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The Kennewick courier-reporter. [volume] (Kennewick, Wash.) 1939-1949, October 21, 1949, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093044/1949-10-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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who Kennemirkl'Qlnurier-anrtrr
Issued Thursdays by The Kennewick Printing Company
217 Kennewick Ave., Kennewick, Washington
Member Washington. Newspaper. Publishers Association. Inc.
WW
$3 year in Benton County. $4 outside. Entered as second class
matter April 2. 1914 at P. O. Kennewick. Wash., under Act of
March 3, 1879. The Courier. established March 27. 1902; The
Reporter. established Jan. 24. 1906. consolidated April 1, 1914.
Operated by the. Scott Publishing Co.. Inc.
Glenn C. Lee ........"......"........................................................Publisher
J. W. Hanson ...............................................................................Editor
01mm Yv‘énspaper Benton County and City or Kennewick
2
—Friaay. ombe—r 7 I949_——‘-
K ennewick Not So Bad
There probably is no place in the state of Washington
where a community’s own people find more fault With
theigcifiy than in Kennewick: _ , ‘ _ _ _7 _ A
Being a community which doubled its population
several times in a few years, it may be only natural. It
should be encouraging to those who have done most of
the criticising to learn that the experts on cities rate us
far above the average in city planning.
The new community was built by the thousands of
new people who streamed in from over the USA. during
the last several years. Many of those new people started
comparing their new community with “the old home
town” when they arrived. They remembered that back
home they had something different in street naming or
schools or police methods or building regulations. Every
new person who was inclined to criticize loaded a new
“beef” on. When all the deficiencies were piled on top of
each other, it added up to the contention that we had a
pretty dull, pretty unattractive, pretty awful city, which
Kennewick is proving not to be by any means.
How do we know that the critics'were wrong? We
don’t, but we have the word of Washington's expert plan
ners to the contrary.
Speaking at the weekly luncheon meeting of the
chamber of commerce last week, 0. L. Mithun expert
community planner from the University of Washington,
said that Kennewick, from the standfioint of planning,
was far ahead of the average city he as visited on his
tours of the state. Mr. Mithun has been around, speaking
to chambers of commerce and other groups, sometimes,
several times in a week. He studies the problems of com
mtn‘iii’ties, points out their good points and their short
co gs.
What did he find? Read the list:
1. A much better planned street and highway system
than most cities and‘one 9f the very best in the state.
2. A well Blamed business section.
3. An inte igent system of handling city problems and
4. (Of all things) An efficient set of city officials.
- -Some day probably that city government will get
around to straightening out most of the problems that
we have. Some day we probably will become so settled
in our new community that we will realize that many of
the problems we thought we had were imaginary. .
In any event, it is nice to know that we are not as far
wrong as some of us thought we were. And best of all, it
is nice to have on our si e an expert in the branch in
which we were supposed to be the least qualified.
Hunter Is Found
cmmsm (UP)—The
body of 3 mm sing for al
most. a week was found just two
miles from his home‘east of Che
halis by a search party today.
”A apart from the shqm’gpfc.
ce “Willi;
:Ith cm mmur'nmv
ently. been unable to survive a
week of exposure but cause of
death has not been definitely
detemlned.
De fines is the that hunting
fatality in Lewis county this. as
8011..» up“ -
‘BENWN
If»! man woman: 5
: wha
m-73"?" NUMBER CAN
. \- PLAY"
FRIDAY AND §AWIDAY
Mun-'0!
11. Sat-day m
M Story Coma
. ‘ to m. \
"TALL IN Jul-l: SADDLE"
non-m WAY“!
co-wzs'rm
Danger Aland!
"mm SMIIGGLERS"
, wuh
~ 'I‘IIII Holt
. :: sunny ONLY
' Yes. Sir.
It's Terrific!
DONALD O'CONNOR
GLORIA 1:."AVI"
”YES SIR.
THAT'S :lflY BABY"
“8 ‘
Sol-end Slums
#
"6NO" AND mason
lo m c flown: in his coat—
_ And a gun under it!
;; GEORGE RAF‘I'
.. As .
"JOHNNY ALLEGRO"
l. cam
Ehe Boy Saw It Happen
j "THE WINDOW".
wma
‘ BOBBY DISCOLI.
BARBARA HALE
———-———-———
fsnnrs WEDNESDAY
. 2 Days Only
In Technicofor
2' JUNE HAVER
" RAY BOLGER
.. in
“100 K FOR THE
~ SILVER UNING"
'- PLUS '
Gannon 9pm
'“Néws Briefs '
From Wallula
Vern Prewitt who has been in
the hospital in Walla Walla with
pneumonia was able to return to
his home Saturday but will not
be able to attend school for a'
‘Whlle. ‘ . I'.
WEI-Belles resumed his duties
as postmaster after having been
confined to the hospital in Walla
Walla and ill. at home for two
weeks. -
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kieth
and children of Touchet visited
a the Geo. Warner home on
béc‘"u"li%°t§‘°€3§?mfihfi.y¥?
en e n
visited Wallula Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Gellle Mon and
children visited Sunday in Walla
Walla.
Mr. and Mrs. Rollin Mesnerry
otjl'ouchet were in Wallula _
Mrs. Van Fry spent Saturday;
in Touchet to help her mother
celebrate her birthday. Mrs. Gus
Kuhlenkamp. \
New Procedure
For Pasture land
Applications for use oi govern
ment-owned pasture lan must
be made through the community
activities division under a new
procedure announced recently by
C. F. Barnes. division superin
tendent.
TONIGHT AND SATURDAY
COUNTRY STORE
TONIGHT! I I
loads of Groceries!
JEANNE cum
WILLIAMmI-IOLDIN
"APPAR'I'MEN'I' FOR
PEGGY"
co-m'r
IDA LUPINO
CORNEk WILDE
3
"ROAD HOUSE"
CO-STARRING
RICHARD wnmnx
ems“ HOLM
PLUS
anPTER NO. 4
"KING or THE
JUNGLE LAND"
SUNDAY ONLY
Smash Anal:
on the Undefworld!
WILLIAM ¢UNDIGAN
"STATE POLICE"
(10-ACTION HIT
Death in Sealed Onion!
"ARMORED CAR"
with
CESAR ROMZRO
”'5 Your
Health
Prepared by- the Staff— of the
Schools of Medicine, Dentistry
and Nursing, University of
Washington.
Although legend indicates that
rusty nails are the chletvoffend
ers in producing the condition
known .as tetanus, there are
many other ways in which the
tetanus bacillus can be introduc
ed into the body.
In fact, almost any type of
puncture wound or laceration
may be the portal of admission
if the nail or Splinter or other
agent causing the wound is con
taminated with the tetanus bac
illus or its spores.
Burns, frost-bites. bee stings,
ulcers, bed sores, fractured bone
penetrating through the skin.
needle punctures, and gun pow
der burns can all serve as the
pathways through which these
minute organism gain entry in
to the body.
Once inside the body the tet
anus bacillus and its products
are destroyed it the injured in
dividual has been properly pro
tected by what is known as pro
phylactic immunization. Such
protection saved the lives of
many of our injured military
personnel during the recent war
and, likewise, in reducing the in
cidence of tetanus among chil
dren today. 4 . ‘
However. it the indivduai has
not received this protection a
gainst tetanus, the disease may
result after a wound. In tetanus,
muscles are thrown into tetanic
spasms of contraction which are
very painful and which may
eventually result in exhaustion
«the patient._ __ . __ l
The time interval between the
Infection and the (inset of symp
toms varies greatly from as short
a period as one day to as long as
several weeks, depending upon
the severity of the infection. The
sooner the symptom of the dis
ease appear following the injury
Ithe more serious the condition
usually is. e
The important thing to remem
her is that with tgroper protective
‘i unization. ere is really no
‘nee ”or any child or adult to
be me a victim of this relativeifi
rare but serious disease. A his
degree of protection may be con
ferred by two injections of tetan
us toxo d given approximately
two months apart. '
Furthermore. it is important
that following any pentrating,
lacerated or gun powder wound.
an individual receive a protective
injection of tetanus antitoxin.
This is not the same as tetanus
toxoid. Since some individuals
.are sensitive to horse serum,
however, it is essential that they
be tested for such sensitivity be
fore receiving antitoxins.
When an individual actually
develogs the symptoms of tetan
us, it essential that he receive
treatment in the form of ade
quate amounts of tetarlus anti
toxin along with whatever was...
sures are indicated.
Even Insignificant wounds
may be dangerous. Don't take
chances. Tetanus immunization
provides protection that can
easily be a life saving measure.
[H I - L'AN‘DI
DI?!:E;[N TH EATRE
LAST TIMI TONIGHT
1::an- Hull
0! 111. ounwm . "
All!" um."
MRIJRIVOR
won»; 6! THE row
And
"You ONLY uv: oucl"
‘ With »
HINIY FONDA
"WM SIDNIY
SAWRDAY ONLY
8 o! a
Kid-mo Killer!
"RIFF-RAFF"
' With '
PA‘l' O'IIIIN
Al"! “I!!!“
ma? mum: .
00-18811]!!!
RUSSELL HAYDEN
JIM! SAM!!!
"Romney Hons"
SUNDAY ONLY
being! Exciting!
GIN! flflNIY
"DRAGONWYCK"
With
Vincent Mu '
Walter Huron
‘ ”JEAN“
His Kind Always
0m Themselves!
"RONImPOWIR
"NIGHTMARE ALLEY"_
With
JOAN ILONDILI.
MON. - W 55. ' WED.
#
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JOHN GAME”)
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Life-Lady Dream Of Pasfor
Finally Becomes Realify
‘ For the Rev. Frederic Baker,
rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal
church, Kennewick is both the
ending and starting of a trail.
It’s the ending of the trail be
cause his assignment here means
that he has realized a dream of
coming to the United States.
But, at the same time, it’s the
beginninfi of a new adventure
which wii lead eevntually to
American citizenship for his wife.
his son and himself.
Explaining the move to Kenne
wick, his first American pastor
ate, Rev. Baker said that he
wanted to do the best possible
thing for his son, Derie. ‘
“I wanted to do the best I
could for Deric, so I wrote the
Bishop and asked for an Ameri
can assignment. An exchange of
letters followed and as a result,
here I am.”_
IN 6831300 DIOCESE
At the time the letters were
written. the English-born pastor
had the Church of St. Michael at
Merrit. British Columbia. This
was in the Caribou diocese.
Previous to his assignment
there. Rev. Baker had been at
the Church of St. Barnabas in
Lytton. British Columbia for
three years.
Born in Chester, England in
1901, he attended school in Liv
erpool and migrated to Canada
at the age of 16 in 1917. His in
troduction to formal church work
came in 1929 when he joined the
Church Army in Canada.
The Church Army in Canada
was an Anglican organization,
devoted primarily to lay evange
lism. Eight years of service with
this organization followed.
oEgiESTfifixéi-an
In 1941, after a period of social
work in Edmondton, Rev. Baker
was ordained in the Episcopalian
ministry.
“I don’t hold a degree," he ex
plained. “I studied theology at
the University of Saskatchewan
.\\\\||\lHHl| 11111 liIJII I l I MN I | II I l I//
:‘ caosuv MILLION ~OOIIAR GIVEAWAY :-
,’/,,mul‘ll\\l\l II I 111 \I\I\I'\“"I”\"I'{I \l\\\
x ‘ » . YES, o‘vm $2,000,000 IN CASH
‘ .:. . a N or” IN G .MAND VALUABLE nuns: - '
V I 6'7/ TO 3UV Just ”tell us a good reason why we should .
g ’.o’ ’l‘: _ ' give you a new Shelvador* Refrigerator
‘- 6 A double chance lo win. First—we're one of hundreds of Crosley Dealers having a local Coolest, designed
. g I" .9; gm friends and “'th-fifidj9fifiézfl‘k‘°l lodges right igwgggwm how simple
v ’ ‘ ll lsl All you do is write on lhe local Enlry Blank in 50 words or less why you believe Crosley should give
you a beaulllul, new Nubia-fool Shelvador Refrigerator. If our iudges select your reason as host, you will
I ‘ l gel a new 1950 Shelvador Refrigerator to be awarded by us and delivend right Io your home. .
WIN A BRAND NEW 1950 CUSTOM“ MODEL
4 SHELVADOR REFRIGERATOR
$27,800 In cull-25 complete Crosby Ileetrlc mine and
109 m 1950 Show-dot Roman-lon as Ncflonol Prizes!
Second—a National Contestin addition to and separate fromourLocal
CmbyDalcContuhwheretheeamewordlyouwriteforthelAeal
Contut (ordifl’aentonesifyouprefa)maybeeubmittedonthe National
MBhnkudwmpeufwtbGrandPfimdmahfimm.
mm to be awarded by Croeley. ~ -
’EechotthoCroeleyElechicKitchemhasaretailvalmofoverflSOO
.‘ . and includes: A 1950 9—cubic-foot Model CB-9 Custom Shelvador ..' ;
’ Model DE 129 Croeley Electric Range. ;'. 3.2 cubic-foot Model HF-lß4fi .
Greeley Kitchen Freezer . . . 40-gallon table-top Custom Model CMT4ODE
Ore-ley Electric Water Heater . . . Model CKD2S Croeley Kitchen Dis
poeum4B-inch Model CST4BOO Croeley Cabinet Sink...and base
andwolleteolcabinetstoamaximumretailvalueofmflm'
, The Amazing 1950 Sholvador . I
with Exclusive WORKSAVER Design
All SPACE AT THE “CONVENIENCE llVll-"I
_lr You our A NIW "so cnosm IIFRIGIRA‘I'OR during this contest
andwinone as a prize either in NationalorLocal Contests . .‘ . youwill
geta‘eeshrefundequaltotheretailpriceofyourprize.
JUSI’ rouow 'l’l-IISI SIMPLE Rlllls—
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mam». MdthIhIb—MMMIIMMMM
‘ toool Mdmgm‘fly "Michael" NollonolOonlol. y
’ 30W mummadoyhalboolas'mmfioaodoyflmloaolcw.
flavour, "wig... noy lib!!!" only on- oMry In only ono ol 111. Goal-y local Doulon' Camus
:ummmmuynmmmmummmlm
.lolllolllsolnlryllnhl booblohodolnoood'nu ApplloooodoolomTharoanll-y
Neal: lor llno Nollonol°Conl:sl fro- our Crolloy Doolor, m Entry Blank lron tho 1000 l Crosloy
humomolm. ,
C. MyruldomdmmolmMmymmmmlaymoflhaoohybhlfion
o! "co AVCO Mom m corporollon, mil doolou o! Crosby op llonooo, wholuolo dislr‘lwlon
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I ‘ V ' Happier Living
GET ENTRY BLANKS FROM: ' .
DUROCHER’S or KENNEWICK FURNIIURE (0.
Corner Washington & Kannewick Ave. _ KENNEWICK Phone Kennewick 5061
[at Saskatoon.”
. Both the rector and his wife
feel that Kennewick has Wel
comed them in an extremely
friendly way.
> Mrs. Baker commented on this,
‘saying, “People have been very
friendly and we don't at all feel
strange here.”
For the smiling and yet quiet
pastor whose English accent is
still noticible, the Columbia riv
er country where he now resides
will give him a chance to in»
dulge in his favorite sport—fish- ;
Inge ‘
£3om; msn mom i
His favorite fish is trout
and he laughingly refuses to
“Brag" about the size of those
he has caught.
For Mrs. Baker, Kennewick isn’t
as much of a change as some
housekeepers might expect.
“Some prices are cheaper afid
others are about equal, but I’d
say the cost of living is about
the same as it is in Canada," she
reported.
Deric, a quiet youngster who
will celebrate his sixth birthday
on Nov. 16, finds that his new
friends in the neighborhood are
Millers Entertain
D_aug_h_ter-_ln-l.uw
Entertaining Sunday after
noon with an At Home, Mr. and
Mrs. O. P. Miller introduced
their new daughter-in-law, Mrs.
Lloyd Miller, the former Patsy
Grant of Pasco, to their many
friends who called during that
time. The rose theme was car
ried out in arrangements of roses
and forget-me-nots on the lace
covered table and the rose cor
sage worn by youner Mrs. “ii"w.
Rose buds also decorated the
cup cakes served. Mrs. Ward
Johnson, Mrs. Robert Taylor and
Miss Shirley Bateman assisted
in serving. .
more than willing to share their
tricycles with him. He still re
fers to cookies in the afternoon
as “tea.”
The Bakers entered this coun
try on a visa and have already
filed for their first papers.
So, to paraphrase an old say
ing, it can be seen that that Ken
newick's gain is Canada's loss.
Church Groups Plan
Social Times
The congregation of the Church
of the Nazarene have gathered
into five groups, each group
meeting once a month for a so
cial time and twice a month for
a devotional meeting. 0n Tues~
day evening Group Four with
15 present, enjoyed a social eve
ning at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. R. E. Bauder. An election
was held with Mrs. Don Garner
named chairman; Mrs. Jim May,
secretary; Mrs. Emery Aman.
treasurer; Mrs. R. E. Bauder. so
cial chairman; and Jim May,
devotional chairman.
Kennewick Man
Going To Turkey
Lt. Col. Leon D. Marsh, whose
father, John A. Marsh lives in
Kennewick. has been notified
that his next assignment will be
with the Turkish army.
Col. Marsh who recently re
turned from 20 months duty as
adjutant general with the Sev
enth Infantry Division in Korea
will establish a classification
and assignment system for the
Turkish army.
He will be accompanied by his
wife and two sons, David and
John. The family hopes to visit
month.
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OHd-Fashioned Bargain
Days Are Planned For
Kennewick This Week
Next Friday and Saturday will
be observed as “Old-Fashioned
Bargain Day" by Kennewick
merchants. according to an an
nouncement by Dave hunkey,
chairman of the Retail Mer
chants Bureau.
Don Solberg. ot Carlberg's, has
been named chairman for the
special event. and plans are un
derway to give Kennewick shop
pers the greatest array of bar
gains in history.
Merchants taking part in the
event will display special bar
gain counters and employ other
novel methods for presenting
their offers to the public.
Owen Lytle, chairman of the
Kennewick Appreciation Day
committee, said that plans were
being developed to stage a big
ger and better show on down
town Kennewick streets Friday
night.
In conjunction with this event.
Andy Anderson, who will be mas
ter of ceremonies, proposes to
dispose of a “considerable
amount of cold cash” to some of
the people who attend this event.
Solberg said that Wednesday
special banners advertising the
events would be distributed to
participating merchants. He also
urged that Kennewick business
men enter into the spirit of the
Meetings To Come
Madonna Circle of the Chris
tian church will meet Tuesday.
Oct. 25, at 2 o'clock at the
chalich.
Needle Club will meet Friday
at the home of Mrs. T. W. Payne.
An executive board meeting of
the Madonna Circle of the
Christian church will be held at
the home of Mrs. Gordon Hille
on Tuesday evening.
IT’S. THE
BIGGEST
THING YET! ..
' V I V'— '
Givuupto 2396 M spa:- In the
:.. ”:23 size cabinet—«3y to null—om 10 111.-
_ huge. guppy. dong-32 flu floor.
' \ rm
“Old FashiOned Bargain Days"
in an attempt to encourage more
people to regard Kennewick as
the logical trading center.
'i‘runkey indicated that Kenna.
wick merchants would again be
open Friday evening. He said
business was brisk last Friday
evening and that merchants were
anticipating an ever larger vol
ume of business this week.
The “Old Fashined Bargain
Days" will be the second in a
number of trade-at-home promo
tions to be staged by Kennewick
merchants. Next .week a Hal
loween Carnival is being plan
ned.
Scout Troop
To Get Charter
The Boy Scout troop sponsored
by the Kennewick Parent-Teach
ers association will receive their
charter Monday night at the sen
ior high school auditorium.
Bob Major, assistant Scout ex
ecutive. will present the charter
to the scouts before their parents.
Major represents the Blue Moun
tain council, which directs Boy
Scout activities in tour counties
or Washington and eight coun.
ties in Oregon.
Earl E. Strege is Scout Master
of this new' troop of about 40
boys. Men helping ‘Strege are
Lynn‘ Hebron, who represents the
P.-T.A.. and the following troop
committeemen: Clarence J. Mc-
Credie, chairman; John 11. Cur
rie, Francis H. Myers, Eugene W.
Gardner, Emil Schinke. Jr. _ .
Scouts organized early this
summer attended Boy Scout
‘camp in the Waliowa mountains
in Oregon and participated in
the! Benton county fair and pa
ra e.

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