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The Kennewick courier. (Kennewick, Wash.) 1905-1914, May 12, 1911, Image 7

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093029/1911-05-12/ed-1/seq-7/

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I
|Wv> Doot hone a cold •
IP s , race's
p; 3 iP'Er
mwsE
COLD CURE
Quick, Podtfoc, Pleasant
ere in all cases of Sore Throat,
infla nation of the Lungs and Cold in
the Head.
Donua tkMV Co., IX* NMms, U.
a* centsmm
THE COLUMBIA PHARMACY
CBESCiI
Raises the Dough Hte|jg
Chemists and Authori- I
ties state that Crescent
»me. Sold by Grocers
FULL
POUND L L
CRESCENT MFG. COMPANY. SEATTLE
Kingsbury Hats
AGENTS
Kennewick, Washington
ItfrfO 3POKAKE, ±
M COMEANY. Jo|
W DESIGNERS ENGRAVERS Pfl
V PHONE. MAIN 104 //, J
jV 909& SPRAGUE AVE /A\ \
Irr'J
NOW VEST TIME
•f the yiir to h»r« your U«tb oat ul plate u4
Wpwork done and hero ii the plaoo to gat the
kut painless work poaaibla. Corny an #w Fricu.
HWe finish plata and
brifluo work for out
of - town patrons tn
on* day it desired.
Painless extraction
free when pittn or
bridge work is order
•d. Consultation free.
Gold ritiinf* 1.00
Enamel Fillings 1.00
Silver Fillings .50
G«od Rubber ___
Plates 5.00
Best Red Robber y jq
n.w.«. win, PtEm«T4seMisieii P«inls«s Extr'tion .50
N tub imniiMi n nenise HIT METHODS
fully guarantied for fifteen jean.
Wise Dental Co., inc.
Painless Dentists
25? TI »M «"<• Washington PORTLAND, ORE
OfflcsHoare: 11. 11. uI ML laadsys, •ta 1
COLUMBIA STEAMBOAT CO.
STEAMERS
Efeahw May 1*
Carrying United States Mails, Passen-
Eew and Freight between Kennewick
I'isoo and up-river points.
Up-River Steamers
Str. Mountain Gem leave* Kennewick for
Wihluke, 7:30 a. n. Pasco, 7:40 a. in.
Tuesday and Saturday.
Down-River Steamers
Lave Wahluke 8 a. m. Sunday, Wed-
De *ky. Friday.
Lmw White Bluffs 9 a. a.
Leave Haniord 10 a. m.
at Kennewick and Pasco in the
afternoon.
Additional Service
Six. Moimtain'Gem will run from Wah
u e to Priest Rapids every alternate Sat
jfV. rrtun >iag Sunday a. m. or oftroer
' ou nd necessary.
Dining room, sleeping rooms—
everything comfortable on board.
right is reserved to vary from or to
•nge the above schedule at any time
W 0T without notice.
Columbia Steamboat Co.
H. R. VIBBER, Manager
If., hone OG- P. O. Bo* U8
eßnewick Washington
ARREST MEATMEN
Warrants for the arrest of Geo.
N. Irish. W. L. McLaughlin, Oscar
Anderson and D. I. McLellan,
meatmen of Sunnyside and Top
penish, for the use of "freezeni" in
the preserving of meat, have been
sworn out by Inspector Will H.
Adams of the state health depart
ment, who has been working re
cently in the lower valley.
GIFTS
for the
Graduate
VanNorsdall
Jeweler
Hover Block
Why Haven't
You Bought
a Lot in
Olmsted
Addition
7??
you
haven't given
it a thought.
*"Wake up!
Put on your
thinking cap
and get to
figuring. Take
advantage of
our liberal
offer while
you may.
QThink it over. Those
beautiful lots, close in,
provided with all conven
iences, cement walks, water
mains, water rights, tele
phones, electric lights.
Every citizen of enne
wick should own a lot in
Olmsted
Addition
IflYou can afford to buy
one now. Look at the
prices and terms —
$300 and up;
A $300 lot,
$30 cashand
$6 a month
without
interest.
€flWhere else
can you do
as well?
Northern Pac.
Irrigation Co.
TEB niWWIOK OOTTMBK, IMW»WIOK, WASH.
In Orchard and Field
Happenings of Moment to the Man Behind the Plow
THE VALUE OF TESTIN6
There are a great many men who
pretend to be dairymen who speak
with pride of the number of cows
that they milk. They may milk
thirty cows, yet another man only
milks half that number and carries
as much or more milk from his
barn. Go into the barn of the
man who milks the large herd of
cows and express any surprise at
the small amount of milk and the
owner will begin to apologize by
saying that grass is rather short,
this cow is just a heifer, that one
was fresh in the winter and is now
nearly dry, the red cow never was
a very good milker, and so on thru
the entire herd. There are usually
several cows that he really intended
to dispose of last year but he hated
to see them go. After going over
the entire herd we find that he only
has four or five cows that are good
milkers. The others are not pro
ducing enough to pay for their
keep. We find things quite dif
ferent over at the barn of the man
who owns the small herd and is
making money. His cows are every
one good milkers. He don't keep
poor ones. Each cow must pro
duce a full pail of milk or she is
sold. The owner of that herd
knows that full pail cows are scarce
and when he hears of one he en
deavors to buy her. He makes the
dairying business pay because he
knows that it is the full milk pail
that counts. Every herd of dairy
cows should be tested by their
owner and if the te«t is to be of any
value it must be a test of each in
dividual animal. That will show
just what each cow is doing in
the way of paying for her keep.
Those that fall below acertain point
as milkers and butter producers
should be disposed of at once and
their places filled by good ones. If
good cows connot be had at that
time let theirplaces remain unfilled.
Every heifer calf should be carefully
reared and, when it becomes a cow,
tested and kept or sold just as the
test may decide. By a careful plan
of testing and elimination it is pos
sible to raise the average production
of the herd —just think what that
would mean. If you could raise
the average production of butter
per head of your herd one pound
per week a goodly sum would be
added to your income in the course
of a year. Every dairyman should
ask himself just how much each of
his cows is producing. If he does
not know it is time for him to get
busy and make a test. There are
too many people who just "keep
cows." They think that testing
savors too much of the man with
the white shirt who reada the farm
papers and has a store of book
knowledge. They haven't time to
make a test but must hurry thru
with their work so as to get a supply
of hay sufficient to feed their cows
through the winter and two-thirds
of those cows may not produce
enough to pay for what they eat.
A good dairy herd is a profitable
thing to own if the milk product is
properly taken care of and used.
It must be kept in mind, however,
that merely owning cows is not the
whole business. If the cows do not
give enough milk and if it is not
rich enough in butter-fat the herd
cannot pay a profit.
TREATIN6 FENCE POSTS
The coal tar product is the one
used for treating posts and other
wood to increase it 5 ? service in the
ground. It must be applied at a
high temperature and for some
hours to be effective. The usual
method of treating is to have a
metal tank so arranged that its con
tents may be heated with a fire be
low it, although the process of treat
ing has to date been generally thot
too expensive to make it profitable
for the ordinary farmer to provide
the needed equipment for the work.
When our more desirable varieties
of timber are no longer available,
however, this treatment will increase
the durability of timber not well
suited for posts.
MORTALITY IN CHICKS
On our advice a certain young
farmer and his wife bought a cer
tain make of incubator. Out of
two hundred random gathered eggs
they succeeded in getting a hundred
and forty rather thrifty chicks.
Poultrymen who saw the chicks
said they were as good a lot as
they would want to start out with.
The young farmer and his wife
thought they could get along with
out the brooder, as they had read a
lot about heating a box with a jug
of water, so they tried it. The
chicks chilled a number of times
and begun to die off at the rate of
ten a day. Feeding directions were
not followed and soon the little
fellows that could stand the constant
chilling had to succumb to bowel
trouble and whatever other ailments
that chicks poorly cared for are
heir to. And* now there are two
very hard condemners of the incu
bator in their immediate neighbor
hood.
Another party bought a very fine
incubta«»r and followed directions
to the letter. On the twentieth
day the chicks began to break prison
and he got excited so much that he
had to take the chicks out of the
machine and dry them in the oven,
as he thought they would never dry
in the machine. The chicks were
fed just as soon as they could be
forced to pick at anything, and
they, too, began to die, and it was
a veritable battle of the chicks to
see which could die first. A few
days of this and all was over.
The machine's temperature was
run down below a hundred during
the very time it should have been
kept right at a hundred and four or
five and a third of the hatch was
spoiled. We might add that a
poultry beginner was spoiled too.
Directions are pretty safe things to
follow.
MAN WHO CHAN6ED A VALLEY
"It was Burt, the drayman from
Carson City," writes S. Glfen An
drus in Sunset Magazine for May,
"who with a working capital of
$ 1,000 gave the ranch kings of
j northern California and the capital
ists of the east the economic lesson
of their lives. With his 81000 sav
ings Burt made his first payment
on his little farm, built his home
and barn with his own hands and
began to farm it as farming should
be done. With only seven acres of
land for cultivation, Burt sowed
three acres to alfalfa and around
the home he planted a small orchard;
between the trees he planted berries
and vegetables; under every tree
he placed a bee hive so that the
bees might pollenize his trees while
storing for him their golden honey.
He kept on planting and sowing
things until every foot of land was
made to do double and treble ser
vice. he had land left suffic
ient to devote to a chicken yard, a
pigstve and a cowpen. In the year
1910 Burt took from his seven acres
a total of 82,063 and with his aggre
gate savings he purchased forty acies
more of river bottom land.
CARD OF THANKS
I wish to extend my sincerest
thanks to all my friends and neigh
bors for their assistance during my
recent bereavement.
A. E. Quimby
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
<TO FILE CLAIMS
No. ISI.
in the Superior court of the State of Wash
ington for Benton County, In probate.
In the matter of the estate of Edgar Cox,
Deceased.
Notice is hereby given that'the undersigned
was appointed executor of the last will and
testament of Edgar Cox, on the; 10th day of
May, ]<jll. by the said Superior Court and that
letters testamentary have been duly issued to
the undersigned by the clerk of the laid Conrt.
All persons having claim against said estate
are required to present them with the neces
sary vouchers, to me at my residence at Ken
newick, Washington, within one year after the
date of this notice, or they will be forever bar
red.
Dated at Kennewick, Washington, this 12th
day of May, 1911.
Almyra cox
Executor of the last will and testament of
Edgar Cox, deceased.
Anderson & Marshall
Attorneys for Executor.
First publication May 12. 1911.
I.ast Publication June 2, 1911.
FRATERNAL ORDERS
Kennewick Lodge, F. & A. M.
Meets first and third Wednesdays
!n every month.
A. H. Richards. \V\ M.
A. \\\ Tompkins, Sccy.
AFTON CIRCLE NO. «92
WOMEN OF WOODCRAFT
Mrs- Sadie Conway, Guardian Neighbor
Meets First and Third Tuesdays
each month, in Masonic Hall.
All Circle Members Invited.
I. O. O. F\
Kennewick Lodge N0.22 2
Meets every Friday evening In
1.0.0. F. Hall. Visiting brothers
cordially Invited to attend.
C. E. LUM, N. G.
R. G. Tripp, Secy.
W. F. Sonderman, Fin. Sec.
ORDER EASTERN STAR
The O. E. S. meets the 2nd and
4th Wednesday evenings of each
month. Visiting members
welcome.
Emile E. Shanafelt, W. M.
Cora Sercombe, Secy.
Kennewick Lodge
KMGHTS of
PYTHIAS
Meets every Monday
evening. Visiting
r °ited rS cordlally
A. R. GARDNER, C. c.
C. L. Holcomb,
K.R.&S.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
Cause No. 1101.
In the Superior Court of the State of Wash
ington for Benton County.
St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company, a
corporation. Plaintiff
VI.
O. S. Hinsdale and Mittie R. Hinsdale, his
wife, and H. Ward Wright and Jane Doe
Wright (true name M. G. Wright) hit wife.
Def aid ants.
Under and by virtue of an Execution under
Foreclosure issued out of and under the seal of
the Superior Court of the State of Washington,
holding terms at Prosser, in and for said County,
on the 10th day of April A. D. 1911, upon a
judgment rendered in said Court on the 10th
day of April A. D. 1911, in favor ol The St.
Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company, a corpora
tion, and against the above named defendants,
for the sum of $151.95 (.One hundred Fifty-one
and 95-100 Dollars) together with attorney's fees,
interest, costs and increased costs, and to me di
rected and delivered, commanding me to sell the
following described property to satisfy said judg
ment, to-wit
The E. Half of the W. Half of the E. Half of
the S. E. Quarter of the S. E. Quarter of Sec
tion 23, Township 8 North, of Range 30, East
ofW.M.
Now Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given,
That on Saturday the 13th day of May A. D.
1911, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon of said day,
I will sell the above described property, or so
much thereof as may be necessary to satisfy said
judgment together with attorney's fees, interest,
costs and increased costs, in all amounting to the
sum of $256.18 (Two Hundred Fifty-six and
18-100 Dollars) together with costs of sale.
Said sale will take place at the front door of
the Court House at Prosser in said County and
State, and will be at public auction, for cash in
hand to the highest and best bidder.
Dated at Prosser, Wash,, this 12th day of
April A. D. 1911.
W. R. Mahan,
Sheriff.
By Hugh Forsyth, Deputy.
First Publication April 14, 1911.
Last Publication May 12, 1911.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. S. Land Office
at Walla Walla. Wash., April Bth, 1911.
Notice is hereby given that Joseph F. Svaton
sky, of Kennewick, Washington, who, on June 8,
1909, made Homestead Entry No. 03739, for
Lots 1-2-3-4, Sec. 6, Twp. 6N. Range 29 E.
W. M., has filed notice of intention to make Final
commutation Proof, to establish claim to die land
above described, before F. J. Coad, U. 8. Com
missioner, at his office, at Pasco, Washington, on
the 29th day of May, 1911.
Claimant names as witnesses: Lewis Trimble,
James Dodson, Owen Kniffen and Arthur H.
Wheaton, all of Kennewick, Wash.
John H. McDonald,
Not coal land. Register.
First Publication April 14th. 1911.
Last Publication May 19, 1911.
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION
In the Superior court of the State cf Wash
ington in Rntl for the county of Benton.
Elvia Harris Wright, plaintiff.
-VB*
Kathryn Leitclj and R. L. Leitch, husband
and wife, Defendants.
The State of Washington, to the said Katbryn
Leitch and K. L. Leitcb:
You are heieby summoned to appear within
sixty days after the date of the first publica
tion of this Summons, to-wit within aixty days
after the 21st day of April, A- D. and de
fend the above entitled action In the above en
titled court and answer the Complaint of the
Plaintiff and serve a copy of yoor answer upon
the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff at their
office below stated, and in case of your failure
so to do judgment will be rendered against
you acrording to the demand of the Complaint
which has been filed with the clerk of said
Court.
The said action is brought to recover from you
the .'am of Two Hundred Dollars ($200.00) with
interest thereon at the rate of ten per cent per
annum from the 13th day of October, A. D. 1909
which said sum is said to be <lue Plaintiff up
on a certain promissory note given by you to
plaintiff and dated October 13th. 1909.
Anderson & Marshall
Attorneys for plaintiff.
P. O. Address, Kennewick, Benton county,
Washington.
First Publication, April 21.1911.
Last publication, May 26.1911.
NOTICE FOE PUBLICATION
Department of the Interior, U. 8. Land Office
at Walla Walla, Wash., April 20,1911.
Notice is hereby given that Leo Gleason, of
Kiona, Wash., who, on August 31,1909, made
Homestead Entry No. 03936. for 8E l 4 NWji.
lots 3-4-5, Section 6, Township 8 N., Range 28,
E. W. M-. has filed notice of intention to make
final commutation proof, to establish claim
to the land above descrifced, before K. J. Coad,
U. S. Commissioner at his office at pasco,
Wash.. 011 the ftth day of June, 1911.
Claimant names aB witnesses: E- p. Scanten.
L. T. Young, 8. A- Tucker and Robert Erench,
allot Kiona, Wash.
v , , ~ . John H. McDonald.
Not coal land. Register.
First publication April 2S. 1911.
Last publication June 2.1911.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS -
Kennewick Undertaking Co.
Chapel and Parlor
Undertaking
Embalming
Funeral Directors
H. A. HOWE, Mgr.
Embalmers License No.
Calls Answered
Night or Day
Phone 302 Res. 845
C. V. Delepine
Physician and Surgeon
Office in Emigh-Howe Bid;.
Phones
Office 782
Residence 783
ANDERSON &
MARSHALL
yyyvyw»<y
Lawyers
Office In the Fechter Building
C. LHOLCOMB
Lawyer
Office over Intenational Bank
Notary Public
Practice in all state and
United States Court#.
Kennewick, Wash.
HAL H. COLE
Lawyer
Office in Nat'l Bank Building
KENNEWICK, WABH.
C STASER
Attorney at Law
insurauce
Kennewick, Wash.
Offices in C.O. Anderson's old stand '
ERNEST L. KOLB
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Office np-Ktairs in Emigh-Howe B'lding
Keunewiek. Wash.
Practise in All Courts
Mou 1 ton & Henderson
Lawyers
Offices over First National Bank
F. M. CROSBY. M.D.;C.M.
Physician and Surgeon
DiHeases of Women and Children
a Specialty
Office is Bauk Building. Phone SM
J. W. KELLEY M.D.,C.M.
PHYSICIAN and S7TRGEON
Office in King Bldg.
Phooes, Office X 372 R«.X373
KENNEWICK. WASH.
I. N. MUELLER
Funeral Director and Morti ciaa
LICENSE NO. 113
Calls answered day or night--Office oa
Yakima Street
Office X 472 Res. 953
Dr. D. S. Brogunier
DENTIST
Office over Internationa] Bank
Phone 633
Kennewlck, Washlnton
ORCHARDS and
VINEYARDS
PLANTED
TREES AND VINES PRUNED
My specialty Is straightening
out neglected orchards so as
to produce results.
WM. LEWTAS, Horticulturist
It. F. D. t Kennewick, Wash.
phone X 179
St—
unl HI

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