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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1914-1938, February 24, 1938, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093042/1938-02-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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[NEWS ll
mau- Announces Aims ‘
Begun, Germany—Closely follow
me his coup last week. when by
W statesmen sympathetic to
finish in the key posts of the reor
pmsed Austrian cabinet he brought
tint country within the sphere of
- m Reich’s influence, Chancellor
mug: delivered before the Reich
“; his most militant speech since
min! the Dictatorship of Ger
many. Reiteratlng his belief in a
manual of all Germanic peoples.
he med the Reich’s demand for
com. His speech caused a sen
mm throughout Europe. I
' mnedcnsl’ost 1
mm. England—The first rep.‘
emission of Hitler's address to the
was was the resignation of
Anthony Eden as British Foreign
secretary. Mt. Eden has long op
pad the Cabinet's advances to
“ international understandings
'flh Hitler and Mussouni, and when
it became evident that his colleagues
were disinclined to interfere with
the Nazi penetration of Austria, he
resigned his portfolio. Temporarily
the Foreign office is in the hands of
Viscount Halifax, Lord President of
the Council and former Viceroy of
India. who is senerally regarded as
hiendlv to Hitler's ambitions. Italy,l
also. rejoiced at Eden's downfall,
where-smace feelsthe loss of its}
most consistent supporter among
sum statesmen. The crisis may‘
conceivably bring about the resig
mation of the Chamberlain mlnis-‘
try, with the consequent necessity
for a general election. ‘
nun um PM ‘
WashinxtOn, D. (':.—Experts of the}
Intimate Commerce Commission
realise that the hoped-for rate in-l
can of $517,000,000 would afford‘
«any tanporary relief to the distress-‘
edrailrocds.and will lay before the}
President this week a. plan for the
unification of the country's leading{
railroad systems at the end of a
three-year period of grace. \
Nu! llallßombed ‘
Philadelphia. Pa.—Locol head
quarters of a German singing club,
the liedertnfel Saencerbund Hall,
were slightly damaged by a bomb,
placed evidently in anticipation .of
a Nazi gathering which however had
been postponed. While nobody was
injured, windows were shattered
over 5 wide neighborhood area.
mmwa
Among the problems listed for
Minion at this week's conven
tim of the Associated Bakers of
America in Chicago is the feasibil
ity of a national advertising cam-
Dflxn to combat the impression that
bread is the most fattening of foods
. . . First signs of spring were re
. Ylected in increased activity in the
men’s ready-to-wear garment
trade. especially in costume suits.
. . . For the third successive week,
steel production remained station
aryatsopercent or capacity . . .
Addressing the National Lawyers
Guild in Washington, Senator La
Follete urged a Government invest
,Mt program that would give work
to the “eleven million unemployed
men and women in the country and
utilise the billions of unemployed
dollarsinitsbanks” ...Athree
week steady rise in cotton prices re
flects the curtailment of cotton
laeage from 34,383,000 to 28,384,000
Provided for in the new farm act
II announced by the Secretary of
Wm.
Cm Doesn’t Pay
New Yatk City—Ciro Terranova,
Italian racketeer and so-called ‘ar-
We Kins." whose wealth once
dialed Broadway, died in abject
My. For years no shipment of
We: could enter the city with
” mm craft to Terranova.
balm trying to evade his tribute
had their trucks sprayed with lead
““3 “Tommy suns." Unable to se
mm 3 conviction because of Terra-g
nova’s close alliance with Tammany
Ban. “8301' La Guardia finally or
dered the police to arrest him every
time he crossed the city line from
his $40,000 mansion in Westchester
Cmmty. After 14 arrests, two or
them for murder, and being listed as
Public Enemy 3, the Sicilian out
law save “D the ghost penniless, his
body unclaimed in a funeral home.
_, Communist Test Due
New York City—The American
Legion will begin an immediate test
01 Ammonium in local courts, de
fined to remove from office Simon
Guam, an avowed Communist, who
WIS appointed Assistant to Manhat
tan Borough President Isaacs. Prac
ti(Bally every Catholic organization
in the city is united in the fight
W Gerson, and Victor F. Rid
der. leading publisher and chairman
Of the State Board of Social Wel
fare, sounds a warning that the in
filtration of radical foreign ele
ments is undermining the entire
Works Progress Administration.
L M" II
WEEK
kiféfl
iKmmmirk lexrivr- Etnnrtvr
WbL. xXfi’l“
'Beet Growing to
Increase in This.
Area in Future
U ‘
‘ Specialist Says Indus;
try to Rank High in!
‘ State Importance |
Being Washington week, Paul
Kirker, sales agent for the Utah and
Idaho Sugar company, appeared be
fore the chamber of commerce this
noon urging local usage of this
Washington-made product.
Mr. Kirker gave a very interest
ing discussion of the growth and
manufacture of sugar from the seed
to the finished product. The sugar
industry, he pointed out, was des
tined to become one of this state’s
principal businesses, especially aft
er the Rosa project comes into pro
duction. The Yakima valley in par
ticular, he said, would become
known as the sugar bowl of the
state of Washington.
By the use of Washington grown
and manufactured sugar, virtually
the full purchase price stays in the‘
community, Mr. Kirker said, while‘
90 percent of the purchase price of
sugar grown in the islands leavesl
the country, never to return. 1
That beet growing can be a prof-x
itable crop in the Kennewick dis
trict was shown, he said, by the fact
that more than double last year’s
acreage would be under cultivation
here this, year. With the experience
gained last year the tonnage will
rise rapidly, he said and this sec
tion will produce large quantities.
The refinery at Toppenish, Mr.
Kirker stated, was the last one to
be built in this section of the coun
try and therefore was one of the
most modern plants in existence. He
issued a general invitation to in
spect the plant during their oper
ating period in the fall.
-—-‘—.—.—- '
County GEatvle Echool
Tournament Held Here
The Benton county grade school
basketball tournament will be held
here next Saturday, March 5. The
following schools have sent in their
intentions to enter the tournament:
Prosser, who is last year's county
champions. and also Junior High
champions; Benton City. Richland.
Riverview and Kennewick. Any oth
er teams interested in entering the
tournament will gladly be accepted,
states Coach Normile and they
wouldliketohaveelghtteamsinall
entering the tournament. Mr. Nor
milesaysthatthepurposeofthese
tournaments is not only to prove
the county champions, but to create
a better relationship and social at
tittide between schools of the coun
ty. The first game is scheduled to
start at 9 o’clock. There will be
two local teams playing, the eighth
and ninth graders. The eighth
graders’ line-up will be: forwards.
Bill Happy and Gavin Jones; cen
ter, Allen Smith; guards, Sidney
Brownell and Arthur Evett. The
ninth graders playing will be: for
wards, Robert Smith and Junior
Belair; center, Robert Taylor; cap
tain and guard, Raymond Fries;
guard, Wallace Scott; substitutes,
Frank Dunlap and Charles Tramel.
The Junior high team won from
Wapato by a score of 33 to 8 inthe
Junior high tournament which was
held at Toppenish last Saturday;
The local team placed sixth in the
two districts of the Yakima valley.
Big Dock in PTcture
Really on Little Pond ‘
The group of local ‘ Rainbow
girls who attended the state con
vention at Beliinsham last year
will undoubtedly be present at the
Liberw theatre this week when
“The Barrier" is shown. The girls
as part of their entertainment. were
taken to Mt. Baker last summer.
where the picture was being filmed.
They met and talked with the prin-
Lcipal actors and secured autograph.
inspected the outdoor sets and were
}in general pretty well thrilled over
the experience.
Many of the sets which the girls
saw were not shown in the com
pleted picture, but most or them
were. The dock scene. for instance,
{which shows in the picture as a
landing on the big river, is in
'reality built on a little pond no big
}ger than an ordinary sized room.
Some or the buildings were just
false fronts. while others were com
' plete down to the minutest detail.
-——-‘—.—*——
! NEW BOAT LINE
Announcement was made this
week in a Portland paper that a
man from Minnesota had applied
for federal charter to .operate a
line of freight barges on the Colum
bia river. According to the story,
his operations would be similar to
that of Kirk Thompson, who tows a
line of barges behind a tug boat,
navigating the river in an economi
cal manner. Mr. Thompson’s line
'continues to operate, principally
with cargoes of gasoline.
“RUBBER-NECK” CRUISE
_
Thousands of sightseers each year visit the huge Skagit power plant of
Seattle’s City Light, one of the most scenic educational trips in the state.
Here is a week-end party on the excursion boat “Alice Ross" that plies the
placid waters backed up by the immense dams.——This picture released through
cooperation of Washington State Progress Commission and Washington
Newspaper Publishers’ Association, of which this newspaper
is a sustaining member
Vancouver Rookies
Work Out Here
'lnspection this week or the local
facilities will no doubt result in the
agreement of the Vancouver base
ball team to come here for their
spring workout. Word was received
this week that the offer from Ken
newick o! the grounds and other
equipment here was satisfactory
and a representative would be here
to complete the arrangements.
The club will come here early in
March with the entire roster of
players, a couple of dosen young
sters, probably. and will stay for
about three weeks. Last year a sim
ilar amusement was made by the
Spokane team at Pasco and it
worked out fine, apparently, and
will be repeated again this year.
With the two teams as close togeth
er as Kennewick and Pasco some
interwtins games are anticipated by
local baseball fans.
._‘—.___
Mia Emile} Gets
Injury While Skiing
> Miss Eleanor Allen of Portland!
,» and a former Kennewick resident.l
,receivedavery painful injury while
'onaskiingpartyatut.noodßun
.day. During the day's sport she
» broke the outside ankle bone on her
:rightfootandwastakenbysledto
pagovemmentmmpuxmnufM‘
1 where the accident happened. She;
‘ received first aid treatment at the‘
camp but had to wait some tfine‘
. before a doctor's services were avail-1
¢ able. Miss Allen will not be able
,towaikonherinjpredfootforat‘
Lleastthreemonths. ‘
___4;#__ J
I Brain Teaser
' 1
' People With a natural aptitude for
‘iiguresarebeinggivenachaneeto
’ win a couple of valuable prizes. thisi
‘ week. A washing machine and a‘
mixer are the prizes offered by the‘
. C. H. Yedica Co. for the solution 012
' a “cross-figure” puzzle illustrated
* in his display ad in this issue. It’s‘
* a brain-teaser, all right—and the‘
‘ prizes are well worth the effort.{
' Take a look at it. ‘
I How Times Do Change I
2 u W/y}
quumm. w. 2!. VJ”.
WE;TWEETNETONTTHUR§DAYfFEBRUAR'YWZII; i 938?“
Truck Gardners to
[Meet at W. S. C. ‘
I
Invitations to the second annual
shortcoursefor truck growers.on
mazmbelnsextendedbyn.
n Ova-how. head of the division;
iol horticultm'e, State College of
IWashmgm'l'hemeetlngsareopen‘
manyonelnterestedlntruckcrop
growing.
In addition to talks on many
phases of vegetable growing. the‘
visitors will be taken on a tour 01‘
'the horticultural greenhouses and
cold storage lockers and will visit;
the U. 8. Fruit and Vegetable Prod-‘
ucts laboratory on the campus. All‘
will meet at the Washington hotel
for luncheon at noon. 1
Included on the program will be
nuth.Wood.horticulturslinspect
or at large. Spokane; l". E. Bailey.
marketing specialist. bureau of ag
ricultural economics. Yakima: EH.
Motern,inchugeotu.B.rmitand
Vegetable Products laboratory. Pull
man.
Research men from the agricul
turalexperiment station. State Col
lege of Washington. who will speak
mi. 1.. Overholser. horticulturlst;
L. c. Wheeting, research professor
of soils, L. K. Jones. plant patholo
gist; R. D. nichman, assistant en
tomologist; W. J. Clare. assistant
horticulturutpz. l". Burk, assistant
horticulturist; and c. D. Bchwutse.
!assistant horticulturist. Western
iWashlngton experiment station.
. Each of the speechu will be fol
lowed by short discussions. Dr.
Overholser announced. Such prob
lems as crop rotations for truck
growerslsoilmanagement. vegetable
diseases and insects. residue prob
lems, vegetable inspection. electric
hot beds. processing vegetables and
seed treatments will be discussed.
Therealsowillbeanexhlbltoi’
frozen vegetables in the afternoon.
I Fireman Hurt
F. P. Freeman, Richland mn-sery
man, was badly bruised last night at
Richland when he was struck down
by a truck. Reports from Pasco hos
pital today, where he Is recovering.
state that he mattered no broken
bones in the accident.
Official Paper for Benton County
Four Injured as
Coupe Runs Off
Elighway at Tyler
Local H. S. Student,
Evidently Dozed a t
Wheel
Howard Reymore. 20-ycar-old
Kennewick high school student. sus
tained undetermined injuries Tues
day morning while driving a car
neur Tyler. a few miles from
Cheney. The three passengers in the
coupe with him, also sustained ser
iousinjuriaoneofthembeingso
hadlyhurtthatherlifelsnotcon
sidered safe yet.
Reymore. in a car borrowed from
Marley Parker. 8. local school teach
er.tookittoattendedanceat
Moo Monday evening. His young
lady friend. missing a late train;
accompanied by her father and;
mother. Mn. and Mrs. Newlum.
started for Spokane Tuesday morn-‘
ing with Reymore at the wheel.
The driver eVldently dosed. the.
car running out of the road and.
into the ditch. All four passengers
were severely injured. with their
full extent as yet unknown locally. ‘
ItisreportedeNewluniseo
senousiyhunthatherureudw‘
paired of. Mr. Newlun has suffer-;
ed a broken back. while Reymore
suffered a. back injury too. although
not so scrim as that of the older
man. The young lady had a hed
lylacerated leg.accordingtothere
ports received in Kennewick to
night. It is elec reported that Reyr
more will be brought to the Pasco
hospital tomorrow. though thl: ru
morhunotheenverlfied.
Pasco-Kennewick Hi-Y ‘
Boys Banquet ‘
Them-Yboysheldthelrannunl
banquetmdjolntmeetingwiththe
Pascoboyslntheachool meted:
alt-5:30 Mona” evening. Mm
sabonuthmmdcummt.
mm.pmddentotthelocd
mum-fledum.
RchAttcnha-ouhmaguest.
mummnm.mme
malnspeakernndslaoannmmced
datesoftheolduboysconlm
whichwmbeheldmmm.
17,18md19. Hamlin-sedan;
Pasco “Mamma
forahmanendnnceutthbcon-
ference. “ultimatum!”
Mr.Crowley.sdvlaorotthePuco
mmvmmwm
visa-.wWßuuneyuvethewel-
megawatLMne-
spondedtorthem Thedinner
marvedbythehomeeconomlc
girls mdthehbleswu'emced
'mtoxmotwundcleveflydeoor
mmehckundgold. -
Townsenders Hear -
Piano Pupils
Incteesed em and inter
estisbemsshownlnthe'rowmend
movement as there m e lute
crowd attheclubmeeflnzwmch
washeldnondeyevenmglnthelo
ealclubmoms. Themembersen-
Joyedapotluckdmnertouowedby
ammenmnmmtwmchm
composedofnumbersgivenbynrs.
N. Bomrd's phanpupns. There
wereelghtnewme-beuwhojoln-‘
edtheclublonduevenlns. j
SCHOOL TEACH-S ENJOY
BANQUET AND DISCUSSION
The school principals and super
intendents or south central Wash
ington held their monthly dinner
meeting at the Pasco hotel Tues
day evenmg. niece wene a number
of guests present. including their
wives and a number of school
teachers. Eleven of the local school
teachers were present. 0. C. P‘rlsbe.
Prosser superintendent and presi
dent of the clams-mon. acted as
toastlnsster. Mlss Basel Burdett.
school librarian. and Mr. Newland.
principal of Pro-er sailor him.
are pspeu otter which a. damnation
or these subjects was nude.
{Russel Day to be
,Candidate for
School Director
File 8 Against Vane
Wilder for Position on
Local Board
Plumb:- school dimetorcloaod
thisweekundtwocltwemhavede
clandthemaelvescmdldateltorthe
office. Vane Wilder. appointed this
lastyurtoaeweouttheunupuwod
temofl’.J.Arnold.&mdtoo.c
ceptnmnterm mauled for the
otneeeu'lylnthepedod.
Yeseeuhy Russel Day. of the
Highlands, filed for the job. Con
cerning his candidacy. Mr. Day has
madethefonowingmtemmt:
"Ibeuevethlttheelectionofa
achooldn'ectormuldbeatflend
lyeonteetbetweentwoormm
mummuthevm
myhnveanoppawnltytomdl
uhethetrdedreetothebou'don
'mymtterotlmporhuceénwhlch
maxim-remnant
’mtt them-elves.
’“Oneofthemoettmportmtmob
‘lemebetmalaloolboardhthe
unploymentot gamma
luneeundldwetorlchooldmec
wrbecuuelthlnkthettho-ewho‘
Worm-.m'sm‘
muondxhodmmouldhuve}
an may to express their
opinionatthepolll. Idonotbe-i
www.mmberg
employedwhenhhpxuentoanu'ectl
manhunmtmtm‘
ummmmmml
fythemejouwotthevoeenlnthe‘
am" .
mm'muheldmelt-l
m'dnyotnext'eok. ‘
Former Dakotms' to
Hold Annual Picnic
‘ AbmtfortyDnhotsnsmetlan-osp
;ser Monday to form the Yakima
Nancy Dakota. Plcnlc Association.
with the lntentlon of promoting tel
lawshlpemongthe tomer residents
'otthosestetes. Theyplsntohold
nn annual plane each year ln s.‘
Mme-ent city of the valley. The
31938plcnlcwmbeheldearlyln
Llano at Prosser. met tune to be
unnamed Inter. At the cram”-
tlon meetlnz officers were elected es}
follows: Chairman, 31. L. Kippes,
Kennewick. secretary, Mrs. Charley
L War-ma. Gnndvlew; directors.
Olaf Strandwold and A. u. muck-1
son, Prosser; Chas 1". Werner.‘
Grandvlew; Chas. Fox. Bunnyslde;
Mrs. Simmons. Benton Clty.
First Aid Class
To Start Soon
1113 me of Yah
mmdmmofsanm-
daemmnneldmyofthe
American were. mxenne
wickvmmumthytorthepurpoae
of mung a. local Red Cross
first-dam
mmmummmn
thenexttcwdnyswdwmconunue
forthenutdxweehwlthnr.h
_G. Bmg: mm. Finn
mututhedstemdphce
havenotumhaanmmtm
humanism. ‘
CmpFireGirls
‘nemum heldtneloc-{
muommthuraewhud-‘
mmmmmme
foflowlnzdrlsbelncelectedzmu
menuNmAlenndazvioepm-
mummzmry-m‘
urer,mneWhMcmm;mlbe.
maximum-om leads-. 1
‘Josnsklnner;andoochlchurmnn,‘
mmmmmm;
plannxncnhlkesumrduymm
pmvldlnsthemtherpermlts. 1
ITheYokowlshandHopim girls
arebusyworflngontheirhud
bandsthuweek.
Loses Eye
was W Reed. who-e eye‘
mhjundmsunnynde recentlyl
when struck by a snowball, was
fopced to submit to an operation;
SuhndaymmnlncgtYmm. 'l'he‘
dzhteyemnmovedShelsmak~
measplendtdmoovu-ymduex
pectedhomethelastormwoek.
Most Farmers in
County Take Part
[ll New Ag. Setup
C
System of “Goals” Set
for Participation Pay
ments on Some Crops
Before the map at the Kiwanis
luncheon this week in Kennewick.
Waldo W. Bkuse. county extension
agent. cave some interesting infor
mnion regarding the 1938 Comer
ation Pang-run end the general
production contml We as cov
ered by the recently named hill.
Two thirds of the county parti
cipated in the 1937 program: prob
ably nearly all of them will be
identified in the 1938 program. as
it is much less restrictive in certain
features and much more liberal on
’the smaller sized farms. Mr. Bkuse
brought out the point that our farm
ing revolves. so to speak. about al—
falfa as a major crop, and credit
is given for old fields maintained
as well as new fields seeded. Cre
dit is also given where phosphates
areusedlntheseedingofnew
fields of perennial legumes or
grasses.
A system of “goals” is used: a
soil building goal. a soil depleting
goaLandapotato goal for farms
on which the normal potato m
aseisthreeacresormore. Goals
willbeficuredforeachfarm. If
the farmer concerned keeps his
farming plans within the goals he
is eligible for certain benefit pay
ments. These payments are of a
“token” nature and are designed
tohelpcoverhiscoetincomplyin:
suchashuyinceeed.etc.Thepno—
cram is not compulsory. In no
case does a farmer receive pay
ments for letting land lie idle. The
pmsmn thus far has served to
bringintopracticebetterfarmim
plansofrotationsandsoilfeeding
bymeansofcover,creenmanure.
andsoilconservincerops.oursoil
fertilityisbeingbettermaintained.
AspartoftheiOflprocramsu
carbeetmwerswillreceiveahout
accentsatonaspartofthe‘Ocn
servationmramandtuzatm
asthepaymentinaooordanoewith
thespeeialmcarbeetlawpassed
recently.whichpaymentsareinad
ditiontothosereceivedfromths
suaaroompany. Alsopotatom
‘enwinreeeivespecialpaymmtsas
partofthelmlu'osram. Theywin
bepaidecentsahuahelonanav
erageproductionofsmtonspc
amuflnrlngflnperamweonpo-
Mmuptoandnotinos
cemoi'thepotatoccal. Them
forthecountyismaoresandh
thesumcftheindividualcoals. It
isnotyetknowntheenactreduo
tion this will represent from the
normalaweaces.
Bugarbeetcrowerswillbeccm
pensated in 1938 as a means of
stimulatincproduetiontotakeoars
of dunestic needs. which pince
maytakeafewyeara.'l‘heamce
pmductioninnentonoountyinw
wasnmmnsperam:lntheen
tin Yakima valley. 15.6 tons per
acre. These’fiaureswilllikelyhe
inueasedconsidenblyin mass
mduoticndifficintieswillhscor
lectedtoaneatent.hasedones-
parlance. Overwoacsosofhseb
were harvested in the county in
1937. Twice that amount have al
readyheenoontractedforlflflfll'he
Motionintheentirevalleyoill
heumoacnsormoae. Growers
willmostlywanttomwtenw
mosescresannuallymncejheyam
linedoutcnaproductionplan.
Astothespeelalconnolm
ofthefivemaioretopsofcunrioe.
cottontohaoooandwheat.alneady
schedulesaremsdeforfarmersto
voteonplaoincthelawsinefieot
cnmootwnandtobscco. Ith
still uncertain about rice centre:
for this year. Wheat cannot be
conflderedtillthereisam
mannerwhiohisdstbedas
_mmmmamnm
muohmuuhandmm
mmmmmw
two-thindsvoteareinfavor.~
mamas”
’anemeuencytepntintoetfectflls
Imm of this bill. Farmers
;would be given quotas based on
normalproduoticnandthetaxon
iwheatsoldoverquotawouldbeato
‘abushel. Atthesametime. the
Epsovisionsofa'opincomeinsurancs
andlcansacainstwarehouaestooks
‘would also become effective.
L Itisespeotedthatsugarbenefit
‘paymentswinbemadeinuarch.
)In a comparatively short time
farmers will be notified of their
’coalsinthelmm.
~ v 7“. "7
Moscow. 0. 8. B. R..-—The rescue
at {our Rum scientists from a
Polar Ice floe. on which they had
headlining fox-many weeks. was
cotebnted by wild demon-tum
'0! joy throughout the nation. It
mmeuedthat the elaborate“-
mtlonoetup {ox-theme:
thequnrtettemdlnetedbymota
torsmnntnperaon.
NO. 48

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