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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1914-1938, December 09, 1937, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093042/1937-12-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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IntuaduSecondOlassmtter.Aprfl2.multP.O.ntKennewlck.Wuh..underlctotm3.lm
REWARD FOR SERVICES
It seems no more than fitting that
some public recognition should be
given to public servants who have
served the community long and ,well.
This district has two such {persons
and we would like to ,se’e them
honored for their long and gaifhml
efforts. We refer, of course to‘Jas.
Johnston and M. N. Hudnall, both
of whom have served as directors in
their respective irrigation districts
for more than twenty years.
Mr Johnson has made something
of a record in another way. He not
only has been re-elected term after
term, but he has an almost un
broken record for attendance at the
meetings. It the man was able to
be about, he was in attendance at
the meetngs—nothing came ahead
ofhisideaofhisdutyinthisre
spect.
Long hours, and many, many of
them, brought perplexing problems.
Each was given the very best
thought and judgment the man pos
sessed, and the progress made by the
organization attests the quality of
that work. Mr. Johnson has played
abigpartinarrangingtorthecon
duct and management of the Col
umbia district. His work has saved
every landowner in the district a
considerable sum oi.’ money and,
while it was all in line of duty,
nevertheless every landowner owes
Mr. Johnston personally as debt of
gratitude which will never be pad.
The least that could be done would
3 public acknowledgement of the
Mr. Hudnall. whle not yet ready
to retire from active service on the
Highlands board. can be credited
with many of the fine compliments
which have already been paid to Mr.
Johnston. These two men richly
deserve the acclaim o! the citizens
01' this community.
We are glad that Mr. Hudnall
feels that he can continue his
work. While we appreciate, per
haps a little better than most indi
viduals, the vast amount of time
and work and thought which enter
into these jobs, and so can evalu
ate Mr. Johnston’s services, we can
ice his VieWpoint. He has done his»
abate of community work and more.
Land is entitled to rest upon his
~laurels. .
52%.. FAVORITE MAGAZINES
NOW . . . You can renew your subscription to the
; COUIRER-REPORTER—One Year
3 and get 3, 40r5 of your favorite magazines at a
A tremendous bargain. Don’t wait ’til your s'ub
} scription runs out .. . Renew NOW before this
"I offer is withdrawn.
3. HERE’S WHAT YOU GET:
Courier-Reporter for one year, and
Any 3 Magazines below, only $3.00
Any 4 Magazines below, only $3.50
Any 5 Magazines below, only $4.00
REMEMBER—When you accept this offer your
present subscription to THIS NEWSPAPER will
be extended one full year, and in addition, you
will receive the magazines you select for the full
period shown above. Check the magazines you
want and Mail or bring this ad with remittance
to THIS NEWSPAPER.
THE COURIER-REPORTER, Kennewick, Wn.
I accept your offer. Enclosed find $.......-......,
for which renew my subscription to your neWSpa
per for one year and send me the magazinel have
checked above for the full time specified.
Name R...........FD
Street P. O.
State ....Date
Gll2 Kgnppmirk Quarter-Ewart»:
SOLIETHING FOR. NOTHING
; The Kennewick citizen who con
. tends that “you can’t get some
' thing for nothing" is wrong. All
3hehastodoiscatchcoldandhe
.willrealizethathecangetenough
i free “cold remedies" to fill a book.
10f the number. some may be ben
-1 eficial, yet all of them are worth
. less to those who know how to avoid
L catching cold. Comfortable cloth-
L ing, fresh air in the sleeping room.
a careful attention to the elimina
tion of waste matter from the sys
,' tem and drinking plenty of fresh
, water daily will, it has been deter
’ mined. go far toward preventing
what we know as the common cold.
But even this fails at times—and
. then is when a cold becomes dang
erous. In that case the best pos
sible advice is—go to bed. Don’t
try to wear it out. Better the loss of
a little time spent in bed than con
tracting one of the many serious
conditions that common colds are
capable of bringing on. Don't look
lightly on a cold. Go right after it
the moment you feel it coming on,
and don’t stop doctoring it until
you have it under control.
ASAFETYSTUNT
l A Cleveland, Ohio man has sug
_ gested that it might hem to reduce
' auto accidents if every time a mo
’toristkillsapedestrianabrightred
; tag be substituted for the regular 3
'onehehasonhiscar. Thenum-‘
_ber would remain the same, of'
_ course; only the color would be
changed, and that a bright crimson.
In this way the public would know,
he points out, the moment it spied ‘
acarwlthacrimsontagthatithad‘
been the agency through which ‘
someone met death, and other ‘
drivers, fearing the publicity and 1
comment such a tag would bring, ‘
would naturally drive far more care
fully. .We have heard many sug- ‘
gestions for safer driving offered by ‘
motorists around Kennewick, but ‘
never anything touching on' this ‘
line, and while suchasuggestion will ’
probably never be adopted by any
state in the union, it shows to what I
extremesthosewhomakeastudyc
ofsafetyarewillingtogotocut
down the nation’s annual death roll. I
“I can’t please that guy,” said 3
the shoe clerk. ““He insists on two 1‘
shoes that squeak in the same key.” 1
(Check the Magazines
You Want)
El Woman's Home Companion 1 Yr.“
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ECONOMIC HIGHLIGHTS
When President Roosevelt called
the special session of Congress the
country was virtually in a boom
stage, as compared with today’s con
dition. Stocks were at high levels.
Reemployment was going ahead on
a comfortable scale. Though un
favorable signs existed, they were
few and apparently insignificant.
and almost everything pointed to a
highly prosperous winter season.
Now, in two months, the picture
has changed completely. Stocks, in
spite of occasional flurries, are hold
ing stubbornly at levels close to the
October lows. With few exceptions,
industrial production conunues to
sag. Unemployment is increasing
alarmingly. And it is very likely
that this winter’s relief problem
willbeasgraveasinanyyearsince
1929.
Oneresultofthsisacomplete
change in the attitude of Congress
—and, to a lesser degree, a change
in the attitude of the administra
tion. The special session was pri
marily called for three purposes—
the wage and hours law, the farm
reliefproposalandthebilltocre
ate seven new regional electric au
thorities similar in nature to the
TVA. It was assumed that these
matters would absorb the undivided
attention of the session, and that
nothing else of moment would be
brought up on the floor or in com
mittee. ‘
What has happened? The wage
andhourslawisinastateofchaos,
with warring factions seeking to
change it one way or another, and
with a strong Congressional bloc
opposedtothepassageofanylaw
ofitstype. Thechancesareagainst
it going through in the special ses
sion.
Thefarmbillisinasimilarpre
dicament—it seems almost impos
sible that a law satisfactory to the
various opposed factions in House
and Senate can be prepared for
months.
The seven regional authorities
bill is, according to last reports,
completely moribund.
Congress is almost wholly occu
pied with the business recession,
mm! with proposals designed to pre
rent it from becoming another ma
lor. long-lasting depression. Tax
reform seems nearer to achievement
pthanatanytimeinthelastfour
years. There is a defeinite senti
ment in favor of a more conciliatory
general policy toward industry.
Thereisagrowingfeelingthatwe
have gone too far with regulation.
especially as it affects the security
markets and exchanges. There is
a movement on foot to encourage
business to spend on a big scale—
of which the most significant de
velopment is the President’s an
nounced policy of a more friendly
attitude toward the electric utilities,
and his recent talks with utility exe
cutives.
The principal question now is.
can Congress act fast enough and
drastically enough to stop the de
cline? Some recent events have
been encouraging, but they by no
means assure a change in the down
ward trend. Whatever happens, it
seems impossible for any important
Change to take place before late
January—a. fact which augm-s badly
for the Christmas season.
IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN
Some day we are going to take
time off and go through all the old
files and compile therefrom a size
able lttle booklet on things which
Kennewlck almost got. After we
get all through with it we'll per
haps add a chapter on some other
things which we ought to have.
Among this latter group will be one
item at least which by all rights.
should be located here. Thls par
ticular one is the Washington State
College. ‘
There is plenty of room for the
institution on the bench just south of
town. It would be an exceptionally
sightly location. the soil and climat
ic conditions are much more suit
able than at Pullman: locaton in re
lation to the rest of the state is
much in its advantage. three rail
roads for transportation, on main-1
trans-state highway—in fact every‘
qualification for the establishment‘
of the insttution is here . I
‘Thisisjustoneofthemany
things which Kennewick is suited
for Don’t you think that this local
ity has bright prospects for the fu
ture? Can you think of another
towninthestatewhichhasas
many advantages? And yet the
complaint that Kennewick is the}
best “next year" town in the world
is heard almost every day. Well,
for that matter it is— and Just
as soon as we find which corner
prosperity is lurking behind, we’ll
find that “next yearn” 1
lNawthatthewaterisoutofthe
'ditch, it seems the right time for
;some organization to get busy with
the new bridge across the canal at
the school house. This is one civic:
improvement which is really needed.
The time to think about accidents is
before they happen. This bridge
would be the finest guarantee
against traffic ’ accidents to school
children that can be found here.
Wake up!
1T ALWAYS WORKS
Everybody knows the story of
Robinson Crusoe. how be m
stranded on an island with only a
goat,aparrotandablaekmanas
his companions. and how badly he
wanted to get off of that island. But
most people do not know that it was
advertising that got him off. He
had only a ragged shirt with which
to do his advertising. but he stuck
it on a pole, planted the pole in the‘
ground, and waited. He didn't get
discouraged when no one came the
first day—no good advertiser does.
But he kept advertising his predica
ment by means of that old shirt
waving in the air—and finally he
got results. It Robinson Crusoe
with one old shirt could reach the
people he sought. how much more
easyitisformerchantsinthister
ritorytoreachthepeople they want
tosellgoodstothroughtheeolumns
of a modern, home-town newspaper?
Now that the winter buyias season
is in full swing. this is a pretty
timely subject to devote a little
study to.
i‘éslo'2oz3og?
2&‘Nfi‘é3m 33:93
Mr. and Mrs. E. c. Smith had re
turned from a Ford dealers meeting
In Seattle, where they saw the new
A models which were to be demon
strated in Kennewick in the near
future. 1
w The Boy and Girl scouts were con—
vassing the town for the purpose of
soliciting for Red Cross funds which
were to be used for relief work only.
such as the Mississippi Flood re
lief, Florida hurricane relief and
several others. 1
The Turkey day game with Pasco
resultedlnatiedscoreofstoG.
The Kiwanis club held an election
of officers with Herman Schmidt
and Dr. L. G. Spaulding heading
the club, with several committees
beingappolntedtotakemeofthe
various phases of the club work. The
clubwasjustayearoldandthe
newoficersweretoheinstalledon
Januarys. 1
Urban Koclker spent WV
ing with his parents here. He was
attending WBO. and working in
the J. c. Penney store there. <
The following lettemen were to
report for basketball practice in the
local high schol: Boyer, Brown,
Hudnall, Reese, Koelker, Dutch and
Grover Lincoln.
TWENTY YEARS AGO—I9I7
The high school held its Thanks
giving program in the school build
ing. Those taking part in the pro
gram were the high school orchestra
and readings were given by the fol
lowlng students, Allen Arnold, Warde
Johnson, Ruth Huntington. Wilbur
Weisel, Bess Peters, Esther Smith,
Ernest chkinson and Earl Ander
son.
The parent teacher’s association
was to give its second program of
the year at which time topics ne
lating to the local school problems
would be discussed.
The total apple crop of the valley
was estimated at close to 450 car
loads. of which there were 105 cars
in storage in the several ware
houses.
Word has been received that C.
H. Yedlea and Julius Hopp, two or
the t Richland boys to enlist in
the nuzby were then stationed at
Panama. on their ships. They ex
pected to see Cuba before return
mg home.
Atameetingottheschoolboard
George Byrd was chosen as Janitor
tosuceeedl-I.B.Terruatthehizh
school and Thomas James as Janis
tor at the Washington building. ;
Mrs. C. A. Crawford and children
had returned from several months’
visit with relatives in Cleveland, 0.
The Misses Margaret Baxter, Avis
Philson and Ruby Hinds spent a.
day visiting their friend, Marian
Peter. i
THIRTY YEARS AGO—I9W
Nearly 125 Kennewlck voters at
tended the general caucus which
was organized by naming L. E.
Johnson chairman and city clerk.l
FayF.Dean. {
H. A. Bier made a business trip
tonabtonthe Wednesday previous.
manl’etersotmtflewM
herevmungherparents.’ _ ‘
The Xennewick Military band was
to give an open-air concert the next.
Sunday afternoon.
The Exchange Bank of Kenne
wick received a. telegram tram
Washington, D. C. authorizing them
to merge into the First Nahum]
Bank or Kennewick. Incidentally
this was the only National bank in
Benton county. The new mm.
tion was capitalised for 325.000 and
organized with the following offi
cers: W. R. Anion, president; B. F.‘
Knapp, vice president and L. 13.1
Johnson, cashier.
c. E. Lum had completed the
Richland bridge and expected to
move to Kennewick and improve his‘
property. I
The ladies of the Presbyteflan
church were-planning to give a
ChristmasFalrintheOddPellows
hallabovemrcuen'smrket. \
The Hamilton Supply company
distributed a eat-load of apples
among the four merchants in town.‘
Swiss Reject Mannie Ban
Geneva. Switzerland—A mm
measure designed to exclude Masons
and Odd Fellows from the right of
free assembly was overwhelmmgly‘
rejected by a'vote or 514,539}? 233.-
an.
TEN YEARS AG0—1927
[Ladies Club to
§tudy Sewing
Hover—The Women's Home Ben
efit Club will meet Wednesday. De
‘eember fifteenth with Mrs. Carl
Evans as hostess. Italian hematitch
ing. a quick method hemmed: and
Ric-Rae trimmings will be demon
strated. Please bring material to
make samples.
| The a. Smith family moved Wed
snesdayontothenonmephoe
vacatedbmeungethlstan.
Harry 81mm left Tuesday tor
BonnersFerrdenho.
‘DonnossiiomKennewlckvlsit
edattheEvereuMosshomem-
any.
rTheHoverPlnochlecluhmetlast
iWednesdny with Mrs. C. B. Ashby
as hostess. Mrs. Larry Dlmick won
highscoreandeCarlEnnslow.
Mrs.J.R.Ayers.Mrs.W.F.Ash
byandurs.c.'rholmanweneonthe
public utility election board Satur
day.
‘Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Imhyxrom
WallaWaflavisltedattheC.h
Evans home Sunday.
Rev. and Mrs. Croft Imm Kenne
wlck and Mr. Ira True from Nampa.
Idaho were dinner guests at the C.
J. Dahnn home Sunday.
I Mr. and Mrs. Charles McFadden
'aocompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Harry
:Benson 0! Finley motored to Walla
‘Walla Friday night. returning on
Saturday. While there they attended
the Whitman vs. W. S. C. basketball
game.
Mrs. B. 3. Stewart and Mrs. H. 8.
Hughes attended “bury guild in
Kennewlck Monday.
Mr.aners.J.E.Cochz-anwue
dlnnerguestsattheW.F.Ashby
home Sunday.
Mr.aners. mam and
daughter Beverly from Pasco are
visitingatthe'roothakerhome.
Manna Hammonmemmedon
Saturday from lowa. where she has
beenthepastthreeween.
’ Mrs. Charles Mchdden enter
‘talnedthel’lnleyßx-ldgeclub'nws-
dayanemoon.
Mr.andflrs.33n73rlflonfmm
Willows. Outta-ma. visited-12th:
AlvinDyehomelastweek—eml. J
CONNIE-NULL
Miss Edith Null of aermlston.
Oregon became the brlde of Ed
‘garCOnnerolStannemOregonat
‘3mmceremonyperxormed at
_thellethodlstpamgebythefiev.»
nAttenborwghlaStSamrdnyaft
-31110011 .The 37011118 couple were
:weonmmnteabyttzepmntso:thel
brlde.
Emmmmmmmmg
:5
'Q
1.: Fwthflmuthnmtmnon ,
a mum'llnamnynotmt '
3 unythlngbutthetlneu2,l)edllcto
-g- «yummwsgm...
s mmms
,a
‘Q
.m
a“ We have prepared a casefull of the widest asortment of gifts
all of our cut glaséware, sugar and creamer sets, vases, pictures
g and gift novelties. Every item a quality gift. ' g
I ~ HALE PRICE! I
5 MAKE THIS THE FIRST STOP ON YOUR SHOPPING LIST I
g E; H. BEHRMAN I
g JEWELER Kennewick, Washington J
'Local Telephone
Organization Has
Annual Election
y'mame—miommephm
’mnintion met Sewn-. 37. Dec. 4
atthehelltortheunnualelectionoi’
yoti'ieers and dim. Charles Nic
‘oaonisthisoominsyar'epreeident.
‘M. Simmellnk. vice pxuident and
Gilbert Clodi'elter was elected nec
tetery-trelmm. On My the
loculnnchenwwhednepumthe
telephoneunamditilhopedbet-{T
ter telephone service will be avail:
able this coming year. Heevy snow
and frost denim the lines. oftenl
braking them. hence they nequine
constantvisunneeontheputoithe‘
telephonedirecm l
Mnnndnntnennufiemenot!
Westemfioueneuvenweresundny‘
mmuthea.n.urunhome.|
MmJ.W.Rootusttyln¢atthe
MarkPotterhomemWalh Wana‘
andtaklngtlutmmtsfmmadoc
tot-there. '
Veuandnthedneflmosonspentl‘
Sammy and Sunday with their 1
gmIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
WATKINS Dealer
2 For Benton and Franklin Counties
E Will be in your neighborhood soon. Watch
E for him, with a full line of
E Household Necessities
é Cosmetics, Extracts '
g Liniments and Farm Remedies
G. A. MORRISON ‘
E ROUTE 2 SOUTH HIGHLANDS
Wmnnmmmn '
JEWELRY First Among g
CHRISTMAS GIFTS
What makes a good gift? What makes 3
~ the recipient open your package first? i
A gift that combines utility . . . value
. . . sentiment; a gift that lasts and becomes
more precious as the years roll by; such a
gift is Jewelry. '
Our store is replete with creations from
the four corners of the earth as well as na-.
itonallg advertised merchandist, known
I the war] over.
Everything in our store is here because i I ;
of its intrinsic value .. . its sentimental ap— . ‘
peal . . . and reasonable prices.
I .
' SEE OUR BARGAIN GIFl‘ CASE
“my W...
M
stint ond uncle, Mr, tad ‘
ett mu. m‘ In.
Mr. and Mrs. C. 3_
W 111: Walls were Hamid,“ C
at the a. R. Wooden home. N
Mrs. M. Simmelink M
with Mrs. Gilbert “M“
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Sou“
Monday dinner guest. .1; a.“
sword home. 'I
Mr. and Mrs. E. A, Gilliam
w. and Mrs. Winkle we... ‘1
visitors at the Heberieih hm,
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer m
Potsy were Monday gum ~
u. Simmeunk home. " '0
Mr. and Mrs. Budd mu.
Sunday visitors at the J, c. in:
home.
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle
!were Sunday visitors at 2::
Larkin home.
The Edwards, Heberlein 11l ._
ford families attended an on“
llow entertainment in Wllh M
‘P‘riday.
I Gilbert Edwards sprained ..‘
Sunday. It is improving m.
1 Mr. and Mrs. R. K. am.-
Walla Walla visitors Bm,
? Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Mm‘
overnight visitors at the m
home in Walla Walla PM",

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