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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, September 06, 1945, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1945-09-06/ed-1/seq-4/

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Dwight Golfinett .::.:.,:.:;?'mm PLAY LAND
40 Promineni
Citizens Head
Advisory Group
Organization of the ten standing
committees of Gov. Mon C. Wall
gren’s advisory commission has
been completed with more than
40 prominent state citizens com
prising the membership, it was
announced today by Howard G.
Costigan, executive secretary of
the commission.
Some of the committees already
have met, elected chairmen and
begun studies on projects referred
to them by the commission, Cost
igan said. The others will meet
within the next week.
Membership represents every
portiOn of the state and includes
leaders in industry, labor, agri
culture and civic affairs.
Committees and members are:
Agricultural Development: Hen
ry Carstensen', master of the
Washington State Grange, Al
mira; Kirby Billingsley, manag
ing editor of the Wenatchee
World; R. T. Smith, president of
the Washington State Farm Bu
reau, Walla Walla; Harry J.
Beernink, general manager of the
Washington Cmgjrafive Farmer
ers’ Association, attle, and Wal
ter J. Robinson, former director
of the State Department of Ag
riculture, Pomeroy. .
- Foreign Commerce: C. L. Eg
tvedt, chairman of the Boeing Air
craft Company, Seattle; E. W.
Elliott, Golden Rule Mercantile
Company, Bellingham; Joseph
Gluck, exporter and importer,
Seattle; John P. Herber, president
of the Grays Harbor Exporta
tion Company, Seattle, and A. H.
Lintner, vice president of the
American Mail Line, Seattle.
Manufacuring: I. A. Sandvigen,
business agent, Machinists’ Union,
Seattle; Frank McLaughlin, pres
ident of the Puget Sound Power
& Light Company, Seattle; Ivan
Block, Bonneville Power Admini
stration, Portland, Ore.; Charles
Clise, president of the Seattle
Chamber of Commerce, Seattle;
and Charles F. Barman, presi-‘
dent of Washington Metal Trades,
Inc., Seattle. ' A
Natural Resources Develop
ment: Col. W. B. Greeley, secre
tary-manager of the West Coast
Lumlierman’s Association, Seattle;
Wylie Hemphill, president of the
Associtaed Industries of Wash
ington, Seattle; Evan Oscarson,‘
supervising engineer, U. S. Bureau 3
of Mines, Spokane; George Yan-‘
tis, speaker of the State House
of Representatives, Olympia; Kar
1y Larsen, president of the I.W.A;
District Council No. 2, Seattle;
and Carroll E. French, industrial
relations director of Boeing Air
craft Company, Seattle.
Publicity and Promotion: Geo.
Savage, associate professor of
English, University of Washing
ton; Hector Escobosa, general
manager of Frederick 8; Nelson,
Seattle; Harlan I. Peyton, presi
dent of the Associated Chambers
of Commerce of Washington, Spo
kane; and James Stevens, inform- ‘
ation department, .West Coast}
Lumbermen’s Association. }
Public Works: E. R. Hoffman,
superintendent of City Light, Se-l
attle, chairman; Roy Atkinson, di
rector of €lO regional office, See
attle; Robert Glynn, president of
the Washington State Council of
Painters, Seattle; H. W. McCur
dy, president of the Puget Sound
Bridge and Dredging Co., Seat
tle; and J. B. Warrack, president
of J. B. Warrack Co., Seattle.
Survey and Research: C. T.
Bakeman, director of industrial
development, Puget Sound Power
8; Light Company, Seattle, chair
man; John Binns, attorney, Ta
coma; Jerry Simpson, National
Labor Bureau, Seattle; Dr. Edwin
R. Guthrie, University of Wash
ington; and C. .L. Egtvedt, chair
man of the Boeing Aircraft Com
pany.
Taxation: John King, director
of radio and research of the Wash
ington State Grange, Seattle,
chairman; Roy Atkinson, director
of the CIO Regional office, Seat
tle; H. C. Brown, manager of the
Washington State Taxpayers’ As
sociation, Seattle; Dr. Ralph I.
Thayer, University of Washington;
and H. E. Bowman, secretary of
the Boeing Aircraft Company.
Tourist Trade and Facilities:
Frank Hull, hotel operator, Se
attle; Sidney Gerber, Gerber
Brothers, Seattle; Alton Tillman,
chairman of the Soap Lake plan
ning commission, Soap Lake; A.
Works, Bellingham; and Bill Dob-
W. Talbot, Bellingham Iron
Works, Bellingham and Bill Dob
bins, Building Service Employes’
International Union, Local 6.
Transportation; Dave B e ck,
president of the Joint Council of
Teamsters, Seattle; W. C. Pat
terson, manager of the Ford Mo
tor Company, Seattle; L. W. Bak
er, vice president of the Alaska
Steamship Company, Seattle; and
Thomas Balmer, vice president
of the Great Northern Railway,
Seattle, 7 _‘ _ _
Additional members may be ad
ded to committees later and many
of the committees will have sev
eral subcommittees, Costigan said.
110 W MUCH IS ENOUGH?
Allow one-half to two-thirds
cup of prepared, ready-to-cook
vegetables per person and, say
Westinghouse home , economists,
you’ll lick the leftover problem.
TWO MILES'WEST OF KENNEWICK, THEN WATCH FOR BIG SIGN “PLAYLAND” AND TURN RIGHT V 4 MI.
ONE ARMY VETERAN SOLVEB
THE RETURN To CIVILIAN
LIFE—WITH SPEED
Ex-soldier in search of a bright
career. Rubin Trout: of Brooklyn,
N. Y.. decided to enlist his talents
in America’s gigantic fashion busi
ness. Recently dischsrged from the
U. 8. Army. he took advantage of
the GI. Bill of Rights and selected
for his training the Tnphsgen
School of Fashion, New York. Now
sitar s. few months study.he_'s a.
rising star in costume design and
proving he undo the right choice
in finding his vocation.
This young designer is shown
above giving 3 final sdjnstmcnt to
s. convertible hare midrm dress he
has just created for the lady who
Rig/it @ress.’ '
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AGE SAVING EQUIv- TI'IE PPEI. SYSTEM
Hum- 10 ONE
MoNlH's rR a a ‘ ' . ' ' _
SERVICE PER YEAR
\ ' .
Do you realize how little it costs to add to your present elec- Then when you get up to 250 KWH a month, you rate (Jr—cg
trical comforts and conveniences with PP&L’s new low rates sharply down to only 6/10ths of a cent a kilowatt-hour. You can
for homes and farms? buy 600 KWH at this big-value, m ME I And if
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YOUR BUSINESS-MANAGED POWER, SYSTEM
mttobocooluweuuchtc.
The skirt and Inn-blouse are of dam
tin-blue cotton chambuy and the
perky blbbod peplmn In rod and
white ltrlpo. untenod with fix his
buttons. goes on or oil to suit the
wearer's uncy.
mimWICK COURIER-REPORTER
Job Prospects
Are Good Here
Kennewick has not felt the un
employment problem as yet, ac
cording to information received
from Fred L. Houston. Manager
of the local office of the United
States Employment Service. The
employment picture in the Pasco-
Kennewick area differs some
what from other points in the state
in that there is not as yet a short
age of work for either skilled at
unskilled workers. _ _ _
“The critical demand for rail
road workers still exists," Mr.
Houston stated this week. “With
in the next month replacement
of approximately sixty men will
be necessary if the various rail
roads in this community are to
continue functioning at their pres
ent peak of efficiency.” He added
that the classifications required
include B 8: B carpenters and
helpers, section ' hands, round
house helpers,- with breakmen,
switchmen and firemen especially
needed.
Skilled workmen in other estab
lishments are desired, 1%: auto
mechanics heading the fol-
JIFFY mm
mm SHOP
mu m {was
Specialising in non. m
6 Washington Street
W
lowed by sheetmetal workers and
shoe repairmen. Laundry and dry
cleaning facilities report a critical
shortage of help. both skilled and
unskilled.
Cooks.. waitresses and Janitors
who desire employment in this
locality would do well to contact
the local office for further inform
ation relative to positions in their
classifications. -
Job opportunities for women
are particularly promising as there
are several attractive stenographic
and general clerical positions
available for permanent residents.
In addition, there is a demand for
male cannery workers, Mr. Hous
ton reported.
In. You Know 1
That we repair, :
replace or rebuild
anything an to
electrical an d
ou r exchange
price on carbur
etors, generat
ors, and starters.
Saves more than
it costs.
Don
Foxal Studio
(PASCO, WASH.)
SEPTEMBER SPECIAL
On 810 d 14x6 ,
A§s.s"o viiuef’fiiny $2 00
Order Your
Pictures for Christmas Now!
For a sample of our work—see portraits
' at our Studio
OPEN EVERY DAY, AND EVENINGS r
WITH APPOINTMENTS .
Phone 619 tor Appointment
1023 Margaret St.—s blks. W. of Court House
BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS!
Thursday: September 6 I.“

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