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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, June 07, 1945, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1945-06-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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“ Bill Graimillerl33;“wemmsaaymfi'aiis‘fl3 PLAY LAND]
TWO MILES WEST OF KENNEWICK, THEN WATCH FOR BIG SIGN “PLAYLAND” AND TURN RIGHT V 4 MI.
ATTENTION. ‘
rnnnznsl ,
' Bring us your dressed
poultry and Rabbits
. —__.—_+
HIGHEST CASH PRICES '
uzuuu's MARKET.
l'l' PAYS TO ADVERTISE!
w. Do .. . ' 3’ Hour 0: % SIGNS
man scmonn , 5°33“ 0;- ALL xmns
wont run and one-half I .-_ -
' your: painting in GOLD LEAF
, mac: ._ the Twin emu Lama .-
msanm. um i
_ . . ”$336 .. __
PAINTING .
_ m swcco I.OOM up. roan _
panama ‘ WO3B ' 33°12‘51”
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fi‘e‘i-‘iggififii m I%“m CLEANED m
33.21” e year pus'rxc x 011: "mp
KENNEWIQK & PASCO PAINT SERVICE
,' 340 Ave C East on Highway '
PHONE 3712 ' ‘ . KENNEWICK
BUY ,AN'OTHER WAR BOND
LocAL TRANSFER”
' MOVING, CRATING; AND STORAGE ‘
_ Daily Trips
Between Kennewick & Richland
Nationwide Moving Van Service
mcnuun 'rnusr-zn
Joe and Roy - , . '
17 Avenue G Kennewick Phone 942
THE OLD JUDGE SAYS... , e - G _ ' . ' » '
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TOM: “It‘s mighty_ niceto receive a com- OLD JUDGE: “Simply this ... an you
pliment hke you’v'nqsig glyenus, Judge. We think of any other business in which the
do take 0111' reopensibmtxee very seriously seller isresponsible for what the buyer doe
and try to $lO thenght thmgyith every- with his merchandise? If a person at. too
body. In spite of it, we get cnficized now much cake and gets indigestion. the baker
and then.” . - isn’t blamed. Nor is the eofl'ee Mt
. . . . . ee
OLD 109%“! how - - -Y9u’ve got to 35mm°dvt§$§°§3§ thdlemksaelltegiifnepirifobev
take the bltter Wlth the sweet m times like erageegeteblamed plentyifoneofhiscut' .
the“ Spealdng of criticism. an Imm tamer: overindulgee. Doesn't seem quit.
really unfatr criticism, reminds me Of the “if. d 0” it) Tom?”
'9‘” “was" hm ‘ TOM: “Frankly. it doeln't. Judge. We've
FRANK: “How is that. Sludge?" novel-looked atltthatmbem’?
,' - mwmuwmqmmtmtn
Homemaker!
' Briefs
GLADYS K. BOW
Home Demonstration Agent
To Make Sugar Supplies
Go Farther: .
It you have any extra Juice
from canned or cooked fruit—use
in sauce for puddings and fritters;
to moisten brown betty; to add
flavor and sweetening .to gelatin
desserts. '
If you have any cake crumbs
or dried cookies use crumbs .to
sweeten bread- puddings. ' '
Dried fruits, rich in their nat
ural flavor, I am told are hard to
buy thru the summer months it
you need your sugar for canning
fresh fruit. Why not dry your
own next summer?
Add a lot of salt to fnostings,
pie fillings and puddings to ac
centuate the sweetness. Many
of you have come to prefer your
grapefruit with salt or plain. Some
of us are learning for the first
time the flavor of the natural
fruit taste and some jams we
liked very much a few years back
do not even taste good to us—
they seem too sweet.
They tell us less sugar is need
ed to sweeten cooked fruit if
sugar is added after instead of
before cooking. -
Have you tried honey to glaze
sweet potatoes? A tablespoon of
sirup placed in . the bottom of
each serving dish before filling
with cornstarch or tapioco cream
pudding? You can use less sugar
in the pudding. ‘
They tell us there is a short
age still of food containers. The
ones that carry food" overseas are
not returned to this country. The
4—H groups interested in earning
hours for their war project can
salvage all fibreboard boxes for
re-use or turn into the waste
"paper drive to be used with wood
pulp for new containers. Turn
in egg cartons, clean and in good
condition to grocers.
Canning supplies—new jar rub
ber rings are superior to 1943
rings. Home canners are .advised
to continue last year’s practice
for boiling rings. Boil ten minutes
in one quart of water containing
one tablespoon of soda for each
dozen rings and then rinsing in
boiling water. Black. brown or
red proved equally satisfactory.
Color has no bearing on‘ quality.
All rings in cartons have a char
acteristic odor but this does not
necessarily give a flavor to the
foods canned. -
A time saving way to keep
§9Y3Wm. bright 3.--“! 119.3"! a_ '
little aluminum pan filled with hot
soda water near the dishpan and
put into it any silver tarnished
with egg or other food.
Have you ' tried vegetable
meringue. Beat the whites of two
eggs until stiff, but not dry and
fold into one cup of mayonnaise.
It is used on hot cooked green
beans, spinach, peas or carrots.
Brown lightly under broiler. .
The easiest way to get a bet
ter fit to your made-at-home is
to alter the pattern to fit you be
fore you put it on the goods to cut.
m mun-max comm-LEM!!!
‘ltdiost of us have figure 1179811181"
1 es. ,
Just about time we find out
about shoulder pads—along comes
the wing shoulder. They do look
more comfortable for- summer
clothes than the heavier padded
one.
Buy Another Bond Today
Obituaries
LOUIS HARVEY RAYMOND
Louis H. Raymond was born
October 11, 1886, at Appleton, la.
He was united in marriage to
Elsie Brickingham on April 2, 1905
at Hampton, lowa.
'He made his home in Hampton
until they moved west and settled
in Kennewick in 1911.
.He was a pioneer merchant of
Kennewick, going into business for
himself in 1914. He retired from
business about two years ago on
account of poor health. Mr. Ray
mond was a member of the local
Methodist church.
A son passed away in infancy.
He is survived by his wife, Elsie
at Kennewick, two brothers, and
one sister in lowa.
‘ Funeral services were held on
‘Monday, June 4, with Rev. J. B.
‘Coan reading the service.
‘ Mueller Funeral home was in
charge.
MRS. C. O. BENTON
Mrs. Clarence 0. Britton died
at the family home here Friday,
June 1. She was 61 years of age.
The Brittons had rebeived word
only a short time before of the
diath of their son, Eugene, in ac
ti n in Germany.
The funeral was held this aft
ernoon from Mueller’s Funeral
Home. Burial was in the River
view Heights cemetery.
Olive Weddle was born at Lo
gan,’ Phillips county, Kansas, on
December 28, 1884. When she was
one year old, the family moved
to Solomon, Kansas, where she
grew to womanhood. When a
young girl she joined the United
Bretheren church, retaining her
membership thruout her life.
On May 20th, 1904, she 'was
united in marriage to Clarence O.
Britton. She was highly respect
ed in her neighborhood .with her
interests devoted to her family,
home and raising flowers. !
_Besides her husband, she is
survived by two daughters, Mrs:
J. D. Binger of Ellensburg andi
Mrs. Alta Barrow of Bakersfield,‘
Calif.; two. sons, Wayne of Kenne
wick and Gerald with the army in
the Philippines, one brother and
her mother in Kansas, one brother
in Texas, and a brother and a sis-’-
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WALL-IS
_ Furnitnremdhonfloilgoodsaspéddw
WE PICK UP, 01:53:; STORE,- AND smP
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i C LE A N E R S
For service anywhere in the Kennewick-Pasco ‘
area, call .
KENNEWICK 3791
mange” m: M
ter in California. There are 12
grandchildren and one greatgrand
son. '
‘ PM E. MOW
Frank E. Moraine died June 5 at
the Veterans hospital in Walla
Walla. He is survived by his wife,
Marcella, a daughter. Pat, a step
son, James E. Brown, who is with
the Air Corps, Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
Morain of Kennewick, a sister,
Mrs. Lola Coleman of Colorado
Springs and two nephews in the
armed services. The funeral ser
vices will be from the Mueller
Funeral Home in Kennewick at
2:30 June 8.
Mr. Moraine lived for many
year in Kennewick before enter
ing the veterans hospital. His fam
-21:0 and parents are living here
For effective ,
treatment for .
II A N D II II F 1'
use .
DR. PAGE BARKER’S
BRIT I S H
, HAJR
LOT I 0 N '
Imported from England
Quick, effgtgre, easy to
use . for both men and
women.
Get it from '
ARMSTRONG
BABIES -
Open Evenings until 8
SUGAR MILL BROUGHT
BY OX TEAM STARTS
GIANT ENTERPRISE
IN 1847. Mormon pioneers in Utah, cut off
from the world, needed sugar desperately.
They undertook to make it themselves.
They made various unsatisfactory at
tempts to get “sweetening” by “boiling
down" squash. carrots. melons. cornstalk.
an: an: a: ‘
Then, in 1851, Brigham Young, leader
of the Mormons, sent word to his foreign
missionaries to investigate beet sugar
manufacturing. As a result, John Taylor,
one of the European missionaries, bought
on his own account for a modest sum, a
sugar-making outfit in France and sent it
by sailing vessel to New Orleans and then
by steamboat up the Mississippi river to
Fort Leavenworth. Then it went by ox
team to Wyoming. But now funds were
exhausted. The outfit was purchased by
the Mormon church which moved it to a
squat little building on the outskirts of
Salt Lake, now a suburb known as Sugar
House. There, in modest fashion, was
born the great beet sugar industry of
America
Today, under. the name Utah-Idaho
Sugar Company, this pioneer of beet sugar
manufacture, is of immense operations in
Washington, Montana, South Dakota, as
well as Utah and Idaho—ll factories in
five states, producing annually 300 mil
lion pounds of U and I sugar.
Utah-Idaho Sugar Company, now of
world-fame. is an important, valued cus
tomer of The National Bank of Commerce
of Seattle.
I: a: s
Everyday practice of THE NA
TIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE is
a; based on similar intimate knowledge of
customer’s afi'airs the knowledge that
virtually all successful businesses of to
day were once small. A basic principle of
this institution is to extend the full co
operation of all its departments to the
welfare of individuals or firms with sound,
although moderate, operations. Small
business receives sympathetic, construc
tive consideration here. . .
The
NATIONAL BANK
OF COMMERCE
of Seattle
MCI! m
KENNEWICK
EGW.W
The Willows Trailer Camp ,
5 Back of White Kitchen
0 Several nice spaces now available - .
0 Clean heated shgwem
O Wefnrnishthewashinzmacllll'.
GROCERIES AND MEAT
Tinny's Bichiield Service Stall"
Complete Battery Service
' Washing aha Simonizing -
Goodyear Tubes and Batteries
PhoneKenn.37l7 Cor. WlSho&ch
Thursday, June 7 I.“ i
l".
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