flatus upon
the slavery question. She will keep the failli
and stand by its settlement, the laws, the Con
stitntion, and the courts. She will stand by
the repeal of the Missouri restriction. Sh
will stand by the fugitive slave law, the Died
Scott decision, the democratic party, and its
faithful Executive. She believes tlmt slavery
is neither a moral, social, nor political evil."
The following is the closing paragraph of
the message :
"We do not look to a dissolution of tlie
Union ns a remedy for the evils or which
complain. Oh, no; this Union Is hallowed by
too many .asooeintlons which ought to be dear
to every American heart. Its very slrenglh
consists in its seeming antagonistic interests.
Its power is in its apparent opposing fore
The commercial and the planting interests«
which were so dillleult to reconcile by the eon.
volition that framed tho Constitution, ul
Nourish together. Agriculture, manufactures
commerce, and the arts have become mutually
dependant upon euch other, aud should
stregthen our socinl and friendly relations
under our glorious system of government
Tho interests of the North 'and the South, the
East and the West, which seemed i
able, have been so happily adjusted, so beouli
fully balanced, and so powerfully harmonized
io the Constitution upon a (irinolple, as to con
stitute the chief strength of the Republic—and
that principle is, to permit the people ol each
section of the Union to regulate their domes
tic aud local institutions tor themselves, giv
ing to Congress the power, coupled with the
duty, to uttend to our external relations and to
regulate our national affairs. Affection and
confluence are the bonds of this Union. May
we do nothing to weaken, but everything to
strengthen, the ligaments that bind ns together
as » nation, aud may God still continue to
protect us as ei|iiiils, as Iricnds, ns brethren,
and as patriots iu tho Republic ns It is, deep
ly devoted to ils continuance; and may we and
our posterity, us the worthy descendants of the
gallant heroes of the revolution, ' both now
anil iu the future, stand by the cornpnet of the
Constitution formed by their wisdom and con
secrated by their blood, as the only hope of
freemen iu time nnd eternity."
These words have the ring of the true revo
lutionary metal. It was amid the Inspirations
of a sublime patriotism like this that our Con
stitution, with ull its compromises, was framed
and the Union cemented, and it is only by the
nurture of such a patriotism that they can be
preserved and perpetuated. We rejoice to be
lieve that the sentiment which Gov. MugofUn
has so glowingly expressed is treasured up In
the very depths of the American heart, and
that the agitations of the day have not and
cannot reach it. We have only to deplore that
so many of ont high offleials fail td give such
utterance to this sentiment of loynlity to the
Union as the times demand, and thus uncon
sciously afford "aid and cotafcirt" to that band
of "drunken mutineer»"—as Mr. Cushing so
appropriately terms them—who are striving to
get possession of the vessel of State
To succccd you must keep moving ; to grow
rich, you must keep saving.
Important Charge.
BY Mil. JUSTICE WAYXK, OK TUR UNITED STATES
SUPREME COURT, ON TUE 8LAVK TRADE.
t'iïrteu States Cir
cuit Court for Georgia^ at Savannah, for the
November term, Judge Wayne charged the
grand jury at great length in regard to the
«lave trade. The cause of tho charge on this
topic was tho recent Utting out of the yacht
Wanderer. After alluding to this fnct, he pro
eded to state tho action of Congress on the
suliject. The first act was passed on the 22d
of March, 1794, when Washington \vas Presi
dent, prohibiting American eitiaens, or resi
dents, (Vom equipping vessels within the Uni
ted States, to carry on trade or traffic in
slaves to any foreign country. Tho next act
was passed March 2d, 1807, when Mr. Jeffersou
was President, which subjected to forfeiture
any vessel found in any river, bay or harbor,
or on tho high seas within the jurisdiction of
the United States, having on board any negro
mulatto or other person of color, for the pur
pose of selling them as slaves or to land'them
In any port or place within the United States,
The next act was that of 1818, which prohibits
the importation ot negroes altogether from any
foreign country, and of titling out vessels for
that purpose, and sets free any slave so im
ported. The act. of 1819 authorized the Presi
dent of the United S'atCH to ufc the naval force
for the prevention of the slave trade, and the
payment of a bounty for the detection of every
negro brought into the country contrary to
law. In 1820. Conffieps enacted that any citi
zen of the Uni t i'd S at 's who becomes one of
the crew of a slaver of a foreign ship shall be
deemed a pirate, and punishable with death ;
and the same as to any person who shall enter
upon a slave voyage within tho United States.
Having stated in general terms the provisions
of these acts. Judge Wayne said : "It will be
found, in the history which 1 will give of that
legislation, that It is the n-pult of an early
and continued disapproval by the people of
tho United States, both North and South of
the African slave-trade. In all of which, the
very beginning of our neutrality, tho distin
guished men of both sections took an active
part, none of them more decisively than South
ern statesman, in every act that ha« been
passed,
tlie slave-trade was prohibited iu the territo
ries of Mississippi and Louisiana, the only
slaveholding territories of the United States.
Again revert ig to tho acts of 1818, 1819 and
1820, the Judge says: "Thus it is seen that
during the Admiuistratioi of the (list live
residents, all of whom were concerned in set
tling the foundations of the Government, a
series of laws, based upon a common principle,
aud Itaving a common end, have been adopted
by the united and concurring views of the
States and' the people for the suppression yf
the African slave trade. The powers of Con
gress^) suppn'ss the slave-trade, by passing
all laws necessary and proper for that purpose
is not questioned by any one at all conversant
with theConstitntl» n and constitutional history
of the United States.
In conclusion, he quoted passages from the
speeches of Senators llayne, of South Carolina,
Johnson, of Louisiana, aud Ltcrricn, of Geor
gia, against the slave-trade.
'
Ain T bndkbko V ikoinia fkom tiik N outii.—
The Schenectady News publishes the following
letter from Gov. Wise, iu reply to a tender of
service from one of the military companies of
Schenectady. It tells its own story:
ICxWITIVK I )i: l'A It IM km', [
Richmond Va., Nov. 2fith, 1850. J
M y P kaii S iu :—Your favor of the 22d lust..,
came duly to hand. In behalf of the gnat
State of which 1 am Chief, I d. sire to ret nr.i
to you my sincere thankH for your patriotic
and generous offer, tendering in behalf of your
gallant company your services to the Common
wealth, fiee of charge, iu this, her hour of
need, when she is endangered by treasonable
invasion from without, and servile insurrection
within. Nothing is more grateful It» me than
to receive these assurances of sympathy and
support, from sister States, aud especially from
the Umpire Stale, in whose galbiut aud patri
otic military companies I have no doubt you
bear an honorable rank.
Notwithstanding the fact that I have the
utmost confidence that the sons of Virginia
will bo fully able to vindicate lier exalted
honor, still, iu view of the incendiary and
treasonable efforts of misjnjided and fanatical
Abolitionists, 1 deem it proptr to uccept your
olferconditionally: that is. to way, if 1 shall
deem the danger threatening our beloved State
of such a character that 1 shall require tin; aid
of other troops than our own, I shall not hesi
tate instantly to inform you, aud shall in such
case expect your prompt attendance. Again
thanking you for your kindness,
^f remain your obedient servant.
Hi.
A. Wi
A n - AiXKmrnv.— A venerable old man was
toiling through the burden and heat of the day
in cultivating his field with his own hand, and
depositing the promising seeds into the fruitful
lap of the yielding earth. Suddenly there stood
before him, under the shade of a huge linden
tree, a divine vision. The old mau was struck
with amazement.
" I am Solomon," spoke the phantom, lu a
friendly voice. » What are you doing here, old
man ?"
" If you are Solomon," replied the vener
able laborer, " how can you ask this? In my
youth you sent ine to the ant ; I saw its oc
cupation, and learnrd from that insect to be
industrious and to gather. What I then learn
ed, I have followed out to this hour."
44 You have only learned half of your les
son," resumed the spirit.
" Go again to the ant, and learn from that
insect to rest in the winter of your life, and to
enjoy what you have gathered up iu the sum
mer."
A rrival of C ait. F arncm at S avannah.
Capt. Farnurn, of the Wanderer, who was ar
rested in New York lately, under a process
from the United States District Court, Southern
District of Georgia, arrived in Savannah on
the 15th, in charge of U. S. Special Agent
O'Keefe, Deputy Marshal Paten nnd others.—
Ho was immediately conducted to the jail.
Praise Your Wife.
to
of
be
;
be
of
of
^Acorrespondent of the Springfield Republi
can recently offered three dollars for a papt r
containing this admirable article, whiéta every
reader of generous impulses will say la *ortli
considerably more money than that :
Praiso your wife, man ; for pity's sake give
hor a little encouragement—it won't hurt you.
She has made your home comfortable, your
hearth bright and shining, your food agreeable;
for pity's sake tell her you thank lwr if nothing
more. She don't expect it ; it will make her
eyes open wider than 1hey have for these ten
years, but It will do her good lor all that, ami
you too. There are many women to-day thirst
ing fv r the word of praise, tho language of
encouragement. Through summer's heat and
winter's toil, they have drudged uncomplain
ingly, and so accustomed havo their father,
brothers, and husbands become to their mono
tonous labor, that they look for and upon them
as they do on the daily rising of the sun and Its
' "daily going down. Homely, oVcry-day lifo
may be made beautiful by an appreciation of
Its very homeliness. You know that if the floer
Is clean, manual labor has been performed to
make it so. You know that If yon can tako
frotn your drawer h clean shift whenever you
want it, somebody's fingers have ached in tho
toll of making it so fresh and agreeable, bo
smooth and lustrous. Kverythlng that pb^asen
the eye and the sense has been produced l>,7
constant work, much thought, great care, ami
untiring efforts, bodily and mentally. It Is not
that many men do not appreciate these things,
and feel a glow of giatltude for the numberless
attentions bestowed upon them in sickness and
in health, but tljey are so selfish in their feel
ing. They don't come out with a hearty "Why,
how pleasant you make things look, wile or
" I'm obliged to you for taking so much pains."
They thank the tailor for giving " Ills they
thank the man in tho full omnibus who give»
them a seat ; they thank the young lady who
moves in the concert room ; in fact they thank
everybody and everything out of doors, bu
causo It Is the custom ; ami then como home,
tip their chairs back and their heels up» pull
out the newspaper, grumblo if tho wife asUa
them to hold the baby, scold If the lire has got
down ; or. If anything I r just right, Bhut their
mouths with asmaek of nutislUetlon, but nevir
say 41 [ thank you." 1 lull you what, men,
a
to
towards those common articles oK
housekeeping, your wives—If you gave tho ono
bundled and sixtieth part of tho compliments
you almost chocked them with before they woro
married—if you would stop the badinage about
whom you are going to have when number ono
Is dead—(such things wives may laugh at, but
they sink deep sometimes)—if you would cease
to speak of their faults, however huutcringly,
before others —fewer women would seek for
other soueccs of happiness than your cold; *o
so-ish affection. Praise your wife, then, for
all the good qualities she has, and you may i ' cb C
assured that her dolicicueicH are fully counter
balanced by your own.
Prni io M kktinu to S ihtain tiik CoNHTrap
tion . - -The conservative portion of the citizoiM^'
of tho north are arising everywhere in tho largV
cities and towns, 1») give au expression of their
views against the fanaticism which would pro
mote servile insurrection and produco civil
war, aud in favor of the preservation of tho
Union and the Constitution. A call has been
made in Mouton for such a meeting, which thu
Hon. Kdward feverett aud other distinguished
sons of Massachusetts have signed. In New
York also preliminary meetings have been held
to the same end, aud In Philadelphia arrange
ments are making for a similar meeting. Tlicro
no doubt (says the Philadelphia Ledger) that
such meetings will havo a good effect iu quitt
ing tiie minds of our Southern brethren and •
assuring (hem ttiut all the people of tl>o North
not John lJrowtirt, ready to carry fire and
sword among them for the sake of a sentiment,
regarding institutions which do not concern
them, and with which they have no right to
ddle.
speaking of the Doston meeting, the Courier
of tlmt city snys :
" We have no doubt that such a meeting will
be held as has seldom, if ever, come together
in thiacoinmoiiwcnlt.li, and one which will teml
not only to n -assure our brethren iu other parts
of the Country, but also to proiuoto a far bet
ter state of feeling amongst ourselves. Wo
need nothing but a concentration of the patri
otic sentiment widely dill used ainoiig thu peo
ple of Massachusetts, to enable it to exercise
the most salutary 11111001100."— Mobile Tribune.

W hat sort of a M an is S kwari »? The Herald
answers the question in this somewhat personal
description : '• lie smokes rather too many
cigars ; but they ure of the most fragrant
tobacco, and correspond most admirably with
the aroma from the cut-glass, out of which ho
drinks success to tce-totulism and the Sons of
Temperance. There are very few of our states
men more decorous, straid aud respectable than
Mr. Seward, lie neither fights, gambles, nor
is addicted to debauchery. He is a model of
private virtue. We do not believe he swearsi
much. His dress is propriety itself—a combina
tion of semi-eecleiilastical gravity with aifevery
day business look, which instantly inspires cou
fidoncc. He is the avowed representative of
iho whole moral law. tempered by overflowing
indulgence for every failing and peccadillo on
the part of his fellow creatures, and especially
of the nigg"rs. What a pity that such an ideal
for a future President should be gangrened
with the heresy of « irrepressible conflict!' Mr # .
Seward does not wear a white cravat. If ho*
did, he would bo taken for a Protestant minis
ter. lie might, as it is, pass very well fo£
priest. No one can question that lie I
man, aud a member of the ehurch t ^^^ re uofc
sure to what church ho belqu^^" ,: ' 8 ' a
burning and shining ij»w^Homewhere. Ho
may bo a Mothodia^^"" 0 w °nld be an excel
lent class leoA^^" ,ft t persuasiou." Mr. Se
ward, present, the favorite raccr
aek Republican stud—but he a ill gefr

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