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The Seattle star. [volume] (Seattle, Wash.) 1899-1947, March 02, 1910, Home Edition, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093407/1910-03-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE SEATTLE
STAR
"vol i- NO. **_
SURVIVOR SAYS SIXTY-FIVE WERE IN SLIDE
lf'A'Mi* «* i»i yip
NONE CAN BE
ALIVE NOW
!■ HE SAYS
Man mmawtm , am aim mmm
Viet All Down and Relief Train Is Lost Beyond
IAH Down and Relief Train Is Lost Beyond
fcykemith Railroad Officials Admit That 23
{% lend, 20- Missing, Are Conservative , Figures.
\-*s:ml ~— -4;3£&* ■
m mw mmm* — iii '■ mmt^mamaamtammmmmmmt l_g mv.
M^fwre-were at least 65 passengers on the;
; STiin when our party It-It Our party was the
[bit to come out to safety from the stalled train.
i know the number of passengers on the train as
I went through it a hundred times in the week .
« were there. JOHN S. ROGERS.
I believe that there were more than 60 pas.
Imagers on the train when 1 left. Ido not see how
Mtrof them could escape.
! m --GEORGE W. LOVEBERRY.
P|A Great Northern messenger is struggling through
fe'eaw this afternoon from Wellington to Scenic with
**iSrtof the dead in the avalanche. At Scenic the list
i'rfbe telephoned to Skykomish, where it will be put
•fc wire for. Seattle and made public immediately.
Jess* announced at Traffic Manager Costello's of*
faire this afternoon.
At tke same time the company officially announc
ed dead. 16 to 20 missing and 12 injured were
arrrafmj'* latest figures.
Newspaper - and railroad offices were flooded
■I ■funis from agonized relatives of those sup
fmi to be on the train, from early morning. The
wdt A completely cut off from the world and the
'***m company knows little more than the public.
TW wires extend only as far as Skykomish.
■w sH messages are relayed to Scenic Hot Springs.
** there to Wellington is an impassable barrier of
"*' |*J5 miles up the steep grade of the mountain.
P»M efforts of newspaper workers to reach the
E. Ihe ***** have been fruitless. Those few who
*«5»tM their way through the snow to the wreck
••out of reach of the wires and unable to give the
[•y « the horror to the waiting thousands.
| THE MISSING
E§P-t McNENY ' at'orney. Marion building; residence.
H"?*"^ Seattle.
I JAMES McNENY ... mate dealer; residence, 820 E. 45th
Wrdiv Sn
0- MAHLER, real estate dealer: residence. 820 E. 4Sth
m**p
SK-JETHEL, contractor ami civil engineer: residence,
garner Ninth «v. and Jefferson St.. Seattle.
£*RS- .M. A. COVING of Olympia; mother of L. J.
J^ the Wsshington Children's Home, Seattle
_ tORGE F. DAVIS, motorman. Seattle, Renton & South-
I *' Zm* Arn «»cus ay., Seattle.
■*•*»»■ fceLTim treasurer Pacific Coast Pipe
SS'/u W,nw" 4515 14th 3V- N. W., Seattle.
JIRAMFOWI'i
"ED BOH ™ clerk, Seattle,
I gjjrr-LEMMON. attorney, Seattle,
'■tot' .* i r; * WIFE AND CHILDREN. Pleasanton, Cal.
U rI ARRETT- THRKf! CHILDREN, MOTHER
! I i '"ER. en route to Bellingham.
-*ILP ntJ3! TL conductor of ,rain' Ev"«t.
fs" DIEHL' baggageman. Spokane.
m^"* :. JOHNSON, stockman. Trinidad. Colo.
~~-—COHN, Everett.
VtaiT ■ ?0 GART- of Spokane, clerk on one of the mail
kJOHND p°o 2 X '" i ' k 2304 N. 65th at.
tAU vim ' rai!way ma'l clerk. 2304 N. 65th st
tarn field,
IW lie-!. „_■
Vancouver, H, C.
j**-~-BOLES, brother of the above.
i^f 0"^ WIFE. Colvillc, Wash. |
T rivt)| Vl" 8 " St* FranciH Spokane, name unknown.
; 'Cbii '"*• "**" of Ar,lnon' Ohio, name unknown. .. .
; nMr of Seattle, n,mc unknown.
j I**4. CHAr RELL, government inspector, Blame,
K m- ADAMS *au .
ms ' address unknown.
< HENky WHI|T A ' ,awyer ' rcsif,ence unknown.
f^PipttCo i* ' marrieflß Raveling salesman for Amen
*** <*0., lives at Fairmore hotel. 510 Broadway, Seattle.
eadway, Seattle.
»MABTER ENTIF,ED DEAD*
■tINIIAbTI-j-- a ■
3^ to nupt' ° Neill
**„„. KNOWN INJURED.
i fcS<Jl . Kurdlc ' fata!'y; Mail Clerk A. 11. Hi rsall.
"n*£^D THE aWONDAY tWGORE MEETING AT THE GRAND [email protected]/[email protected]
HERE IS DEATH HILL, WHICH SENT TONS OF SNOW DOWN ON HEADS OF HELPLESS PASSENGERS
Porter A. Smith. Porter L Anderson. Brakeman Ross. Assistant
Trainmaster W. Her ring ton, Engineer Osborne, of Seattle;
Engineer F. S. Martin, of Everett: Engineer Carroll, Engineer
Jarnlgan, Fireman Dan C Oilman. Fireman S. A Bates. Fireman
Fred Nelson. Engineer D Tegtmier, Conductor M O. White,
of Everett; Fireman Msuk. A, G. Mthlet. Seattle; John Msckic.
Moyie, B. C. ; Alex Chtaaholm. Roasland. B. C.; O. Heron, Van
couver, B. C; Mr. and Mrs. William May. Chemainus, B. C; A
, Thompson, Presbyterian minister, Bellingham, Mrs. Davis and
child, Seattle.
_______________
(By Staff Special.)
EVER KIT, March 2.—Swept lo a swift .Iratlt in an ava
lanche of snow was the fate of more than a score of passengers
on the ill-fated train that has been held at Wellington at the
mouth of the Great Northern tunnel fnr the past week.
.At *, yesterday morning the vast mass of snow which
citing lo the mountainside lei go. In an instant the train,
coaches and engine, were picked up like hips in a stream and
sent whirling down the canyon.
There was no warning—only a vast space-filling roar that
was the knell of thojic who slept in fancied security, a roar which
reverberated back and forth among the mountain peaks—'and
than all p
Far flown the canyon side, buried in the smothering depths,
men and women struggled and died. Freakish fate looked after
some and left others to their stifling doom.
It was a horrible tragedy, enacted high up in the wind
swept passes of the Cascade*, with only the bleak mountain
tops as witnesses.
23 DEAD. 25 MISSING. 20 HURT.
Twenty-three arc known to be dead, 20 arc. injured ant!
25 are missing—and missing al the bottom of that snow-choked
canyon means death.
This down-rushing death came ss the frightful climax of a
week of terror and despair. Penned in at the mountain top lit
soft, treacherous snow, facing hunger and cold, while day and
night the slides thundered strain them; the passengers aboard
the train have lived in hourly fear. Death stared at them from
cvfrysidr „ ; ,-, *.. Imt tin
Inside the tunnel they were safe from snowslidcs, but the
dread bf being locked in there and left to die was too great.
They begged tlie conductor to take them out into the open, lie
did so. Hardly were they out in the air when a slide blocked
the n-ar to the tunnel, another piled a mountain of snow in
front of the train.
COULD ONLY WAIT.
Hemmed in on all sides, the 72 passengers could do nothing
but watt —wait while the thunders of falling avalanches chilled
their souls. They were but a few weak human beings caught
in one of nature's crudest traps, They could do nothing fur
themselves but wait ami hope—-liopc that the little spot they
occupied would not be swept fiver.
Anil nil tl.' tlm" Ilut snow tt hs pilltiK up on ttie. , '.i_... . iitiovn Hit.
train; tbe snow plied up snd tha rarm wind* loosened ti» nrlp,
Until'tbn limtßlil i-aiue wlioil Ihn wi'lslil above overbalanced tho
Krunp below, nnd Ihn vt hoi" iiiiiku ciiinu lnnilit.i: down, nwn-pltig
over_.tl.lnK 1" Us path- Notlilwt Unit mini DSS mndn could resist it.
Continued on Page Three.
•^IQM^I.
EDITION
:.^^7\X
SEATTLE, WASH., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1910.
FREIGHT TRAIN STANDING AT DEPOT IN WELLINGTON, WHERE TERRIBLE SLIDE OCCURRE D
***a*a*a*a*.*,*, aa*******,m.*.*.*.*•*.*****.*.*.*
i HAS THIS LEOPARD I
! CHANGED ITS SPOTS?!
I in v *
(From the Seattle Daily Times. April 25. 190fi)
"If Mr. Gill means to have it Understood that Mayor Moore
is interfering with tin right* of Ihe council when he exercises
his charter right to enforce the law of the city against every
drinking place, bawdy house and gambling den in the city, 'hen
iwe will admit that Mayor Mcmrc has become offensive to at
least one member of the council. Had Mayor Moore approved
, every saloon license which has been handed up to him since he
became chief executive of the city; had he let the blind pigs
stone in the Third ward, whose owners are among the supporters
of Hi Gill—had Mayor Moore done these things, then we say
Mr. Gil! would probably have voted for the confirmation of
Capt. Spaulding."
a i
(From the Times of December 12, I'XM)
I
"The Comique is still running in full blast, with wine, I
women and their drunken victims in the boxes, which the
ordinance granting the license for the place says shall be re
lieved. No one seems to* dare to interfere with the conduct
of the den of vice. THE COUNCIL CLIQUE. HEADED BY
HI GILL, IS THE POWER THWARTING THE POLICE
DEPARTMENT IN THE PERFORMANCE OF ITS
DUTY
December 5, 1904, in speaking 'if tin passage, against Hal
lingers wishes, of a liquor license for the Arcade dance hall,
the Seattle Times said:
"With the license granted, Ferguson is to be allow ctl to sell
liquor,[employ women rustlers, ami maintain the boxes in the
house, where robbery and murder have occurred, just
the same as he is doing in the Comique dive. Mayor Hatlingt-r
once vetoed the Arcade privilege and it is to be put up to him
again by THE NOTORIOUS HI GILL CLIQUE WHICH
HERS EVERY CORRUPT PROCEEDING IN THE
COUNCIL."
-
(From the Times of December 13, I'tH)
"During the time Hi Gill has been president of th- city
council ,i worse condition has rcign-d in thai body than in any
pievious Seattle council as far as is publicly known. Property
owners of Seattle and all who are interested in ihe welfare of
the city have read in Ihe public press of the city of the president
of the council, whose oath of office to support the ordinances
of the city of Seattle and till' laws of the stale of Washington is
on file with the city comptroller, leaving the president's chair
of the council during a session, to go about the city and rustic
bail fur gamblers, whose den, within ihe heart of the city, had
just been raided by the police. ill' HAVE SEEN HIM
STAND SIDE BY SIDE WITH FRENCH A"ND OTHER
(Continued on P*i; Thres.) ,
THE SEATTLE
PASSENGERS
MIGHT HAVE
BEENSAVED
Two Men Who Walked Over Stormy Trail From Stall
ed Train to Scenic Ahead of Death-Dealing Ava
lanche, Tell Dramatic Story of the Tragedy.
________________
f"Hsd ths passengers on the train .wept Into the canyon by
MM avalanche st Wellington taken the trail with my party and
made their way to B:enic Hot Spring*, the fearful lots of life
would have been averted " *
■ i-.: -■ ■■----''
This ass the statement made by John 8. Itocers. real fatal*
dealer In the Epler block, who was a passenger on the train, and
stayed with I! from Tuesday of last week until Monday noon.
"The train." said llogcra, "reached the east mouth of the Cas
cade tunnel on Tuesday night. We were- stalled there. lii' train
SUB' there until Thursday night. When all of the food on ihe
train ami st tin bunk houses st the mouth of On- canyon had been
consumed, the train wan drawn through the tunnel.
"The train never stopped In the tunnel, as reported. w,.
stopped about one eighth of a mile from the west mouth of the tun
nel, nt Wellington. Directly ahead of us the track was coverts!
wllh a mountain of Know. All of tho passengers were In good
bumor nil passed tin. time playing cards and In conversation.
WOMEN BECAME FRANTIC SUNDAY.
"Uy Sunday, however, the women had become frantic. I ba
came alarmed myself. All day and night you could hear ilie re
ports of trees being Knapped off by tbe anowslldec In tha moun
tains. Prom the train one could see the tops of telegraph poles
Just protruding Ibrough ibe snow. Near tbs train snow covered
the ground lo a depth of 40 feet. One gulch 60 feet deep bad been
Completely filled with snow, and on Ihe track above It the snow
was parked elgh! feet high by the »Hde.
"Monday noon several of us became alarmed. The question ot
leaving iho train was discussed. The strange thing about It was
lhal Alaskans, used lo SBOW traveling, absolutely refused to mako
tho trip. They declared lt was foolhardy to attempt lo reach
Scenic Hot Springs, nine miles away.
"Many of Ihe passengers argued that there was no danger in
staying with the train, ns there hud never been n anowstlds In
that spot In Ihe history of the railroad. A hogback ridge In the
mountains directly over the train was relied upon to stop a snow
slide. On the tracks adjacent to tbs mountains were three motor
cars, on lbs nexl truck wns iho engine and the superintendent's oar,
and on ihe track net! to the canyon was the passenger train.
"I left on Monday noon with a
party of 10. The psrty was mudo
up iif li. A. Sperlier, of Vancouver,
li. ('.; v. MiKiiigiu, Vancouver, H.
I.; 8,-Kield, Vancouver. 11. O.i
Charles Vohn, Portland, Ore.;
Angus Van l.nikeu, Seattle, Wash.;
l'tiinli Hitler. BoUth Seattle: tiuls
eppfl Dtnatslle, Portlsad, Ore.; 11.
U Merit, Hlllynrd, ore.; K. w.
tidies, Viuieouver, H. t*,, and my
self,
"The parly, all safe, tearful
—..... ma,, — ..ii.ii., .lain a.na.ll n —S—>—— m •••" • '■■■■'■ '— ■■—■■•»
MNF C'l'lUT "** TWAtm ****
Oltte V.CII I MJV. a Hl A Mis Be.
I Scenic In three hours. Field, on
; Ihe way out. was thrown by a small
; slide against v slurp boulder Slid
this hack «as Injured considerably,
A great part of the time wo wera
; walking on snow through which
[the telegraph wires just protruded.
"Ami the Hiiotv was railing—lt
was n veritable blliurd through
which ws floundered from Welling.
ton to Scenic, lively few minutes
(Continued on Page Three.)

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