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Cayton's monthly. (Seattle, Wash.) 1921-1921, February 01, 1921, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093354/1921-02-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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It will be observed by studying the above tabulated
election returns, that the eleven states, all of the
South, which registered Democratic majorities, cast
2,986,088 votes for all candidates, just 132,971 votes
more than were cast for all presidential candidates in
the state of New York. The eleven Democratic states,
Alabama, 10; Arkansas, 8; Florida, 4; Georgia, 12; Ken
tucky, 11; Louisana, 8; Mississippi. 8; North Carolina,
10; South Carolina, 7; Texas, 18; Virginia, 10, have a
total representation in tho House of Representatives of
Congress amounting to 106 members; while the statD of
New York, casting, in round numbers, but 100.000 less
votes than the eleven Democratic states, has but forty
three members in the House of Representatives, which
gives to th > aforesaid Democraiic states almost two and
one-half times greater voting strength in Congress than
the state of New York, which is neither just nor fair.
In this country all men may be born equal as runs the
preamble of the Constitution, but the white citizens of
the South, from a voting standpoint, are two and one
half times greater than the white citizens of New York.
Here is another comparison that will come nearer
home to a majority of the readers of this periodical:
The state of Washington in the recent general el :ction
cast 393,584 votes for all presidential candidates, and it
has five representatives in the House of Representatives
of Congress. The states of Mississippi (82,492); South
Carolina (66,600); Georgia (148,716); Louisiana (12G.
--057), together cast 423,5G5 votes for all presidential
candidates, just 30,281 votes more than was cast by the
state of Washington, and those four states have a total
representation in the House of Representatives of Con
gress of 35 members. In other words, the voters of
those states are just seven times greater than the voters
of Washington. The states of Mississippi and South
Carolina each cast fewer votes than did the city of Se
attle.
The state of Idaho cast for all presidential candi
dates, 134,897 votes, and she has only one representa
tive in the House of Representatives of Congress, while
the state of Georgia cast 148,71!6 votes, but 13,819 more
votes than was cast by the state of Idaho, and yet
Georgia has twelve representatives in the House of
Representatives of Congress, thus making on^ vote in
Georgia twelve times greater than one vote in Idaho.
Listen again! California, in the recent election,
cast 943 274 votes for all presidential candidates, and
she has eleven representatives in th 3 House of Repre
sentatives of Congress. The states of Mississippi,
South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama, Arkansas
and Florida cast 944,815 votes for all presidential can
didates and those states have fifty-nine representatives
in the House of Representatives of Congress, thus
making, in this group, a vote in any of the above Dem
ocratic states, four and one-half times more powerful in
governmental affairs than one vote in the state of Cal
ifornia.
And thus could these startling comparisons be car
ried on almost ad inflnitum; all of which makes it plain
why the congr ssman from the South swell all up and
feels himself many times ov r the more powerful and
influential in shaping the destinies of this country than
tin congressman from the North.
In the great Civil War one white soldier from the
South figured himself capable to conquer three and
MONTHLY
OAYTON'S
four Hires as many soldiers from the North, because
he had nothing to do but fight, while the colored slaves
(Yd all ci his drudgery. Now the southern white poli
t;cian invents by force and intimidation the colored
citizens fiv>m voting, and yet they get from Congress
rspr sentati'on for all of the colored citizens just as
though they voted as do the citizens of the various
northern states!
Hear tho conclusion of the whole matter: Let
Congrosa cut down the number of representatives to the
Ho.ua') of Representatives of Congress from the South
la proportion to the votes cast in thse states where no
class of citizens is disfranchised. If the present or the
incoming Congress do?s no* do this, both will be recre
ant to the trust reposed in them to maintain a govern
ment of the people, by the people, for the peopl\ Such
legislation is bound to come, if the "grandfather" dis
franchisement acts continue to prevail in the various
southern states. Had the Force Bill been passed many
years ago, long ere this the voting entanglements of
t'.ie South would have been adjusted. But the fates
have decreed it a legacy to W. G .Harding, who will
:om be president, to settle, and all because, perhaps,
they foresaw that he would settle the question right
and proper, and so mote it be.
I wonder if Bob Tripple thinks that he will make
himself a sphynx, by manufacturing racial strife and
cause some man to loosj his ,life. Does he expect
to make a hit, with Harding or with Jimmy Brit, and
pluck a pretty purple plum or have his head become a
rum? "Marse" Bob is from the sunny South, and there
he learned to pop his mouth, about the niggers having
rights, when white men had to hold the lights. Is Bob
just like all southern fools, who chew the rag in lazy
scules, and damn the niggers all the day, but all night
with their women lay? Six million outcasts stand in
line, a looking for old Father Time, who left before
they saw the light, because thjir mothers had no right,
but li.re they'll stand and look and look, yet never find
within the book, a name which they can legally claim
because their fathers were to blame. Bob's bill would
have a similar wrong brought face to face with Wash
ington's throng; and all about the Puget Sound, outcasts
will be scattered round. Of course the Tripples have
the might, to make such wrongs exactly right, but I
hardly think that Heister Cuie, and all of those who
with him fly, will listen to such tommy rot, as tha^ pro
pcvul by Bobby Hot, but will this number thirty six, and
chase-Bob Tripple back to Dix. If this our legislature does,
then peac; will be just like it was, and all the peoples
in the stale will say begone and don't be late.
Number Thirty-Six
HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON
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