OCR Interpretation


The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1914-1938, December 09, 1937, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093042/1937-12-09/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
BRICK SAYS:-
When you bring the kids
in Saturday for the big
parade, remember to have
the car serviced.
léAsouNEI
Standard
—unsurpassed
Standard
R. P. M.
TIRES
Firestone
—none better!
B R I C K’ S
SUPER-SERVICE
Every Tim; You Come
' to Town
Bestes Ifin . Grocery
SPECIALS, Fri. and Sat, Dec. 10-11
Snowdrif t figmmmr 3“ 3 lb. 53c
COCOA [a rich, Wholesome, 2 pounds 21c
GREEN BEANS, Lane County, 2 cans ....19c
CAKE FLOUR, la Light’n Fluffy, Box 19c
PANCAKE FLOUR, la It’s Good, 9 lb. 53c
BLUE G. COFFEE DEAL
Beautiful Cup and Saucer FREE—2 lb. 53c
BORAXO, for dirty hands, 2 for 29¢
CATSUP, fancy Vaco-Seal, 2 bottles ............29c
Salad Dressing, [EI ‘1 Quart 39c
HEAD RICE, long grain, 3 pounds ................19c
Rolled OATS fi‘é‘ééfr? 9 Pounds 39c
FLOUR, Centennial Quality, 49-Ib. -.-.--...-..51.65
PEAS and CORN, Seaport, 2 cans .............19c
CORN FLAKES, IGA dish free, 2 for ....23c
XMAS CANDY, Choc., Gums, Etc., 2 pounds 25c
BANANAS i???“ 3 Pounds 13c
LETTUCE, solid, crisp, 3 for 10c
SWEET SPUDS, 4 pounds 19c
CELERY, Utah, crisp, Each 9c
ORANGES, large 176’s, Dozen 23c
FREE-10 Baskets Groceries-FREE
—and $125.00 in Lovely Prizes Given Away
SATURDAY NIGHT AT 8:30 P. M. .
Kids get in the parade Saturday and we Wlll
give you all a treat.
And Don’t Forget We Deliver Phone 2-5-1
Senior Class Play
'lB Big Attraction
The seniors who participated in
the class play. “The Whole Town's
Talking" gave a very good perform
ance Friday evening. The play fur
nished plenty of laughs and was well
{directed by the coach, Miss Kather
ine Ponti. Special mention should
be given to the two leading male
characters. Robert Wheelhouse and
.Gerald Britton. who did some very
igood acting. Robert took the part
:of Henry Simmons. a manufacturer
iand head of a household who was
always getting himself or someone
else in or out of a jam. Gerald took‘
the part of Chester Binney partner!
of Mr. Simmons, as the bashful hero
and did some remarkable acting due
tothefactthathehashadno
previous experience in acting. Peg
gy Burton acted her part well as
Mrs. Simmons, the suspicious wife.
Betty Shaughnessy took the part of
the daughter, Ethel Simmons; Lor
raine Smith was the much-talked
about movie star, Letty Lythe:
Wayne Smalley was the motion pic
ture director. Donald Swift, who was
Ithe star’s jealous suitor: Pat O‘Neil
‘was the rival of the hero in the
character of Roger Shields; Coral
Jones and Jane Nagley took the
part of young friends of Ethel as
Lila Wilson and Sally Otis; Velma
McCamish was the maid, Annie;
Dorothy Doyle, took the part of Mr.
Simmons’ dancing teacher and Du
ane Campbell was the taxi-driver.
The seniors presented the play
again at White Bluffs Wednesday
evening with a large crowd attend
ins.
Teachers Attend
County Meeting
A meeting of the Benton county
Education Association was held at
Prosser on Tuesday evening, Decem
ber 7.
The speaker for the occasion was
Mrs. Frances Reynolds of Vancou
ver, who is the newly-elected pres
ident of the Washington Education
Association.
Mrs. Reynolds stated that the
teachersofthestateareinaposi
tion to secure many benefits for the
schools of the state and for them
selves, by dilligently striving to make
known the wishes of the majority of
Washington’s 11,400 teachers.
Also on the evening's program
were reports of the Washington Ed
ucation Association Representative
Assembly which was held in Seat
tle November 26 and 27. These re
ports were given by C. A. Greene,
president of Benton County Edu
cation Association, and E. S. Black,
who were delegates to the assembly.
Entertainment for the meeting
was furnished by students of the
Prosser schools. They were enthus-‘
iiastically applauded for their cow-l
boy songs, violin numbers and
gypsy dance. - l
Egypt’s Premiu- Escapes
Cario, Egypt—Four shots were
fired at the automobile of Premier
Mustafa Nahas Pasha on his way to
deliver a political speech. He es
caped uninjured and his assailant,
a 20-year-old clerk in the Ministry
of Agriculture, member of the Green
Shirt organization, was captured;
Riots followed throughout the city‘
in demonstrations against the Nahasl
government. - '
|Construction is
Started on New
School Building
O
Richland - Construction on the
new grade school building was start
ed Tuuday by A. 8. Murray, con
tractor. The excavation for the
basement and foundation is being
dug by the county shovel. 1
The Junior sewing class or the
high school gave a tea and sew
ing exhibit for their mothers Fri
day afternoon at the high school. A
very interesting program was given
by the girls. 1
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Dighton enter
tained four tables of bridge at a
seven o'clock supper Thursday night.
Ben Dighton won high honors for
the evening. .
The Woman’s club held their ba
aaar and supper at the club rooms
Friday evening. There was a large
crowd. The ladies took in around
$35.
\ Mrs. C. s. Bimngton received
word the last of the week that her
mother had been severely burned in
an accident at her home in Kan-i
sas. Mrs. Ellington left immediate-j
ly to be with her mother. 1
Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Scott and fam
ily arrived this week from Walla‘
Walla. They wil lmake their home
in Richland for the winter. I
Kathleen Munoey spent the week
end at the home of Dorothy Kin
ney.
Mrs. Frank Capehart entertained
nine iitle boys Saturday afternoon.
The occasion was her son, Frank's,
birthday. .
Mrs. Dunnington is in at the
home of her mother, Mrs. E. C.
Sharp. _
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hartung of Pen
dleton, Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Hartung and family, were dinner
guests Sunday at the Koehler home.
Edith Semester, missionary from
TChina, gave a lecture Monday eve
ning at the M. E. church.
The missionary "society of the M.
E. church met Tuesday afternoon at
the home of Mrs. Lemon. The pro-i
gram was a Christmas one. Mrs.‘
Wm. Hayes rendered a piano solo
and Mrs. Rhea a solo. There were 16
ladies present.
Miss Edith Semester spent Mon
day night at the George Tuttle
home.
Mr. and Mrs Edwards are the
parents of a nine pound baby girl
born Saturday.
George Plant was called to White
Bluffs Tuesday by the illness or his
wife.
Mrs. F. Lewis had as dinner guests
Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Yed
lea. and son, Dean, Mrs. Lou Miller
and Mr. and Mrs. Urban Koelker
and small son of Kennewick and H.
F. Yedlca of Richland. ‘ .
Mrs. Dickerson and daughter,
Juanita, Mrs. C. A. Kinney and Dor
othy were visitors in Walla Walla
Tuesday.
. The Social Hour Club met Wed
nesday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. Simon Carlson with Mrs. P.
Perkins and _Mrs. Supplee as assist
ing hostesses.
i Mrs. Robert Chalcraft entertain
‘ed Mr. and Mrs. Comatock and fam
‘ily Sunday, the occasion being Mr.
iChalcraft's birthday.
\ The annual meeting of Pomona
grange will be held at the Richland
grange hall Saturday.
Mrs. John Dam had the misfor
tune to severely burn her hand.
The cataloguing committee met
Wednesday at the club rooms to
catalogue and place on the shelves
the books recently donated by the
Kennewick library. 1
R. R. Mclntosh is hauling lumber
this week from the Bnoqualmie mills
for the standard Lumber Go all
Richland.
Walter Shepard, who has been in
ngato, zfeturned home Tuesday.
Mr.aners.J.A.Bun-nettand
three daughters of Poncho Springs.
Coloradorare visiting at the home
of Mrs. Burnett’s brother, D. N.
Weathers. _
The Lutheran aid will meet De
cember 111 at the home of Mrs. 0.
Luellotf for an all day meeting.
Mr. and Mrs. John Vaugan and‘
two children of Hepner, Oregoni
spent the week-end visiting at the}
home of Mrs. Vaughan’s sister. Mrs.
Harry Snively. ’ .
Jean Cochran, neice of Mrs. Barry
Snively, who is in training at the
St. Elizabeth school of nursing in
Yakima spent Friday visiting her
aunt, Mrs. shively.
An American citizenship class un
der the supervision of the American
Legion was started Monday eve
ning at the high school.
Fred White, principal of the high
schoOl, will be their instructor.
There was an enrollment of ten,
Mr. and Mrs. Antone Norling, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Skelton, Mrs. Roy Allen,
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Hanson, Mrs. Ar
rostoulh, and Mr. and Mrs. R. R.
Mclntosh.
Mr. Casin spent the week-end vis
iting his daughter, Mrs. Harry Sniv
ely.
Mrs. Thad Grosseup and Mrs.
Harry SniveLv attended Wednesday
Bridge club this week at the home
of Mrs. Charles Powell in Kenne
wick.
Mrs. Robert Hanson, Mrs. L.
Sloan. Mrs. John Larson and Mrs.
North were among the Richland
folk attending the Democratic meet
in Pasco Saturday.
James Rickard died Tuesday
morning in the Pasco hospital fol
lowing a six month illness. Mr. Rick
ardhasspentthepastfewyearsin
Richland. coming here from Con
nell. The funeral was held Friday
afternoon from the undertaking
parlors at Pasco. 1
m MICK (WABBJ 000 mm
Il‘l‘le city election was held Tues
day. William Perry was elected
mayonaeomareamdLßJlury
ray,councilmentoservetwoyeus.
Ray Reeder and C. 8. Blfllngton.‘
‘councilmen ioroneyeartermsnnd‘
‘lmflsSloamcmmdlmanfm-athree
yecrtemandaP.Cannlchael.as‘
treasurer.
The literary club met Mondsy
atthehomeolMrsmlJoneefor
their Chrlstmas program and party.
Mrs. Vic Nelson gave a. very ln-i
terestlng and unusual paper on heel
visit to Forrest Lawn at Glendale.
California. Mrs. John Daln sang a
solo and Mrs. Bert Clonlnger ren
dered a piano solo.
There was a his Christmas tree
and the usual exchange of gifts.
Mr. Meeker of White Bluffs spent
ITuesday at the G. E. McClendon
home.
Pauline MeClendon and Delbert
Avery were visitors in White Bluffs
Sunday. ‘
‘ Mr. ’and Mrs. Harold Elder. who
have been visiting in Richhnd, left
Saturday for their home in Idaho.
’Finley Grangers
Elect Officers
Finley—Finley grange held its an
nual election December 2 with 34
members present. H. S. Hughes was
elected master. Ernest Sherry, over
seer, secretary. Irene Hughes, treas
urer, Margaret Schuster, chaplain,
Mrs. Gerber, steward, Vernon Mc-
Carty, assistant steward. Bob Turn
er; lady assistant steward, Louisa
Schaffner; gatekeeper, Waldo Ger
ard. Lecturer, Hattie Erickson: exe
cutive, C. W. Glassner; economics,
‘Mattie Street; Ceres, Clara Mc
-Icarty; Pomona, Mrs. Schaffner;
IFlora, Nellie Sherry.
‘ Members voted to give their pen
ny each toward the cancer cure.
Wesley Street was obligated in the
third and fourth digress. Waldo
Gerards was reinstated.
Refreshments were served by Mrs.
Ernest Sherry, Mrs. c. W. Glass
ner and Mrs. J. R. Ayers.
The Finley Ladies Aid will meet
with Mrs. Fred Masters in Kenne
wick Wednesday afternoon, Dec
ember 15th.
' Mr. and Mrs. Al Hedstrom of
Walla Walla were week-end visitors
at the game farm as guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Witham.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jacobs and
children, Leonard and Donna were
guests or Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Young
of Umapine Saturday and Sunday.
Bob Turner took charge of the
store while they were away.
Turkey growers of this district
arekillmgoutmostoftheirtur
keys this week for the eastern mar
ket.
The River View school benefit club
met Wednesday evening with the
program being presented by the
grade school.
Miss Blanche Young who has been
visiting her sister, Mrs. Allan Home
in Hoquiam for the past two
months, arrived home this week.
' Mr. and Mrs. Hamid Witham at
tended a Sportsmen meeting in
iPasco Monday night. ‘
3 About twenty women were pres
ent at the stark shower given on
‘Wednosday, ‘December 1 in honor
to Mrs. Herbert Teide at the home
of Mrs. Stanley Stllwell. Assistant
hostesses were Mrs. Henry Jacobs,‘
Mrs. Charles McFadden, Mrs. Harry
Benson and Mrs. Harold Gerard.‘
Dainty refreshments were served
and the honor guest received many
lovely and useful gifts.
Mrs. Charles McFadden of Hover
was hostess to the Finley Pinochle
club with a dessert luncheon Tues
day ai'ternoon. Three tables were
in play with Mrs. Leo Glassner win
ning high score and Mrs. Harold
Gerard low.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Benson were
Walla Walla visitors over the week
end accompanied by Mr. and Mrs.
Charles McFadden of Hover. They
were guests of Mrs. McFadden’s par
ents.
River View basketball girls went
to Kahlotus Saturday night and
were defeated 12 to 16. This was the
first game of the season. ‘
Finley-Hover teachers and their‘
families attended the W 341. teach-1
ers banquet at Prosser Tuesday
evening. ' ‘
Ernest Johnson, who is employ
ed by the state game department at
Yauma was home over the week
end.
Mr. and Mrs. Marry Benson and
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Stillwell at
tended a meeting of coaches and
referees at Walla Walla last Thurs
day.
Gerald and Harold Parker came
home Sunday from Coulee Dam,3
where they were employed 1
The sewing club met with Mm
Hattie Erickson Thursday with a
potluck dinner and all day meet
ins.
In a game with Pasco last-Friday?
night River View basketball boys
wonwithasooreotutofl.
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Kincheloe and
children were visitors at the Fred
Falque home this week mroute to
their new home at The Dulles. The
Kincheloes were former residents‘
or Finley. but have been living at‘
Pullman tor the past three years. I
Moving min-nah? sunsnde. .
Loo Anceles. Cal—Until an move
ment ceases 1n the huge slide 13
Elm Park, which threw 1,000,000 l
tons ofenrthinto theLosAngeleg
Riverbedeversider-lvehasbeen
abandoned in the threatened area,
and engineers srestfll doubtful of
the possible danger to m and
power mpplieainam-oundlng dl3-
trlcts. A concrete automobile m.
ducthasbeenalmcstdestroyed.
Irrigation is
'Necessary Says
Dean Ellington
| 'muon tummuoomlngmo
iitsowninthlsstate. Asamxlt
of the federal program or national
conservation. of which irrigation of
aridmdsemi-afldlendslsaninte
grel part. we are standinc' on the
threshold of a decisive and signifi
cant development which will vitially
effect the social and economic life of
everyoneinthisstate."
Speaking of the need for 1311:!-
tionhesaid: “Duringthenextso
years there will be a demand for
every available acre that is capable
of the successful raising of a crop.
and the acreage involved in the
great Columbia Basin will be but a‘
drop in the bucket as compared to
theneed.”Hestatedthatthisisbe
cause lands of good quality are con
tinually deteriorating through em
sion and over-cropping until they are
eventually falling into the sub
marginal class. He added. "Thous
ands of acres are being abandoned
annually and many other thousands
should be. It inevitably follows that
to maintain a constant national cul
tivated acreage new land must be
continually added."
Dean Ellington told of the assist
ance given to irrigation projects dur
’ingthepastasyearsbytheWash-
ington Experiment Station through
many studies made of projects in the
Yakima Valley and other places. He
sketched the history of the Irriga
tion branch station from the time
of its establishment at Prosser in
1919, and outlined some of the many
results obtained through studies
made by members of the staff.
Experiments Made
Among the more important exper
iments made at the Irrigation
branch station. he said. were varie
tal investigation of alfalfa and sweet
clover showing the adaptability,“
the varieties and strains of these
crops; soil fertility investigation:
studies on the reclamation of saline
soils; varietal studies with fruits and?
vegetables that show that irrigated
valleys of the state can produce high
quality products that are particu
larly adapted to some of the more
improved processing methods, in
cluding freezing, canning and Juice
preparation.
He also told of feeding experi
ments at the station that have
shown the possibility and desirabil
ityofusingcullcropsmchassquash
potatoes and rutabagas an feed for
livestock. ‘
“The station has been handled as
apartoftheregularworkotthe
main experiment station system of
the state," Dean Ellington said. “as
aresulttherehasbeenavailableto
it the best thought and effort. not;
only of the staff immediately in‘
charge of the station, but of the;
larger research workers at the main}
experiment station which also has
the statewide viewpoint. Because
of this the station work has been
well planned and the results secur
ed have been significant.
“The Irrigation branch experi
ment station has become a focal
point, the headquarters for all the
state research staff and many of the
federal agencies that are interested
:in attacking the problem facing the
irrigation farmer."
FuthorkPhnned
The further investigations of the
duty of water, crop improvement
and the maintenance of son fertil
ltyarebutthreeotthemajorltnea
of research that will be carried on
at the station in the future.
LUCY BEBECCA BERRY
Lucy Rebeceaßerrymhornin
Lind County. lowa in 1863 and
passed away in the St. Elizabeth's
hospital in Yakima Wednesday. She
westakentoYakimatwoweehago;
following a. long illness at her home‘
here. BothMr.andeßexrywexe
pioneer residents of Well: Well:
hetore they came to Kennewick in
1925. Mr. Berry pneeeded his wife
indeethlnlszs.
Mrs. Berry was a charter member
of the W.C.T.U.. having helped or
ganize the first state chapter ut‘
Dayton. ' J
She Is survived by one son.
HakßerryOlSeatfle:threedstex-s.
MmAdnh Sta-aluminum
Jensembothot Well: Well: and;
MMerSchmlba-otcolvulm
and a brother 1). 6.1110111“ 01"
WallaWalla. . {
Funeral services will be held from
the Cookerly a Croeeclose Funeral
Home in Walla Walla at 10:30 Fri
day morning. Rev. B. Attenborough‘
otthe-lomlM.E.churchwlnbeln
charge of the servieeee. “
Utz is Own Display
Window Model
GlennUtzsaysheknowsmm
a hitch hike-feels when trying to
get a ride arm-the We be
hadyesterday—andrightmhuown
display window, too. Mr. nu was
arranging a window display mi
mymopenedthedoormd
”mafewquesumcloaem
thedoorandwentonhuwgymt‘
knowinsthat by closing um; um
locher.UtzintheW. The
em'l3'“llomm:llulsrshomm-sthought
Mr. Uta unusually friendly due to
theract that whentheym by
hemmtomouontoraway
0‘“ Of the windwmutmmmey
allpmdmmbywmzul'esxmmnng
wave. After one-half hour or shiv.
eflngmdwavinghemnmgedtoget
ayounsladytomewmm
byunlockincthedoor.
TheWeeklnßuflne-
Heaflngnmlnmthuweek
before the mm Commerce
Commission on the plea of the rail
madsforagenenirateincreue de
signed to produce additional reve
nues oi “MO9OO yearly . . . head
ed by Sir Josiah Stamp. eminent
British financier and Director of the
Bank'ot England. European econo
mists. especially in Hoiiand‘and
Germany. attribute the business re
cession in this country to shaken
confidence. All authorities say that:
. W i—W SATURDAYfi‘
‘ tours run mammm Every Child
‘93!“ 1:5 awn“
:Y', '43 ..’, E ' e i die -
63$ . Womfgfl rape will beta.
Jilly/[[ol6 mslg'i‘duntfifle
ms . :,t(f.p|[,/,'VII[,I.S/ Matinee
cnroon /‘ ” ~ _4‘s FREE!
WNW
IL
hall
1:?
IR.
xr
v
r. _ Wfi-~..
4; 5% g), M A run an UK! ms: 1
\ . .......:...Mx\. .. h T‘\ [,l o 1
. g 0 rA» / JNBJA ‘
_ i"\ ' C ‘ __ 2)
pm 3/ MW M.
47 f / \ Nrfi‘ “§\ «m. ..., i
GOES ‘9 \‘ @101“ ““5“
' / ‘ nowvw‘“ ;
. * ' game“ ”33‘- gm“ :
0"" Gang 6333,“ ”gnaw-‘3
y ‘3“sz
Patricia Ellis
Warren Hull
Wm. Newell
“llllY'l'llM I%} GLOIDS” “BIG T 0“ Glll.‘
5 THURSDAY-FRIDAY = _
.4 \ ~ '. .."~'~3=::~‘ .3 v.‘
[I Va" w an 4
m. ammgu ee. ‘5
.-,._. .... .
Coming Soon—“HEIDI,” “100 MEN AND A GIRL”
FREE!!!
Every Saturday Night We are giving away a 76-
piece dinner set. You need not make a purchase
-—the tickets are free. All you need to do 13 *0
ask for your ticket, and while in the store lance
around at the wonderful Christmas gigs we
have on display. Here are a few of them-we
carry:
Yardley’ 8 Gift Sets
Smoker’s Supplies .
Eastman Kodaks and Movie Kodaks .
Amity Leather Goods
Shick Electric Razors .
Remington Portable Typewriters
Fancy Box Candy
Fancy Box Stationery _
Pottery, Glassware, Silverware
Watches, Clocks
All kinds of medium-priced gift novelties
Lamps, Toilet Articles for Men and Women
Baby Gift Sets
Fountain Pens and Desk Sets
Beautiful Christmas Cards, Booklets. 5“"
Fancy Wrapping Paper, Tree Oman”
In fact you can do all your Christmas Shop?“
here. We can’t. help bu. talk about our won“?
ful display of Gift Goods. In fact “The W
Town’s Talking.”
$20.00 in CASH _
Given Away Christmas Eve 1
A Ticket with Every SI.OO Paid on Anew“
“_A Cash Purchase ‘I
VIBBER-GIFFORD DRUG 00»
PHONE 721 KENNEWICK. WA”
BRING YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS T 0 ”3
SUNDAY - - MONDKY
TUESDAY - WEDNESDF
gig
Thursday M.‘

It Is temporary and M‘ .
aerated as to its basic “‘3
Steel production comm... h":
cnne. reaching a low 0n“...
otcapactty...onaturm.‘
and-a-hnlf million “MN. h
the New York Stock I."
reached the lowest level; N
1935, although recover}. ‘.‘
trading were general. 3 t“
that Wall Street In. “’.‘
covered In the spam N!
Commas the concrete “‘.'
edial business legislgtm M
expected at the outset. -
Claire Trevor
Donald Wood:
Alan Dinelnu

xml | txt