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Vashon Island news-record. [volume] (Vashon, Wash.) 1919-1954, May 27, 1921, Image 2

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Vashon Island News-Record
The Vashon Island News, established June 17, 'O7
The Vashon Island Record, established Oct. 26, 16,
Consolidated December 18, 1819,
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
Published every Friday at Vashon
(Vashon Island), Washington.
e e —————————————n
P. MONROE SMOCK, Editor
FRED F. NOYES, Foreman
EBntered as second class matter, Oct
26, 1916, at the post office at Vashon,
Waabington, under the Act of March §,
1879,
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I pledge alleglance to my Flag, and to she
Republic for which it stands; one Nation
indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for ail,
THE BLUE AND THE GRAY
B Y the flow of the inland river,
Whence the fleets of iron
have fled,
Where the blades of the grave
grass quiver,
Asleep are the ranks of the dead:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day:
Under the one, the Blue,
Under the other, the Gray.
These in the robings of glory,
Those in the gloom of defeat.
All with the battle-blood gory,
In the dusk of eternity meet:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day;
Under the laurvel, the Blue,
Under the willow, the Grav.
From the silence of sorrowful
hours,
The desolate’ mourners go,
Lovingly laden with flowers,
Alike for the friend and the foe:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day ;
Under the roses, the Blue,
Under the lillies, the Gray.
So, with an equal splendor,
The morning sun-rays fall,
With a touch impartially tender,
On the blossom blooming for all:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day; .
Broidered with gold, the Blue,
Mellowed with gold, the Gray.
So, when the summer calleth, ‘
On forest and field of grain,
With an equal murmur falleth
The cooling drip of the rain:
COMPARE —_——
OUR VALUES =
w———i_%——t\__—_—:;fl =1
_(s&lo‘”"%—"_::\’;7s_—:—'&‘_%%
= RO L % gl @ B
:'-ng “‘-!'%
| Mahncke & Co. |=
, - Pioneer Jewelers '.—__l;
| 914 Pacific Ave., Tacoma e
s ==
W ——
| Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day;
Wet with the rain, the Blue,
Wet with the rain, the Gray.
Sadly, but not with upbraiding,
The generous deed was done:
In the storm of the years that
are fading,
No braver battle was won;
Under the’ sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment day;
Under the blossoms, the Blue,
Under the garlands, the Gray.
-
No more shall the war ery sever,
Or the winding rivers be red;
They banish onr anger forever,
When they laurel the graves of
our gead; )
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgnwnl'(lu.\';
Love and tears for the Blue,
Tears and love for the Gray.
—l'. M. Finch.
MEMORIAL DAY
NEXT Monday is Memorial
Day. It will be observed
throughout the country with
more ov less interest, depending
largely upon the locality and the
personal interest the several com
munities may have in the day.
It will be an important day for
the people of these islands, be
cause it will be the day on which
the Memorial Monument now set,
’\\'ill he unveiled, with appropri
ate ceremonies.
The keeping in sacred memory
our departed dead is as old a
tradition as the hills. Was it
not Jacob who made mention in
itis death that his bones be not
left in Egypt, and was his body
not carefully taken out of Egypt
by a large retinue of relatives
and friends and buried beside
that of his grandfather Abra
ham, in the tomh at Machpelah?
And was not the tomb kept
sacred more than a thousand
years? The same was true of
David, for on the day of Pente
cost St. Peter declared the old
patriarch’s tomb was still with
them. i
The keeping green the graves
of our friends and loved ones is
the expression of the divine
that’s within each of us. They
were loved long since, but lost
awhile, and during the interim
we irrigate their graves with our
tears. Like Rizpah, we refuse to
give up their dust, but cherish
it as the sweet memory of a
watered garden. How fitting
this love for the dead should be
extended to those who fought and
died that we might have a coun
try. The flag we love is preserv
‘«-d to us without a star effaced
or a stripe obscured because some
who now sleep in the Island cem
etery bared their breasts to the
enemy’s bullets and faced the
mouth of the smoking cannon.
Could we do less than ereet ai
shaft of granite in ‘memory of the
veterans of ‘6l, '9B, and the war
just ended?
But we cannot fittin ol observe
the day in its full spicit unless
we prepare our own hearts for
VASHON ISLAND NEWS-RECORD
the day. Let us re-read Lincoln’s
Gettysburg Address, and give to
these, our dead, the full measure
of our devotion, Without shont
mg, noise, or acclaim-—llet us nnd
our way next Monday morning
to the cemetery, and there be
neath the open sky, with uncov
ered heads, let us review in mem
ory the great price paid for our
liberty, our homes, and our na
fion—and reverently thank God
that brave men fought for our
Union, our traditional Hounor,
and for the extension of Democ
racy throughout the world. And
they WON'!
THE SACRED POPPY
Sl.\'(‘l‘l the world war the
poppy has become sacred,
for, under its nodding head on
the battlefields of IFrance, lie
buried hundreds of thousands of
sons who gave their lives in the
defense of eivilization and who
championed right against might.
What is more fitting then Hmn‘
on Memorial Day of this year |
Americans wear a poppy in com
memoration of the fallen heroes?
While we may not have the
original, French war orphans will
see that we have replicas of the
‘l'(‘(l flowers ‘‘that grew in Flan
ders fields,”” for they have made
five million of them and have
sent them to the United States.
The American-Franco Children’s
league, of which Madame Miller
and, wife of the president of the
French republie, is president, is
behind the movement. The pro
ceeds from the poppies will go
to the league for the ameliora
tion of conditions among child
ren in the war-torn areas, inno
cent vietims of the war,
The Flanders poppy has been
selected as the memorial flower
heause it has been said by so
many to represent ‘‘the soul of
the dead.”” It was immortalized
in verse by John McCrae. Its
adoption as the Memorial Day
flower will serve a three-fold pur
pose—the commemoration of the
dead; the relief of those in need.
and the tightening of the bonds
of friendship between Trance
and America.
HOMES ARE GIVEN DISTINC
TIVE PERSONALITIES
WI'I‘II our first issue of this
month we suggested our be
lief in the appropriateness of
naming the ranch, or home. The
suggestion was taken up with
alacrity by the people of the two
islands and the list now num
bers about 100.° The movement
should mnot stop thepe, but an
other 100 places should be given
distinctive names. It may mean
little to the parents, who will
some of these days shuffle off
this mortal epil, but it will mean
a mighty ]:ft to the boys and
girls who go out to face the in
teresting, but difficult problems of
life——to look backward to the
little playplace on Vashon-Maury
islands where their happiest days
were spent in careless glee, and
be able to tell their children
about the birthplace, and the
name it was known by, and the
happy days that were spent in
the ‘‘old home.”’
It isn’t meet fol us to pass
on the merits of the different
names, but some of the names
sent in are certainly worthy of
a niche beside the “Window in
Thrumbs,”” or the ‘“Bounie Briar
Bush,”’ or Balzac’s ““‘Sign of the
Cat and Racket.”” Braeside, and
Knoweside, and Knowetap, knd
Inglenook, and Craigsy-nos, and
Valhalla, and Flowing Springs,
and Stillwaters, and Kinnikinie,
and dozens of others, suggest
something distinetive. Dr. Stock
ley casts the Einstein theory of
relativity to the winds and names
his place, ‘‘Faraway.” Mirabel,
to the Scotchman, is suggestive
at once of the real place it 15
We would like to lecture for an
hour on the names of the places
we publish this week, for no one
can study each name cavefully,
without either taking a mental
picture of the place, or taking the
measure of the person who gave
it the name. We publish the ad
ditional names as received. and
close this preamble by asking
why some one with an east front
didn’t choose the name ‘‘Aurora
'Al'.‘l.” A
Laurel Wood—Capt. Wiman
Bay View—Mesdames Wylde and
Williams |
Torwood-—l. 11, Church
Four O' Clock-—M. H. Morrisey
iorget-me-not—D, W, l"iup;ml
rick
Inglenocok—J. Gordon
Tedlaw-O-Te-Atun-W. B, Mackie
Hardnox-—-W, O, Cook
San Juan Will—G. B, 5t John
Primrose Cottage—l. Faull
Rancho-O'-Herrera—W. ‘W, Ake
hurst
The Poultry Farm-——G. I, Taylor
The Lumpines-—Scott Spahr
Minnchaha—A, €. Moe
Bonoke—G, K, Coryell
Ivy Lodge—dJ. R. Jenkins
Cherryvale—ll. Krogh
Crane Lodge-—J, A, Lindstrom
Knoweside—David Mackie
Kuowetap-—J. M. Ogilvy
Firwood—-James Cowan
Walnut Grove—P. Irickson
Comice—oO Miner
Mirabel—E. Kneebone
Roselawn—Peter Clansen
Faraway Ranch—D. R. Stockley
Lockerbie Place—D. G. Fenton
Center Boulevard-—Wm. Marsden
Sylvan Retreat---1, M. Pitts
‘('rnig-y-nns——\\'. A. Davies
Lone Acre—{, 11. Howard
Brae Side Farm—T. G. Ogilvy
Old Stomping Ground-—A. D,
Kingshury
'Rninivl' View—G. W, Blekkink
atfield Place—Myrtie Coleman
\\'as]mnoso—l". E. Newman
lMnmnnin View—J. L. Pope
Island Nurseries—S. J.Harmeling
'l‘;n'ld_\'n-—.]m'k Wood
‘Suns Souci—P, Monroe Smock
\Uptodate Fruit Farm—P. M
l Cormick
' Brooy Hill—J, . Mclntosh
J‘(’horr‘v Lane—Mrs. Abbie Smith
Hill Crest—C. L. Garner
lMil]ln'unk—]*'l'nncis M. Sherman
Sea Shell—Fred S. Sherman
Casa Lomo—C. A. Tonneson
Grand-View—Wm. Francis
Twin Maples—S. H. Barry
1-*\11111_\'(1;11(‘—(?. R. Price
‘.\[np]m\'ood——J. M. Silvey
Shamrock—J. L. MeMillan ;
Fernwood—DMrs. I, A 7 Wise
Carvilla—Robert Carvill
Fiz Tree Farm—H. A. Stanley
Canyon Ranch—J. A. Campbell
Vashon Gardens—ll. Hoshi
Sunny Slope—M. Nakayama
Isle Croft—C. J. Robinson
Madrona Drive—W. T. Mills
Madrona Lodge—C. J. Pyle
Swastika Lodge—F. C. Shanahan
Flowing Spring—Frank Enochs
Sunshine Ranch—P. Butcher }
Neverest—L. C. Newby J
Highland Park—E. Morgan
Tuck-a-hoe—R. A. McLean
Outlook Inn—A. B. Odion
Valhalla—T. N. Thompson
Rosebank—B. P. Kirkland
Kinnikinie—P. S. Petelle
Flower Acres—Mrs. M, Lara
Dahlia Farm—Geo. Sheffield
Still Waters--P. Billingsley
Roserox—W. J, Magowan
Rescue—d, L, Masterson
Homestead—Jas. Malone
Bide-a-wee—DMr. Satterwhait
I|Sunny Deen—A. Bartman
, | Shawnee—M. . Shaw
.’"l\l(flldc. A. Cook
.| Adam’s Bden—DM. Myers
fIC. View—Sidney Louch
I:j Sunnybrook—E. W. Bader
e |Sea Breeze Farm—C. B, Taylor
" | Viewpoint Aceres—G. A. Collins
':. Northold Farm—C. 8. Colegrove
¢ | Ferncliffe—Fred M. West
l Ferncliffe—ll, 0. Thomason
o | Ideallin—C. A. Renouf
“10lympic View—L. M. Earles
i Greenvalley—DMr, Abrahamsen
rlThe Marshes—A .J. Marsh
! Holstein Friesian—d. . Bonnell,
Do You
' Use Good Paper When
I You Write?
We Can Print Anything
I and Do It Right.
C. H. BRUCE
v
OFFERS
an unvarying standard of worth and quality in
CONTAINING PURE DRIED BUTTERMILK
GLOBE A-1 LAYING MASH—GLOBE A-1 CHICX
MASH—GLOBE A.l DEVELOPING MASH—ALSO
GLOBE A.l CHICK SCRATCH, CHICK DEVELOP
ER AND GLOBE A-1 DAIRY FEED
All compiled with a thorough understanding of chemical
and nutritional values of feeding stuffs from a scientific as
well as from a practical standpoint, and one so formulat
ed that they provide for the greatest symmetrical growth
in chicks, and the most continuous egg production.
Having demonstrated the value of Globe A-1 Feeds on
Vashon-Maury Islands, we are handling a full line.
€€ o ° .
Aviation Quality
. o )
Submarine Prices
BURTON, - WASH.
PHONE RED 862
” . é’
oqe
* § 1120 Pacilic Ave.
Tacoma, Wash.
{ They Say That,
4 KIRSCHBAUM
y_ Is the “Wizard" of
@ the Clothing manu
pl facturers to-day;
fl - DBy creating an
B Industrial Democracy
( in his factory whereby
8 the entire husiness is
managed jointly by the own
ers and representatives
8 from the workers in the dif
-8 forent (1“]';”"7“"111.\ he
f{ has solved the big problem
8 of assured production:
, This, together with a
M net loss taken on all woolen
M fabrics bought for this
{ scason’s business made
$25. suits in Kirschbaum
Quality, possible at
j this time:
At $25, S3O, $35, and
B S4O we can duplicate in
quality and workmanship,
the goods sold a year
ago at S4O to $75; we
will go even farther and
say that there are some
fillrl‘iw\ i!l our stock
this year that we could
not have bought at any |
price a year ago.
Every day we find |
real appreciation |
of the ]‘l‘fimw at ‘
which we are offer |
ill‘.' these “-r(-rl~‘
D.
ickson Bros. Co.
Tacoma, Wash.
——am LUMBER
!_A*m AND
»Mn«@ SHINGLES
" N ;
IL' Fruit Boxes
H. Steen Mill Co.
Phone Black 173 Vashon, Wash.
I'riday, May 27th., 1921
Chicago Dentists charge
lowest prices beeause they
want the great advantages
of modern scientific dent
istry to be available to
every one. 2
Remember that no charge
waatever is made for dent
al examination and if your
teeth need treatmen, this
teeth need treatment, this
elsewhere.
Come in the next time you
are in Tacoma, for [ree
examination.
AND REMEMBER
TR
It It Hurts l
s
Don't Pay |
All Work Guaranteed 15 Years
We have been in business
continuously in Tacoma for 17
years at this same location.
. .
Chlcago Dentists
INCORPORATED
Est. 1904 Dr. Douglass, Mgr.
Open Daily 9 a. m. to 8 p. m.
Sundays 9 a. m. to 12 m.
11241, PACIFIC AVE.
TACOMA, WASH.
Fianos Tuned
Now is a good time to have your
piano tuned. F. (. Shanahan,
Dilworth Point, P. 0. Address,
Vashon, Wash. 19tf
—TMHave you tried one of those 3
flavored ice ereapm bricks at Fur
bush’s? Take one home,
—Reaq the Classified ads on page

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