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The Leavenworth echo. [volume] (Leavenworth, Wash.) 1904-current, April 14, 1922, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093039/1922-04-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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EDUCATION LAWS TOO LOOSE
Children's Bureau of United States
Department of Labor Deplore*
Some Exemptions Allowed.
Every state now lias a compulsory
'lay school attendance law, according
to Information' recently furnished by
the United Stated Department of La
bor through the children's bureau. The
bureau hits just completed on analysis
of education laws affecting child lator,
the results of which are published In
a chart entitled "State Compulsory
School Standards Affecting the Km
ployment of Minors."
In five states attendance is required
until eighteen year* of u^e. in two
of these in certain dlatrtcti only; In
three until aeventeen; and In thirty
two until sixteen. One stnte jequlrei
attendance until fifteen, its other* and
the Dlitrict of Columbia until r< mr
teen, and one itate require* attendance
until the ii^-c .if twelve years, but
appllei this to Illiterate! only.
Unfortunately, utyi the bureau, the
exemptions in tin- majority of states
are so numerous that they greatly lim
it the application of the law, The
most common exemption! are for em
ployment, or upon completion of »
specified school made. Four states
specifically exempt for work In usjri-
CUttnrai pursuits, three with DO age pro
vision. Laws of fourteen other suites
contain loosely Worded provisions ex
empting a chihi nt any age, which
ralßht be uspd to cover absence for
farm work as well as for ninny other
purposes. Several states exempt a
child whose services are necessary for
the rapport of himself or other*, with
out any aife or educational provision.
The amount of attendance required
is still unsatisfactory In many states,
several demanding only 12, 18, or LHI
weeks In a year. Even In states
where city children must attend for
eight or nine months, the amount of
attendance required In rural school
districts Is sometimes considerably less.
HAD MIGHTY SUSPICIOUS LOOK
Washington Correspondent Tells of
Joke Played by Senators on
Veteran Capitol Barber.
Onp of the most remarkable things
arout men, be they <>f high or low es
tate, is thui they never grow up.
Take for Instance, tliut group of el
der statesmen in the United States
Semite. Here is the trick they were
caueht playing on Sims, the old negro
barber at the capltol, who has been
shaving them and their kind for forty
years.
Sims is a preacher and great Bibli
cal authority when he Is not shaving
senators. He Is profoundly religious.
He has confidence in his fellows.
So, when Senator Hurry New of In
diana told Sims thai he hull B present
for him, the venerable barber walked
Into the trap all unsuspecting.
The senator suld tie wanted to be
stow his present in private. He anil
Sims went into an anteroom. The sen
ator squatted down and Sims did like
wise. The senator took from his pock
et a large-sized pair of dice and rolled
them out on the carpet Sims watched.
At this moment a group of semi
tors, In the plot with New, burst into
the room. There, apparently, were Sen
ator New and the old barber, despite
his protestations of religion, shooting
CntpS, The statesmen were horrified,
An employee of the senate had been
caught gambling. Btms, of all men,
had gone wrong utter forty years;
Sims, whom they trusted impllcity. It
was a case that called for drastic ac
tion.—Philadelphia Public Ledger.
"Le Chef" Is an Artist, Too.
"Chester, the original of Sir Wil
liam Orpen'i famous picture "Ls
Chef," which the artist had presented
to the Royal academy as his diploma
work, Is now chef of tin 1 grili ut the
Royal Palace hotel, Kensington, Lon
don,
The manager of the hotel, being in
Paris on Imsiness, called, out of cu
riosity, at the HotH Chatham to sec
the chef whose portrait had attracted
such attention. In conversation
"Chester" would talk of nothing Inn
a wonderful new i-aiice he bad just
made. The manager sampled It and
realized, In Ills own phrase. Hint
"Chester Is, In his own way, as great
an artist us Sir William Orpen."
He Immediately offered him a very
substantial salary In return for his
services during the season. "Chester"
at first refused to leave Paris, but
finaMy succumbed to what is said ti be
the largest salary an assistant chef
has ever earned. — London Times.
The Bursting of a Bubble.
Statements made tlmt because of
the flotation inctliod of mineral
■SpaTßtlOß tlio future of copper pro- i
ductlon. and therefore, of the electrl- f
cai industry, is Largel) dependent
on hubbies Is declared by students j
of Industrial development to be ex
aggerated. The electrical industry Is (
no mere Is dependent upon this proc- |
ess, It Is declared, than is any j
other, but it will benefit more di
rectly, experts say. from this Inten
sive method of copper refining than
nny Industry which doea not tue
copper s,i extensively.
Women Match Coins.
"I'll mutch you," need to be reserved
for ■wnillin conversation. The flip
of ii mill decided »ho wit to pay for
lunch or for 11 dgar. lUit women hnve
taken It up. It Is masculine no lotiKi'r.
"Tin' women have gotten tired of
fighting about who la to pay." said the
illuming soda counter cashier. "It
mod to take them nbout live minutes
10 decide. Now they match v couple
of quarter! to lind out. The winner
gets treated."
BALM FOR RAINY VACATIONS
"Weather Insurance" Designed to
Give Monetary Solace to Travel
ers That Are Unfortunate.
Got all your vacation tot's? <iot
your fishing tnckle. your round trip
ticket, your mosquito lotion nnd your
i rain insurance?
Yes, then*! balm In Cllead nt last
for the bitterest of human tragmllea,
I Kor there'! no denying that n rnlnj
vacation Is a worse catastrophe than
| a collision of planets, even if the lat
-1 ter Involved the wiping 081 Of all
one's wife's relations.
The balm consist*, of a bet made
; with you by xn insurance company
j that it won't rain during your vnca
tion. In other words, you take out a
1 rain policy for that period. And then,
j If It happens to pour eat! and dog! all
i the time you have the consolation of
J collecting a tidy sum of rain Insur
ance when you return to town. You
, may be to constituted that the money
j would fail to conaole you for the lost
I vacation clays, but there are other tel
I lows who Would pray for ruin in order
j to "beat the company."
The Idea comes from England, where
all sorts of freak Insurances are prac
' tlced. Record! of the United States
weather bureau are used to figure out
rates based on the probabilities of
j precipitation In any given part of the
j United States and Canada, One in
surance company points with pride to
the fact that last year It paid fill
-318.30 to the Wnltham fair on account
of loss due to a rainy day. the fair
corporation having taken out a rain
policy. And the Kansas free fair at
1 Topekn wns protected by a $2.".000
| rain policy with a British company.
REAL TREAT FOR IMMIGRANTS
let Cream Something New to Arrivals
at Ellis Island, but They
Finally Liked It.
Immigrant struggles with American
food on Kills Island reached a climax
when Commissioner Wallis Introduced
plates of Ice cream to the 1,700 diners.
The Idea behind the Ice cream was to
give the Immigrants v real treat on
their reaching the hind of promise.
What happened »m>. a marvel to wit
ness. The first persons served were
a Balkln native und a native of
East India. The Kiist Indian took a
lick and liked It. He looked around
and saw that the Balkan opposite him
had a bigger piece. Greedily lie
grabbed for it. Then the tight began.
Both got well smeared In the face with
the food.
The other diners touched the lee
cream, und finding it cold, thought
they knew the trick. The gtnnt was
to smear the cold substance on your
neighbor's face. This happened sev
eral times. Then someone tasted the
Ice cream and with a whoop an
nounced it was manna too precious to
be wasted on countenance!, The hea<*
steward said the snme thing In the
eight languages he speaks. The faee
sniearing ceased abruptly,
But the final experiment was yet
to be made. The real genius of the
meal took up his knife and ti piece at
bread and spread the new butler ten
derly over It. He started the fashion
with a bung, und :ill the rest enjoyed
their Ice cream that wav. —New York
World.
Average Life of Auto.
As highway transportation de
velops and passenger curs anil trucks
become practically the sole means of
road travel, the proportion of first
purchasers of cars and trucks in the
total of car sales will decrease, and
the demand for new cars each year
will become more and more nearly
equal to the number of cars which
drop out of service. For this reason
it Is becoming Increasingly impor
tant for the trade to know how many
cars will he required for replacement
of those withdrawn from service.
Analysis of registration, production,
export and Import figures over a
period of years leads to the con-
elusion that the average life of tlie
U.noo.fkXi cars retired from service In
the last seven years was about 5.8
years.—Scientific American.
New Tombstone.
Austin J, Harnan of Caster, f)kla.,
has Invented wliat he rails a "new
and Improved tombstone," says the
Columbus Dispatch. It Is designed to
represent a lift-.size human figure
standing erect. For instance, It might
be a soldier. Tlie material Is galvan
ized Iron, made hollow, so that the
lower part of It may hp filled with
lenient to make a heavier ba«e. The
bad? Is hollow In order that If de
sired. It mny hold nn urn containing
the ashes of the dei-eased. As for
the head, it || incunt to lie screwed
on and may lie made a UkeMM of the
person for whom the tombstone la
erected.
Greek Temple Discovered.
It is announced that the archeology
c«i service In Thessnly ims Informed
the minister of education of the dis
covery of an Olympian temple at Kerres
| near Velesilon, of the fourth century
before Hie present era. The temple.
It Is stated, resembles that at Olympia;
, It Is In a good state of preservation
and has 10 bronze plaques with laws
and decrees.
Some Men Can't Be Satisfied.
"If v mun is rlrh aud has gon<]
heiilili and a heuutiful wife and two
or three lovely children," she said,
"what bon can he want?"
"Well," he replied, "there's many a
heautlfu! wife who talks more tlmn
Is absolutely hex essiiry."— <Kiica*.'t>
Herald anil Kxiimlner.
THE LEAVENWORTH ECHO
THK STORY OF TWO MATCHES.
By Robert Louii Steven ■:,.
One clay there was a traveler in the
woods in California during the dry
season, when the Trades were Wo*
in? strong. He had ridden I |.i>ii'
way, and he was tired and hungry,
and dismounted from his horse ti
smoke a pipe. But when he felt in
his pocket, he found but two mr.t.-'ics.
He struck the first and it would not
light.
"Here is a pretty Mate .>f thing!,"
said the traveler. "Dying for a
smoke, only one match left, and tl a;
certain to miss fire! Was there ever
a creature M unfortunate?" "And
yet," thought the traveler, "suppose
I light this match, and smoke my
pipe, and shake out tlm dottle hero in
the graae—the grau might catch on
fire, for it la dry like tinder; while
I snatch out the flames in front, they
might evade and run behind me, and -
seize upon yon bush of poison oak;
before I could reach it, that would
have blazed up. Over the bush I sec
B pine tree hung with moss; that too
would fly in fire upon the instant to
its topmost bough. And the flame of
that long torch—how the trade wind
would take and brandish that through
the inflammable forest 1 1 hear this
dell roar in a moment with the joint
voice of wind and fire. I see myself
gallop for my soil, and the flying con
flagration chase and outflank me j
through the hills. I see this pleasant
forest burn for days, the cattle roast
ed, the springs dried up. the farmer
ruined and his children cast upon the |
world. What a world lianas upon
this moment!"
With that he struck the match, and
it missed fire.
"Thank God," said the traveler,
and put his pipe in his pocket.
H. McDaniel returned recently
from Everett where he is having ;i i
number of fine boats made for hia
summer trade at Lake Wenatehee.
i u Pm • *£ T* JJ jTT*
•V/MjL "Jim's' got His —
/as*l Vf|j\ So has "A 1"
You'll want one too
tM|| \ ly^' Yes, indeed—
Fitn m A new Hart Schaffner
Vi m & Marx suit for Easter
I
i
y f'.. P :■-<■' ■ ■-■ : "■■.'•■ i :j;
They are here now
a good selection of patterns
and models, that are
RIGHT—
in style
in fit
in fabrics
in price
THE TOGGERY
PIPKIN-TAYLOR CO, Inc.
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes
MALI.OKY FLOKSHEIM, WALK-OVER &
AND HARDEMAX COI'KI AND & ÜBYDER SHOES
HATS FOR MEN
six RULES roll
PREVENTION OF FIRES.
l. MATCHES. He rare your
match i- out. Break it in two before
you tl row it away.
j. TOBACCO. Thron pipe ashe.,
and cigar or cigarette itumpe in the
■ I 1 ..f the i' ad and stamp or pinch
tin- fire before leaving them. Don't
throw thrni into brush, leaves, or
needles.
::. MAKING (AMI 1. Build a
small camp fire. Hu-ild it in the open,
not against a tree or log or near
brush, Scrape away the trash from
around it.
I. LEAVING (AMI. Never leave
a camp lire, even for a short time,
without quenching it with water and
earth.
.".. BONFIRES. Never build bon
fires in windy weather or where there
s the slightest danger of their es
caping from control. Don't make
them larger than you need.
6. FIGHTING FIRES. If you
find a fire, try to put out. If you
can't get word of it to the nearest U.
S. Forest ranger or state fire warden
at once. Keep in touch with the
rangers.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES — IT
PAYS.
WELL ESTABLISHED SYSTEMS
OF STOCK PRODUCTION URGED
Well-established systems of live
stock production consistently followed
from year to year are the outstand
ing needs of the live-stock industry,
acordinß to a conference of animal
husbandry and marketing extension
workers held at Chicago, March 2 to
1. Economy of production, the con
ference agreed, is the most import
ant factor over which farmers have
control. Producing live stock of the
best quality at the lowest possible
cost was urged and particular em
phasis was placed on economy of
production rather than increased pro-'
ducrtion as the key to a pro perous
industry.
Vmong the controlling factOM m
economical live ■toe* production, m
the judgment of Uu conference, were
■election of animal , choosing of ra
tions, and good practices in care and
| management. Delegates to the con
ference included United States Pc
partinent of Agriculture specah tl
'and animal husbandman and exten
■ion workers of agricultural eoltaget
in the Central West.
FBBDKR HOOS MUST BE RAISED
TO SUPPLY THE CORN BELT.
The poMibility of economically pro
ducing feeder hogs in the South for
supplying the corn belt with the ex
tra hogs for consuming the corn crop
will he investigated by Hie United
How About Those
TIRES?
BRING THEM IN
My Vulcanizing Shop is now completely
equipped and ready for business.
Leavenworth Tire Hospital
E. L. BARKEE, Proprietor
Located in Leavenworth Supply^Co. Garage
States Department of Agriculture in
cooperation with some of the South
ern state:-. This spring, work on the
problem mi begun at McNcill, Miss.,
66 miles north of Men Orleans. Th<-
Mississippi Experiment Station will
uaiat in the work. The idea is to test
out the (rowing ami marketing of
hogs at a weight of about 100 pound?,
using both the lard and baron types.
The growing of feeder hoi's is an
industry which should be developed,
as the Corn Belt is in need of more
shoats than are usually produce i
there. Similar experiments to those
being made in the South will be trie!
later in the Northwest and the South
west.
Mr. and Mrs. Clare Preston were
up from Dryden Wednesday of last
week ami were the guest! of Mr. and
Mr.-. F. C. Olberg.

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