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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, January 09, 1941, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1941-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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@ll2 Krnnpmirk (Enurier-iflwnrtrr
Issued Thursdays by The'Kennewick Printing Co.. 217 Kennewick Av'enue, Kennewick. Washington
Member of National Editorial Association and Washington Newspaper Publishers Association. Inc.
Subscription $2.00 per year _ R. E. REED. Editor and Publisher
The Courier. est. March 27. 1902 - The Reporter, est. January 24, 1908 Consolidated April 1. 191‘
Entered as Second Class matter, April 2. 1914 at P. 0. at Kennewick. Wash. under act of March 3. 1879
John a; Reid.
University District Herald, Seattle
June 25. 1940, was a dark day for
France. Officially a day of national
mourning as Hitler walked in and
Democracy walked out.
Subsequently Norway repudiated
its loyal governmental setup while
King Haaken was hiding in England
Similarly Holland’s queen and
royal family were kept under cover.
And so nation after nation became
puppets of a few individuals whose
purpose spelled destruction and
death and sorrow and famine.
This world cataclysm might not
have been visited upon these peo
ples if they themselves had been
united and loyal citizens of their re
spective countries.
Political and economic barriers
were thrown in the way of loyal
BOWL ~
FOR
HEA LT H ,
a clean sport for ladies
and men.
EVERYBODY
WELCOME
KENNE WI C K
{Bowling Alleys
+_____§
Start your morning 9
with gusto
Start your
car with
MAW/fl
3190/1/22?
GASOLINE
\V/
AND ANOTHER HEIPI’UI
HINT from Your (onoco
Mileage Merchant . . .
The more empty space in
your gasoline tank the more
risk of condensed moisture.
Safer to keep your tank close
to full—especially overnight. ‘1
subjects who by all means honorable
‘ were defending their native land.
Thus it was that foreign termites
found it an easy matter to build dis
sention and divisions detrimental to
a united defense. In fact, the foe
was given so free a hand in all these
unfortunate lands that their gov
ernmental functions became confus
ed and ineffective.
This unhappy condition of na
tional affairs in Europe is certainly
not only a warning but a mandate
that the citizens of our United
States do not become victims of in
?trigue and political dishonesty. It
; can happen here
; Thankful we 'are that America
‘has not been carried away by sub
versive movements of whatever ism.
We have not lost our heads and un
ited we must stay lest our heads be
cut off by a foreign foe.
God has richly blessed America—
a land where everybody can write
and speak his mind, where lawful
asembly is not prohibited, where
worship of God is every person’s
heritage. where military or any oth
er class will not push one off the
sidewalk. It is truly a country of
freedom.
May God grant that this fair land
which we love and cherish shall
never be faced with a day of mourn
ing. May our institutions always
stand firm in the face of adversity.
A STARTER
So you want to develop your per
sonality? A wise man says to get up
assoonasyouawakenandtobe
wide awake when you do get up.
This will be difficult (or the fellow
who doesn‘t get going until utter his
morning cup of coffee. We are ed
visedtostartthedaywithasmile,
andaswiseasitmaybe,itisoft
en difficult to squeeze out anything
socheermltmfllaboutnoon. Asa
good day-starter. say something
nice to the wife. There is sound
sense in breathing deeply the good,
flesh air into the bottom of the
lungs. This is something easy and
we'willtrythat. Butthererwillbe
many a man in Kennewick who
won’t bother about developing per
sonality.
The spirit of accomplishment and
victories purposful living isn’t a
thing that comes to an individual
from the outside. It is an inner force
that determines the attitude and the
manner in which the individual will
meet all hardships and reverses. It
is difficult to defeat such a. man.
The fortune of many years work
may be taken from him by reverses
but within he is still the same cour
ageous being. His courage and his
‘faith is not built on material poss
iessions. It is the thing that has
i made his possessions possible.
BE QUIET
An acquaintance remarks, “so
many people dying of heart trouble.”
We comment and forget all about
it as we hurriedly go on with some
thing or other. Always there is
something or other and pretty soon
the tired body and exhausted heart
‘just stops doing something or other
\and we go into print as a lesson for
someone else who won’t heed the
warning. Why can’t we relax and
take care of this inner self by al
lowing it a quiet time once in twen
ty-four hours-l Surely we can com
mune with ourselves once a day for
a brief interval Our hearts would
not be so overworked and weary it
would take some time to .pay atten
tion to this inner self. They tell us
our pace is so rapid that our heart
isn't able to withstand the strain.
How amdnus is the business man to
keep his office in running condition.
The housewife works to keep her
home in order. We all wash our
bodies that we may be clean and all
the time tail to keep order within
ourselves. Being so busy doing some
thing or other we haven‘t time to
justsitandthinknetusbeginto
marrow to give ourselves a quiet
time and ii we want to sit and think
of courage for the day, blessings to
bewroughtorjustnotthinkatall
—that will help the heart and the 1
spirit of man. , J
GOOD NR RADIO
We remember when there were
plans made by radio chains to give
the listeners of America the chance
to get the war in Europe by taking
them into the very thick of things.
They interrupted regular broadcasts
by flash news which was exciting
and sensational. This quieted down
We are glad that nothing further
was done to bring Kennewick to the
front-line cries. But radio has gone
far to carry its listeners a vivid pic
ture of the stituatlon and has played
a prominent role in informing us
of experiences through contact with
individuals. You can be well read
through your newspapers but you
mill the tone of the voice, the elo
quent words of kings and prime
ministers. It brings the halting
words of children speaking to par
ents on English soil, of personal in
terviews with people in air-raid
shelters in underground London. No
picture can photograph, no newspa
per edit, what the radio brings in
human spirit of reliance and cour
age.
JUSTA-WONDERING
You never take time to wonder
what one hundred years will bring
to your world, you are so busy try,-
ing to keep up with the one of to-
THE KENNEWICKLLEASH.) COFFEE-REPORTER
gm”
iW”
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lrl."_-_ ",... 7",.- n I. " I— "I.
I TEN YEARS AGO—I93I
During the past year the Church
Manufacturing Company had its
name changed to Church Grape
Juice Company J. G. Kelley of Wal
la Walla was elected president of the
company and stated that 10 percent
more grapes were pressed in 1930
than in the previous year. ‘
C, L. Powell became a law partner 1
day. Think back of what has been
given us in the last hundred years
land you are compelled to visualize
‘for the future. It was the begin
ning of the developing of photogra
phy and quite a sensation there was!
Today the photo is one of the most
common of sights and almost every
home has its own camera. Will the
airplane Ibring oblivion to the rail
road track as man and mail fly
from here to everywhere? Will it
put the auto where the horse is to
day? A strain on the imagination
perhaps, but you can even picture
yourself coming back in phantom
shape to Kennewick and finding
they had repaired and paved streets
and sidewalks, torn down unsightly
billboards, erected neat mail boxes
and cleaned up the alleys. You can’t
tell what a hundred earswill do!
The disadvantage the United
States would have in a war would
call heavily upon her resources is
that this government has to pay
several times as much xor its mu
nitions, equipment and ships as any
other nation in the world.
Priest Rapids Valley
Pioneer Woman Dies
WHI’IYE mum—Another pio
neer of the Priest Rapids valley was
laid to rest in the White Bluffs
cemetery Sunday afternoon. Ida Mae
Salisbury was born May 22, 1879, at
Sheridan, Wisconsin, where her
early life was spent. On August 4.
1906, she was married to David
Hartman at Hoquiam, Washington,
and in 1908 they purchased a tract
or land at Hanford. They did not
undertake development of the prop
erty at once. instead, assuming
management of a fruit ranch in the
In-B-Tween belonging to Prof N. D.
Showalter, then state school super
intendent. In 1922 they moved from
the Showalter place to their Han
ford property and the death of her
husband eleven years later left Mrs.
Hartman, a widow.
About a year ago, her health
failed, but a successful operation in
the Pasco hospital gave her hope of
complete recovery. As time went on.
however, another illness, which was
to prove fatal, developed and she
died Thursday morning, January 2,
at th age of 61 years. ‘
Funeral rites were conducted at
2 pm. Sunday at the Presbyterian
church in Hanford, the Rev. L. C.
Krug, putor of the Lutheran
church in White Bluffs and. a
friend of thirty years, reading the
service. Mrs. Hartman was sur
vived :by a son, Clayton Hartman, of
Hanford, and by four brothers, all
residing in Wisconsin.
LOW RAIL FABES
$5895
Round-Trip to
CHICAGO
IN COACH
' $3495 32$
DELICIOUS Low 008 T MEALS
Breakfast . . . 25 cents
Luncheon o o o 30 cm
DIIIIIOI' In I o a 3560!!”
TOTAL PER DAY 90 cent.
served to thou traveling by Coach
and Pullman-Tourist can on .. .
The Portland Rosa
Daily from Portland . 9:33 p. n.
2 Other famous trains
from Portland
Pacific United daily 8 n. a. Bm
llnon-S ailing: nonthlyon 1,7, 13, 19, 25.
Porter Sonic. and Pro. Plum
In Conduct on all Tum
ENJOY WINTER SPORT
Visit Sun Valley, Idaho, when
winter sports, brilliant Inn-
Ihino and splendid accom
odations await you.
Po: all tron! Won lag-nll. of—
H. S. TA¥LOR
9‘ Phone 671
UNION DACIFIC
A ”RAIIRUAD
in the office of M. M. Moulton. al
though he had been practicing here
for the past year. Mr. Powell was to
take over the duties as the new
prosecuting attorney with Mr. Geo.
Beardsley acting as his deputy in
the Presser office.
Harold G Fyfe was installede
president of the local Kiwanis club
at a special meeting in the Hotel
Kennewick. The gavel was pre
sented by the retiring president, M.
M. Moulton.
The new transmission line from
Yakima to White Salmon. which was
put in during the summer by the P.
P. Jr. L. company under the direction
of c. S. Knowles went out during
the week An airplane was used to
spot the trouble due to the fact that
there was five feet of snow covering
most of the trail. Officials believed
that frost or a falling tree caused
the line break.
1 Miss Wilma. Lewis and Robert
Christenson were united in marriage
‘at midnight New Years Eve.
Clarence Schuster who spent the
holidays with home folks, left by air.
plane for his home in Portland .
Miss Ruth Mueller. Alice Mae
Smith and Elmer Huppman return
ed to Cheney to resume their stu
dies in the normal school.
Manley Gest had returned to
Sunnyside after spending the holi
days here. .
Ed Lum was confined to his home
with the mumps.
Miss Maxine Sawyer and Leo Per
kins both of Richland were united
in marriage on December 31.
Maurice Compton and Harold
Winmsen of Richland left Sunday
to resume their studies at W3O.
TWENTY YEARS AGO—I92I
H. W. Dugranges was Kenne
wick’s new mayor who took office
Tuesday evening.
Mrs. Thomas mm was to be
me new city librarian to succeed
Mrs. H. E. Btmtington. who had ne
signed. Din-ing Mrs. Huntington‘s
administrationthercodershadmore
thandwbledthenumbertolzoo.
A special. budge election was to
becalledtowobeonbondsforanew
concrete bridge over the canal at
Second street. -
Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Raymond re
turned treat a ten-day visit in Spo
kane. ,
Burns Brown entertained a groan?
of boys at his home with Bob Mat
techeck and Art Jacot winning the
prizes. .
Miss Violet Reik and Alfred J.
Thompson were married at the
home of Dr. Lane in Walla Walla on
December 30. The bride was the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Rel]:
otfi'inle‘yandwasateacherinthe
Finley‘ schools. Both were gradu
ates of the North Central high
school in Spokane.
Perry Soth left Friday for Spo-
My pgy m thammletflowpfices when
G H EVROLET
brings gall Jail llwse great
[Vi/IT (/1575 a]; dil'fl/VflMKtool
ORIGINAL
VACUUM
POWER
SHIFT
Ia! no extra cos!)
BUILT AS ONLY
CHEVROLET
BUILDS IT
IHRIIIING NEW BIGNESS
IN All MAJOR DIMENSIONS
_
" 90-H.P. VALVE-IN-HEAD
7 uVICTORYH ENGINE
#‘(IHEVROLETS the LEADER
Kennewick Auto Co.
Phone 100
‘HWWU‘DHQ“A\.\‘Y “giggl‘éfifi
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' SAFE-T-SPECIAL
HYDRAUIIC BRAKES
knne where he planned to attend
the Northwestern Business college.
J. 1. Hill had taken over the dairy
business of Barley Peter. Mr. Hill
expected to make a model dairy
farm of his ten acre tract three
miles southwest of town.
John Bernath had gone to Boise
to visit with a daughter.
Miss Ruth Dickinson was elected
lecturer of the Finley grange to take
the place of Mrs. J. C. Swayae, who
had resigned.
The first girls basketball game of
the season was to be played at Rich
land Friday with the following in
the line-up:
Jeanette Huntington, Ruth Stev
enson. Margaret Given. Della Hud
nall. Helen Turman. Leila Johnson.
Margaret Appennellar. Dorothy
I‘m-ner. Evelyn Serier. Thelma Boy
er and Mia Byrd.
THIRTY YEARS AGO—I9II
‘ Kennewick’s new city council set
in new record for quick work by in
structing the mayor and city clerk to
enter a five-year contract with the
P. P. a: 1... company for 60 street
lishtstobeplucedintheresidence
section of the city.
Prof. l". A. Huntley. who had been
experimenting in cape pmemtion
Men Who Know
When you need insurance you gen
erally need it badly. It is a great
relief to know that your insurance
is in the hands of men who special
ize in all the “ins and outs” of all
forms of insurance. Then you
know, too, that your protection is
as xrfect as human judgment can
m e it.
INSURANCE REAL ESTATE
215% Kennewick Ave.
Gaseoigne & Pyle
I “‘.‘-‘— ‘Wfl ‘2-
DE lUXE KNEE-ACTION
4 ON All MODEL?
wnu BALANCED spnmcmc
mom AND REAR, AND IM
PROVED snocxrkoor ,
w ‘ STEERING ‘ .
Kennewick, Wash-
Thursday, January 9. 1N!

and manager E. M. Sly of the 3.;
Inewici: Fruit & Produce comm
had opened some kmzx of saw M
in which they had packed m
The experiment showvd that W
careful handling and With m
grapes in prime condition Km
wick grapes could be kept to, flu
Christmas trade.
A quarter of a million don"...
to be expended by the P. p. t L
company putting in the am“
Richiand light and power 1m”. la
tcrial for the lines was arflm |t
the rate of several carloads an, 0M
was being transferred to the m
of the Columbia Steamboat mm
for transportation up the river.
The last in a series of m
talks was given in the m
church by M. M. Moulton. who u
on the subject of “Religion 13 q.
State.”
me Kennewick high school 6-
bate team was to meet the PM
team soon. The local team cm
of Rosella Hamilton and Gen.
Richardson were taking the a.
tivesideoitheincome tum
J. H. Gravenslund was m
wnep C. Jacobsen. an old no”
of his in Hutchinson. Minn. vi.“
him here.
, ———r
| NEW [ONGER WHEREAS! |
lONGER, lARGER, wwea
V mum toms
WITH NO DRAFT VENTILAHC“
[YE If".
, ner/7'" '
Buy/f."
RENTAIS
Phone 1281
l CONCEMED
. SAFETY—3m:
I At EACH 000;
l‘ o:¢7—"‘t‘li;:lliu:wf "
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CD‘IEVWIII(')"HY ‘
I DASHING NH"
' "ARISIO‘.V~ \
I DESION

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