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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, June 23, 1949, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1949-06-23/ed-1/seq-5/

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Mrs. Robbins
Is Elected
Mrs. Norman Robbins of the
Kennewick Highlands has the
honor of being elected to the
state presidency of the Washing
ton Federated Clubs which met
in convention last week in Ever
ett. Installation 01 officers took
L place on Friday. '
Mrs. Robbins, long active in
club work has served for the
past two years as first vice presi
dent of the State Federation. She
has also served as. treasurer. and
as director, and has held the of
fice of president in the ngima
Valley Federation and of the
President’s Council of Tacoma.
Mrs. Robbins home member
ship is in the Pasco club, the
Kennewick club having been dis
continued during war time.
BANK TO OPEN '
Richland's second bank. the
National Bank of Commerce
opened for business Monday
morning. Bert L. Sellin, formerly
assistant manager at Ellens
burg. is manager. ' -
"All [I "G ,
F' E l D. .._.e ;
CMC trucks . . . light, medium and heavy duty, gasoline and
Diesel. . . are the best truck buy you can make. So are genu
ine GMC parts. And so is GMC specialized truck service.
GMC trucks and parts are products of the world’s largest
exclusive commercial 'vehicle manufacturer . . . and they
benefit from the advantages of the industry’s finest engineer
ing and production facilities. ' .
Our GMC service offers special truck tools and machines
0 e e truck-trained mechanics who are experts on all makes
. . e constant parts supply from GMC’s nation-wide network
of parts warehouses. There's nothing in trucks or truck serv
ice better than GMC. See us for all your truck needs.
Strickler Motors
~ 13 Washington St.
I, -' 1"“ I
I a / ~
Evidence that Rainier is the "favorite brand" ' /,4
of Westerners is indicated by the fact that
Rainier leads all other brands in sales. 4%”;
In the We“ it.“
BEERit
—’f
SICKS’ SPOKANE BREWERY, INC. SPOKANE
HILL 3: MUNDELI. msmaurme co. ‘ ''—
Kennewick Walla Walla
Benfon C ounfy Agenf’s Column
C. r. WEBSTER
_Acfing Epctengion Agmt
I believe that farmers should
consider the economic condition
,as they go‘ through their farming
year. Outline highlights at the
present time briefly are these:
Industry production in April was
3 per cent below March, 5 per
cent below April, 1948, 8 per cent
below the post-war peak of Oc
tober, 1948. Declines are general
among both durable and non
durable industries.
Employment rose 200,000 from
March to April but was still half
a-million below a year earlier.
All gains were recorded on
farms. Nonfarm employment in
early April was down 300,000 be
low March. On the first of May
about 3'million are unemployed.
Wholesale prices in late May
average about the same as in
late April, a drop of about 5% in
the last year. Prices received by
farmers in mid-May were 11
per cent below May. 1948. and
17% below the peak price period
of January, 1948. Prices paid by
farmers including interest and
taxes have eased only slightly in
recent months and had dropped
only 2% in the last year. Total
personal income dropped for the
third straight month. frices paid
by urban customers in contrast
to prices in farm and wholesale
markets, continue at near record
levels. In short, this means that
the farmers are receiving almost
a fifth less for their products, but
city buyers are paying practical
ly the same prices they paid a
year ago. This situation will
probably continue for the rest of
1949.
COCCIDIOSIS IN TURKEYS
Turkey growers should be on
the outlook for appearance of
coccidiosis in their young birds,
according to Frank Webster,
county extension agent. '
He said that during the next
three months this disease, which
makes turkeys unthrifty, is most
likely to strike the flock and do
the most damage.
Poults from 5 to 16 weeks old
are usually the most susceptible.
Symptoms are usually dropped
wings, listlessness, : and ruffled.
feathers. The birds may also
have a diarrhea condition. ’Fur
ther details are available by
contacting the county extension
office and asking for a copy of
Poultry Pointers No.‘ 6, “Coccidio- ‘
sis in Chickens and Turkeys.” 1
Webster says it is important‘
‘that turkey growers watch their
‘ birds every day now. At the first
signs of suspecting coccidiosis,
he suggests getting a quick and
accurate diagnosis at the near
est poultry disease diagnostic
laboratory.
Sanitary measures in the
brooder house are important‘ in
avoiding coccidiosis. The litter
should be cleaned out often and
kept _dry. Several of the sulfa
drugs appear to give good results
in control of the disease. The
manufacturer gives complete di
rections and these should be
followed carefully, the agent
said. He warned that neither a
“flush” nor any other medicine
should be given while the birds
are being treated with sulfa.
SLEEPING SICKNESS IN
HORSES . _ __
Warm weather means that the
danger of sleeping sickness in
horses will soon "the around
again, according to Frank Web
ster, county extension agent.
He said horse owners should
keep a constant guard against
the disease. The fact that ani
mals in an area were not affect
ed last year is no assurance that
the disease will not appear this
year.
He said the disease strikes
especially hard near rivers,
lakes, marshes and 'seashores,
where insects are most numer
ous. Prolonged hot weather adds
to the danger. ~ Sleeping sickness
is mostly a disease of animals.
grazing or workout outdoors, but
it does occur sometimes in sta
bled animals. , A _ _ _
The agent said sleeping sick
ness is hard for an untrained
person to identify. The symp
toms maybe similar to other
diseases, like moldy corn poison
in‘g, heat stroke or rabies.
The real answer, he said, is
prevention. Sleeping sickness
can be prevented almost 100 %
by vaccination at the proper
Kennewick
time. which usually means be
fore July 1.
He said other p cautions are
always advisabl Mosquito
breeding places sh uld be clean
ed out, or chemically treated to
kill the insects. Nets could be
used on working animals and
stables could be screened. And
compounds that repel insects
could be used on animals and
premises to help keep insects
away. __
cluuu 10 cows ON
mswnz ,-
Now that pasture-season is un
derway many dairymen find
that their milk production is go
ing down. Ask them how much
grain their cows are eating and
the answer is often this: “The
cows are getting so much grass
they won’t clean up their grain."
That answer is the clue to the
trouble, according. to Frank
Webster, county extension agent.
Cows can eat only about 150
pounds of grass 3. day. This
, amount contains 16 pounds or
digestible nutrients, but a cow
producing 50 pounds of 4 per
cent milk needs 24 pounds of
nutrients. This means the cow
should eat 10 pounds of grain in
addition to the grass she gets to
provide the nutrients she needs
or she is going to give less milk.
The agent suggests that one
way to handle the situation is
to bring the cows in from pas
ture an hour or so before milking
time so they will be hungry
enough to eat their grain.
He said the dairyman needs to ‘
rate his pasture in order to know ‘
how much grain to feed. A pas
ture of dark green . palatable
grasses about four inches high is
considered excellent. A cow will ‘
fill up on this kind of pasture‘
in about 1% hours and get 16‘
pounds of digestible nutrients
from it. This is enough to main
tain her body and produce. 25
pounds of- four per cent milk. ‘
A pasture rated “good” will
supply the cow with 13 pounds
of nutrients, or enough to pro
duce 16 pounds of milk above her
body requirements. Pasture with
_a “fair” rating supplies enough
Lieed for six pounds of milk. But
b“poor" pasture will just about
;maintain. the cow; any milk she
‘gives must come from her body
requirements or from hay and
gram.
The agent passed along a for
mula provided by Roger Morri
son, atssistant extension dairy
man a the State college, on how
to adjust the grain level on each
cow according to her needs after
the dairyman rates his pasture:
“A cow giving 4% milk needs
about ‘ls of a pound of digestible
nutrients for each pound of milk.
This means one pound of grain
for each 2% pounds of milk.
Those of you having cows testing
3 per cent should feed one pound
of grain for each 3 pounds of
milk produced overthat .provid
ed by the pasture; Cows testing
5 % require one pound of grain
for each 2 pounds of milk not
supplied by the pasture. ‘
“After grading your pasture
subtract the pounds of milki it
will produce from the amount
given by each cow. Divide the
remaining pounds of milk by
two, 2% or 3, depending upon
the buttertat test, and you will
have the amount of grain she
should have.” _
Farewell For
The Deeters
Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Deeter, who
are leaving Friday for their new
home in Blaine, have Been hon
ored with a number or farewell
social attairs. _ ’ ‘ _ _
On Tuesday evening, of last
week the National Bank. of Com
merce staff were hosts at a din.
ner for their pleasure at the Rivi
era Supper club and presented
Mr. Deeter with a gift. On Thurs
day evening Mr. and Mrs. E. S.
Black and Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Witt entertained at dinner in the
Black home, also ,bestowing a
gift as a farewell compliment.
The Pinochle club gave a party
on - Saturday evening at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Sherry. First prize was won by
Mr. Sherry and second by Mr.
Deeter and a gift went to the
honored guests. Hosts on Wed
nesday were Mr. and Mrs. Grant
Chapman who entertained at a
social evening.
Know. don'f guess
Do you know {llai' all _your
proporly is adoquaioly insured
against ovary hazard which can
bring you a ioial or crippling
loss? ’
If you are no! sure. lef {his
Hartford agency help you will!
friendly counsel. _
'Fyfe &
Spaulding. Inc.
Phéne 123!
2| l Kenn. Ave.
I] 7 ' KENNEWICK (’7'-
_‘ cougusmspoma j
Tliurs., June 23
Fred Clark Is
City Building
Inspector
Fred Clark, a civil engineer
who once was employed by Gen
eral Electric at Richland, has
been appointed by the city coun
cil as Kennewick building in
spector. He has taken over his
duties.
' Clark, a graduate in engineer
ing of the University of Illinois,
taught in the Pasco city schools
but has been practicing engi
neering on his own the past year.
He lives in the Fyfe addition in
West Kennewick.
City Superintendent R. C. Rec
tor said Clark’s duties would be
to check all new construction in
the city, see that builders have
building permits before starting
new construction. He said the
ordinance on building would be
enforced as to types of buildings
in different zones, sanitation,
fire protection, and appearance
in line with city planning.
Clark will also do routine en
gineering jobs for the city and
draft plumbing and electrical
codes for the city. One of his
first duties will be to inspect all
walks and recommend repairs.
The human eyeball has three
coats serving three purposes:
protective, vascular and sensory.
PROFESSIONAL AND SERVICE DIRECTORY
ABSTRACTS
BENTON COUNTY
ABSTRACT & T 111! 60.
216 Kenn. Ave. Phone 6161
' ACCOUNTANTS
SD M. PETRASK
' Licensed Public Accountant
Bookkeeping—lncome Tax
Richmond Bldg.
Phone 4401 —. Kennewch
1 .
1
ERNEST. n. CBUTCHEII
ACCOUNTANT
Income Tax Consultant _
Room 3—Wash. Hdw. Bldg. ,
Phone Kenn. 6201
}
v.l. museum
‘ ACCOUNTANT ‘
Complete Bookkeeping
. Tax Service '
Phone 436 7 Cascade
I. H. WILLIAMS (:0.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS--
410 W. Columbia Street
Phone 6532 . Pasco
. 1 All! SERVICE
I G. _I. FLIGHT TRAINING _ I
HUNTING FISHING
RIDES CHARTER
‘wnsnma'rou smnrs
Pasco Phone 3732
WIN CITY AIRPORT
All Kinds Flying Instruction
Seaplane Instruction
Charter Service
Gasoline and Repairs .
On Nob Hill Phone 5531 ‘
AMBULANCE SERVICE \
MUELLER.
, FUNERAL HOME
DAY OR NIGHT PHONE
2201 or 2401
314 First Avenue
APPLIANCE REPAIRS ‘
EXPERT ‘
'N C E
,9U A f
/ \ F“? \R 5 o:2] !
«\Q E? A o
’_A \ Q~ R .
as“ .R .
m ~‘\ 1:" 1‘
Al‘s cnnrsn .
WASIIING MACHINE
SERVICE
902 S. 11th Pasco
Dial 2731 Kenn. 1-7550
ATTORNEYS
i _ HUGH _3. non-ron
‘ " ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
303 Kennewick Avenue
Phone 8721 Kennewick
Commercial Prim‘ing
Kennewick Prinfing Co.
217 Kennewick Ave. .
5
5 SALES
3mm
Horse Heaven ,
Horse Heaven, June 21—At
tending the Biékleton picnic
Tuesday were the Frank Rich
man family. Frank Green. Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert Quillen, Mr.
and Mrs. Elmer Smith, Mr. and
Mrs. Guy Travis. the Harold
Headys, Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Han
son and the Claude Youngs and
Claude Richmans. Mrs. Elmer
Smith-was one of the chaperones
for the Benton county fair queen.
Miss Barbara Wells. and her
court.
Mr. and Mrs. Chester Henson
and daughter Caralee returned
Thursday from their three-week
trip by plane to the east coast.
On Friday Chester. Dennis Hen
son and Ray Gould joined a
flight to Yakima where they had
luncheon.
Grass fires have burned over
a large area on the Horse Heaven
hills back of Prosser and back
of Kiona. A great deal or the pas
ture used by various members
or the Stampede for their horses
was destroyed.
Reports are out that the elec
tric lines have been strung in
part of this community, but as
yet, the lines have not been wir
ed in the western end of the
country.
Guy Travis was a visitor
Thursday at the W. C.’ Travis
home in Prosser, to see his cous
in. Nat Travis, who was leaving
that day to return to his home
in Santa Ana, Calif.. after a
week's visit here with his par
ents and brother and sister.
ATTORNEYS
“001.108. POWELL
and GESS
Office in Owen’s Bldg.
300 W. Kenn. Ave.
Phone 761
nossnr. n. monsoon ‘
ATTORNEYoAToLAW
106 N. sth St. Pasco
Phone Pasco 4601
_ an n. semen
" A’I'I'ORNEY-ATLAW
16 Kennewick Ave. East
Columbia Bldg.
Office 2971 - ~ _ Res. 2951
. W. I. am ‘
A'i'i‘OßNEY-AT-LAW
. Title & Trust Bldg.
Pasco Phone 5579
“I
cllsß. I'. 3103326:
' . A'I'rORNEY-A'r-LAW.
j ' 323 Avenue G
A Phone 1408 Kennewick
W
#
" 1m: mu
ATIORNEY-AT-LAW
P. O.Box673.Pasco.Wn. '
Phones: -
Office 3632 Home 4082
W
AUTOMOTIVE
___——
‘ '_cum' _ ‘
AUTO SERVICE 1
Guaranteed Service ‘
. on All Care I: Trucks t
15 N.- Auburn Phone 1001 ‘
' DON SWING!
Am a. arsenic same:
14 N. Auburn Phone 881
' mum SHOPS
1111.11“
BEAUTY 8808
107 Avenue C
Kennewick Phone 4906
Evening Work By
Appointment Only _
CLEANING
‘ Ic. x wrunow
CLEANING SERVICE
Venetian Blinds Cleaned '
Janitor Service, Floor Waxing
Kennewick and Pasco
Phone Kenn. 4746

821.? YOURSELF Lamar
COLUMBIA WASHI?!“
HOURS: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday thru Friday 7
(Across from Sa 1 Motor): .
Phone 1941
#
, SPIC ’N’ SPAN
PHONE
PASCO
CLEANERS
Mr. and Mrs. Eric Cooper re
turned last week from Spokane
where they attended the session
of state grange. Mr. Cooper is
master of the local organization.
C. L. Chipman of the L and D
Flying service was a visitor to
the community Thursday and
Friday in the interests of poison
spraying for mice control. Chip
man and Sampson had planned
to try out their rain making ap
paratus Thursday but the cloud
formations were not exactly right
for success. Glen King had the
flying service spread poisoned
Now Available—
JEWISH RYE BREAD
If you want a taste treat fry “II: no ' special"!
Both White and Sour Rye are mllabk.
Buy If 'Where You See "- Baked!
NEWMHN’S
G oonv
» oon
BAKERY
" " Between Bunch-Pianist” and Gates Cafe
Phone 2702 219 Ave. 3
COLD STORAGE LOCKERS
ELLIO'IT'S MEAT MARKET
Lockers for Rent
‘ Retail Wholesale
Phone 4181 202 W. Lewis
‘ Pasco
{ ELECTRICIANS
COLUMBIA merino
ALEX BEER, Prop.
Electric Supplies
Maytag Parts and Service
Phone 3201 16 Kenn. Ave.
1 FARM SERVICE
2. s. JOHNSON
GRAIN DEALER
Telephone 3324 Pasco
505 West Léwis Pasco
FILM SERVICE
continua pnoro us
415 Avenue C
8-Hour Film Service
In at 9:oo—Out a 1: 5:00
FLOWERS
.0 Table Arrangements
‘ Wedding Flowers
' ! Funeral Designs
.- Plants and Giltware "
! Flowers by Wire
KENNEWICK
. FLOWER SHOP
FI‘D MEMBER
Phone 1856 So. 17 Cascade ‘
leg cams"
mum ICE CO.
Block _& Crushed Ice
Deflvered Anywhere
in Twin Cities "
Ph. 6191 125 Wash. St. N.
INSURANCE
_ YEDICA
mSURANCE AGENCY
ALL RISK COVERAGE
Room 9 Bateman Bldg.
Phone 5301 Kennewick
MOVING STORAGE
‘mcnunn 'mnsr-‘sn ,
Local and Statewide Moving
Fireproof Storage
Agent North American
‘ Van Lina '
Phone 942 11 E. Kenn. Ave.
OPTOMETRIS‘I’S
DR. H. C. CURRY '
» Buttered Optometrist l
w
Eyes Examined
Glasses Fitted
Broken Lenses Duplicated
Established Many Years
Optical Office at Residence
402 First Ave.
Corner of Dayton St.
Phone 1361
DB.- CLARK DURHAM
OPTOMETRIST
Eyes Examined
Lenses Duplicated
9 80. Dayton Kennewick
Phone 6241
wheat for mice on his place thl
week.
Luncheon guests at the R. 1
Wooden home Wednesday we:
Mrs. Mabel Meek and Mrs. l
M. White of Prosser and Mn
Guy Travis. Mrs. Meek um
over to attend Grange meetin
that evening. in which mepori
were given of the state gran:
convention. Meetings will be dir
continued: until October. . a
William Medley of Oregon 1
at the home of his cousin; 123115
Wooden. where he is helping '
install a sink and bathroom i
the basement rooms.
DB. HAROLD E. OLSON
OPTOMETRIST
Analytical Eye Examinations
Complete Optical Services _
by Appointment , _
210 N. 4th St., Pasco, Ph. 3881
"synapses ' -
SPOKESKAN 3mm
AGENT FOR .
Call 1812 Kennewick
PHOTOGRAPHY ' '
; PHOTOGRAPHY
l COLWIIA more m‘
} 415 Ave. c Ph. 2086
___-"_-
’ PLUMBING
Everythin in Plumbln
andgHeating ‘
1 STANDARD PLUMBING -
HEATING & SUPPLY. . A
For Free Estimates Ph. 8921
or see Ira H. McClearen. W.
Kenn Ave., Kennewidt. ,
Residence 18 Pacific St,
*—
RADIO sauna: "
was none: or annex
Exceptional Radio Repair on
Home and Auto Radios" "
Authorized RCA-Victor Dealer
Phone 6251 119 Flat Ail".
' c. A. mm» A _—-
Lieensed Real Estate ’i: “
maker ‘ ~ '.'“ pl.
108 First Ave. East ‘ s‘:
Kennewick Phone 701“:
~ cameraman smack-r.
mas-ran
mcmnon ‘ ,-
‘_ . 320 Ave. C East "
: Phone 2998 'l,
neuron semen ‘ ‘1 7
ms EI-LAND
RADIATOR SERVICE ,
1% Miles West or 111-Land I
Drive-In Theater
Hudnal Road
Repairing, Cleaning and ,
Re-Corlng
SHOE REPAIRING .
me sion nosrmu. '
116 Kenn. Ave. Phone 1944
Expert Workmanship
Men’s Work Shoes for Sale ' j
___—.l
TITLE INSURANCE -
WASHINGTON TITLE ~- -
INSURANCE CO. '
216 Kenn. Ave. Phone 6161
VETERINARIANS
DR. I. I. PREDERICKSON
Residence No. Stevens Drive 1 _
Phone 263-J—Rlchland

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