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Aberdeen herald. (Aberdeen, Chehalis County, W.T.) 1886-1917, August 02, 1906, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093220/1906-08-02/ed-1/seq-3/

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DECISION IS FINAL
PRESIDENT REITERATES INTEN
TION NOT TO RON AOAIN.
Through Secretary Loeb He An
nounces that He Has Nothing
to Add to Former Published
Statement—Bryan to Outline
Issues at New York Reception.
Peoria, Ills., Jnly 81.—A positive
announcement from President Roose
velt that he will not be h candidate
for a third term was made yesterday
in a letter addressed to Mrs. L. A.
Kinney, of Peoria, by Secretary Loeb
for President Hoosevelt. The text of
the letter follows:
"Oyster Hay, L. 1., Jnly 35.
"Dear Madam: Your letter of re
cent date has been received and I
thank yon on the president's behalf
for calling, attention to the enclosed
clipping. I would say, however, that
the president has nothing to add to
the statement issued after his election
in 1004. His decision its announced
at that time is irrevocable.
"Yours truly, William Loeb,
"Secretary to the President."
This expression from the president
was called forth by an editorial in the
Peoria Herald-Transcript, which was
i,ailed to the attention of the president
through Mrs. Kinnsy, wife of a prom
inent Peoria politician.
BRYAN TO OUTLINE
CAMPAIGN ISSUES
New York, July 31.—William .T.
Bryan, it has been announced here,
desires it to be known that he will
outline his conception of the issues
upon which the next Democratic cam
paign should be fought, in his Madi
son Square Harden speech August 30.
This is the official program of the
Bryan reception as announced at the
headquarters of the reception commit
tee:
Mr.' Bryan will meet, at the Bat
tery on the afternoon of August 30,
the members of the reception commit
tee. He will enter a carriage in which
will be Gov. Folk, of Missouri; Tom
L. Johnson, mayor of Cleveland, and
possibly some other prominent Demo
crat. Headed by the Bryan carriage
the processisosn will move up Broad
way to the Victoria hotel.
Declare Principle* for 1908
Mr. Bryan will meet the Democratic
leaders and dine there. In the even
ing he will be escorted to Madison
Square Harden for the reception. Gov.
Folk will call the meeting to order
and will make a speech, after which
he will introduce Mayor Johnson to
preside.
Augustus Thomas will deliver an
address of welcome in behalf of the
Commercial Travelers Anti-Trut
League. Mr. Bryan will then deliver
his oration on the Democratic princi
ples for 1908.
Word has been received at the Vic
toria hotel from the treasurer of the
reception committee, Alexander Tre
enp, ot New Haven, in regard to the
popular subscriptions for Mr. Bryan's j
reception, that the subscriptions had
been pouring in upon him and will be j
all that Mr. Bryan expected. j
JOINT WHEAT RATE
IN EFFECT AU6. 20
Olympia, July J!o.—lt is announced :
at the office of the railroad commix-1
sion that the joint wheat rate order |
will be isxned August 1, becoming ef
fective twenty days thereafter.
It had been planned to issue the or
der about July 20, but its actual pro
mulgation has been delayed ten days. 1
It U now believed at the office of the I
commission that the order will be!
promptly acquiesced in by the rail
toads, and it is even regarded as prob
able that now joint wheat rate tariffs
will be issued by the railroads before;
the expiration of the twenty days
granted under the commission law for
orders of the commission to go into
effect.
At the office of the commission there
seems to be no information as to why
the railroads have changed their atti
tude toward the joint wheat rate order.
Until recently both sides were pre
paring for a contest in the courts.
But, whatever the reason, the word
bas gone out that the order will be
accepted and immediately acquiesced
in by the roads, and that tariffs will
be issued accordingly, in time for the
movement of this year's crop.
Sentence Paiied on 37 Mutineer*
Sevastopol, July !10.—A naval court
martial has passed sentences upon the
seamen who were arrested for complic
ity in the mutiny of the Black sea fleet
of November, 11105. Four men were
condemned to death, one to life servi
tude, thirty-two to varying terms of
penal servitude and fifty to imprison
ment. Six were acquitted.
Everette Ha« City Dock
Kverett, July !10.—The city council
has closed a deal wereby it becomes
the owner of the dock at the foot of
Hewitt avenue, built a year ago on
property leased from the oity. Ihe
dock and small warehouse thus ac
quired will become the lamliug point
for the mosquito fleet free of charge.
Congressman Do Armond has been
nominated by the Sixth district Mis
souri Democrats for another term.
WHY COUNTRY PEOPLE SUCCEED.
By Juliet V. Strauss.
■rirtmTiOTii** rwr n
JUI.ItT V. STRAI NS.
knowing It. We lake It In at the etuis of our lingers. If
wo lielong to an intelligent, reading, thinking family we
get the general Information needed about the world and
contemporaneous history and literature, and meantime
we are learning all ahont cattle, and horses, and li >g«.
•nd poultry; aliout seed time ami harvest, ahont tilling
the soil and gr.rnerlng the fruit and grain. We forget
that all tills is knowledge. We are accustomed to think
that knowledge conies only from hooks. How mistaken
the Idea! One branch of knowledge learned at the linger
tips Is worth all the menial accomplishment in the
world. One must he a "brainy" person to succeed, but
If In addition to braitiiliess bo adds real knowledge of the
tilings of life he is thrice armed.
I persist HlHf tile WnlliaU Wild klUlW* how to niHliP good
bread Is the superior of her who can merely make n hril
llnnt recitation 111 literature or history. Neither Is to hp
despised 11* Hll accomplishment, hut the bread comes first.
The country town makes all around people. II Is made
up of people who know things by experience. not lienrsay.
No idea was over more mistaken than that the city is the
place to learn things. 'I'he city may lie the place to go to
turn one's learning to account, hut It Is In the country
rihl the country town that we learn what la valuable to
know.
RAILWAY RATE REMEDY.
W. k. chanui.kr. j m y freight or the fares—they
must pay before they get back their merchandise or get
Into the cars. Therefore, there should be and are in the
pending bill two necessary remedies: (I) criminal |ven-
al Men upon the railroads for refusals to obey the orders
of the commission, and <2l the command to the courts to
Issue mandamus orders to the railroads commanding
them to obey the orders of the commission.
Now. It Is easily to lie seen that there is no way to
JAMES R. GARFIELD'S HABITS.
A Serloua Minded OIVIcIhI, lei n
I.over of SSeereH I lon.
»'ommissioner James It. (iarticld of
the Bureau of Corporations, whose
official nets make lilm a prominent
figure hi uie 111vi'm
tlgatlon inn) prose
cut ion <>f trusts,
I ins the reputation
of tiding the most
serious minded of
ficeholder In Wash-
Ingtou. The fact
that ho carries one
or two hooks under
his Arm to and
from Ills oft're add*
j. h. (iAHi'ikxi). to the dignity of
his mien In the eyes of some, and the
uut-of-datH bicycle he rides and the
manner In which he strides the steel
■teed lends a further appearance of
stiffness to his personality, (iiirtleld's
hlcycla was probnlily built four or five
years ago, and he rides with the handle
bars high up ami his back as vertical
as the Washington monument, lie was
uever known to "scorch." and probably
could not If he wanted to. on account
of Ills position on the wheel.
The exercise that Mr. (iarfleld like!
most Is tennis. He can lie found two of
three afternoons a week hard at the
game el tber on the White House court or
on a lawn in the northwestern part of
town, and those who have occasion to
try conclusions with lit 111 declare him
a flrst-class player. President I loose
veil likes him either as a partner or an
opponent at tennis, and they often dis
cuss the most Important matters re
lating to the business of the bureau
which Mr. (iarfleld has managed since
Its foundation as a branch of the !>e
porttuent of Commerce and Labor.
At home Mr. (iarfleld frequently
plays baseball with Ills boys, and re
cently Mrs. (iarfleld has become a most
enthusiastic advocate of the game.
Both Mr. and Mrs. (iarfleld ifrvote a
great deal of attention to the athletic
training of their children, mid enter
with them Into all their outdoor
•ports. They frequently take eight and
ten-mile walks in the afternoon, and
when they reach home they are as
fresh and buoyant as though they had
been only around the block.
Commissioner (iarfleld conies honest
ly by his love for athletics, for hU
father, the lute President (iarfleld, was
quicker on his feet and of flruter
muscle than most men of his sedentary
habits.
Porenriiieil.
Interviewer- Senator, 1 have called
to ask If you will give me some reml
lilscem-es of your public career——"
Senator (with dignify)— Not much,
you uk man, do I propose to let any man
with a rake run amuck through my
Vast history.—BttlUiuor# American.
1 was iiitn-ti interested recently in a
bilk with a young friend of mine who
has intuit* ii success of his life and
whose head 1* full of bright Ideas.
He says that nearly all of the
strength of our cities is made up from
the country towns. That two-thirds
r>f the liralny men of cities are men
who have come from towns or vil
la ices.
Ills theory as to this state of affairs
'is this: That In a country towu we
learn so much about life without
By Win. B. Chandler.
The question of Judicial review of
decision* of the Interstate Commerce
Commission making remedial rates
does not seem to lie very complicated.
The object of the shlp|>ers Is to get
orders fixing such rates which shall
not he at once destroyed either by
the refusal of the rallrnnds to obey
them or by Immediate suspensions
of the orders by Judges—Just or un
just. There Is no remedy for the
shippers or passengers In refusing to
Frank \V. Klnckmur, professor of eco
nomics In the I niversity of Kansas,
contributes to the North American Re
view a very Interesting article In which
lie recounts the history of "The Mas
tery of the l»esert." For many years
the theory was universally accepted
that a great American desert stretched
over boundless wastes In the Interim' of
the continent, attd that vast regions
within the eouttoes of the Fulled
States were not habitable by man. As
time went on, however, and through the
exploration of the pioneers, the char
acter of the-country was gradually
made known, the dimensions of the sup
posed desert steadily shrank from dec
ade to decade. Professor ltlackmar
shows how this process was reflected In
the liooks and maps relating to the
Fnlted States which were published
from time to time. He describes the
prosperous conditions which American
enterprise and energy have created In
a section of the country which was at
one time regarded as a second Sahnra:
Hut let us see wlint has been ac
complished already In tills arid region
of Major Powell's. T,et us observe to
what extent the real desert has been
conquered. Leaving out of considera
tion the great States of Missouri, lowa,
Minnesota and Arkansas, comprising a
territory nearly all of which was once
considered valueless, with a population
of over 8,000,000, and considering only ;
ABERDEEN HERALD, THURSDAY, AUGUST, 2, 1906
prevent Judges- Just or unjust from refusing either to
enforce the penalties or to issue mandamus orders until
they have considered and determined the constitutional
ity of the law and the legality of the action of the com
mission thereunder. To this extent, therefore, the shlp
pers and pijssengers— the people—are In the hands of the
Judges—Just or unjust.
But there is one thing which Congress can do. It con
prevent the Judges from interfering to suspend the orders
of the commission. If the rnllroHds refuse to obey those
orders they must Justify themselves If they can and take
their chances of Judicial relief In the course of the pros
ecutions for penalties snd the proceedings for mandamus
which may be brought against them by the government.
NATION LIVES PROFLIGATELY.
place when exhausted.
It la only a question of time till our llnilier Is exhaust
ed. Our public domain Is all gone nnd thp nation can
no longer Unist that it has homes for all. Where are
the Immigrants rushing to our shores to end up? Not
on tlie land. Wo have no more to offer them. They
must crowd Into the cltlps.
When 1 Ills Million luih inn,ooo.ooo people they will h:ive
to do something else thnn exploit nnturnl rewmnto
earn n living. We will eventually have to meet the com
mercial competition Kugland Is meeting to-day nnd have
to fa cp such problems as slip is now facing with 1.500.000
unemployed crying for bread with no broad to feed save
uk charity doles It out to tlinm.
KINDLINESS AND CHRISTIAN CHARACTER.
willingness to throw money here and there. Kindness Is
a greater thing than that. It Is a revelation of the divine
love. It is a willingness to strive.
Von know that a good ileal of the downright misery
of your life comes from petty trials. You wrangle at
the breakfast table about, some arrangement of the day
and go fretted to the day's work. Such little things
mount up into evil temper, darkened outlook, sore heart
and bad blood Not one of these little trials could ever
have happened if you and I had some common sense,
and without common sense some kindliness toward our
brother.
The Duo tor—What seems to be the trouble?
The Patient —Why. doctor! 1 hove Indigestion In four of my stomachs.
Conquest »Ijs Great
American Desert
The nation Is living profligately.
True it is that the nation at large Is
prosperous. We are cutting a wide
swath, there Is no doubt of that. But
if we Ret down, however, in a closer
examination we will readily see that
we are selling out our natural re
sources exploiting them as I'ast as
we can without building up indus
tries and trade relations to take their
J. .1. 1111.
By Dr. John Watson (lan Maclaren).
I decline to believe that any person Is a
Christian who is unkind. And if you can (>olnt
out to me a person who is thoroughly and gen
uinely kind, then I do not ask what his creed
is. I say the beginning of Christianity Is In
that man, and an exceedingly good beginning.
I>o not confound this familiar, homely, but
magnificent fundamental and pervading virtue
of kindness with good humor, easy-golngness.
WAS BADLY OFF.
the ft ft een Suites and Territories lying
almost wholly In the great 'arid region,'
exclusive• of California, comprising a
territory of 1.. r iOH,2IO square miles, wo
liHve to note the following statistics:
The population with this territory num
bered In I!MHi, H.77l.aiK*; the acreage of
farms was ttOO.KWuM.'i. Of these farms,
10(),l). r iti.4S7 iii-res are already improved.
The value of the farms in I!NH> was
$4,0(K1,10N.252. The value of agricul
tural products for Uhki was estimated
to be 91*47.! 107.KM. lit' the farm lands,
ii,st!ii,7!lß acres are under irrigation. In
addition to ibis, the mining products
add Sli!<>.(million io iin- growing wealth
of the country. Hut. more marvelous
than all this, is the rapid growth lu
railroad extension throughout this ter
ritory. The mileage of railroads had
already reached In J 000 the enormous
figure of Go.7li!.iMi miles. There are not
less than six great transcontinental
lines running through the territory, and
there soon will be several more. Short
lines are extending In every direction
into fertile valleys, and to mines and
cattle ranges, opening up the terrltory
and furnishing means of serving In
creasing population."
The Stranger -You've had a great
many cases <>f highway robbery here,
haven't you? |
Chicago Official We did have quite
a number, but we don't have any now.
The Stranger How do you prevent
them?
The OflVlnl—We arrest every citizen
who leaves his house after nightfall.—
Cleveland Plain I>ealer.
The public wouldn't know what wom
en some men married If It didn't occa
sionally see the husbands and the»r
wlvm together at funeral*.
By James J. Mill.
In ChlrDien.
PPOITSSIONAL CARDS.
PAUL SUITS, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
OFFICE HOURS:
DR. SMlTS—Office at Aberdeen
General Hospital. Honrs—lo to 13 a.
m ;2t04 p. m ;7 to 9 p. m. Tele
phone 611.
J)R. WATKINS.
Office in Crowther-Wooding block,
corner of U and Heron streets. Office
hoars—lo:3o to 11:30 a. m.; 1:30 to
4:30 and 7:00 to 8:00 p. m. Tele
phone 135.
J)R. McNIVEN
Practice limited ti> the EYE. EAR,
NOSH and TIIKOAT. Office rooms over
E 1. K Pharmacy, Atierdeen, Wash.
Office hours,o to 12 a. m.,2 to - and 7to
.S J). 111.
J)R. J. A. MAPES
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
nITKT. I lOl' RS: 9toll a. in.: -J to
3 and 7to S ji. in. Kooins ."> and t<
Kaufman liloi'k. Tel. 17."»:>. .Aber
deen, Wash.
J£VERETT E. LANE, D. D. S.
Office hours—B:oo to 12:00 a. m.
1:00 to 6:00 and 7:00 to 8:00 p. m.
Hayes & Hayes Building. Telephone
177.
C. CROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Will praotioe in State and Federa
courts. Zelasko Block, O Street.
E. H FOX »
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Rooms 10 and 11, Postoffloe Block.
ROBERT E. TA6GART,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Will praotioe in State and Federa)
courts. Room 14, Dabney Block.
gEN SHEEKS
LAWYER
Room 7, Dabney Blook.
POPULAR RESORTS.
Continental Saloon
O. C. VAMMEN, Prop.
Choicest Wines, Liquors and Cigan
always on hand.
409 Ci Street, near Heron,
Aberdeen, • - Wash.
Humboldt Saloon
FRED HEWETT, Prop.
Finest Wines, Liqaors and Cigars in
the city.
113 South F Street,
Aberdeen, Wash.
Anchor Bar
Andrew Blum Prop.
214 South r Street
Wines, Liquors, Cigars
LODGINGS
20 nicely furnished rooms by the
day, week or month
S. W. Johnston Transfer Co.
Transfer and Express
First-Class Livery Rigs
403 S. r Street
ROSLYN COAL
Telephone 193
Residence Phone 407
ABERDEEN
Steam Laundry
J. M. LUPTON, Mgr.
Aberdeen Steam l.aundrv is equipped
with lat st improved laundry machin rv
made, and does as goo i work as can
be turtle I out an . \vh re.
PRICES REASONABLE
Telephone 364 Cor. H. «ad Hume ste'
RELIEF FOR LADIES
French Tansy Wafers
Genuine only In Yellow Wrapper with
the Crown Trade Mark
For Sale by leading druggists
BICYCLE SHOP
Bell Brothers
Quick and Durable
Repairing.
Laroe Line of Tires in Stock. Wheels
for Sale and Rent.
205 SOUTH r STREET.
TIME CARD
(*{ MX\ —of—
TRAINS.
AT ABERDEEN
DEPART
For Portland, Tacoma, Seattle
and all points east - - 8:42 a. m.
For Portland, Tacoma, Seattle
and all points east - - 3:35 p. m.
For Moclips (except Sundsy)3:os p. m.
For Ocosta .... 3:45 p. m.
ARRIVE
From Portland, Taconia, Seattle
and all points east - - 3:05 p. m.
From Portland, Tacoma, Seattle
and all points east, - - 7:50 p. m.
From Hoquiam 8:42 a. m. and
3:35 3:45 p. m.
From Ocosta - • - - 8:10 a.m.
Sunday excursions to Moclips leave
Aberdeen at 8:00 a. m., returning
leave Moclips at 6:;00 p. id.
H. B. ELDER,
Agent N. P. Ry.
A. D. CHARLTON,
A. G. P. A., —N. P. Ry. Co.
Portland, Dragon.
TU SCENIC ROUTE
Our Watchwords
SAFETY and
COMFORT
Our own rails across the
continent ensure fewest
possible transfers en route.
Special Kxcursicitis to Minneapolis, St.
I'au , I>ll littti. For! William, Chicago,
Milwaukee, St. I,nuis, Kansas City,
Omaha.
Lowest Rates to all Points
Apply to P. S. LOCKE, Aberdeen. or to
JOHN HALSTEAD, Agt, 917 Pacific
Ave., Tacoma, Wn.
GRAYS HARBOR
AND
CALIFORNIA
Water Route
$SOO SAN fRANMSCO $10 00
$13.50 toa Angeles Ports $17 50
Why pity double our rates to go
overland through the heat and
dust, when you can travel in
comfort on one of our commod
ious steamers, sailing about
every three days?
For sailing dates, folders and
other information call on or ad
dress,
The C. E. Burrows Go., Agts.
Phone 1501. Aberdeen, Wash.
Central Restaurant
M. ANTICII. |»mp.
Food prepared as it is at home
Waiters attentive to every want
Meals 2."i ecnts and upwards
F Street, between llvron and Wislikah
Telephone 244
Fred Redmger
Shaving and
Hair Cutting
Pioneer Barber Stop
21 Heron Street
CECIL HOTEL
WCSTPORT, WASH.
Newly furnished Throughout
MRS. MARY SMITH, Prop.
Wm. ZIEGLER
Boot and Shoemaker
The repair shop sit JEFF'S
SHOK STOUKiaonece more in
niv charge. I am tlie pioneer
shoemaker, mvwork is tiixtelnss
ami the prices are right.
WILLIAM ZIEGLER,
Posto ffiee Block.
Wheels Repaired
A. INGEBRIGHTSEN
206 G Street
Complete line of bicycle sundries
always on hand.
FISHING TACKLE SPORTING GOODS
s

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