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The Seattle star. [volume] (Seattle, Wash.) 1899-1947, June 14, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093407/1913-06-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Bob Bridges is not an issue in the port election next Tuesday. Don't let the organs of the Port Pirates muddy the water. There is only
one issue and that issue is the attempt of the Pirates to increase the commission so they can grab control. 0 0 A morning paper says
there is no danger in the Pirates' attempt to increase the membership of the commission. Only two members are to be elected next fall, it
gays, anil it lies. Three members are to be elected if the Pirates'scheme succeeds. AND THREE MEMBERS* WOULD BE A MAJORITY,
jj jg A majority is what the Pirates'hope to get. 0 0 The Pirates threaten to delay Seattle another two years by court injunctions
unless their terms are accepted. 0 0 Why not kill the Pirates' scheme now? 0 0 Why not end their criminal efforts to tie up Seat
tle's harbor? There's just oneway to do it. Slaughter the Pirates' proposition, No. 4. 0 0 Said slaughter should take place next Tuesday
-Mk-v RKFOHMI'KS «ET AS HI SY WITH
Tlf THE MEN WHO IKOrn KKUM VH'K
W THK VVOMKS Wilt) SI.W K AT IT.
" IT WILL UK A HKTTKK TOWN.
JURY AFTER BRIBERS
reliable citizens give out
STATEMENT URGING VOTERS
10 KILL PORT PIRATES' STEAL
The following statement, signed by a score of reliable and public
minted citizens, and submitted for the consideration of Star readers,
merits careful reading and thought. These citizcns see the bunco game
of the Port Pirates as The Stai pointed it out in its issue of Friday.
They urge voters to block t!.e Pirates' steal by defeating their Proposi
tion Four at the election next Tuesday. The statement follows:
(To the Ruder* of The Star: .
Few franchise* of greater value have ever been granted t.> private corporations than
ifee franchise nought a little over a year ago by Mr Ayers and hi* associate*, viz The power
tDOperate and control the principal unit <>f our jx>rt
Bv a great blaze of newspaper publicity this valuable grant was urge.! upon us Seattle
(or the moment was swept from her feet I.ater sober judgment showed we ha«i been car
ried avrav by glittering promises. Public opinion came to the point <>f view that <>ur great
fatnre port should not pass into private hands, but should remain in public control, just
ewe retain public control of our I.ight Plant and our Water Plant
THE PORT PIRATES* TRAP.
Wtfcct, Tuesday, another election. We believe in that election in involved, in hidden
itm, tbt ■""* old i»aue: Shall Mr. Ayers or tome other private concern ~et this valuable
faadiM. or ihaH Seattle retain its benefits and revenue® for ita own upbuilding.
Mr. Avers is now in Seattle Why is he here? According to his own statement he is
bere to get that priceless franchise. He savs he is going to fight for it. lie savs he vvill
have recourse to the courts and cause two years' delay in our development if we do not
fire it to him Realizing that we feel the great urgency of beginning work at once. Mr
Arm would now plav upon our fears, as a year ago he played _ upon our hopes The
fains that backed Mr. Ayers with such glaring newspaper publicity, back him still. Mr.
Am and these forces behind him know there is now but one way that they can take from
■ tins franchise and that is to get a new port commission. The present port commission
if dm members has refused to sell to Mr. Ayers Seattle's birthright for a mess of pottage.
Therefore, Mr. Ayers is here now with his veiled threats, awaiting the result of Tuesday s
iictioa.
It at that election, the people vote to increase the commission from three to five, then
ml then only has Mr. Ayers a chance to accomplish hia purpose. For If the commission
■ increased to five members, that will mean an election of three members or a majority of
the board, neat December. If Mr. Ayers. with his publicity fund and newspaper backing,
on elect three commissioners favorable to his project, then Seattle will have lost the price
tos privilege of operating and controlling its own port development. That is the stake
vhkh is on the table and for which we play by our votes on Tuesday next.
If vou do not wish to run the chance of giving to a private corporation the power to
by toll for 30 years to come at the door of Seattle's future commerce, then vote against
i iffthere is*profit to be made from the operation of the Port of Seattle, let us retain
4k profit for'ourselves.
A publiclv operated terminal will 'end to reduce rates and therefore will cn " i n c, ow ";
m«f private' docks to meet that re'need rate This was the effect of lowered rates m
w light plant upon the private plant of the Seattle Electric company. Public operation
tftedocks nv reducing rates will tend to make the railroads reduce carrying charges to
wet water competition In case of p iblic < prration. dividends will not have to .e j aid on
Tes or Eleven Million Dollars of watered stock. Thus charges and rates ctn l* "
»minimum, and Stattle can compel- on equal terms, if not on more favorable ones.
other ports.
Therefore, we urge all citizens to vote on Tuesday and in so doin>; to- register their
imests against anv increase oi the commission at this time.
diiy iiu rcast w» —
Oped i
UCHARD WINSOR, President School Hoard.
C. A. EWALD, prominent lumberman.
*®SUE M. FIEL.DK, rnembpr of library board.
CML J. BMITH, lawyer.
jjt BLACK WELL.
WWAY PARDEE. President Public ownership
Uipie
1 * HAWTHORNE. President Kin* County I>emo
ewlc Club.
ALLEN DALE, Chairman Kin* County Central
Committee, Progressive party.
"08 P. MCRPHINE, member of legislature and
»lead In* progressive.
£• J PRANCE, a former president Municipal league.
JUT ALLEN.
The Star's Big
Free Razor Offer
•» told of in detail in the large ad which ap-
P®w» on page Bin today's paper. This is one
®" the moat liberal offers that The Star has
jj*®* been able to make to its readers. The
•wham is a high class razor in every respect
*nd if y OU bought it in the regular way it
would probably cost you at least $2.50.
i» outfit is complete, including the razor
j "'.seven guaranteed blades, a Colgate shav
ttick and a nickel handled shaving brush,
packed in a neat and serviceable leatherette
With a year's subscription to The Star,
» . the regular price of $3.25, you are given
tM. "*ndsome outfit absolutely free. For
"Other details see the big ad on page 8.
The Seattle Star
VOLUME 15
NO. 91
JI E. JONES, President Seattle Commercial flub
OTTO A. CASE. secretary S«'attl«- Coniniercial < lub
JOHN H. BHOKETT. formerly president of the Fedcr
ated Improvement club* of the 14th ward and at
torney for the l>uwnmlsh Waterway dlatrlct.
GEO H REVELLE, lawyer
J S IA)NO Chnlrmnn MethodUt Brotherhood of City
MRS OEOROE N McLAUOHLIN. President S%|ti«<
Federated Women * Club*
MRS FRED W BERT, Jr., President West Queen
Anne Parent-Teachers' A*»oclatlon.
JOSEPH K HART
FRANK S. HAYLEY.
MRS. HELEN N. STEVENS, editor Western Wom
en'* Outlook
OEOROE H WALKER, lawyer.
SENSATION IN
LOBBY INQUIRY
WASHINGTON, June 14.—A real
1 sensation waa sprung at the "In
sidious lohhy" probe here today
when a letter purporting to show
that ('resident Wilson last Septem
ber promised the sugar Interests
that, If he were elected, lie would
not molest the bent sugar Industry,
was read to the senate sub-commit-
The letter wa* signed hy W. It.
Wallace and wa* addressed to W.
It Hathaway, aecretary of the
Mlchlxan Hucar Co. Wallace la
general manager of the s«mo com
panjr
The letter watt admitted to evl
dence during the examination of
Hathaway. It la said that Wllaon
had made thin promlaw to Wallace
on Hept ember IS and that on Kept,
ft, at Haxnlaw, Mich., he made a
similar promise to Vice I'realdent
/Douglas of the Maine company.
THE ONLY PAPER IN SEATTLE THAT DARES TO PRINT THE NEWS
SEATTLE, WASH.. SATURDAY, JUNE 14. 1913.
SltoWntH foNIOlIT; HUN I)AY I'ROMAHLY FA IK, MODKKATK H (H'THWKHT WINIW
HOUSE BURNS; WIDOW AND HER LITTLE
ONES LEFT WITHOUT ROOF OVER HEADS
MRU. EI,ISHA DAVIS AND HER CHILDREN, BTANDfNO BEFDRE THEIR TENT. CHARRED RUINS
OF THEIR HOME IN BACKGROUND
NEIGHBORS PUT UP TENT;
WILL REBUILD HER HOUSE
Mr*. Rtlsha Davta had. at the out-
M't, the unit chance In the lottery
of life as any on else There I*
no evidence that the game I* crook
ed If »br wa* cold decked, you
mu*t blnme Fate, who dealt the
cards
She married. There are In
the world good men, bad men,
rich men, poor men. Industri
ous msn and laxy men, amiable
men and grouchy men.
Mrs. Oavla reached Into the
grab-bag and drew a husband.
He didn't support her, Finally
he left her to support his four
young children. She might
have "had the law on him," but
he escaped the law's reprisals
by dying.
Mr* IHi v I*' four children are:
Marie, IK; Irving, IS; Arthur, 11,
[and Charlie, 9
With her needle Mr* I>avl*. a lit
, tie woman, managed to make a liv
ing, and even to *ave a little mon
ey. With It *he bought the cottage
j In which *he lived, at 3262 McCUn
tock *t.
It wasn't luck that enabled her to
Nothing to Do But Eat Chicken;
Job's Too Hard; Bothell Man Quits
from Our f'nrr««|><>n4»nt
ROTHGUi, June 14. —"Condition* attached to Ihl* Job :tre too
darn hard."
Thl* I* the simple and sufficient reason given by Henry Car
tonberry for 111* resignation a* curfew officer here.
In addition lo keeping the children off the streets at night,
Henry wa* ordered by the town council to kill all chicken* he
found roaming through the town In daytime. He wa* told to oat
all he killed.
Henry ha* been killing and eating chickens for 30 day*.
BAR WIELDER DIES
SAN FRANCISCO, June 14. Bar
kis HatidnsHros, a Greek. who whs
shot here Thursday by Patrolman
lames M Bench, died from his In
juries today. lleach was charged
with manslaughter and released on
fSO hall.
Heaeh alleges that nsgdasaroH
attacked hlrn with an Iron bar and
that he shot In self-defenße.
/ I SHOULD
Vfbftmr
A chandelier and get lit
up every night.
buy the homo It was hard work
an>l harsh Monoinjr.
Marie. the oldest child, grew to
allm. comely girlhood. and In her
turn tried her hand at the grab has
H«-r child, a girl of 18 month*, has
/Sever seen her father.
I.ast Wednesday the little home
was dent roved by fire There
wasn't a penny of Insurance. Rv
erythlng in the house, even the
clothing, waa loaf
The neighbor* loaned them
clothes They loaned them lenta —
a sleeping lent and a living tent.
They mucked the larder
1) M Taggert. 3207 37th av S ;
Albert E Todd, 3272 McCUntock
nt , T K Hlches. 3107 Hanford St..
and Fred Kelly, 3231 34th av. S..
form a committee representing the
neighbor*. who hope to collect
enough money to rebuild Mr*. Da
via' home Initiation* may he *ent
to any memtier of the committee
j Marle't baby was saved from the
fire In the nlrk of time
H lan't It lucky that wa got baby
out In time?" aay* Marie.
"lan't It lucky that we have auch
good nelghbortT" aay* Mrs. Davis.
REJECT.ALL BIDS
npraußc the lowest hid for the
construction of the tuberculosis
hospital on the clt)'s site at Klr
land exceeded the appropriation,
the board of public works rejected
all bids, and Superintendent of
Mil 11*11 ii ks Ober has been Instruct
ed to prepare now plans and spool
flcatlons M. J. Ilurson Co.'* bid
of $57,1190 was the lowest.
ADVISORY BALLOT FOR
PORT ELECTION, JUNE 17
Recommended by the Commercial Club, the Municipal
League the Public Ownership League, and The Seattle
Star Yes _No
PROPOSITION I EJ— U
PROPOSITION II 13 "—O
PROPOSITION 111 El
PROPOSITION IV Q — EI
1 PROPOSITION V El ~LJ
one cent
Bryan's Going to
Carry His Lnnch
WASHINGTON, June 14.—
Secretary Bryan made another
bid for fame today ae a real
democrat when he announced
that, beginning next week, he
will carry with him each morn-
In to the etate department a
real, eure-enough lunch basket.
"My wife hae already bought
the basket," said Brya ntoday.
"I figure I can aave an hour'a
time by eating my lunch In my
office. And I can do a little
dieting ae well."
STILI FIGHTING
BI6SAG HOBOS
MANILA. June J4 Fierce fight-
Ing continued between American
troops and Moro outlaws on the rim
of a volcano's crater. latest re
|>orts saj another American scout
ha* been killed and another wound
ed. The Moros still hold one fort at
Hagsag. but Its capture Is expected
today The fighting for the last
three days, the reports say, has
been of the fiercest order.
Got a Hen You
Can Spare Us?
In response to an article in Fri
day'* Star calling the attention of
Ita reader* to the cn*e of the tuber
ular patient. Q R Mlnchlom, re
aiding with his wife and two small
children at 2021 19th av 8.. whose
flock of 14 chickens was stolen,
Mrs. Hardman, 118 Vine St.. has
donated one doznn fresh e«KH and
a sitting hen.
She sufCKott* (hat 13 other chirk
on owners give Mlnchlom n hen.
thiiH making up fur his loss.
Why, Woodrow,
How Could You?
WASHINGTON. June 14.—
President Wilson, despite re
port* that he would not play
there, today golfed on the ex
clusive Chevy Chate links with
hi* physician, Dr. Grayson,
The president was resplendent
In white duck trousers.
HOME
EDITION
BRIDGES GIVES GRAND
JURY FACTS; CHAMBER
TRUSTEE IS SUMMONED
J. 8 Brace, a Chamber of Commerce director, spent an uncomfort
able hour at the courthouse today, while answering a subpoena of tha
grand jury in connection with the alleged attempted bribery of Robert
Brldgea.
Brace waa aubpoenaed immediately after Bridges gave his testi
mony to the effect that he was offered a bribe of 250.000 shares In tha
Ayers company to "see things In the right light."
M B. Harbin, a Commercial Club member, chanced Into the ante
room of the grand jury room by mistake, and saw Brace before tha
jury. Harbin says Brace was near collapse.
Besides Brace, the grand jurors subpoensed Lee Melleur, secre
tary of Bob Bridges when the latter was land commissioner; Port Com
missioner Remsberg and Paul Hedrlck, employed on one of the news
papers which boosted the Ayers scheme
C. B. Busted, the prominent tide land owner on Harbor Island, who
alio wai subpoenaed late Friday afternoon, at the tame time that
Brae* was served with hit subpoena, wai in the grand jury room today
' al*o.
In his statement Friday, Bridget Indicated that a director of tha
Chamber of Commerce had coma to him with aome prcpotltlon, purport
ing to act aa tha agent of two local editori Interested in the Ayera
tcheme. Brldgaa, It la alleged, told Paul Hedrlck at one time the nama
of the man and dared him to publlah hia statement. The name waa
navar publiahed.
Bob Bridges, port commii- 'hey would have you believe. be
•ioner, his named the man ' lec,l , on -, fc r> ° yo , u no ,hat
• ' _ § _ . .. a today there Is the same
who attempted to bribe him ot disclaimer? Again, they
with 250,000 ihard in the want the voters to believe that they
Ayres wildcat Harbor island are no longer behind Ayera. that they
terminal »cheme. discarded 'he slant financier
u. .l. .l, i"»ni out of the Kaat. and will have
He gave the name to the not hi n g to do with hi* arheme?
grand jury Fnday afternoon. A yer* la now in the city. Who fa
"I told the probers more responsible for his appearance
than that," Bridges announced Who Invited him to our
at the mass meeting of the " hprp , ht()
Ayera making
Public Ownership league in a public statement that It la lm
the Commercial Club rooms material what the voters of King
Friday night.
And because grand Juries are se
cret bodies, and because every wit
ness testifying before a grand Jury
>s enjoined to absolute secrecy.
Bridges stated that he could not
make the name of his would-be
briber public.
Bridges did not appear before
the grand Jury on hla own motion.
He was served with a subpoena af
ter his Interview In The Star, in
which he declared he would publish
the name of the briber if the ed
itors of the two papers, who gave
the brass band music to the Ayres
steal, would demand it at the mass
meeting.
Two Subpoenaed
Following his appearance before
the grand Jury, subpoenaes were
issued for C. B. Buaaell, owner of
property on Harbor Island, and J.
S Brace, director In the Chamber
of Commerce
500 Attend Meeting
The mass meeting was attended
by over .100 Friday night, and
Bridges was received with tremen
dous enthusiasm. Once, when a
representative of a local paper at
tempted to elicit some information
as to his testimony before the
grand Jury. Bridges replied:
"I am a law abiding cltzen"
The answer elicited a storm of
applause that continued for more
than a minute
Bridges took up the five propo
sitions to be voted on next Tues
day. Discussing Proposition 4,
namely, to increase the port mem
bership to five members, which
Bridges strenuously opposed, he re
ferred to the campaign preceding
the vote on the A.vers Harbor
Island plan.
They Did Care
"I>o you recall," Bridges asked,
"that after the notorious gentle
men'# agreement was staged, and
a few days prior to election, there
was a disclaimer by the Chamber
of Commerce and other newspa
pers who backed Avers, that they
were no longer behind that propo
sition, and do you recall the post
ers distributed broadcast, announc
ing: 'We want the terminals. We
elon't care who builds them?'"
Why I* Ayere Here?
"Those 'public spirited' citizens
were going to throw down Ayers,
STORES DODGE NEW
TRADING STAMP LAW
By putting a cash value of one
cent on all certificates and so
called "trading" stamps, thereby
changing their name to "chsh" cer
tificates and stamps, the trading
stamp companies and stores giving
certificates with tobacco and other
merchandise claim to have knocked
out the trading stamp law which
went Into effect In Washington
Thursday.
The law provided that every
store which gave away trading
FOIt OIK* I'OOK, I IRAK, TIKKD JI'DOEM,
AN KIOHT VVKKK HDUDAY, ll' I KOK
TIIK COMMON HI I KKK, 10 HOI KM OK
NO I'AV.
county will do in the election
Tuesday, that they must come to
him and accept his terms. Who is
this Napoleon, who is greater than
all of Seattle? And who is respon
sible that he can make the threat
to block all harbor improvement#
unless the voters agree to hja
terms*
"The proposition to increase tha
port commission originated with
the Chamber of Commerce. ! do
not think they deny it. It is right
they should not. And why? Be
cause. if they succeed Tuesday,
there will be three commissioners
to elect in December. and that con
stitutes a majority of the port com
mission. Thnt means the control.
That means the Avers plan or any
other the majority dictates."
SEEK TO REDUCE
GASH FOR FAIR
The county commissioners hara
appropriated $26,000 for the King
County Fair association.
Investigation by a prominent
member of the Seattle Commercial
Club reveals the fact that a year
ago the total cost of the f;iir was
about $19,000, part of which was
defrayed from the receipts at the
gate and concessions.
A resolution is now being prepar
ed, to be presented to the Commer
cial Club Tuesday, asking the com
missioners to limit the appropria
tion to $15,000.
Aged Conductor
Dies in Harness
LOS ANGELES, .Tune 14—Geo.
G. Clegg, aged 78, snid to he the
oldest railroad conductor in the
West, Is dead at Rscondido. Craig,
who had seen 60 years of active
railroad servtce, "died in harness."
Tie brought his train in yesterday
from San Diego and expected to
take it hack. Death was due to
valvular heart disease.
stamps should pay an annua! li
cense of $6,000. It is claimed that
the license cannot be collected
from'stores gi\ lug away cash cer
tificates.
I'llder the new system, purchas
ers get either stamps or a ash re
fund. Cigar stores are giving a
cash certificate with each 10-cent
purchase, or, if requtsted. will re
turn to the buyer a penny. Nino
certificates or nine cents will pur
chase any 10-cent cigar.
Three to Elect

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