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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, October 26, 1944, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1944-10-26/ed-1/seq-7/

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Rule Slories
the Week
Gus Henke returned Friday
from a visit in Bremerton.
Irene Bailey and daughter, Kat
ren of Bremerton, are visiting at
the Gus Henke home.
Sunday night and Monday visit
ors at the Joe Stradling home
were Mr. and Mrs. Emmerson Baze
and daughter of Lind. Mrs. Baze is
Mrs. Stradling's neice.
[AID POLITICA L A otvsgsrvsssmafia‘
Hal Holmes for Congress
Re-elect the man who was sent
to Congress by the overwhelm
ing vote of 11 out of 12 counties
in this district. His record merits
your support.
Vote for HAL HOLMES
Republican Candidate 4th District, Vote Nov. 7
HAL HOLMES-FOR-CONGRESS CLUB
2%; Bellingham Labor News £4
Referendum No. 25 Vicious
f l Opposes Bill; PUD Spent
' uge Sums of Public Money;
Workers Rights Endangered
Declaring that Referendum 25 is not in the interests of
organized labor, Ernest R. Hanstead and Ernest J. Brazas,
group presidents of Local 77 of the International Brother
hood of Electrical Workers, have just released pertinent
information relative to fees receivedby some of those now
engaged in promoting Referendum 25. - -
Referendum 25 is the power bill which the last A. F. of L.
Convention at Wenatchee refused to endorse and which has
been opposed by Central Labor Councils of Bellingham and
Bremerton and leaders of the labor movement.
This joint statement by Messrs. Hanstead and Brazas
follows: I
“Many of the leaders in the campaign for Referendum 25
have long been retained and employed by the Public Utility
Districts and have received large sums of money.
“The PUDs have levied more than $2,000,000 in taxes.
Let’s see where the money has gone.
“PUDs which have never sold a penny’s worth of elec
tricity have spent almost a million dollars of this tax money
for fees to lawyers, engineers,
for propaganda, and for a ne
mating committee which
has gone out of business.
“According to the Congressional
Records, two of the authors of
Referendum 25 were Messrs. Cluck
and Coughlin. They also are mem
oers of the Seattle law firm of
Houghton, Cluck & Coughlin,
which has already received more
than $140,000 in legal fees from
the PUDs. Clarence Coleman of
Everett, attorney for the Snoho
mish County PUD, who has been
campaigning for Referendum 25.
received a total of $8,600 for legal
services to the end of 1943, with
additional payments of $4,000 in
early 1944, making a total of
$12,600. Second highest in amount
was E. K. Murray of Tacoma, who
received $79,000 prior to 1944,
with additional payments of some
over $9,000 during this year.
“Nor have the lawyers from out
side the state overlooked the op
portunity. Herman Lafky of
Salem, Oregon, has collected just
under $40,000 in legal fees from
Washington PUDs.
“Total expended by the PUDs
for legal fees is $369,329, up to the
end of 1943.
“An even larger amount
$379,885—has been spent.in fees
to engineers, and $166,000 of this
maid out by PUDs which have
n operated any electric prop
erty whatsoever. Again, large
The 35°“ “Or? is reprinted, word for ford, from the Bellingham Labor Nomof Oct. 13. 1944. Now read Referendum 25, and learn how
SupethUDs would be formed, without your You. Get I. copy It on: OE“. PACIFIC POWER & LIGHT COHPANY. ___ __ ____
Mrs. Chas. A. Schlosser of Sun.
nyside was a week-end guest of
her sister Mrs. J. L. Stradling.
Circle 2 of WSCS will meet at
2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 2 at the
home of Mrs. George Adams.
The Twin City Navy Mothers‘
Club will meet Wednesday night,
Oct. in the Methodist church hall.
Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Foraker of
Bremerton, and their son, Cpl.
Richard Foraker and their daughc
ter Mrs. Wilbur Ash spent last
week-end visiting friends and rel
atives in Kennewick.
amounts in engineering fees went
outside the State 526,657 was
collected by firms and individuals
in engineering practice from Kan
sas City, New York, Chicago,
Portland, and Eugene, Oregon. Ap
parently local talent is not always
good enough for the Washington
PUDs.
“And then we have the organ
izations which have sprung up on
the fringe of the PUD movement,
are supported in whole or in part
by tax-collected money—yet have
been so cleverly placed beyond
public control that they cannot be
required to make an accounting
for their expenditures.
“There have been two such or
ganizations formed by the PUDs
and their hired brain trust—the
‘PUD Research and Information
Service,’ the propaganda agency,
and the so-called ‘Puget Sound
Utility Commissioners Negotiat
ing Committee.’
“Although the ‘take' of the ‘re
search’ organization is one of the
smaller ones in the list of fees col
lected about $40,000 to date,
mostly from tax funds—it is one
of the examples of unsupervised
and uncontrolled use of taxpay
ers’ money.
“Here we have an organization
devoted to selling the PUD idea to
the people, financing and coordi
nating a state-wide campaign in
favor of Referendum 25—and us
ing public funds, tax funds, to do
Cpl. Richard Foraker is sta—
tioned at Lowry Field No. l, Den
er. and is home on furlough.
The Finley Grange Ladies‘ Aux
iliary will meet at 2 p. m. Wed
nesday, Nov. 1, with Mrs. Lulu
Hampton at Hover. There will
be election of officers.
'Miss Betty Higley left Friday
morning to enter the University of
Washington as a senior. Betty
has been a student at the Central
Washington College of Education
at Ellensburg the past three years.
; ; .9. . m:
':EE :: MAKE-UP lESSON
; ‘l" =--- ‘--
'l‘ 111- l -
, ---- The week 1‘ November 6 to 10, ' -
ll ==== I elusive. is oDußarry make-up web:
a; l Our demonstrator will give you free
all I=== . _of charge a make—up lesson. Come
=--- m and arrange your appomtment now
’l‘ 1... .
ll :1}: 1 GfgfudndSaloneomultant
:5 111. ”
;._ ll ==== l; Dam from the Richard and“: Salon,
'.:; 'li ... Fifth Avenue, New York...this beauty
‘ l = .'.: expert will bein our Toilet Goods Section
.s:}- ll RI CHA »R D all next week to advise you personally on
fill H U"p"N-U T problems of skin are and makeup.
ll - Egg l :.;.- new: miss this we oppomiw to solve.
1 ' 1‘ 3J“ your beauty problems, learn how to cre
. I. ate a new make-up that may be just'the
' . lift your spirits need. .
1..- .1
£5” VIBB ER S .
Make-up can do wonders -
...when 1 how
imam-2.“: Bexall Drug Co.
mmduotheu. '
it. They are required to make no
accounting of any sort to show
the purposes for which the money
is spent. 25?.» . s
“ln passing, it might be appro
priate to inquire why this organi
zation should maintain an office
in Spokane, with a secretary at
S3OO a month (out of taxpaym’
money). when Spokane county
does not have a PUD.
“As for the Puget Sound Util
ity Commissioners’ Negotiating
Committee, it has a history not
nearly as impressive as its high
sounding name.
“This committee came into exist
tenee in 1940, collected $35,000
from various PUD treasuries, and
then resigned in 1944, without, so
for as we have been able to find,
ever making an accounting to the
public for the $35,000. At least
$30,000 of this amount came out
of tax monies, for this is the
amount collected from PUDs
which have never gone into the
electric business, and which have
no other source of revenue ex
cept levies on the taxpayers. .
“To sum it up, the PUDs have
taken more than $2,000,000 from
the taxpayers of Washington.
They have paid fees to lawyers of
nearly $400,000, fees to engineers
totaling almost another $400,000,
they have subsidized a propaganda
organization to the tune of $40,000
and propose to endow it with a
budget of SIIO,OOO next year, they
have paid a ‘negotiating commit
tee’ $35,000 apparently without
buying anything.
“On top of this, many of the
leaders in the campaign for Refer
endum 25 are among the leading
recipients of these PUD bounties.
“There is no requirement of ac
counting to state authorities by
the.outsid‘e organization set up by
the PUDs, for the public funds
they have received and spent.
“Altogether, $824,000 has been
paid out in fees, more than half of
it by PUDs which have néver gone
into the electric business. For
what? It would probably take
another battery of lawyers and
engineers to answer that question.
“If ever there was a need for
an investigation of the use of pub
lie funds, this is it: In the end, if
the power politicians should suc
ceed in unloading Referendum 25
on the voters, we can expect still
more of this kind of thing, for
then there will be 'more than
$200,000,000 worth of property for
the lawyers to litigate, the engi
neers to engineer, and the ‘re
search’ organization to put out
propaganda about.”
Valley Grange will have 3 Hal
lowe'en party Monday the 30th
with pot-luck supper at 7:15. For
dessert bring pumpkin pie. Come
prepared for a good time, wearing
your gingham dress and your
overalls.
Circle 4 of WSCS of Methodist
church elected the following of.
ficers at the last meeting: Mary
Minton, president; Barbara Hille,
vice president; Jean Campbell, as
treasurer. and Isal Winterscheid
as secretary.
Total of the fees and expendi
tures criticised are as follows: ‘
Operating PUDS: m
’Legal Fees ”manganese
Engineering Fees ...... 213,338.75
Negotiating Committee 4,471.72
PUD Research and
Information Service 16,052.86
Total Fees ....a..........5432,801.02
'PUDs Not Operating
Electric Facilities
Legal Fees ”.“.”...317039155
Engineering Fees ........ 166,546.57
Negotiating Committee 30,737.67
PUD Research and
' Information Service ' 23,881.01
Total Fees W 3391,556.80
Grand Total of
Fee Payments ..,...382435732
We, of the 1.3.1337” stand to
lose our union rights we so cher
ish. Should this measure receive
a majority at the polls, the future
of organized labor in this State
will be definitely threatened. The
fundamental rights for which
American Labor throughout its
history have fought, and which
today are recognized by the law
of this land, would be definitely
lost by 4,000 electric utility em
ployees who are now in the em
ploy of the private power com
panies in this State.
The public should know that in
the event that Joint Commissions
and Authorities under Referen
dum 25 are successful in acquir
ing the private power companies
of this state, the employees would
lose their COLLECTIVE BAR
GAINING rights guaranteed by
the NATIONAL' LABOR RELA
TIONS ACT, their right to OVER
TIME COMPENSATION guaran
teed to them by the WAGE AND
HOUR LAW, certain SOCIAL
SECURITY benefits after a cer
tain period of time guaranteed to
them by FEDERAL SOCIAL SE
CURITY ACT, PENSION
RIGHTS, the right to UNEM
PLOYMENT INSURANCE guar.
anteed to them by the WASH
INGTON STATE UNEMPLOY
MENT ACT, because of the fact
that the Public Utility District
Commissions are a political sub
division of the State and these
laws specifically exempt political
subdivisions from coming within
their provisions.
Ernest R. Hanstead,
Pres. Local 77A LB.E.W.
. Ernest J. Bram,
Pres. Local 773 LBEW.
Pvt. Ray Deranleau. Imm Camp
Gruber, Okla. is visiting his par.
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Deranleau
of South Kennewick.
Mrs. T. W. Payne and Mrs. I. N.
Mueller attended the state meet
ing of the WSCS in Walla Wall
this week.
WSCS of the Methodist church
will observe the World’s Day of
Prayer in the church parlors Tues
day, Oct. 31. The meeting will
be from 11 am. until the program
is completed. Please bring lunch.
All ladies of the church and
friends are invited.
John Weidle. long-time resident
of Richland. was found guilty of
illegal hunting in Judge Winken
werder’s court this week and was
fined SSO and costs. ‘
The South Highland “Helping
Hand Club" will meet next Wed
nesday afternoon, Nov. 1, at the
home of Mrs. Harold Diamond.
There will be a white elephant
sale at this meeting.
Amos Haney, early day resident
of Kennewick, stopped off over
night here Sunday to visit with}
his old friend 0. J. Staléy in the:
Garden Tracts and other old‘
friends. He had been hunting and
“all he got was back". ’ ‘
Announcements have been rem
ceived of the birth of a son, Terry
James to Sgt. and Mrs. James E.
Tweedt of Bell. Calif.. on Oct. 8.
The new arrival is the grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Tweedt,
former Kennewick residents. Sgt.
Tweedt is in the army air corps.
flubffifii! I , 5
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ifiiljl~fil::il§r;|wfi:‘:x. V. 1': oI” ~ i ..a .
DRESSES and ACCESSORIES
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‘ ENSIGN: A second lieutenant Kennewick Courier-Report" " 7
who can swan. ‘ Thursday. October 26. 1944
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Washington Motor Coach
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