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The register. (Monroe, La.) 185?-1861, January 05, 1860, Morning, Image 1

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THE REGISTER.
published every thursday morning,
BY C. TELLES.
Every description of JOB PRINT
ING executed with Dispatch and Nealnm—
UiiKip—for CASH.
.Tornu of Sab .cription.
JB®" Invariably iniAdcunce.'TäS.
Türke Dollars per annum, or Fivb Dollars
for two years.
> copies, (one year,) .. .,$ 5 00
Four
Ton " "
Single coriBS..
10 00
20 00
! 10 cents.
professional (Harbs.
w. ii. compton,
Jiastrop.
COMPTON & BAUD,
Attorneys at Law,
Offices at Monroe and Bastrop, La.
Practice in all the Courts of the Twelfth
Judicial District, comprising the Parishes of
Ouachita; Morehouse, Union and Jackson.
refebknges:
Brown, Johnston & Co., Now Orleans,
Goo. M. Pinckard & Co., New Orleans,
J. F. \Vyche & Co., New Orleans,
Hon. Tlios. T. Land, Supreme Judge.
Hon. Lewis Selby, Providence. La.
. w. jemison.
Vernon, La.
francis p. stübb3.
Monroe, La.,
STUBBS & JEMÏSON,
ATTORNIES AT LAW,
Practice ill tlie
Parishes of Ouachita, Jackson, Union,
Morehouse, Caldwell, Franklin, Bien
ville, Claiborne and Winn.
April 14, 1859. " ly.
R. RICHARDSON,
Attorney & Counselor aS Law,
M onroe, L a.
Will practice in all the Courts of the 12th
Judicial District and the parishes of Caldwell
und Franklin.
Oct. 13, 1850. jj.
A. H . MARTIN,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Monroe, La.
Will attend the Courts in the
Parishes comprising the lltli and 12th
Judicial Districts.
Uä>" N. 1>. Office nest door below
the Post Office
Nov. 1st. 1S5S. ly.
C. u. mokrisox, g ko, purvis
MORRISON & PURVIS,
Attorneys at Law,
[iuay-7-ly.] MONROE, LA.
JOHN McENRRY,
Attorney at Law,
Monroe, La.
Nov. 11th, 1858. ly.
i. IV. T. lUCU iKDSOSI,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT
LAW,...
Monroe. .. .La
J A3. D. IcENERY,
Attorney at Law,
Mun
■iv. 11th, 1858.
La.
Iv.
ßOBERT KAY,
ttorncy & Counsellor at Lav/,
Monroe .... La.
P. II. TOLER.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
"Winsböro', Franklin Parish, La.
Will attend the District Court of
Franklin, Ouachita. Catahoula and
M .)'rchons'5 Parishes, and also the Su
preme Court at Monroe.
,7 une 10, 1858.— ly.
l - . A. V. ITAIirCK, wm. a. WI1YTE.
HARPER & VS'ïïYTE,
ATTORNEYS it COUXSELORS AT LA H*
Winnsbara, Franklin Parish, La.
W r ILL attend promptly to all .busi
ness in the 11 tli and 12th Judi
cial District Courts.
May 12, 1S59. ly.
J. B. Mathews. Wa. McFee.
M.Vl ! E «UWS & MCFUE.
Attorneys ij- Counsellors at Law.
B astrop L a.
Y>"ill attend to all business entrusted
to llibm in Uie 12th Judicial District,
and also ill the Silpreme Court at Mon
roe.
DR. D. G. TEMPLE.
OPERATIVE, SURGICAL
and
MECHANICAL DENTIST,
Monroe, (La,.)
March 21, 1858.—ly.
J. L. HYHNE ' !.. i. BUIIiLUa.
Iî ï K S E & SHIELDS,
Receiving and Forwarding
Merchants.
MONROE, LA.
R 'fcr to Pilcbor & Goodrich, Sew Orloaus.
Oct. C, ; ö9. -tf.
Scientific and Practical
AVATCH AND CLOCK
MAKER.
JOHN MILLER,
Columbia, La.
Every description
Watches, Clocks,
. '.I ''' 11 s ' 0 Boxes and
Ir^-lB Jewelry, carefully repaired.—
t - "» Twenty-two years of practical
expérience in the business, entitles him
to give the assurance that his work
will not be surpassed by any establish
ment in Louisiana.
An assortment of Watches, Clocks
and Jewelry, of all descriptions; also,
Watch Chrystals, Fine Gold and Steel
Keys, Hands, and all other articles in
his line, always on hand. Old Gold
and Silver exchanged for new articles,
P. S. The watches I have on hand
belonging to my customers in Ouachi
ta, and other Parishes, will bo deliv
ered at Columbia when called for.
JOHN MILLER.
January 1st, I860. ji ly
SAMUEL BARD,
I
JL
OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE PARISH OF OUACHITA.
EDITOR.
YOE. X.
MONROE, LA., THURSDAY MORNING, ÂNUARY 5, 18t!0.
NO. 6.:
Kcra (Orleans Director!}.
b. iîloomfield. edgar steel
BL00MFIELD & STEEL,
Publisheri, Booksellers, Stationers,
and dealers in
PAPERS AND SCHOOL BOOKS,
Law, Medical, Theological and Mis
cellaneous Works, in all styles of bind
w ; Libraries supplied on liberal
terms; Cheap Publications, Periodicals,
Magazines, received soon as issued
from the press.
Juvenile and Toy Books of every
description, Games, Alphabet Blocks,
Transparent Slates, and A B C Cards.
Blank Book Manufacturers, Printing,
Book Binding, Engraving and Litho
graphing Visiting Cards neatly, exe
cuted.
BLOOMFIELB, STEEL & CO.,
BOOK SELLERS AND STATIONERS,
(j0 Camp Street, New Orleans.
Jan.' 20, 185U. ly.
H. KENDALL CARTER COT
COTTON FACTORS,
and
C OMMIS S I ON MER CIIANTS,
No. 15 St. Charles Street,
New Orleans.
—o—
N. B. — II. K. C. A Co., are agents for, and
keep ooosUutly oall.md, Fruit's improved Cor
ton G ins.
March 25, ISM. ly._
PILCHES,, GOODRICH & CO.,
CO2 TON FACTORS
and
COMMISSION M Kit I'll AKTS,
38 Factor's Row,
SEW ORLEANS.
Dec. 9, 1858. ly*
J. F. AYYCHK & CO.
COTTON FACTOR,
and—
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
119 COMMON STREET,
new-orleans.
Dec. 9, 1858. ly*
J. B. HUE, S & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Union St.—Over Bank of New Orleans
NEW ORLEANS.
JdSy -Rcfcrs to J no. Ray, Esij. Monroe,
Lu.
Mardi) loth 1S58. ly.
Drugs, Chemicals, Faints,
Oils, Window Glass.
O . O. WOODMAN,
WHOLESALE DRUGGIST,
Corner Commerce and Magazine Sts.
SEW ORLEANS.
Jan. 4, 1859. - ly*
BLR TON d> WORN, '
TOBACCO AND GENERAL COMMISSION
31 E R C II A N T S ,
Ü5 Gravier Street,
N ew -O rleaxs.
i New Orleans.
J. II. Bmrrox,
G. P. W ork. f '
D i : '. !- Houston, Texas.
iy
J. M. ALUERTSOX. I>. L. MUDUK
ALBERTS N «J- MUDOE,
Agents for the sale of Mill and Plan
tation Machinery of every description,
demons, Brown & Co.'s Single and
Double Cylinder Cotton Gins, Bates'
Patent Steam (>uages. No. 8 Union
Street, New Orleans, La.
Oct. 13, 1859. ly.
11. jordan jas. brewer w. m. ulu.asfie,
ÜILLASPIE, BREWER & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS.
AND —
CO M MISSION MERCHANTS.
No. 3S UNION STREET.
NEW ORLEANS.
SSyRcfu's to Dr. C. H. Dtibbx, Mon
roe, La., Mid Maj. James H. Brigbaui,
Morehouse Parish, La.
September 15, 1859. ly.
james f. ml'sk. ulo. w. jluäe
MUSE & BRO.,
C OMMIS SION, RE CLIVING
—AM)—
FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
No. 10 Fultou, and 5 Front St.,
new oki.ean3.
July 0. ly
B . L . LYNCH,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
No. TS Camp Street,
new orleans,
Front Office over Home Mutual In
surance Co., entrance 011 Natchez St.
Oct. 6, 1859. ly
DRS. D E HART & SMITH,
DENTISTS,
17 Baronne St. near Canal St.
new orleans.
All operations entrusted to them will
be performed in the most skilful man
ner and warranted.
Dr. Smith will be in Monroe on
the 25th of September next, to attend on
professional calls and remain three
weeks.
May 12, 1859. ly,
Socal smirvttsciunus.
New Fail and Winter Goods!
BYRNE & SHIELDS,
AIIE now receiving and opening their exten
sive stock of
FALL. AKD W1KTER COODS,
comprising everything nced-d in this section,
in the way of Plantation supplies, Dry Goods,
Groceries, Hardware, Queensware, Clothing,
Hoots and Shoes, Iluts, Caps, A;e.
We Have made our purchases entirely at the
North, and can afford to oiler a
Considerable Reduction
ix prices . We would be glad to have our
friends and the citizens of this and adjoining
parishes, come and see us and examine our
stock.
Monroe, Octobcr 0, lS59.-tf.
Fresh Groceries & Provisions.
WE have now in Ftore the largest and niosl
complete supply of Family Groceries and
Provisions offered in this market, which we can
guarantee to be fresh—as follows :
F lour —Extra St. Louis and Superfine in
barrels and half-barrels.
Sugar —Common, choice and crushed.
M olasses —Barrels and halves.
H ams —Sugar-cured, Duifield and Stagg and
Shay's.
B acox —Clear ami ribbed sides and shoulders.
Pork, coffee, pepper, apices, lard, rice, can
dles, soap, wines, brandies. &c M for pale low by
BYRNE & SHIELDS,
Oct. 6, '59,-tf.
Boots, Shoes and Russets.
MEN'S thick double bole, calf, water-proof
Boots, grain horsemen's Boots, fine pump
sole calf boots, boys'calf halt-welt and double
sole boots.
R ussets —JO cases men's and boys' No.
oak tanned, which we are selling lower than
ever before offered.
Heavy brogans for men and boy a.
Women's brognns and boots.
Men's fine calf Congress gaiters.
A large assortment of misses' and childrei
shoes of all kinds.
Ladies' goat, morocco, kid and cloth la
heel boots, buskins and Flippers, in every vai
cty. at BVliXE &, SHIELDS'.
Monroe, November 3, 1851).
Tol)aceo ! Tobacco ! !
A LARGE supply of the above article, of
every quality, ou hand, which we buy di
rect from manufacturers, and can lurnish to
planters and the trade generally at unusually
low rates.
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. C, *59—If.
Bagging", Rope and Twine.
A FULL supply of India bagging and best
machine-made Rope on hand and for sale
low by BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. C, '59,-tf.
0
Readv-Made Clothing.
YERCOATS—Dlack cloth, black and blue
, pilot cloth and seal sftcjucs and
Fine black cloth, dress, fi\ncy cass, satinet and
tweed Pâques and frocks.
Vests —Black and fancy silk, satin, cassimire,
black and fancy colored plush velvet.
P ants —Fine black doeskin, fancy cassimcrc,
j<«ans and kersey. _ *
Shirts, drawers, under-shirts, or a vats, gloves
and gentlemen's furnishing goods generally,
no v.o. BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Storage Î Storage ! !
HAVING a commodious Warkuousb nud
Cotton Siikd . all cotton or merchandise
consigned to our care for storage or shipment,
will receive the most prompt attention from
BYRNE & SHIELDS.
Monroe, Oct. G, '59.-11'.
H. G-ERS0N, Ji-. & Co.
SEW LARGE B11ICK STORE.
JIAVIXG removed to their new and
'- spacious fire proof brick building,
have now opened and are still receiv
ing their new Pull and Winter stock,
consisting of plantation supplies, such
as Kerseys, Ky. Linsoys, ^
Jeans, russets, blankets,
m Hats, negro clothing,
Satinets and casimeres ;
Gentlemen's furnishing goods and
c loti ii mi -—overcoats,
Dress ami frock coats,
Pants and vests,
Boots and shoes, drawers
and shirts, linen and
Silk handkerchiefs,
Cravats, linen and
Flannel shirts, Hosiery and
Gloves, hats and caps.
A complete assortment of youth and
children's clothing ; ,
A new and fresh quantity of RK m
general groceries, saildleiy,
hardware, porks, cutlery and
stationery, medicines and cigars.
Also a very large assortment ok
Ladies' Goods,
Selected from the largest and most
popular importing houses of N. York
Boston and Philadelphia, consisting of
Fine and fashionable dress silks,
Cashmeres, merinos, delaines,
Woolen shawls, cloaks,
Bonnets, ribbons,
Embroideries,
Hair dresses, corsées,
Trimmings, perfumery, hosiery,
Gloves, gauntlets,
Slippers and gaiters.
Also a large and well selected stock of
Gold and silver Watches,
Guard chains—new styles of jewelry,
consisting of coral sets, Comeo and
Mosaic, ear-rings, pins, rings, shirt
and sleeve buttons, all of which will
be guaranteed to be what represented.
Their whole stock is one of the lar-|
gest und best selected' ever brought
to this place, and will be sold at much
cheaper prices than heretofore.
A call and examination of goods
and prices will satisfy all that we have
the ability to please and suit.
Strict and particular attention will
be paid to orders from our friends aud
customers residing at a distance.
Monroe, La., Nov. 3, 1859—6m.
WANTED. — 200 Subscribers to pay
their subscription to the Register.
£ocal 'abuertiscmcnts CruUuucö.
" THE NEW BRICK STORE
IS THE PLACE TO BUY GOODS AT
A BARGAIN!!
DO YOU WAST NEW GOODÜ Î
CALL AT TUE NEW BlifrJK STORE!
DO YOU WAST CHEAP GOODS?
CALL A T TUE NE ir7,7, '/CA' 5 TORE!
DO YOU WAST GOOD GOODS?
CALL --1 T TUE NE II' ER ICE STORJ
Where they are constantly receiving,
and keep always on hand a well tic
lected stock of
STAPLE &FA\CY DRY GOOÏÎS,
of every dcocriptioq. Hats and Caps,
Boots and Shoes, aim a splendid lot of
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
from the Most Fashionable Houses in
New Orleans.
Also, a tine lot of JEWELRY such
as Watches, Breast Pins, Rings, &o.
Also, a small lot Choice Furniture.
Also, a large and choice lot of Cut-,
lory and Hardware, Bridles and Sad
dles, Books and Stationery. Also, a
new supply of
F A 311 L. V G R O C IÎ II 1 E S ,
and a full Stock of Plantation Goods,
such as Bagging and lîope, Lowels
and Kerseys, the very best article of
Oak-tanned Kussets, Blankets, ifce., &c.
All the above articles we will sell
at low prices and on liberal terms, to
those who may honor us with their pa
tronage
The undersigned pretend not to sell
their goods at cost . They could not do
that and live. 'Their object is to do a
fair, legitimate and honorable mercan
tile business. They do not profess tu
undersell everybody oLo ; but pledge
themselves to give satisfaction to
every one who is willing to allow a
reasonable profit. Call, and see us.
S. WEIL & BROTHER.
Oct. Uth, 1858. oH-ly.
Copartnership Notice.
jc The undersigned have, tliii
day, formed a copartnership in tlii
town, under the firm of Herring &
Kndom, for the purpose of carrying on
the Harness and Carriage shop, op
posite the Railroad Hotel. We put uj
any kind of
C an iniEH,
iiugicics
and
Rockiiwnys;
in any style, and supply ourcustoniert
with any kind of Harness or Saddlei
which tliry may call for. Carriages
warranted for one year.
Wo also do Horwe-shoeing and plan
tation work. . Upholstering and paper
hanging done here. We have engage '
good Eastern %orkinen.
HERRING & KNDOM.
Feb. 3d, 1859. ly.
F. BERKHEARDT,
Merchant Tuiior,
Monroe, La.
VI^OULD respectfully inform SR
"* the citizens of Monroe and _t.f_
vicinity, that lie has commenced the
Tailoring Business in Hit- place, lie re
spectfully solicits your patronage. He
Hatters himself, that from his practical
experience in his business, he will
render entire satisfaction to those
favoring hin» with their patronage, lie
has a very fine assortment of Goods on
hand, which he will sell very lowfor
cash. His prices will 1»' moderate, and
he hopes that by doing the. very best imr!,
ut low prices and a sirict attention lo
business to merit a liberal share o!
patronage.
His shop is on the corner of Grand
and De Siard Streets.
Monroe, La. Jan. 3d, 1859. ly.
NOTICE!!
George ICoehler, Gunsmith,
p IVES Mice, that hoi
ly loontjAin Monro
permanent
and i.s pre
pared to muMjar repair
Guus, '• l'istols,
An experieii.ee of fifteen years in the
most celebrated manufactories in (1er
many, enables him to do work superiol
to any to be found ill the South-west
His work is already known, as a|
residence of six years in l 'ai mcrvillu
has given his work much celebyly —
All his work is warranted, und with
proper care will last a generation.—I
He keeps on hand
Guns, Pistols,
and
Hunting Apparatus
Generally.
Office—Two doors South of P. O.
Monroe, March 10, 1859.
Monroe, 10, 1859.
FEI«IiOWES & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
149 COMMON STREET,
NEW-CHILEANS.
Refer to C. II. Morrison, Esij.
Blankets ! Blankets ! !
•4 r\ /\ PAIR just received, comprising l|es
lU'J quality heavy negro, grey and
I wbicb ** 801(1 low
Mackinaw, and tine bed aud crib blunk<|:b
by
nov.5, BYRNE & SHIELDS.
lfjroiu the New York Saturday Pre
A iSaltari,
I.
Slje was tall and fair.
And in her Summer's prime ;
Her feet were snowy feet,
Ap faultless as a rhyme,
Vfhen, 'tis true :
And her eyes were made of heave
Fire and dew !
H.
Iji the kirkyard let her lie !
ijct the thistles and the burs
Cover tip the two-fold life—
The little life and hers!
I'dl-a-day !
It is sad to see a flower
Dead, in May !
Iff.
tils the'
per think*
eh-lue.
Now, Lord Niai su
And laughs above
And he never, nc
Of the Iii ly of Lo
Ma/.v the storms *'
Smite him as he sails, and the sea
Cru-li him in its arms?
O, list. 5*0 maidens fair,
To the ballad that 1 sing ;
Go bid your true-loves fetch
The sainted priest and ring 1
Best be dead
In some old kirkyard, than to give
Your true-loves all, uiiwtd !
From the Joliet (111.) Sig
The National Adiniuisfialioii
mud (Le Ddmxiatit l'a it}.
It is wholly unnecessary lo recur to facts to
|>rove that the Administration of Pr
Buchanan faithfully adheres to the principle of
the. democratic party. It is a faithful repre
sentative of the party which commenced its
career in the days of the sagacious and patrio
tic Jeflersou, and has.continued to the present
timel
Whatever may have been the personal dis
content engendered against the Administration
by its distribution of patronage, and itsooursc
on the Kansas question, it cannot with truth be
detiîed that it has been true to the Constitution.
(Teyj)ted to the interests of the country, neither
proislavery nor anti-slavery, but cognizant of
the riglitft f-ecfîted to the Statesand of the
obligations existing tort-ween them, and just in
sustaining them. We defy the warmest follower
of Air. Douglas to point to u single instance
where the Administration has departed from
the'groat fundamental principles of the party
as Enunciated by the Cincinnati platform aud
advocated by all our leading democratic states
inch.
a|
Every honest, thinking democrat must admit
thut, in the administration of the aiVairs of the
Government, with Mr. Buebau.au there îh a
doi'ire observable to secure to every class ol
our fellow-citizens, and to every section of the
country equal protection, and to grant tin in
equal rights and justice under the Constii
And it must also be admitted that the j
Administration has been eminently successful
iu a national point of \iew, nud (hut t!
of sound democratic policy at home and abroad
ailc being realized to the honor und glory of
tljo American people.
Various dangerous and perplexing questions
hâve arisen since Mr. Iiuchunuu bus held the
reins of Government, but they have only given
opportunity for the exercise of thai, prudent
discretion and just und discriminating decision
for which bis mind is distinguished. Whether
we turn our eyes to the actual executive busi
ness of the country or to the course the Ad
ministration has pursued iu seeing that the
laws ai£ duly executed, we tiud the same cause
<wr admiration. In our difficulties iu Kansas,
the revolt iu Utah, the protection of the rights
and honor of our citizens aud tiag upon the
|iigh seas, the suppression of (iiibusterism, and
the checking of abolition treason and insurrec
tion, the President is found true to the oouutry
and to the obligations imposed by (he Constitu
tion. Sectional passion has almost exhausted
itself in its ingenious aud persistent endeavor
to prevent the operation of law and toenkmdl
revolt, but Mr. liuehanan has newr beei
swerved from a faithful, wise, aud just diacluirg
of duty.
Aud that the hearts of a vast majority of tli
democratic party are with the President is
proved by the elections this year. In noslngl
hit ate have the democracy been victoriou
where the party has not declared, by resolution,
itself in favor of tho'Aduiinistratiott. Mvasi
in this matter has been equivalent to defeat,
may be seen by a reference to the proceedin
id el-ctio
Wist
.in, Mit
and Ohio. While in New York, N<
California, and in various Southern States
where the democrat^ have been successful, (lie
party adopted resolutions strongly endorsing
the national policy of the Administration.
Therefore, in view of the desperate Opposi
tion which is arraying itself against., .the na
tional democracy, more than ever are fidelity
to principle, devotion to the old cause, courage
against (he threatening isms of the future, and
recognition of the just r
j
of the national
Administration, necessary to save the dei
cratic party aud tho Union frotn destruction."
E mtok's C ontention .—We have been often
asked .whether it was iu contemplation to hold
another Editor's Convention In Baton Rouge,
or not. In reply, we have to sny that such was
the intention when the last Convention ad
jourucd, and from all we have been able to
learn, will have a much larger one on the ud
Monday of January next—the time suggested
for the next meeting. Our brethren of the
Pros« should give the subject their conaidcra
I tion. -Wctt JJatm Rwgt Sugar Pt'inKr.
From the N. Y. Journal of Commerce.
The North and Soutli.
There will be a preliminary conference at
e La Farge lTouse this evening, at half-past
vén o'clock, to concert arrangements for a
public meeting, in which our citizens may
manifest in a formal manner their just abhor
rence of the crimes committed by John Brown
and his confederates against the peace.of a sister
Mate, and may put forth such othor^xpressions
of sentiment touching our relations with the
South as the occasion shall seem to demand.
The object of this meeting is to bring to
gether the various movements which have been
set on foot for the same general object ; that
thus there may be a united, consentaneous, and
overwhelming expression of public sentiment,
which shall assure the South of the continued
loyalty of our citizens to the Constitution and
its guarantees, and wlych also shall rebuke and
discountenance those dangerous men at the
North who, under the guise of philanthropy,
are.utulertnining the foundation of the Repub
lic.
We should deem it impertinent, to make any
suggestion as to the proper shaping of the call
had not the same been done toy some other
papers. Our own opinion is, that to give the
meeting a parti tan character, would degrade
the subject and the occasion. We would de
tine explicitly, and without the possibility of
evasioy the sentiments and principles which it
is the object of the mocj|ng to condemn,, but
we would not designate any party as holding
these views or their opposite. Let every man
determine for himself, before God, whether he
can subscribe to the doctrines of the call, or
not. If ho can, we would not cut him elf by a
Shibboleth. On the'eoutrary, we could wish
that all men, of every party, would eschew
their sectionalism, their fanaticism, th.ir tin
brotherly and unchristian Jx nrîng towards the
South, and become, if not good democrats, at
least gooil citizens and good patriots. A demo
cratic meeting for such a purpose wo> ,M be
superfluous. The South knows, nud tin ..wrth
knows, that the democratic party in sound on
the slavery question, or. in other words, that
whatever they may think of slavery an a sys
tem, they are opposed to Northern intern renoo
iu any form offensive to the South, with a >dc\v
to its removal. What we want now Is, an ex
pression of sentiment on a broader scale ; a
joint declaration from all who are prepared l«>
make it that they will st«iul by the rights of
the South, as guarantied by the Coiidiitutlon,
both in its letter aud spirit ; that they have
no sympathy with murderers, traitors, or slave
insurrecliouiots ; but, ou the contrary, abhor
them, and acknowledge the justice which con
signs them to the gallows. Democrats will, of
course, be promirent it»""the movement, but
why should they exclude others? To say no
thing of those Republicans who do not endorse
the •• irrepressible conflict " and its appur
tenances, there are some thousands of "Ameri
cans'' or know-nothings in this city who are as
patriotic in their sympathies and aspirations as
the democrats. So, too, there arc a noble bo
dy of "old-line whigs," good men and true,
who have never bowed the knee to the image
of Baal, aud never will. These men might not
answer to the name of democrats, while \ t
they would us cordially enter into the spirit ol'
the proposed meeting as any men among u..
It will devolve upon the preliminary meet-
j Ittg to determine the Jj^rm of the call, and the
» and place of the public mooting. Already
see enough to convince us that it will be
of the gn atest and most enthusiastic meet"
I ever held in this city ; and we cannot
doubt that, in connection with similar ineet
ugs in Boston, Philadelphia, aud otlw r Nor th
ru cities, it will do much to restore the con
lldence of the South in the general soundness
of public sentiment at the North, and also to
promote at the North a Kindlier feelin/'S to
wards the South.
One abuse mu t be abated at the .s-rth, or
in our opinion the dissolution of the Union is
only a question of time. We refer to the prac
tice «haue tully prevalent in a considerable
portion of the Northern press, of mb.repre
senting and ridiculing every thing Southern;
of holding towards the South a tone of asperi
ty, uuohurilubleuess, and bitterness, which we
hold towards no foreign nation ; and which, if
we did hold habitually towards a foreign ua
Mon, would be ulmo&t c» rtaln, at no distant
day, to result in^vvar. The capital or republi
can editors, to a large extent, consists in just
this habitual vilification of the South. If these
editors lind patronage and gain votes by such
vilification, there must, of course, bo many,
very many, among their readers, who are
pleased with U; whereas they ought to frown
it into silence. Publie meetings with« ut dis
tinction of party, like those about lo be lit Id
hero and elsewhere, will do much, we trust, to
correct this grievous fault of the limes aw
dangerous as it is grievottH. A man and w ife
who cannot live together without perpetual
j quarreling would not live together ul all un
less they were obliged to. and in numerous
eases they separate, in spite of matrimonial
bond«. No more can Stales continue long in
the same nation while nursing a ppirit of
hostility against each other, and expressing it
iu all the nameless ways which malice eau in
vent, even though not amounting to actual
war. Brown's for.iy upon Virginia was war
open war ; and it is only (1
f the movement which r
day from be
involved in n bloody civil con
flict. i-'ueli atrocities cannot be denounced in
exaggerated terms. The lives of thousands of
helpless wouvti and children were put in jeo
pardy thereby, ami had Brown's avowed ex
pectations of help from the negroes and others
be n realized, Virginia would have ere this
been a scene of conflagration and massacre. —
Is it strange that communities to which we or •
bound by the strony U ties, constitutional.
historical, political, social, mercantile, und ma
ny others, should desire to know whether they
are to expect the repetition or such outrages.
or whether the Brown foray is viewed by the
great body of their fellow-citizens of the North
with indignation and sorrow ? It is the object
of the proposed meeting to exprès* the views
of the people of New York city on tiii^ and
kindred topics.
i
ADVERTISING RAREST
•no sjpiure op tss dihes, o/'lésft, for fini
ertiu.« 4Mr 00
For each addidonaUnsertioUrf jçer rquarç/ 50
Liberal discount made» to quurterly,
semi-nnuunl and yearly advertisers.
^tciuuuoav NMiom-fbr the»crw®«VT^I5
Angounoiuk, camUUates fbr ottioe (to be
paid ft» advance) . $10
PrAf.'isionul "arid lihsinrtisCards. (notto
o/cvicd six line#,.} püblklied twelvemonths .'.$10
..ffir Cards of a tkhso.vaï . character can ofily
ha published in U»is» paper -as udvcrtiscmohU,at
double rates, HU.d paid tor lu ««»m««.
m Cr* Advertisement.« not marked on the copy
will bo itiSeViWÎ until forbid and chargwT ac
cordingly.
Sectionalism Kchukcd.
W.tt publish w ^pleasure the timely and ear
nest rebuke v of iVction*li*m, the forcible expo
sure of the dangers which it lifts produced, and
earnest appeal to the reason and patriotism of
our fellow-citizens to arrest its progress, cou
taiued in the following article IYo1n*H»e New
York Express, the organ iu New lorkoftho
American party, and late a lciWtyng Whigjour
ual:
he drouth vf' Scctiviiatnm.-Xot even tho
youngest man, now just embarking upon tho
etui of lifo for himself, lint must feel (hat a
great change has taken place in tho relations
between the slave Slate? and those of the Ndnh
«hid West. He oari but go back (ohistchool
days-his boy hood-»-v as he vettoct» lipon tin«
altered condition of tlib coulitfy, cro he can
be convinced that he U really living under tho
same Government tfettt existed Iben, so differ
ent is the speech of people, and so changcd
arc the politics of the country. With the aged
and gruy-huird il ia t yen more dUlioult to com
prehend this fallingoIf in tine patriotlwu and
brotherly love between the States ol this
Union. They r< member the. atrugglo tvu* inde
pendence, and, if they did .nul aclually puriioi
pato lu il, they were schooled in all its Inci
dents, and taught by the very Ups of tho*o
re o part" iti that mighly contest, whwt
md what was endured it» order that this
glorious temple might be rearetl upon Amerl
11, to bless with the choicest of earthly
gifts their doH'ondanis. They witness with
pulu the growth ot discord nod ill-f ill whiuU
is manifest in all sections of the country, nud
mourn as they toller (»1» to their graves the un
faithfulness or those ft» whom have been In
trusted the préservation aud pevpoluati.ou ut
American 111.tu t v.
For years there was no discord, no ill-will,
between the members of this great family of
Slates. Massuelmsetts aud South Carolina
weie alike beloved, and respt etui each other
in return. There were no tueh tern»» as uro
unhappily now used in distinguishing a Christ"
ion church located on either side of Masûu and
Dixon's line from the other. Then there was
no 'North' and 'South* chrUtians, us I10W» bu*
all could surround tho sau»»» table, nnd_ com
memorate together the death and *V*AVrlngii of
the Saviour of mankind. t I icu the plSlplt wu»
nut desecrated by vociferous aad nngry a^ütls
«to the woi shipper to hate wltfilll hlj
his brother In the Southland to dii^i
Constitution and the laws of the lui®. Titan*
ministers preached Jesus Christ and Uiiu cru
cified, not John Brown, Shurpe's rifles, uor
treason against sister Stabs. The ruler is
authority and the happiness and profperlty of
tl»ls great Itopubllc were remlmbtrtil iu the
devotions of the sanctuary'; tiud {beChrlhtlam*
loved and prayed for one another iu all the
churches of the laud. Now there Is, with some
of the most numerous denominations, a church
'North' tinda church South.' Christians hero
11« longe
In,; Hier
in, ,, h ; h .
fellowship with Chritsittim liv
r • excepting one or two liistunces, per-.
And many pulpilw, on tin. 1 Sabbath um
on days of national thanksgiving, ru
,villi bitter denunciations of one half of
on, and violence, often, Instead of ble»
sing. Is Invoked upon them.
Who does not tnmblo for bis country in
view of this melancholy change? What but
the selti.ih spirit of sectionalism has begotten
this great wrong ? Will not Christians be as
Christians ought lo be, ai d do am Christians
are comtnufWled to do? They ore lo a p. l'eut
extent, respite lido for the evils which we now
deplore. They have joined, or sought to join,
a fanatical religion with politics, and have
abandoned the wholesome doctrines taught
them by the Great Master, This great evil—
mistake mied be speedily rec
Ion, civil war, and dch'potiuu
Haiti de
this disflMtrou
tilled, or disi
must bo ouri.
ny.
There is a picture of Roger A. PryOr, as a
"sojer,"in the Mobile Register, IW iu thutf
described :
Among the Yirginiaub is a frail delicate lit
tle fellow, with a clear gray eye, boyish mouth,
and hair parted in the middle, and falling be
hind Ids ears, a tight, fit ling sergeant's uniform,
with silver-hilled (»word. » scarlet plume, und a
pair of bright gilt shoulder pieces, lie is their
caviller, their "bow Id boy," and his name is
Roger A. Pryor, Orderly to the company of
Ritleman from Petersburg. Ashe passed down
the line, head erect, toes out, eyes lu front four
teen paces, liu reminded me of * bonnle bit of a
woman dresnd in uniform- us lor fXiiMjgtle,
Maria, lajille tin lùyiim ut! But when lie opej^k
those pretty lip-, und the round inollu.v tQgjM
tripped «nit iu true military grace--a soldlt^lr
a soldier every inch a soldier! lie is a sol
dier. Ile walks like ançy talks like oilfc^and
looks like one when he dfitwft Iheshintug MÄÜ •
and gives the command of hlrf fenpenl
on rest, as fie stands negligently at %|
his squad, he appears, as I said bcfgpf, #|
. bouncing, spirited girl, trimmed otrt fbr wf

j {
| Committer
J ( . lt u |„|
j |
-
j ßlir- La»L week a tmllionaru named $dnft,
•-based a uuall pocket-hook ut u stationu h
iuliromptem. Ho wus served by k lady of
great personal attractions. So binilleii \»u*
Mr. Scott with her beauty, that understundinf
hbe was single, he then and there made his fair
enslaver an offer of his hand and heart. Tli*
sequel is to be found iu the marriage, announ
ced as having taken place ut a church of ko I ii «
Puseyite notoriety in the neighborhood la-'
Wednesday, when the pretty shop-woman stei -
ped into a carriage nud £30,000 a year aft< r u
courtship of only one day.- - Isjudvn Ojuri CV
cular.
mbei
culat
0m Republican
EtUguugc of (heir
u to uominute »
Nat
well a manuel u.-» iu < :
ty " of Pennsylvania
S •- w J'-ivy.
aiiU
The Opposition i
•nnsylvunia a/<d N
paper, requesting tli

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