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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, June 26, 1947, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1947-06-26/ed-1/seq-6/

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6
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A FREE GAS MASK AND
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to‘every Scout, if identified by either parents,
scoutmaster or upon presentation of Scout
Credentials.
' Approximately 100' to he
" _ Distributed ’
, ‘ . ~ .
Makes Fine Scout Gear Pack for Carnping
CALL EARLY FOR YOURS .
' —at the.— I .
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" Complete Line of Hardware
480 AVENUE C .
Open Week Days 8:30 A. M. to 8:30 P. M.
Sundays 10 .A. M. to 6 P. M. i
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ment, facilities. It’s wholly guaranteed.
THE TIME“ SHOP
OUR NEW LOCATION
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|Momefles Attend
iSiale 44* Can‘t!!!
Two Richland girls, Hope Lig
gett and Shirley Woehle, were
delegates to the 23rd annual state
4-H club camp held on the Wash
ington State College campus at
Pullman last week. The girls are
active members of the 4-H Atom-1
ettes, and hold the oflices of pres
ident and vice president, respecty
ively of their club. ‘
On the morning of the 16th, they
with three other girls from Benton
City, Margaret Kerr, Betty Weber
iand Doris Kraus, left Kennewick
in cars driven by Miss Loretta
Cowden and D. S. James, Exten
sion Agent from Kennewick.
Many interesting things were
done and many worth while things
learned during the following week.
The two girls studied Tips to
Toastmasters, Recreation, Crafts,
Parliamentary Procedure and ra
dio. They both participated in
the state 4-H club orchestra.
The week came to a climax with
a trip to Moscow, Idaho, to the
college there and then to a dance
Friday evening.
The delegates returned home
Saturday, June 23.
Western
Horse Heaven
.37 Mrs. 6111 Tan.
Th Horse Heaven Home Ec club
held their annual picnic Sunday
at the Prosser park. There was
not as large an attendance as could
have been expected due to har
yest so near, but a good time was
reported. Guests from out of town
were Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Mcßee
and daughter Diane of Kahlotus,
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Dorothy of Ken
newick, Mrs. Elinor Minnick and
son David and Miss Anna Mcßee.
Mrs. Guy Travis came home
Saturday evening from Walla Wal
la, where she was a delegate to‘
)the-annual encampment of the V 3
IFW and Auxiliary. Some of the.
highlights of the convention were
‘visits to the Veterans hospital, the
penitentiary, the adaption of Na
tional President Mrs. Sally Cannon
into the Nez Perce tribe, the an
nual banquet and ball, not to men
tion the delegates various bands,
who entertained the delegates and
the Cootie and encampment par
ades. Louis Starr, national com
mander of the VFW was present
also and gave s‘ome tine talks. Mrs.
Travis was a guest of the George
Smith family during the 4-day
convention. 7 _
~ ‘Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Fouch, for
mer residents, were visitors here
Monday enroute to Yakima from
Santa Ana, Calif., where they
spent the winter and spring. The
Fouchs plan to visit in the East
this summer but will return to
Washington as their daughter Hel
en will enter college at Pullman
this fall. Mr. Fouch in years gone
by, lived also in the Locust Grove
community. _ - . ‘
Thetis Borden and garents were
guests Thursday and riday of the,
Louis Tyacke family in Prosser,
while Thetis was recuperating
from a tonsilectomy performed
Thursday morning by Dr. Wood.
Mr. and Mrs”. Eric Cooper and
daughter are in Bellingham this
week' to attend a convention of
the 1.0.0. F.
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Anderson
and- children were in Yakima Sun
day where they attended the auto
races.
John Moon began harvesting
Monday of this week. From all
reports he is the first to have grain
ready to thresh. The crop is in
the southern part of the commun
ity and has ripened early.
ifiECORDS
Phonograph Records shipped
anywhere. Big stock classics.
Popular, Western. Write for
lists, information.
CON“ RECORD SHOP -
911 2nd Ave: _ Segttle 4, Wash,
MA 3434
Are You Hungry? "
For Something Good -,to Eat?
Attend
THE FOOD SALE
S. & J. Motors Bldg.
Saturday, June 28th
Sponsored by
s:.‘ Elizabeth Altar Society
AUCTION SALE
To be sold at Kennewick Com
munity Auction at 2:45 P. Mes
Saturday. June 28:
3 bedsteods. springs and.
mattresses. 4 rocking chairs.
several straight chairs. tab
les. heating stove. coal range.
dressers. lawn mower. gard
en tools. ' dishes. cooking
utensils. Hotpoint~ Electric
Range in good condition and
other articles too numerous
to mention. ,
MYRTLE McGILVRA,
Owner
Morel Russell. Austioneer
A‘ C. Amon. Clerk
KENNEWICK (W ASH.) COURIER-REPORTER
County Agéni's
Column
BY DAVID JAMES
The farmers of the Benton City
and Prosser areas will elect their
officers for the West Benton Soil
Conservation District June 27.
The polling places will be as fol
lows: Benton City voting will be
at_ the Community Hall; Whitstran
area will be at the Whitstran
grade school and the Buena Vista
voting will be held at the Buena
‘Vista grange hall. All polling
places will be open from seven to
|nine_ p.m_. _ ‘ _ __
Miss Loretta Cowden, Home
Demonstration Agent, and the rep
resentatives from the Benton 4-H
clubs and I returned Saturday
from the state 4-H club camp at
Pullman. The club members were
Hope Liggett and Shirley Woehle
of Richland; and Doris Kraus,
‘Margaret Kerr and Betty Weber
of Benton City. The state 4-H club
program was devoted to 4-H club
leadership. Our delegates were
on a. radio program last Wednes
day and at that time our girls were
interviewed regarding their par
ticipation at the state 4-H club
camp. Hope and Shirley both led
discussion groups at the camp;
Hope, Shirley and Margaret were
in the orchestra. Betty Weber
represented this county in the Cit
izenship ceremony. Doris Kraus
was one of the members who put
out the daily camp paper “The
Owl.” All girls reported they had
a fine time and had brought back
many ideas to use in their club
work and in other organizations.
With mint becoming one of Ben
ton county’s important crops, ex
periments are being carried out
by the Extension Office and the
State College at Pullman. The
experiment plots are on the farms
of Henry York and Lee Hilde
brand. We are trying to deter
mine the best time to harvest the
mint, so that a' high Optical Rota
tion and oil content will be had,
and at the same time receive the
best possible production. I am
taking tests every week and will
*continue Intil the final harvest of i
the crop. It is hoped by the end‘
’of this year that we will have‘
something definite for the mintl
lgrowers of the. area.
In the near future we are plan
ning another weed school, and at
that time I will have a represen
tative from the Aprco Company,
that manufactures the machine
which they claim will' kill the
weed by electrical current. This
machine has been demonstrated
at Pullman and other places and
the results have been fair. How
ever, at the time of the school we
willhaveanopportunitytoseethe
machine in use in our area.
I also _hope that at that time
we will have a new chemical that
18 also used in the control of weeds.
In the past few months many new
ghfmicals have been very success
u .
Again I wish to remind you
that we are having our fair, and
please save any products that have
been grown on your farms for the
agricultural display.
888 CLUB
Fifteen members of the 5.8.8.
Club met at the Highland club
house on June 18, in a meeting
conducted by Mr. Switzer. Visit
ors from Oregon attended. . {
Bob -Pyle gave a short talk on
the recent hayride and weiner‘
roast which followed the election
of oflicers for the 2H Pep club at
Benton Ci . Iver Eliason spoke
on the clu .’s mountain camp. The
meeting was adjourned with the
pledge. 3
The next meeting will be held
on July 2.: nos Pyle will speak. \
NOTICE TO CREDITORS ‘
No. 2604 ‘
In the Superior'Court .of the State
of Washington in and for Ben
ton County. .
In the Matter of the Estate of
a NANNIE BURFEIND, Deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned has been ap
pointed and has qualified as ex-
Fecutrix of the Estate of Nannie
Burfeind, Deceased, that all per
sons having claims against said
deceased are hereby required to
serve the same, duly verified, on
said executrix or her attorney of
record at the address below stat
ed, and file thé same with the
Clerk of the above entitled Court,
together with proof of such ser
vice, within six months. after the
date of first mblication of this,
notice or the same will be barred.
Date of first publication June
12, 1947.
Miriam Cong Williamson, Ex:
ecutrix of said Estate,
Address: Orting, Wash. 1
Kenneth E. Serier, ‘
Attorney for said Executrix, .
'Address: Penney Building,
Kennewick, Washington.
6:12-7:14
mas—N
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Science Finds Why Hogsl
Like Yellow Corn Best
Hog raisers long contended
there was something contained in!
yellow corn which was lacking in‘
white corn. They knew because
hogs liked yellow corn better and
fattened faster on it. Finally, the
scientists named the difference.
One of the factors bresent in yel
low corn is carotene—nutritionists
the world over now know the val
ue of carotene. Horsemen for
years past have raised carrots for
harness, saddle and race horses.
Carrots are rich in carotene; oats
and hay are deficient. Horsemen
now know why they fed carrots.
So it goes. Science explains the
reasons back of many old customs.
(From Grocery Manufacturers of
America, Inc.)
FARM LABOR ms
Another quiet week at the Farm
Labor Office, only a few orders
from farmers for men to hoe mint,
grapes and asparagus. Apricots
are being picked but there is little
acreage and a very light crop. No
orders for additional help.
Picking of early potatoes is ex
pected to start on or before the
first of July. A steady flow of
migrants is passing through the
oflice each day. Few stay.
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION
[n the Superior Court of the
State of Washington, in and
for Benton County
EUGENE L. ABBOTT, Plantiff
vs.
.VIABEL L. ABBOTT, Defendant.‘
THE STATE OF WASHINGTON“
To the Said Mabel L. Abbottp
Defendant: 1
You are hereby summoned to
appear within sixty days after
the date of the first publication
of this summons, to-wit: within
sixty days after the 26th day of
June, 1947, and defend the above
entitled action in the above en
titled Court, and answer the
Complaint of the plaintiff and
serve a copy of your Answer
upon the undersigned, attorneys
for plaintiff at their office below
stated, and in case of your fal
zure so to do,. judgment will be
rendered against you according
to the demand of the Complaint,
which has been filed with the
Clerk of the above entitled Court. .
The object of this action is to?
secure a decree of divorice for
the plaintiff from the defendantl
andtoawardtohim thecustody
of the minor child of the par
ties.
MOULTON 8; POWELL and
THOMAS B. GESS.
Attorneys for Plaintiff,
Office and P. 0. Address,
Box 125, Kennewick, Benton
County, Washington.
‘ 6:26-7:31
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will: Convenient, Economical Troupelmlu
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recently improved scheduler. changing any
‘ departure and arrival times. Ask your local but
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Greyhound Liner will take you where you went
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Setnple Low Bur Peres from Kennewick
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SEATTLE S 4.85 S 0.15
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WATCHES .. 4.15 8.55
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———____————-———-W—
--. KENNEWICK BUS DEPOT
Benton & Avenue C ' Phone 2581 '
m G REY HO U N D
Thursday Jun. ‘ 1|"

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