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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, March 21, 1946, Image 9

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1946-03-21/ed-1/seq-9/

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Ken neWI ck . Dept. Sta re 5w Wm'fim "m
’ 347 Ave. 'U‘Emnhfie Highway “m 3115 f Men's Shoes, m g $5: w Infant’s got-“0N8
[county 59:35:38 Columnl
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‘ serwce Wlll be 1n
: Winston County and
Wu will be broad
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. .. ' . is service, or
Mm will be starting
. .. turd! 25th. Meetings with
' Wu held, and ther-
W‘“ for interested growers
1 M'mer information can
i new” at the .gents office. Below
‘1 at! . M Mons for orchard
, ”Wm; orchard heating
_., W have been pregared by
! mm. m, Yakima fruit grow
: mm" mm placed in orchard
; ”a may to ‘0 by the time apple
; or I!" bud clusters are starting
: to ma. A temperature of 23
66"“ my cause serious damage
.: atthilm
. my: accurate thermometers
f mu 4% feet above the ground
"W from the sky with shelter
‘ min: north. Paint. thermometer
; put white- Use Electric flash light
:13 m ".4162 thermometers. For
A 1 tin: oil heaters use mixture of
t WWW'“ --——' . ‘ -——-. '1
,= mmon snap _ .
Washington & Ave. C., Next Door to Tinny’s
, nearing-39pm
[Z Y ‘ l "
, 1 M g
Now: . Imm SAT.
“Alice Faye .
. hm Andrews '
-_ , ~ ‘v —in— . u
- - Tulle: Angel
SUN. - MON.
a ‘IT ALL CAME TRUE’
HunphreyWßo art
; m'snéridfn
ma - WED.
' Jinx Falkenburg
' Fred firmly
“MEET ME ON
BROADWAY”
A; STARTS THURSDAY
"m: LOST
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£2! mu
' WITH
'_ RS! Milland
Jule Wyman
E
. _.. . i
’- ' \
Help Wanted' +
‘ a ' . .'. . '0 j
Men or Women—-Day or Night Shift *
'11» processing of ASPARAGUS will start the FOREPART at
APRIL OUR EMPLOYEES are assured Of reasonably STEADY '
EMPLOYMENT until late in season (1945—Apr. lsth-Nov. 15th) '
Mlle processing Of— '
3' ASPARAGUS, PEAS, APRICOTS, PEACHES and SPINACH
THE LONGEST CONTINUOUS PERIOD OF SEASONAL
EMPLOYMENT IN THE KENNEWICK AREA \
We have made extensive ilnprovenlenls in
working conditions; new res! rooms. floors. m
-1 lei-ior finish, lighting and other convemenees.
PLEASE REGISTER NOW, either by PHONE or in PERSON,
both FORMER and NEW employees.
t CASCADE FROZEN FOODS, Inc.
Phone 3322 Kennewick. Wash Big 'Y' Bldg.
one-half kerosene and one-half
gasoline. For lighting coal heaters
use three-fourths stove oil or kero
sene and one-fourth gasoline. If
the flame does not follow down the
drip from the torch add more gas
oline. Examine lighting torch
safety screens to be sure they are
in good order. '
In fighting smoke screen type
heaters the first time at least it is
well to put a ball of paper, some
kindling or a handful of planer
shavings down the draft opening to
help ignite. Regular oil heater
lighting torches with single spout
will probably be more desirable
than the double spout briquet
torches.
When heaters have been lighted
hold the temperature at least one
or two degrees above danger
point. On anticipated frost nights,
ascertain the dew point from the
evening weather bureau forecast
and maintain safer temperatures
when the dew point is 30 degrees
‘or below. The lower the dew point
the more damage will result at a
given temperature. If the sky is
FRI. - SAT. ‘
“NOTORIOUS LONE
~ WOLF” '
Gerald Mohr '
' Janis Carter
_and
“STAGE COACH TO
.MONTEREY”
- mm
Allan Lane ‘
Peggy Stewart
SUN. - MON. - TUES
Joan Leslie
Robertinflutton
“TOO YOUNG TO
' KNOW” ‘-
WED. - THURS.
“SONG OF MEXICO”
. wrm » .
Adele Mara ;
Edgar Marrier ;
—and- . .
Preston Foster , - ‘
. ....
\ 'Roger Touhy.
- . n
* Gangster
__ _
_
hazy or if there are clouds along
the eastern horizon it may be
necessary to continue heating one
half hour or more after sunrise.
Cherries are often killed when
the buds have swollen enough to
show green on the tips, by temper
atures of around 20 degrees. If this
happens the subsequent blossoms
may look normal, but if an open
the embryo cherry will be found
brown or black. It is well to ex
amine cherry buds and blossoms to
see if they are uninjured before
heating them. .
0n five acres or more in com
pact formation the number of heat
ers should notbelessthanßOper
acre for coal, 40 per acre for 10-
quart lard pails if provision is
made to refuel while burning,”
otherwxse 80, twice as many five
quart lard pails, or 20 modified
government smoke screen pots.
Border on side or sides from which
draft comes should be a row of
heaters 10 feet apart for all types
except smoke screen pots which
should be' 20' feet apart.
Blocks of less than five acres or
long narrow tracts require addi
tional heaters. It is very difficult
to heat a single or double row of
trees. Have fuel enough available
to heat through the iron season.
Advantages and proper methods
of use. of- sprinkler irrigation on
crops in Benton County are dis
cussed in a new bulleti now avail
:ible at the county extension of
ce.
The bulletin is titled “Sprinkler
Irrigation” and was prepared by
Gustav H. Bliesner, assistant ex
tensmn engineer, at the State Col
lege of Washington.
In recent years, use of rink
ler irrigation has increase?!l con--
siderably in certain areas of the
state. This practice has several
advantages it is pointed out. These
include less labor in preparation
of land, adaptability to hilly and
unlevel land and -to soil types
‘ where the flooding and ditch types
‘ are not suitable, distribution of
1 soluble fertilizers and prevention
3 of frost damage on some crops.
Farmers considering sprinkler
} irrigation will need to carefully
study all the advantages of the
system and the proper method in
installation. The sprinkler irriga.
tion bulletin discusses the setting
up of the system. proper methods
0 operation, source of power, pos
siblesourcesofwaterandeco—
nomic advantages and disadvan
tages of its use.
Washington, the state with cli
mates ranging from Maine to Tex.
as in severity, is a difficult one for
horticulturists to make hard and
fast rules about. But there are
some crops which will do,well in
“victory” gardens all over the
state, observes John Dodge,’asust
ant extension horticulturist‘ at the
State College of Washington.
msorn is good anywl'iehre, suites
garden saehlist. eear er
varieties are tter Where the sea
son is short; such types as the
Spancross and Seneca are espec
ially suitable in the eastern coun
. ties. The horticulturist suggests
that the home gardener follow this
general rule for a long-term, var
ied harvest of the golden ears:
Start with Spancross or Seneca, as
soon as planting is safe (late April
or early in May in .Western and
lower central Washington; early
June in eastern and northern areas
and later (May 15 in,west or cen
tral;gune 15-20 in east or north)
plan such hybrids as Carmelcross,j
Marcross or Koldencross, to give
a succession of harvests for six‘
weeks or so. ', ‘
. Snap bean do well all over the
state. Bush-varieties are good for
eastern Washington and pole beans
for western areas. Pole beans are
more productive and bear for a
longer period, points out Dodge.
_____________.__
_
m m" mum-mom
gags—e 4;
but they are subject to the curly
top blight, prevalent east of the
mountains.
Potatoes can be grown wherever
there is room. Different varieties
for early new spuds can be put in.
TheSebagoisresistanttotbelate
blight, and hence is good for west
ern Washington where there is a
lot of this fungus. In the drier
parts of eastern Washington, the
Katahdinisgood,asisalatepo.
tato like the Netted Gem. The Kat
ahdin does not set as many tubers
as some others, but they are larg—
er and less inclined to be rough
in shape.
Send for your seeds now, con
cludes Dodge, and start preparing
the ground and planning your ac
reage. Extension Bulletin 280 “Vic
tory Gardens.” can be supplied
free by your county extension
agent. It contains much useful in
formation about which varieties
do best in your particular part of
the state, and how much to plant
for your size of famnl' y.
Union Pacific Issues
Vacation Land Folder
Attractions of Mount Hood, the
Columbia River Gorge, the Ore
gon Caves, Mount Rainier and the
Olympic Mountains are set forth
in a new illustrated leaflet. “West
ern Vacation Lands." issued by
the Union Pacific Railroad, ac
cording to J. C. Cumming, gen
eral passenger agent.
The new folder .contains a big
pictorial map of the vacation
lands-of the entire West and in
formation about Yellowstone,
Zion. Grand Canyon and other
national parks. It. can be ob
tained from any city ticket oil‘lce
or from the general once of the
Union Pacific at Portland. Cum
ming said.
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Holy Land Pictures
To Feature Program
The Methodist Men's Brother
hood will hold its March dinner
program on Tuesday evening at
8:30 in Epworth Hall. and will
have for its main program fea
ture Rev. Oliver Arams of Pasco
and? pictures taken in the Holy
This new men’s club of the
church was organized in January
and held its annual banquet a
month ago with nearly a hundred
At the regular meetings the men
will bring potéluck eam from home
and a dinner committee will pre
pare for the serving. Herman
Campbell is general dialer chair
man and Gilbert Cl elter will
head the March committe. Earle
Pence is chairman of the program
plans. Dudley Randal is the presi
dent. .
NEW SECRETARY
At an executive meeting of the
Washington State Cattle associa
tion in Spokane recently, Joe Muir.
extension animal husbandman of
Washington State College was ap
pointed secretary-treasurer to re
places Walter Tolman, resigned.
Platt Ballaine & Sons
Well Drilling
‘ . Complete line of
1 22 Benton St., Tel. M
Kennewick .
A . I . C -
Plumbing Supplies
Sales & Service
Complete Stock of
WASHING MACHINE PARTS
MD WHO! and SONS
COLUMBIA AT FRUITLAND Phone 3311
How would you I
CHART YOUR COURSE?
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