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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1914-1938, November 25, 1937, Image 7

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093042/1937-11-25/ed-1/seq-7/

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[7 .
“ch per word Def insertion minimum, 350-. If prepaid, five times for flu price of tour. -
M
/’——l,
. For Sale 111111111 l
,Q Wham hamburger, 2
p“ to: 25c. People's Market,
wumngton. 28tfc
E “ “ “LIP-Medium size round
IO”: use wood or coal, good or
“..m good grade Jersey cow, will
”gab In January. Will accept hay
.1”: pyment. F. Volland, 5 miles
.‘ a Kennewick. 34tfc
mo BARGAlN—Beautiful, small
I. modern piano in storage—
.m .alflce rather than box and
“9, Terms and transportation ar
m write W. N. Gray 2702 S.
W, W
K’”
.W CARDS—N“ is the
m to make selection for this
,‘., cards. We have an especial
” w Went from which to
”Nib
ff
gm SALE—Pure white shortening,
{was for 35¢. People's Market,
W Washington. 28tfc
"2| W
m much and appleS- Fine
W Gems, 50c and $1 per hun-
I” mmsocperbox.B.A.Mc
m first place west of cemetery;
W- 33-37 p
”3 am __ peonm, shrubbery.
mm shade trees at sacrifice
W 5 mm, ornamental trees:
m. mes, roses. asparagus plants
“mun prices. Home Nursery 00..
and. Washlnston- 29m:
m TWIN CITY NURSERY or
water, Oregon at this time is
mad With puma trees. 01'-
” then for Demarise and Weath
m varieties will be sold at re
m prices the rest of this year.
a. the Grange Supply, 1110-. Ken
mick. for prices. 11. M. William.
W. 33-37 D
Me: Name for fihq U. S.
James Wilson's original draft of
he Constitution shows that an et
at was made to call the nation
“The United People and States of
America."
Puls’ Old Flea Market
:Because Phillipe IV wouldn't be
with peddlers. Paris has its
nearly Myear-old flea market of
my shops at the Porte de Clignan
com.
”city’s First Job Was Cannon
One of the first products from
Dmvet’s first iron foundry was a
two-inch cannon. used to fight In
diam.
lactic! From Queen's Hair
Abracelet made from Queen Vic.
tom's hair when she was a girl is
an exhibition in London.
Cleopatra's Needle
Cleopatra's; Needle, on the Vic
toria Embankment. London. dates
{mm about 1500 B. C.
The Character in Actions
It is in the minor actions of our
daily life that our true character is
mauled.
Phosphates of
West Should
Stay at Home
WWW ammnturxsts m
Mo, Utah, Wyoming and Mon-
NI. 'here about two-fifths of the
W 3 lKnown phosphate rock is 10-
m are making plans to conserve
this ml! of fertilizer for United
M farmers and prevent its sale
M says loeonard Hegnauer, ex
“on mom, State College of
“Milton
5‘ I recent meeting men from the
Mr western states where phos-
M mines are located maintain
“ “lit the potential crop produc
h Value of these phosphaaes when
M to American farms is far
Miter than any price received for
than In foreign commerce.
- ~—-~- --. \
"One need not be a major pro-i
M" Hesnauei- says, “to forsee the
he when the entire output of the
Mm mines should be used by
Wu farmers on lands greatly
h Red of phosphorus. For that
M it would seem wise to safe
k‘ We original supply as plans,
in the making propose. We
WWWt our rich inheritance
"1 3' fertility. our own national
lulu”? ’t' to be sold for a mess of
“”112 Western phosphate meeting
"3 Stated that the world’s pres
.“le of phosphate rock is 16,-
William tons. Of this amount
had: 111 the four western states
W account for 6,500,000,000
In addition in other states
:2; ‘3 Tennessee South Carolina.
‘l3 5:: Kegtucliy there are ad
mm“ min estimated at 500.-
3300 tans. making a United States
m 01 about seven billion tons.
We “Md be enough to safeguard
... plTgsl'lp‘flllture of America, as far
m cfinfemed, for gen
aMinn. e, . .
"it Why. t is retained in
515$
CAR LICENSES—Get your 1938
car licenses ‘at Western Auto
Store, starting Decem‘er 1. You' can
pay your tax here, too, and get your
new plates over the counter. Lane
K. Larson.
ATTENTION—Dr. Geo, L. Houser
of Walla Walla will be in Pasco
every Saturday from 8 am. to 6 p.
m. at 312 Bonneville St. 34-37 c
LADIES—Have you seen our line of
new coats and dresses in silk, wool,
velvet and knit? Also hats, sweat
ers, lingerie and stockings. Joy
Frills Dresses 9 Kennewick Ave.,
Kennewick Wn. 3m
WE HAVE A NEW SHIPMENT of
coal oil burners. We also have
-—priced for quick sale, second-hand
wood and coal circulating heaters.
L. H. Raymond. 33th
*—
EATS AND CAPS—Hats cleaned
and blocked 00c: caps cleaned 25c.
Patterson Dye Works. phone one
two-thne. Pasco. 32::
CITY MATI'RESS WORKS and
upholstering and furniture re
pairing. Bring in your old mat
tresses. Cotton. kapoc. wool, hair
and feathers, made over like new.
Inner spring mattresses a speciality.
Have your upholstered furniture re
covered. Largest list to select from.
Shop, 2 blocks north of the high
school. Call at the Sandal-d Oil sta
tion north of the courthouse. I have
been here three summers. Box 48,
Pasco, Washington. 32tfc
SHOP EARLY—OnIy a compara
tively few more days until Christ
mas. Time now to pick out your
Christmas cards. See our new as
sortment of the better class, dis
tinctive, personalized cards. See our
special offer which includes a free
hand engraved copper plate which
can be used for calling cards or for
other purposes later. 38p
Early Letter Censoring
It was a few hundred Spanish
soldiers that first conquered and
carved out Chile among’ themselves
in the Sixteenth century and then
wanting immigrants badly m ade
punishable the sending out of let
ters abroad unless censored to pre
vent the repute of the colony from
being injured.
The Blackbird Family
Blackbirds and others that resem
ble blackbirds include the rusty
blackbird. the bronzed grackle. red
winged blackbird, yellow - headed
blackbird, cowbird - sometimes
called cow blackbird—and the bob
olink. frequently referred to as the
white-winged blackbird.
How Insects Breathe
Although insects. have no wind
pipe or lungs—they breathe through
rows of tiny “port-holes” in the
sides of their bodies—certain moths,
such as the Green Silver-lined and
the Death’s Head Hawk. make little
clicking. whistling, or squeaking
noises.
E“ . :lv‘ ‘.
ANOTHER REDUCTION—To expe—
dite settling the Loyd estate will
sell one or both store rodms (one
now occupied by The Club, the oth
er formerly occupied by the Mc-
Donald Grocery) at a big reduction
from their real value. Ray Loyd.
366 First St., Walla Walla. 34-38 c
GOOD BUYS In unwed and un
improved irrigated rams. Mutable
for diversified fanning- Priest
Rapids Development Assn. White
Bluffs, Wash." ' 37“
FOR SALE—2O acre irrigated place
all piped, 12 acres hay, balance
tillable, gbod well, blilldlngs. Three
miles from Richland, Chester East
wood, Box 591 Sunnyside, Wash
ington. We
FOR SAW—mculem four-room
house, Kennewick Ave., excel
lent condition S2IOO.
FOR RENT—Furnished house
and an apartment.
FOR SALE—Two twenty- acre
tracts, well improved and very
reasonably priced.
Hover 3m. Kennewlck
IRRIGATED FARMS non SALE-
Also buy. corn. mm and other
farm produce for a): n m
See W. o. Muldrow. my. man!-
ude Intention nun-let. m 3‘3-
Washington. ‘
111111111 l VVVanted :111111111l
WANTED—Wood sawing. satisfac
tion . guaranteed. .See Robert
Swain. 212 Co. sth St., Pasco, Wash
ington. ' 32-36 p
WANTED—IOO people to try our 100
percent pure Penn oil at a. great
saving to you. Investigate. Winks
Motor Parts. 30“
THE AMERICAN PRODUCTS co.
wants your live or dead horses
and cows. Our truck will call every
day, except Sunday. at Benton City,
Richhnd. Pasco and Kennewlck.
Phone 2161, at Grange Supply. Inc..
at once during hot weather before
9 am. American Products Company.
Yakima. sth:
Mllllllllli‘or Rent‘llllllllllll
FOR RENT—House, good location,
close in. Available now. sls per
month. Inquire at Western Auto
Store. Lane K. Larson. 35p
FOR RENT—Furnished apartment.
Kennewlck Apaxytments, 311 Wash.
street. 29“
PAINTERS
Paints—on Won Popu-
Employ a good pinne—
l. J. 3mm O SON
Painting. Doom-sung ond
:: W ::
nanote- cheat-lolly given
PASCO PAINT & PICTURE 81'0”
~ Phone 204
114 8. Fourth. Paco Mo
British Act in' Palestine
Jerusalem—Following a day or
bloodshed in which seven Arabs and
a Jewess were killed, with nine oth
ers injured, British authorities ar
rested forty leaders of the Jewish
revisionists youth organization The
latter claim that the disorders start
ed when a passing Arab car fired
several shots into the crowded Jew
ish market place, wounding two wo
men, one of whom subsequently died.
NOTICE OI" THE EQUALIZATION
OF ASSESSMENT ROLL OF
C OLUMBIA IRRIGATION
DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that the as
sessment roll of the Columbia Irri
gation District is now on file in the
office of the Secretary and Board of
Directors at 10 Kennewick Avenue,
Kennewick, Washington, and that
the Board will meet in their office
on Thursday. December 2, 1937, as a
Board of Equalization, for the pur
pose of equalizing said assessment
roll and at which time the Board of
Directors will hear and determine
such objections to said roll as may
come before them.
Given by order of the Board of
Directors this 2nd day of November.
1937.
OLE BRUE. JAB. JOHNSTON.
ED FRAUEN, Directors.
FRANK MAUPIN, Secretary.
11:11-25
NOTICE 4OF INTENTION T O
LEASE COUNTY PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that at 11
o'clock am. on the 6th day of De
cember. 1937, at the courthouse in
Prosser, Washington, the Board of
County Commissioners of Benton
County, Washington will lease to the
highest and best bidder, at public
auction the following dacrlbed
grazing land, situated and being in
the county of Benton, State or
Washington, to wit: i ‘
Township 9, N. Range 26 EWJI. 1
Section 14—qu South of
Canal; 8% of N 55 of SEIA; Slfi of
SE34.
Section 15—All less Nls of Nyg
of Nsfiand less the 8% of SW34
and Highway rtw.
Section I7—SEIA, of SEIA less
Highway rtW.
Section 19—All county owned lots,
Plat of Yakitat, approximately 250
acres. - A A __ _
"anon 2‘l—wsgg or E 240 acres; w
400 acres. ,- ---
véection 23—A11.
Township 9, N. Range 27 EWM.
, Section 113—ng of Wu; SW“,
less Highway rtw.; ‘2“3‘24- .
Section 15—834 of 83$.
Section 21—NE34; SE36, of
NW34; 535.
Section 23—NE34 of N 834; N 34 of
NW34; SW34 of NW3“ W 39 of
SW34; W 35 01' SE34. ‘
Section ‘ 25—N39 of NW34 of‘
N 134: NE34 of NW%: NEIL of
swag: SE34 of SW34; 3% of $2341
Section 27—N35 less 835 of 835 of}
Imm. 1
Notice is further given that the‘
obOVe described property shall not‘
be leased for less than the sum ot‘
scentsperacreandsaidleaseshsll
beforatermofoneyear. Allthe
above described property will be
leased subject to sale. ]
n. E. CHAPMAN
County Auditor and Clerk of the
loud at County Commissioners.
11:11-18-25‘
FORK IS NEWOOMER
. IN EATING TOOLS
Spoon, Knife Were First
Among Food Utensils.
Washington. D. C. : Spoons that
scooped up walrus strew from a
common pot, and knives that sliced
off mouthfuls of raw blubber tor
hungry Eskimos 1.000 years ago
were found in Alaska this summer
by a joint expedition of the National
Geographic society and the Smith
sonian institution.
“These ancient utensils give a
vivid picture of the life of ten cen
turies ago, but they also are re
minders that although table man
ners have changed. eating imple
ments of today are essentially the
same as in prehistoric times," says
the National Geographic society.
"The spoon is as old. as man
himself, or at least. as a wit re
marked, as old as soup, while the
knife dates back equally far. Even
the fork. though only a few hundred
years old in its present form, de
veloped trom skewers or broiling
sticks, which were stuck in the
ashes with fish 'spitted' on them
for cooking. The first forks had
only a single prong.
First Spoons Were Shells.
“The prehistoric Eskimo spoons
found in Alaska are of wood, ivory
or the horns or bones of caribou.
The knives have wooden. ivory or
bone handles with slate blades
ground to a sharpness comparable
to the table knife of today.
"The earliest spoons. however.
probably _were clam or oyster shells.
or small gourds. Later someone
thought of inserting the shell or
gourd in the split end of a stick.
thus making a handle.
“The spoon. knife and many other
utensils also had a common origin
in the wooden ‘throwing board’ used
by some primitive peoples for gain
ing greater leverage in throwing a
spear. Flat and slightLv hollowed,
the throwing board was used also
for a fire-making tool. for catching
blood from a slain animal. and had
.a sharpened edge for use as a
skinning knife or a weapon. It
could be used as a combined knife,
spoon and platter.
“The spoon served from earliest
times not only for eating soups.
stews. berries and other foods not
easily picked up with the fingers.
but also as a record of family and
tribal genealogy. All over the world
Iprimitive man carved tribal orna
xments and totems of his ancestors
‘—many of them mythical—on the
handles of his spoons, often with
amazing artistry and extremely del
icate detail.
"Spoons of later date, too. had
elaborately carved handles, for ex
ample the ‘Apostle spoons' in sets
of 13. each bearing the figure of a
different one of the 12 Apostles. and
the thirteenth the figure of Christ.
They were popular as gifts to new
born babies. Some ancient spoon
handles had sharp points for punc
turing eggs.
“Spoons have been made of many
materials. wood. ivory. stone. porce
lain, even the horns of mountain
sheep, steamed until they could be
bent into an open spoon shape. Some
American Indians had spoons of
coils of basketry sewn into spoon
shape, but used of course only for
dry foods.
Carried Own Tools.
. “In the Thirteenth century a guest
used the same spoon throughout his
meal, and was expected to bring
his own knife. Even as much as
400 years later people of the more
prosperous classes. when traveling.
carried their own knives. forks. and
spoons with them, for inns of those
days seldom provided eating uten
sils. Fashionable people had elab
orate folding sets of knives. forks
and spoons for traveling.
“Next to the spoon the knife was
the oldest eating utensil. and 'eat
‘ing with one’s knife' was far from
ibad manners until very recent
times. The Eskimo of 1.000 years
?ago, and today. stuffs the end of a
istrip of meat into his month until
lit will hold no more. then cuts of!
the remainder with a swift knife
; stroke that barely misses. but never
| touches. his nose.
“Old knives were pointed. tor
spearing tragments of meat. and
had round ends. for table knives
came into use only after forks be
came popular. In the Eighteenth
century. many knives had their
blades curved and widened at the
ends for scooping up peas and other
small-sized foods.
“The first knives of course were
chipped fiints or the sharp edges
of shells. Originally every man car
ried a knife which served all pur
poses. from fighting to eating.
“Not until the Seventeenth century
did forks come into general use in
Europe. replacing the time-honored
method of picking up food with the
thumb and first two fingers. Use
of more fingers was considered bad
manners."
According to a German insurance
doctor. brown-eyed people are a bad
risk, and he backs this up with ob
servations made during his 30
years’ experience. says Pearson's
London Weekly. Blue or gray eyes
are an indication of long life. he
finds. All the brownoeyed people he
has known died between fifty and
fifty-five years of age. But medical
specialists do not think much of
this theory. They point out that
age itself takes the color out of hair
and eyes. so that a person who
started life with deep brown eyes
might quite easily reach a ripe old
age with eyes of a paler shade. .
Brown, Blue. Gray Eves
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL‘
COUNTY PROPERTY 1
’’’' ' ’ l
Whereas the following described
real property, to-wit: Lots 1. 2, 3.
and 4. Block 30. Plat of Hanford
(known as the Burton property)
was heretofore acquired by Benton!
County and it appearing to the
Board of County Commissioners of‘
said county that it is for the best I
interests of said county to sell the
real property hereinbefore describ-i
ed:
Now therefore. notice is hereby
given that the Board of County 1
Commissioners will meet Monday;
the 6th day of December. 1937. at
2:00 o’clock pm. at their office in
the courthouse in Prosser, Wash-l
ington to hear and determine the
advisability of selling the above des
cribed property, at which meeting
any taxpayer may appear and be
heard for or against the advisabil
ity of selling the above described
property.
11:4-11-18-25 H. E. CHAPMAN.
County Auditor and Clerk of the
Board of County Commissioners.
NOTICE OF ANNUAL ELECTION
OF COMMISSIONER.
Public Utility District No. l
of Benton County
Notice is hereby given that the
annual election of Commissioner for
Public Utility District No. l of Ben
ton County. Washington will be held
on-the first Saturday in December
(December 4, 1937) in all voting pre
cincts, for the purpose of electing
one Commissioner for said district
from the Commissioner District No.
i,ioratermoithreeyears.
Notice is iurther given that the
following named person has been
regularly nominated as a candidate
for said office: A L. Brockway, Han
tord, Washington.
Thepollswilibeopentromßo’-
clock am. until 8 o'clock pm. and
all qualified voters of said Benton
oCunty Public Utility District will
be entitled to vote at said election.
. H. E. CHAPMAN.
County Auditor and Clerk of
Benton County Election Board.
NOTICE OF HEARING OF FINAL
ACCOUNT AND PETITION FOR
DISTRIBUTION
In the Superior Court of the State
of Washington in and for Ben
ton County.
In the matter of the estate of
Geo. A. Peter, deceased.
Notice is hereby given, that Frank
P. Peter, administrator with the will
annexed, of the above entitled cs
tate. has filed his final account and
petition for distribution in the of
fice or the clerk or the above en
titled Court and that the Court is
asked to settle said final account. to
distribute the property of said es
tate to the heirs or persons entitléd
to the same and to discharge the
7 BIG PUBLICATIONS
Each for One_ Year —a Total of 124 Issues
Here’s What You Get!
McCALL MAGAZINE, 12 issues
PICTORIAL REVIEW, 12 issues ‘
WOMAN’S WORLD, 12 issues
GOOD STORIES . . . 12 issues
The COUNTRY HOME, 12 issues 1
The FARM J OURNAL, 12 issues
COURIER-REPORTER, 52 iss.
You will get all seven publications for One Full Year, and if you are
already a subscriber to any of these seven lgublications, your present sub
scription will be extended one full year. ail or bring the coupon below
to our office AT ONCE, and you will receive the Six Big Magazines each
month, and This Newspaper each week—that’s 72 magazines and 52 news
papers—l 24 issues in all for only $3.00. ORDER AT ONCE because we
may soon have to withdraw this offer, or advance the price.
USE THIS COUPON AND SAVE $2.25
Courier-Reporter,
Kennewick, Wash. Date
Yes, indeed, I want to acoe§£your magazine offer before it is with
drawn. Enclosed is $3.00 in F L PAYMENT for a ONE YEAR’S sub
scription, new or renewal, to the following seven publications:
COURIER-REPORTER - 1 year GOOD STORIES - - 1 year
McCALL’S MAGAZINE - 1 year COUNTRY HOME -. 1 year
PICTORIAL REVIEW - 1 year THE FARM JOURNAL, 1 year
WOMAN’S WORLD - - 1 year
My name is ..........................-..........-........Addre5s ...-...
Town .................................................._...State W..............................
Town
{ Notice is hereby given that the
annual electlon of one Drainage
Improvement District Supervisor
torstcrmortwoyearsian-ainnge
llmprovement District No. 11 and
i 11 Sub “A" of Benton County, Wash.
:will he held on Tuaday. December
14th. 1937 from the hour of one o’-
clock pm. until the hour of 7 o'-
11:18-25
REGULAR VALUE $5.25 YOU SAVE $2.25
Said final account and petition for
distribution Will be heard by the
Court It the Count House in Pros
ser. Benton County. Washington on
thel'lthdnyorDeeemberisflnt
the hour of 10:00 o‘clock in the
forenoon.
Dated this 13th day of November.
1937.
FRANK P. PE’I'ER.
Administrator with the will nu
nexed.
By Moulton 5; Powell. his attor
neys. 11:18-12:93)
NOTICE 0? ELECTION ,
Drum Improvement District No.
11 and 11 Sub “A” of Benton
County Washington
clock at the residence of Geo. 0.
Anderson in said district.
All persons owning land in said
district who are electors residing
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 l
Glasses Will Add to
Your Appearance—
Somnny that need glosses hesitate to m then {or fear of
naming appearance. Such teen have no tonndulon ll (leases
are selected here. for we hove
LATEST STYLE FRAMES
In wide variety. You can choose (mm my with the muse
am you will find a style that will become your way.
We know how to test your eyes and pun-cube expertly. Our
prices an moderate.
Dr. L. E. GARD
ommus'r
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
‘ Phone 66, Pence Bldg. Pasco, Washington
lililll mum ir‘m‘HH‘H MM 1 mm HH ‘1 I IN i'vl ||||l|||||
Y 0
Is/xvlé 404
and still get ' I:
”[l“ng :51:
mmfmm’ .
The KENNEWICK
COURIER-REPORTER
In the State of Washington are en
titled to vote at and election
H. E. CHAPMAN.
County Auditor and ex-omcio
Clerk of the Board or County Com
missioners. Benwn County. Wash
ington. ' 11:25-12 :2
NOTICE 0" ELECTION
Drum Imminent District No.
6 o! m County,
' Washington
Notice is hereby given that the an
nual election of one Drainage Im
provement District Supervisor for
a term of two years in Drainage
Improvement District No. 6 of Ben
ton County. Washington. will be
held on Tueeeday. December 14th.
1937 from the hour of one o'clock
P. M. until the hour of 7 o'clock P.
M. at the Finley Gnnge Hall in said
district.
All persons owning land in said
district who are electors residing in
the State of Washington. are en
titled to vote at said election.
H. E. CHAPMAN.
County Auditor and ex-ofricio
Clerk of the Board of County Com
missioners 0! Benton County, Wash
ington. 1135-123
All Seven 1.
For One Year
7
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