OCR Interpretation


The Kennewick courier. (Kennewick, Wash.) 1905-1914, November 22, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093029/1912-11-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
Qx=tjzf!k!!
"Mother," said the little daughter, "our new maid can see in the
dark."
"How do you know, dearie?" her mother asked.
"Why, I heard her tell papa when he came in last night that he
needed a shave," was the innocent reply.
Then things happened that are avoided by steady patrons of
HAYDON'S BARBER SHOP
The Valley Barn
and Dray Line S LIVE RY
85, feS
Proprietors Transfer Service
Telephone - - 141
Benton County Abstract & Title Co.
W. S. Jenkins, ex-County Auditor, President.
Moft complete plant in the county.
Prices reasonable.
PROSSER, .... WASH.
THE T. S. STEEL MACHINE CO.
The Leading Machine Shop in Walla Walla for
First Clsss Repairs of All inds.
Steam and Gas Engine Work a Specialty.
Contractors for Iron and Steel.
339 S Second St. Tel 787 Walla Walla, Washington
FINE WEATHER!
for House and Barn Painting. For real
economy, paint now with Phoenix Pure
Paint, only $2.40 per gallon, and 5% dis
count for a limited time.
e. s. Mcdonald paint company
■ •S 1
Hotel Kennewick
H. J. CLAUSSEN, Proprietor
$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00
MEAL HOURS: SUNDAY MEAL HOURS
Breakfast 6:15 to 9:00 Breakfast 7:00 to 9:30
Dinner 12:00 to 1:30 Luncheon 12 to 1:30
Supper 6:00 to 7:30 Dinner 6,00 to 7:30
Building Materials
qWe are offering special induce
ments in building materials.
Get our quotations on ceiling,
flooring, drop sidiug, boxing,
dimension, paper, etc.
| wood & coal I
We have a full line of Rock Spring
and Smith Coal; also Dry Fur Wood.
None sell for less—Liberal discount for cash.
Crab Creek Lumber Company
THE KENNEWICK COURIER, KKNNEWIIK. WASHINGTON
The KENNEWICK COURIER
R. E. REED and E. C. TRIPP, Editors and Proprietors
Issued Every Friday from the Courier Building, Second St., Kennewick, Wash.
One Year, $1.50 Six Months, $.75 Three Months. $.50
Kotered March 27.1902, as second-class matter ata.ei;Dewick, Wash.,
Act of Congress of March 3d, 1879.
A PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN WEEKLY
WOUL.D DO A WA& WITH DA JVGE"ROUS' C'ROSS'IJVGS'
•"THE NECESSITY for a law authorizing the elimination of dangerous
crossings of railways over highways and of the highways over rail
ways in this state will be strongly urged by the public service commis
sion of Washington in its forthcoming annual report.
The commission prepared and presented a bill empowering it to el
iminate dangerous grade crossings to the legislature of 1911, but it failed
to pass. The present grade crossing law which was passed in 1909,
gives the commission power to prescribe the nature of crossings tb be
thereafter constructed only, and it has no such authority with crossings
established before 1909.
Frequent requests have been made upon the commission for the
elimination of certain dangerous grade crossings in the state, but investi
gation has shown that many of such dangerous crossings were constructed
and in use prior to the passage of the 1909 grade crossing law, and the
commission has therefore had to advise that it is without authority. "In
many of such cases we have ordered alarm bells and watchmen, thus re
ducing but not eliminating the danger, " says the commission in matter
compiled for its forthcoming report.
"The sudden death of a prominent Seattle citizen at one of these
dangerous crossings, in July, 1912, startled the press and the public of
the state and made apparent the necessity for further affirmative legis
lation such as the commission has suggested to the last legislature.
"Certainly this state cannot afford to continue to sacrifieeits citizen
ship by failure to pass such laws. The time is now ripe for such legisla
tion. Railroads, county and municipal authorities indicate their willing
ness to assist. Public sentiment is demanding action and the responsi
bility now rests with the legislature.
"There are many grade crossings in the state that must be elim
inated."
TO CUHE "DEL Ays I/f ELECTION H.ETWRJVS
A S OFTEN as an election is held there is trouble and delay in getting
** an accurate count of the votes, and the difficulties arising from the
present cumbersome systeip will ever be conducive to charges of fraud
and incompetence, especially in the event of a very close vote such as the
late Hay-Lister contest developed.
The Seattle Town Cryer has evolved an idea which its editor believes
points the way to an end of all the usual delay, charges of fraud and
necessity for a recount. It suggests a Constitutional amendment along
these lines:
"Let the ballot boxes be sent to the precincts sealed and padlocked,
the keys to be retained by the proper county or city official and the seals
to be broken only on his order.
"Limit the authority of precinct election officers to the matter of
determining the eligibility of each person asking to vote, and to accepting
the marked ballot and placing it in the box in the presence of the voter.
"Promptly on the hour fixed for closing the polls, let the proper
county or city officers be prepared, with necessary means of conveyance,
to take the ballot boxes from each precinct to his office, or some place
provided for the purpose, there to be opened for the first time.
"Meanwhile this officer shall have assembled a sufficient number of
his employes, some expert calculators, if neccessary, and plenty of add
ing machines.
"Then let the votes be counted, tabulated and totaled."
The proposed plan has the merit of grappling with a problem that is
steadily growing more complicated. In the interest of economy, accur
acy and promptitude something of the kind ought to be done.
CAH. 'BUIL'DE.'RS "BUy WASHIJfGTOJf L.UMHE'R
WITH the national election settled, things have returned to better
than normal conditions and prosperity in Washington, as well as
throughout the nation, is already in evidence. Nooue thing corroborates
this statement better than the fact that, within a few days after the elec
tion several of the biggest car building concerns of the country placed
orders with Washington mills for more than 100, JOO,OOO feet of lumber
to be used in the construction of railroad equipment during the'coming
year, particularly freight cars. Where, during the depression, the rail
road companies had allowed their rolling stock to run down, they are
now hard put to get enough cars t<» handle the immense consignments of
freight that are to be offered. The buyers of this lumber are the Can
adian Car and Foundry Company, of Toronto, the American Car and
Foundry Company of St.Louis, and the Pullman Palace Car Company.
Lumbermen in the Gray's Harbor district captured the larger portions of
these orders.
■P'RCG'RESSIVE, FAH. MRUS
THE FARMER OF TOMORROW will conserve fertility; he will re
deem the wornout land and make it in time more fertile than ever
before. He will preserve it not only for his generation, but for all the
generations to come. It is to the progressive farmer that the nation
must look for increased production of farm products that will enable the
country to reduce the high cost of living. Progressive politics is largely
theory, but progressive farming is a very material fact. —Yakima Herald.

THAT international tea party —Sir Thomas Lipton—says that Victoria,
Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles is the
best city on the Pacific coast.

AND NOW that the campaign is over and there is no longer any de
mand for mud, old J. Pluvius should stop the leaks.

DEMOCRATIC aspirants for the post office job should get their appli
cations in early and avoid the rush.
COAL
Owl Creek Coal
The Best Ever
See Us Before You Buy
Your Winter's Supply
/
CASCADE LUMBERca
R. C. MOUNSEY, Mgr. Kennewick, WaJj.
WALTER LODGE ARTHUR JACOT
KENN E WICK
DRAY LINK
TRANSFER & DELIVERY
fTRXITT T RE ANT) PIANO MOVING
A BPEGIAIiTY
ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY
ATTENDED TO ?„„„ It g,
Al. Fisher
PLUMBER
My work will stand the
MOST RIGID INSPECTION
WHY I BUY AT HOME
Because my interests are here.
Because the community that is good enough for rae to live in
is good enough for me to buy in.
Because I believe in transacting business with my friends.
Because I want to see the goods.
Because I want to get what I pay for.
Because every dollar I spend at home stays at home and helps
work for the welfare of the community.
Because the man I buy from stands back of the goods.
Because I sell what I produce here at home.
Because the man I buy from pays his part of the city and
county taxes.
Because the man I buy from helps support my school, my
church, my lodge and my home.
Becanse by buying at home I imbrove the community, there
by advance the price of my holdings in proportion to the
amount I would save by sending away. Here is where I
live, and here I buy.
5 We have made arrangements to furnish our friends and patrons
with FREE CHRISTMAS TREES. Leave your orders early.
"There's No Place Like Home"
St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Co.
J. O.Skirving, Mgr., Kennewick - H. W. Nelson, "Mgr., Finle/.
COAL!
Smokeless and Sootless!
The mo£t heat for your money
is what you want. Try a load and
you will be our Steady customer.
<1 Phone your orders for Water, Soda,
Coal or Ice to No. 212.
Twin City Ice & Cold Storage Com'y
NOVEMBER 90^

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