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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, October 19, 1939, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1939-10-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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6
_. Wallace Beery and Jackie Cooper in a sbcene from “Treasure Is
land," playng Friday and Saturday. 7
THE MODERN HOME-MAKER
Written for Women of the Pacific Northwest
l By AIMEE M. LEWIS
A Washington Press Association Department
FALL VEGETABLES
Cool, crisp nights, lukewarm days,
turning and falling leaves, all serve
to remind us that autumn has ar
rived with nature’s interesting color
scheme of brown, yellow, red .and
russet. Pumpkin, squash and sweet
potato, typical fall vegetables, all
blend beautifully into this picture.
These vegetables not only blend in
color scheme and lend interesting
flavor to the fall fare, but are val
uable nutritionally for the vitamin
“A" which they contribute in abund
ance. Vitamin “A” builds up resist
ance to infection, thus these vege
tables are a good insurance for win
rter health.
When shopping for pumpkins and
squash or chasing those from the
home grown map to save, select the
ones that feel heavy for their size,
that have a hard rind, and do not
appear damp or watersoaked. Light
weight pumpkins or those with soft
rinds are usually immature. These
vegetables keep best in a rather
warmplaee. Thisplsoemaybea
warm, dry cellar, an unused room,
waspotlnthebasementnearthe
furnace; Small quantities of sweet
potatoes may even be kept near the
kitchen stove. When these vege
tables are exposed to cold for any
length of time their quality deter
iorates. Unnecessary handling causes
bruises or cuts that invite decay.
The ideal temperature for them is
about 55 degrees Fahrenheit, but
theywillkeepwellasmghas'lo
degrees.
01' course. to keep well the vege
tables must be sound before they
are stored. A decayed sweet potato
may contaminate others. Smooth.
well-shaped, rflrm sweet potatoes
with abright appearance are the
best “buy." If they have large
growth cracks in them or are badly
misshapen you'll waste hours more
in preparing them. Also watch close
ly for bruises or cuts especially on
the ends. Examine them occasion
ally in storage. .
The old saying, “If a little is good,
more is better.” appears to be the
great American objective in cooking
sweet potatoes, according to Miss
Helen Steiner, Ass’t. County Agent.
Sweet potatoes have a natural sugar
of their own that is most pleasing.
Some enterprising housewife used
brown sugar as a glaze to very good
advantage. Since ‘hat time richer
and richer combinations have been
added until the modern version of
the dressed up sweet potato casser
lole is.made for the family, try a
little less brown sugar and add the
grated orange rind, moisten with a
little orange juice and sprinkle with
a few grains of nutmeg over all.
This is not so rich and is delicious.
Pumpkin pie still remains the
happy _endiné for all good pumpkin
and one of the best opportunities for
a. cook to show her originality.
IW
ohm
“A:
ET
03'"
'NAICOST
Y
PLANO
.‘ ~.
Mi?“
So. that. team: Tooth vltfi luminous
Mum. 'l’utll that you can dam-d
on for grinding, cutting. shearing, crush
lng. Tooth that on no. clogging, no.
tilting. Plot“ "light as lit." Plates that
resist the claimants! fleets o} foods,
acid, alkali”, alcohol, tobaccos. Plates
that will not warp or get out of align
ment. Mod- ln tones of pink to hor
monixc with your goal.
See sample in our display at
entrance to Book Nook Bldg-
LAN IVE RSAL D ELNTISTSI '.
‘ 781‘ K. NO O K B'L “WALAWALE
Probably no two families are agreed
Lupon the best combination of spicw
)for their pie, but most of them do
yagree that it must be rich with eggs
and top milk.
’ To get all the good fresh pumpkin
flavor, boil pieces or it in a minimum
amount of water until tender. Then
put it through a sieve. If you like
to get every bit of the water out of
it that you possibly can, cook it
some more in a double boiler with
the lid off to evaporate the moisture.
Some cooks like to prepare pumpkin
ahead of time and store it in the re
frigerator since it takes such a
long time to fix it this way.
Serve a piece of pumpkin pie with
the regulation whipped: cream, or
be more original and add a bit of
quince preserves. Individual pump
kin pie and cider is a pleasing and
seasonal combination for party "re
freshments”
Smith Says People
Are “Ford-Conscious”
E. C. Smith, local Ford dealer, was
all smiles today as he described the
public’s enthusiastic reception of
the new 1940 Ford V-8 now on dis
play at dealer showrooms through
out the cotmtry.
“Showroom comments are full of
praise for the many new features of
the new models and bear out the
statement by the Ford Motor Com
pany that ‘lt’s the greatest Ford line
in history: " Smith declared.
“People are ‘Ford-Conscious’ this
year and are showing more genuine
enthusiasm than at anytime in our
history,” he continued.‘
The new cars are big, substantial
and powerful in appearance. Front
and designs are distinctively mod
em and bodies are traditionally
graceful and streamlined. Twenty-
LWo important improvements make
their appearance in this year‘s great
-me and are receiving unanimous
public approval.
Getting a substantial share of at
aention is the new “Finger-Tip"
gearshift, located on the steering
column and standard equipment on
all Ford cars in 1940. Placed right
under the Ford two-spoke steering
wheel, this new space-saving gear
shift is just as easy, reliable and
.mick acting as the former type and
can be operated by the finger tips.
Other refinements include a con
;rolled ventilation system. improv
ed, powerful, hydraulic brakes for
straight-line stops, double acting
hydraunc shock absorbers and
Sealed Beam headlights.
“We look forward to a. highly suc
cessful year," Mr Smith concluded,
"And this outstanding new line cer
mainly has convinced us that ‘lt’s
Ford for ‘4o’! ”
Eight brothers attend the village
school In Isle Abbots, England.
Notice Out-of-Tm
Potion"
1‘ most cases one to
three days service.
Write for our money
saVing prices.
EXTRACTION
WITH PLATES
And Bridgework
FREE
L. J. Smith Spends Sixty Years
Worrying Needlessly over Things
DEAR EDITOR:
Today I stand upon the zenith of
of my existence where I can look
back over the torturous trail over
which I have just passed and ahead
into that path that leads always
into the great unknown.
The road ahead leads through
dark valleys, which are shrouded by
the misty mysterous veils of un
certainty and are but dimly light
ed by the great light which is re
flected by the glorious land whose
attainment is the reward of right
living humans.
Of the future I have no fear; of
the past, no regrets, except the
many, many things I should have
done (and did not and they are so
numerous that I couldn’t get them
all in one life time even it I could
live it over again. A
But as I look back over the
crooked trail by whim I traveled
more than sixty years of my mis
spent life there are certain things
ithat were so deeply impressed upon
‘my memory that made it impossible
to forget them. These occasions
cherished as keepsakes and polish
ed by being frequently relived and
dimmed and softened by the passage
of time stand out as the high lights
of my life. As I look back I see
§many a. shady nook close by my
‘trail. but unseen at the time of
passing, where I could have paused
and enjoyed a pleasant hour if my
mind had not been so fully en
grossed in' persuing.some will o’wisp
that proved of no consequence. .
These little sheltered spots hid
den away from the main trail light
ed with gay laughter covered with
restful grasses and shaded with
beautiful trees which bore much
luscious fruit (some forbidden and
some not) were put there for my
especial pleasure, but I was so
blinded by my Puritinical teachings
that I believed that every thing that
was a pleasure was a sin. But every
time I should have been sitting in
the shade of a tree or resting on the
grass I was wallowing in some
stinking bog hole of needles worry
or striving to correct some- fancied
wrong which was not of my making
and was none of my business. And
what was I worrying so much
about?, you ask, and as bad u I
hate to confess it—it was women.
Can you imagine any one of my in
telligence ever wasting any time
worrying over any one as capable of
looking after themselves under any
and every condition as are the wo
men of America today?
About the time I started to
school the board of education de-‘
cided to teach “The Care and Fit
ness of the Human Body." Remem- ‘
ber those little red hygiene books‘
‘we used tohave? The first lesson I‘
learned was about the evils of tight
lacing. How I worried about that
for at that time all the girls were
strung up tighter than a concert
fiddle. I thought what’s the use of
growing up because all the girls will
either be dead or chronic invalids
and there won't be anybody to play
around with. I didn’t stop to thinkl
that those same tightly heed girls
could out-ride, out-run. out-dance
and out-work us boys with our free
normal lungs, but I used to sit and
brood about it and let my sister
carry in the wood and water and if
the weather was too bad I couldn't‘
even et out in the rain and mud to
help ghem with the milking. Anal
then came the bicycle and all the
worry and abuse that followed. Now
believe me that was something. The
sermons that were preached and the ‘
scathing editorials that were print
ed about why women should not
ride them would make a world’s war
seem like a high school foot ball
game.
No doubt they were devised by the
devil and manufactured by ingen
ious men, but neither man nor
devil ever devised a way that you
could get your arm around a girl
while she was riding one of the
darn things. And the bicycle bloom
ers? Did you ever see a. pair of
For MEN with a mind
of their awn
No “high pressure” selling at E. c. Smiths. Car-scum: I! O bu!!-
ness here, not a circus. So we believe in letting a chap 3“ the
car that suits his purse and please. his pride. Drive in and
give our invitation a. workout!
We like to deal with fellows who have very definite ideas about
values. That’s why we welcome the hard-boiled gen“ Wh" mt
moors of savings. Why not come in and give our car-m
--ing a test . . . we invite price comparisons!
._ , 4.... . *~~;V.‘ ~¢ ' ' A ‘ ,
, '3‘ $33. ', ‘ 5" 5‘ ‘ ' w
-_ 0' «3:71 . T =C~ ; ' ;-':' . ¢
_‘ 3‘ _ ; ' e '.L I, , _ -~.‘- 3 . ..'—_g—u—‘K
LOW
’l3 :. ‘.‘ 1..- ' ~. ‘ " a; ~ ‘, ~. 1 .< ". ' 5 v 5 -
é,» ”flair ”45cc? _- '
{3: . 3; .1: ' h- (1.3, ’ > ..' ‘I . . I”, ~.. .. -’. . ‘w“: ,
five-‘9’? 4" . 10‘. "69' » - -
THE KENNEWIOK (WASH) COURIER-REFORM
them? They were about the last
lstraw. Everybody yelled themselves
hoarse in condemnation of them. I
ididn't even know that a girl had
lower limbs until I saw the first pair
of bloomers. I thought their bodies
were just solid like their dresses
with the feet screwed on at the
bottom so you can easily imagine
what a shock it was to me and
thousands of other innocent young
men to see a girl astride of a. bi
cycle. So again, I was worried sick
wondering what the world was com
ing to. I believe I would have given
up the struggle and shot myself if it
hadn't been for the advent of the
red and white striped stockings
the girls began to wear about that
time.
‘lgumthatisone reasonlhatel
so bad to work while the 'wind is
blOWing because we always used to‘
knock-off work and go to town to
watch the girls cross the street in
hopes to get to see her red stock
ing Peel) out from under her wind
blown skirts.
And then the split skirt. That
was the depth of degradation. Any
woman that would deliberately ex
pose her ankle halfway to the knee
was far too depraved to be men
tioned by decent people. But how
the evil-minded men folks fell for
it! The woman who wore the first
split skirt I ever saw won first
prize at a masquerade ball and
wasn’t even masked. The Judges
never raised their eyes high enough
to see if her face was covered. But
there was nothing the wise ones
could say except to repeat what had
.already been said about other freak
fashions, each one of which was
sure to break down the moral fab
ric of our civilization and which
caused me hours. days and weeks
of needles worry.
But why continue with a story
that you know just as well as I can .
lteli you. Every year a new reform.
,Every year a new tirade of oratoryl
}and scorn from the pulpit and the;
[press. Every year the women of‘
lthe country become more healthy,
imore independent, more comfort
{ably dressed and more beautiful and
‘levery year I worried myself sick on
‘account of it all.
I Were you ever lost in the woods?
:I mean real old honest-to-goodness
itimber and where you had to fight
your way over down logs, big rocks
and across wild motmtain streams.
Where you had to scramble through
brush and briers and go for hours
without knowing just where you
were headng Where your pack
“'35 heavy, your feet tired and your
hands bleeding and your only con
solation was the thought of the
story that you could tell your child
ren and grandchildren about the
vaiient fight you had made and
your only guide was an occasional
Phone 1241 for
Perfect 1
Cleaning
TOPCOATS
They will look like
new when ighey come
ltleal Cleaners
back.
blaze your grandfather had made
upon some old tree years before.
After endless hours and weeks of
toll and trouble you came out on
topofahilland looked back.
' There paralleling your trail and
‘not very far from it was a smooth.
well-traveled road bordered by
fruit trees watered by bubbling
springs and interspersed with hot
dog stands and other places of re
freshments. Well that's how it feels
tolookbackonslxtyyeemotn
wasted life. And now Just when I
needmsttheworst.rvegotthatm
worry about.
Hoplnsyouarethesame.lre
maln,
LESLIEJ.S)HTH.
‘ Kelley Matteson drove down to
Stayton, Ore., last week and met his
mother. Mrs. Ella. mm and his
daughter, Mrs. Jerome Clarke. on
their return from Culver City. 03111..
where they have been visiting with
{relatives the past few weeks.
Nowyo_u gm D_QI_T TOO!
Here is fascinating news that concerns YOUR entire future!
News that now brings Success and Happiness right to
YOUR doorstep!
- _7 _--__- -._-
Walt" P. Chrysler: L
”05 W m and
value.“
Wm. Wtigloy. In: L
What! In".
maize W
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iPublislling Methods Co. fifi__“—_—'—vffl
. YES! Mail at onco, lully postpaid. 5!
my copy of "Siam In Handling ms .
I Pooplo" (you CAN DO IT 1009 __— El
I Endosod is duel: at many ode: lot I
LS3.” in full W. CITY ._._—__- STATI ____:’
Auction Sale
Thurs., Oct. 26, I p. m.
I—BLACK JERSEY COW, 8 years old,
white belly and udder, horns, 850
lbs., “Spot,” milking.
I—BLACK JERSEY COW, 8 years old,
all black except white patch between
forelegs, wide upturned horns, 800
lbs., just fresh, “Blackie.”
I—JERSEY cow, age 7 years, fawn
color, dark head and neck, undercut
in right ear, dehorned, no brands,
milking, “Brownie.”
WALKING CULTIVATOR, no marks.
GIN POLE DERRICK, cable, blocks.
2-TON WOOD WHEELED WAGON,
. no raek
McCORMICK-DEERING MOWER, 5-
foot bar, wide wheels.
10-fttMcCORMICK'DEERING RAKE
—R9532
FEED CUTTER, “Dicks,” (31 6D).
I—VIKING CREAM SEPARATOR,
Model W 75.
12-ft. 2-Wheeled WOOD FLOAT
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
H. S. HUGHES, Auctioneer
DUNNING FARM
'/4 MILE EAST, '/2 MILE SOUTH OF FINLEY STORE
FARMEEQUIPMENT
Woman’s Club Hears
Talk On Exposition
WHITE BLUFPB—The Women's
{Club of White Bluffs held its first
fall meeting 111 me American Legion
man on Wednesday. October mm.
mm. Keel. president. explained the
lreasono fthexnove from the hue
;ment of the Lutheran church to the
‘Leglon Hall. and expxemed the
club's thanks to both institutions for
their kindness. Ila. P. A. English
opened the program with two solos.
“Sylvle.” by Olie Speaks end “Out
oftheDusktoYou”byArthuannd
and Dorothy bee. offer which Rev.
)1. L. Anderson cove n wonderfully
interesting talk of his trlp to the
Golden Gate Exposition. 'nte ex
hlbits were not all mud when
ur. Andemon mede the trip. but
he motes-ed himself to be very
much Impressed by the enemy and
mun-cemlnes of the builders and
the cooperation received from the
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LIVESTOCK
I—LIGHT JERSEY COW, age 6 _yegn‘l.
horns, brand JG left hip, mllklm
“Beauty.”
I—JERSEY -GUERNSEY HEIFEB
CALF, age 10 wks., fawn and white:
white spot on face.
2—JERSEY CALVES, bmwn, 10 mo.
I—WHITE SOW,. wt. approx. 200 11'-
Z—CHESTER WHITE SOWS. wt. 200-
I—CHESTER WHITE sow, wt. 300-
15—CHESTER warm PIGS. 2 I"-
Z-SECTION SPRING‘I'OOTE n 0
marks.
DH‘CHER AND FLOAT
14-h. WAunNG PLOW
7-Shovel WALKING CULTNA'NB-
3-ROW DITCHER
1 SET BREECHING HARNESS.
Z-HORSE FRESNO
2-HORSE SLIP SCRAPER.
APPROX. 12 TON HAY
MISC. FARM TOOLS.
Trim-sang. October 19. 1939
Cdlfornians in general. During m.
um. he mentioned several famous
men that have gone to make
05111011113 history. 81:- Francis
Date. William Taylor. Leland 818 -
m 00m: Huntlnzum and omen.
After Mr. Anderson's talk. Ml 5;
Florence Montgomery told the club
or her interesting work wlth the
children end gave a display or
their achievements. Mine Montgom.
ery has a total or forty-seven chu
dren enrolled since her vacation In
September but durlng the summer
the number was {my-six. Min
Montgomery does this work 1:: ed
dltlon to her work at the library
use. due a. week.
After the program 1 very pleu
mt tea. hour ensued wlth Mrs. R. B.
Relemn and “to. J. L. Brown In
hostel-er. with In. Alex Pub
pouring.
The club is plummg some Inm
aun: study meetmn with well
known spatter: on bubjecu that
m of concern to us :11.
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TERMS—Cash
————/

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