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The Oakes times. [volume] (Oakes, N.D.) 1906-current, June 10, 1909, Image 2

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BUSINESS CARDS
~^ITryBER~~
Physician and Surgeon
Office over Harris' Drug Store.
Private Hospital in Brown Building.
Oakes, North Dakota.
DR. JOHN P. BRASTAD
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office over Oakes National Bank.
Residence one block south of H. School
Phone: Office 174K, Residence 174L
PRIVATE HOSPITAL
DR. M. E. GALE
Resident Dentist
—Offices in
Office In Oakes National Bank Block
Oakes, North Dakota
W. S. Wickersham
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Practice in all Courts. Collections attended
to. Money to Loan.
Office in Lockie Block OAKBS. N. DAB
8G.CADY,
Attorney at Law,
notice in all the Courts in the State. Ool.
lections Made a Specialty, and
Given Prompt Attention.
OAKES, NORTH DAKOTA
ARTHUR P. GUY
LAWYER
NOTARY PUBLIC
Ramharter Block Oakes, N. D.
MRS. W. H. BUSH,
Teacher of the Piano
Pricee Seasonable, and Careful Attention
Gives to the Instruction of
Children.
OBkes, North Dakota.
CHR. PETERSEN
Cigar Manufacturer.
A Full Line of Pipes, Tobaccos and Smok
ere Goods Constantly on Hand.
Shop on Union Street.
OAKES, NOBTH DAKOTA
ROOT & LADD
Dray and Transfer
Will give strict attention to all business en
trusted to us, and guaraneee
satisfactory service.
OAKES Noxih Dakota.
MARSHALL-MCARTNEY GO.
Dealers in
REAL ESTATE.
Oakes, Narth Dakota.
If you have a farm or unim
proved lands for sale or want to
buy lands, call and see us.
Office, First National Bank
AKES, NOBTH DAKOTA
AUCTION AUCTION
AUCTION SALE
W. D. POTTER* Auctioneer
Over twenty years1 experience. For dates
address Oakes, N. D., R. F. D. No. 4 or phone
The FirBt National Bank, Oakes, N. D. Terms
five per cent for first $100 and one per cent for
balance of sale. No sale taken for less than $15.
AUCTIONEER
Having graduated from the Jones School nf
Auctioneering, of Chicago, and obtained all
the new and up-to-date methods. I am now pre-
Earedstock,
to conduct any class of sales: farm, pure
red real estate and meschandise sales,
satisfaction guaranteed. For dates address
CLARENCE P. JENKINS, Oakes* N. D.
DR.S. W. TEAL, V. S.
Ex-State Veterinary
Oakes North Dakota
J. B. COUNSELL
OAKES FEED MILL
AND FEED STORE
DEALER IN
FLOUR AND FEED
FEED GRINDING DONE PROMPTLY
0AKE8, NORTH .DAKOTA
SHIP YOUR GRAIN TO
DULUTH. MINNEAPOLIS
DalKttfar|iR*actk»cf shippers. RecdTiog
a tbadalfy. 'Hot eoonacted with any mill,
nlxlnr boaas, elevator or shipping concern.
Mr later—fame ae years In letting
UONttrieMi beelgfmdeeaedleweet
.?Kln'el»My aaaiXetoMOeatWd.
MANY HOMELESS
at Presque Isle, Me.
FIRE SWEEPS LARGE SECTION
High Wiad Responsible for Rapid
Spread of Flames.
Presque Isle, Me., June
8.—The
en­
tire northeasterly section of this vil
lage, comprising the district where
were situated the most pretentious
residences, was swept by fire, a high
wind carrying the flames and embers
from street to street until 100 dwell
ing houses and the Congregational
church, the Masonic hall and several
other structures had been reduced to
ashes. The Canadian Pacific rail
road station and two large store
houses for potatoes were burned. The
total loss is estimated at $300,000.
Upward of 1,000 persons are home
less.
A high wind which prevailed all
day Is responsible largely for the ex
tent of the disaster. It carried blad
ing embers a distance of a quarter of
a mile in many cases, and new Area
started after the first was well under
way.
Several persons were reported in
jured, but there were so fatalities.
The burned section covers an area
of half a square mile, including North
Main street, Allen street, Third street,
Blake street and South street to Main
street.
The financial loss may exceed $800,
000, but that figure is regarded as a
reasonable estimate. The insurance
will not exceed $150,000.
Presque Isle has a population of
nearly 5,000. It is the center of the
potato raising district of Aroostook
county and Is located on the Bangor
and Aroostook railway and at the
terminus is a branch of the Canadian
Pacific railway running from Aroos
took Junetion. The total valuation of
the town Is $2,000,000.
KILLED ON WAY TO COURT
•t Louis Tragedy Culmination of
Political Feud.
St. Louis. June 7.—Fred Mohrie,
who killed Constable Sam Young in
North St Ixtuis several weeks ago,
was assassinated in the corridor of
tbe criminal court building by Will
iam Kane, a former deputy under
Young.
The shooting occurred as Mohrie
was being taken to court to stand
trial for the death of Yonng and is
the culmination of a bitter political
feud.
Mohrie had asserted shortly alter
tho Young shooting "that the gang"
had threatened to "get him," but fol
lowing the ethics of the "gang" he
refused to reveal the identity of the
men who had threatened him, saying
that he could take care of himself.
ELEVEN BODIES RECOVERED
No Other Persons Misting as Result
of Collapse of Pier.
Mandeville, La., June 8.—Eleven
bodies have been recovered from the
waters ot Lake Pontchartraln at the
scene of the disastrous collapse of a
small pier, upon which scores of ex
cursionists had crowded to board the
steamer Margaret, about to return to
New Orleans.
As far as can be ascertained, no
other persons are missing, but search
ing parties continue to drag the lake.
A revised list of the dead shows
that all of the victims were residents
of New Orleans.
The responsibility for the catastro
phe has not been fixed, but a rigid in
quiry has been instituted by the au
thorities of St. Tammany parish.
MIME. ST0ESSEL IN TROUBLE
Alleged Shortage Found In Funds Un
der Her Control.
St. Petersburg, June 7.—The Port
Arthur Benevolent society held a
meeting here and as a result of an
Investigation found a deficit of $7,500
in the accounts of the society under
the presidency of Madame Stoessel.
It was decided to lay the matter be
fore the crown prosecutor. Madame
Stoessel is the wife of General Stoes
sel, who was in command of the Rus
sian forces .at Port Arthur at the
time of the capitulation to the Japa
nese, at which period the deficit oc
curred.
CHAUFFEUR SENT TO PRISON
for
Qiven Indeterminate 8entenca
Killing Pedestrian.
New York, June 4.—A sentence of
not less than seven years nor more
than twenty years In Sing Sing prison
was imposed upon William Darragh,
a chauffeur, whose automobile ran
down and killed Ingvaard Trimble in
this city on March 27. Motions for a
new trial and arrest of judgment were
overruled.'
Dominicans Expelled From Haytl.
Cape Haytien, June 7.—The Domin
ican revolutionaries, who last week
were driven over the frontier to Hay
tlan territory, have been expelled by
the Haytian government and will
leave here June 14 for St Thomas.
WESTERN TRIP POSTPONED
Illness of Mrs. Taft Causes Change In
President's Plans.
Washington, June 6.—President Taft
has been forced through the illness of
Mrs. Taft to postpone his proposed
Western summer trip an til fall. Al
though he has made no definite an
nouncement heretofore It had been
the president's intention to depart in
August on a ten weeks' tour of the
West and AHpta.
it
Mrs. Taft being able to accompany
the" president with safety is slight, al
though she Is making- satisfactory
progress toward recovery from her
recent Illness. Paced with the neces
sity of leaving her behind and the
possibility that a relapse might occur
Mr. Taft made np his mind to aban
don the summer excursion altogether
and endeavor to make a visit to the
West in tbe early fall. If it is possi
ble for him to go West in September
he may be able to visit the Alaska
Yukon-Pacific exposition in Its closing
days, but tbe Alaska trip hardly will
be attempted.
SLAYS FIVE WOUNDS THREE
Workman in Slaughter House Be
comes Suddenly Insane.
8otnerville, Mass., June 5.—Five
men are dead and three others injured
as the result of an attack by a work
man-who became suddenly insane at
the North Packing company's plant
here.
The workman, whose name is said
to be Thomas Murphy, was seized
with mania while at work In the
slaughter house. Armed with a big
knife which he used in his work he
ran through the factory, lunging at
every one within reach. Five of the
eight men attacked are said to have
been almost instantly killed.
KENTUCKY™ VICTIM
Ei-Skerilt of BretlNtt County
Skot From
ARIIMSIL
Jackson, Ky., Jane
7.—Ex-Sheriff
Bdward Callahan, noted for participa
tion in the feuds that have disrupted
Breathitt county for years, was shot
from ambush and, it is believed, fa
tally wounded. The shooting took
place In his home town, Crocketta
vlllc, sixteen miles from Jackson.
Callahan had swept out his store
preparatory to opening for the day
and was brushing the refuse from the
door when the shot was fired. The
ball took effect in the left side of his
abdomen. Bloodhounds have been put
on the trail of the assassin, who, it is
understood, hid behind a pile of coal
to fire the shot. Callahan was in Jack
son Saturday in attendance upon
court, a warrant having been served
upon him for malicious shooting In a
family affair some time ago. His case
was continued and he at once left
Jackson, telling one or two friends
that lately he was fearful of his life.
It in said that the immediate oause
for the shooting of Callahan was a
dispute over the management of a
church he built at Crockettsville and
of which he is a deacon.
Callahan was the chief lieutenant
of Judge James Hargis. Judge Har
gis was Bhot and killed by his son,
Beach Hargis, who has received 'a life
sentence for the murder.
PASSES PORTO RICAN BILL
House Does Not Amend the Meas
ure.
Washington. June 8.—The house of
representatives passed the Porto
Mean bill without amendment The
Mil provides that whenever the legis
lature shall fall to make tbe neces
sary appropriations for the ensuing
flscal year, those for the' current year
shall be considered as in force and
effect.
It also provides that hereafter all
reports of an official character shall
be made direct to an executive depart
ment of the government of the United
StateB to be designated by the presi
dent, and such department Is autho
rized to take jurisdiction of all mat
ters pertaining to the Island posses
sion.
HEAVY DAMAGE BY STORM
Railroad Tracks Are Washed Away in
Iowa.
Des Moines, la., June 8.—A cloud
burst caused much damage to prop
erty and tied up train service on the
Great Western all day between Sharon
City and Diagonal. Not a train ran
over the system from St Joseph to
Des Moines. Almost sixteen miles of
track were washed out at Sharon
alone.
All of Ringgold county reports
heavy damage from floods to live
stock and crops. All streams in
Southern Iowa are higher, than they
have been since the flood of July 4,
1S88. Thousands of acres of growing
corn were ruined.
MUST REMAIN IN SING SING
Patrick'a Application for Writ of Ha
beas Corpus Denied.
New York, June
4.—Albert
T. Pat­
rick's application for a writ of habeas
corpus releasing him from Sing Sing,
where he is under life sentence for
tbe murder of William Marsh Rice,
was denied by the appellate division
of the supreme court in Brooklyn.
PRAISES THEIR WORK IN CUBA
President Congratulates Mogoon and
Barry.
Washington, June 6.—President Taft
has transmitted to congress with a
special message the report of Charles
B. Magoon, who served as provisional
governor of Cuba during the last
American occupation of the island.
The president takes occasion to warm
ly congratulate Governor Magoon for
his services both to the United States
and Cuba and gives high praise to
Major General Thomas H. Barry, who
was in command of the United .States
forces.
ENORMOUS LOSS FROM FIRE
Largest Corn Mill in the World De
stroyed.
Springfield,
111.,
June I.—The plant
of the Decatur Cereal company at De
catur, I1L, the largest corn mill in the
world, has been destroyed by fire. The
tots
la estimated at
$664,000.
John Bheehy, a fireman, was hilled
br falling timber*.
f,
ALDRICH A WINNER
Point
Carries
In Senate Utter
Bitter Contest on Cotton.
CONSIDERED GREAT VICTORY
Radicals Made Hard Fight o»
This Portion of Bill.
Washington, June 6.—Senate radi
cals went down to another defeat to
day when the senate, by a majority of
eleven, voted with Senator Aldrlch
and his combination of senators from
New England, the Far West and the
South to adopt aections 818 to 817 of
the senate bill, covering the ootton
paragraphs, which have been bitterly
opposed all week by La Follette, Bris
tow, Dolllver and Nelson.
The paragraphs adopted today re
late to the change from an ad valorem
to-a specific basis for the duties on
cotton goods. Heretofore these goods
have been taxed on the former basis,
but now, if the senate bill should be
come a law^they will be taxed in the
other way and the claim ia made by
the Central West radical senators that
in making thia change of base Mr.
Aldrlch has adroitly, increased the
duties on that class of goods to a
point considerably above the duties
charged in the Dlngley law.
Several weeks, ago Senator Aldrlch
declared in a speech in the senate
that the textile schedules of the tariff
bill constituted the keystone of,, the
protection arch and his success in
having them adopted is considered a
great victory.
How the Senatora Voted.
The finance committee amendment
to the cotton schedule inserting spe
cific rates instead of ad valorem rates
on goodB valued at from 7 to 14 cents
per yard was adopted, 39 to 28.
A second committee amendment
fixing specific rates for the purpose
of preventing under valuation was
adopted, 39 to 29.
Several inportant test votes were
taken, on each of' which Senator Al
drlch again showed himself easily the
master of the situation. The smallest
majority by which the committee
amendment waa adopted on any test
vote was ten. Two Democratic sena
tors, McEnery and Foster of Louis
tana, voted with the finance commit
tee. The low tariff Republicans lined
up with the Democrats, with tbe ex
ception of Senator Borah of Idaho and
Senator Curtis of Kansas.
The following Republicans voted
against the finance committee on ev
ery roll call: Beverldge, Brown, Bur
kett, Bristow, Clapp, Crawford, Cum
minB,
son.
Dolliver, La Follette and Nel­
ALDRICH AGAIN VICTORIOUS
'•'.i
Carries Hie Point on Other Cotton
8chedulea.
Washington, June 7.—The senate,
by 'a vote of 41 to 26, sustained the
recommendation of the committee on
.finance on an amendment to levy a
duty of 8 cents a square yard and 20
per cent ad valorem on cotton win
dow hollands. Senators Foster and
McEnery, Democrats, voted with the
majority. Nine Republicans—Bever
ldge, Bristow, Brown, Burkett, Cum
mins, Dolliver, Gamble, La Follette
and Nelson—voted with the Demo
crats.
By a vote of 30 to 28 the senate
•oted down Senator Dolliver's amend
ment striking out the duty of 1 cent
a yard on mercerized goods.
ROOSEVELT STARTS INLAND
—MM—
Will Traverse Waterless Tract for
Considerable Distance.
Kljabe, B. E. A., June 5.—The
Roosevelt expedition has left here for
the Sotik district. Between Kijabe
and the objective point there is a
waterless tract that it will take two
days and a half to traverse. Water
for the expedition is being carried in
ex wagons in charge of a Ulyate set
tler. The moon at present is full and
the nights are bright. This will en
able the party to travel day and night
with scarcely a stop until water on
the other side is reached.
IN ORDER TO SECURE WORK
Negro Man Fined for Passing as
Woman for Yea re.
Chicago, June 9.—John Robinson,
eolored, found it easier to obtain em
ployment as a woman and has passed
as a member of that sex for years, ac
cording to his testimony in the mu
nicipal court.
Robinson found many avenues ot
employment closed to his race, but
years ago concluded that the serv
ant problem offered a solution of his
own difficulties. He was young and
presently abandoned male attire, be
coming a graceful young female
named "Jeanette Robinson." He was
employed as a domestic by various
families and was working In a West
Side residence when detectives dis
covered his secret He was fined |86
and costs and ordered to resume the
oonventional dress of hlf sex.
SUMMER UNIFORM FOR ARMY
•eldlers of Unsle •sm te Wear Olive
Drab Clothing.
Washington, June 9.—The first ate#
toward clothing the army la.a new
summer uniform will be taken en
Thursday when a special board ol
army officers will open bids at Phil*
delphia for furnishing the new shad*
of qlive drab cotten dtfh to,the qver,
tonaastsr's department
At least 826,0*0 yards of this eletfe
la desired by the army and in the MO*
the government makes provisions foi
the purchase of an addiUoaal N per
eoat If desirable. As faet as the
mi xnlfems are Is carded the
anlSerauwlll$e
HON. E. E. LOBECK, Alexandria.
•inn., member legislature, threiherman
and farmer, writes:
While in Minneapolis a short time ago, I
inspected Mr. Sageng'B new combination
threshing machine, and after seeing the
traction and threshing mechanism of the
machine in operation I became convinced
that the old-fashioned steam outfits would
soon be a thing of the past. Mr. Sageng's
machine combines within one frame both
the separator and engine and instead of
the clumsy and expensive steam engine, in
stalls a four-cylindergasoline motor, which
should reduce the cost of manufacture to a
considerable extent I have been running a
threshing machine for six years and it
strikes me that this new machine is su
perior in construction and will be able
to do better work than any other.
I believe the Sageng machine is here to
stay and that it will naturally reduce the
cost of threshing grain.
an?we"
5'
S
..... -i.
Read This JVithout Fail
MEANS MUGH TO YOU
THE NEW SAGENO THRESHING MACHINE
A Perfect Success. One of the Greatest
acquainted with the officers of the company, particularly with President Sageng, whom I
have known for a number ofyeare, and know them to be thoroughly honeftt-and reliable men.
Labor, Money and Time Saving
devices invented in recent years, and one which will revolutionize the
threshing business. This is one of the most profitable investment oppor
tunities ever brought to your notice. It is
Absolutely Safe and Sure a Money Maker for All
and in a perfectly legitimate business that of providing the farmer
with a valuable machine—that saves time, requires only five men, de
livers more grain, disppses. pf the engine, the engineer and fireman, also
the water wagon and and fuel wagon, both teams and drivers." 7'
Saves $20 a Day Current Expenses
It is the policy of this company to place its stopk in the hands of pro
gressive farmers, implement dealers, business men and to restrict sales
to small blocks of stock to any one person, for cash or on terms.
Guaranteed Dividends of 10 Per Cent
and 10 per cent more for each 100 machines sold. Gross capacity of our
Midway factory, St. Paul, is 1200 machines. Can be seen near the trans
fer yards on the Interurban line.
Extracts from the Stock Certificate of the Company
Stock $100 Per Share, Fully Paid anrd Non-Assessable.
This certificate is an absolute promise and contract to pay on a most
unusually fair and liberal basis—not merely a receipt for your money.
The following extract is from the stock certificate itself:
"This stock is a part of an issue of preferred stock authorized by the Certificate
of Incorporation qf the Company filed in the office of the Secretary of State, for the
State of Minnesota.
This certificate entitles the holder thereof to receive a
fixed yearly dividend of 10 per cent, per annum, cumulative after January
1st, 1910,
before any dividend shall be set apart- or paid on the common stock, and
to all other rights, privileges and preferences given to preferred stock under Article
of the Certificate of Incorporation as it appears hereon."
"Section 3. Whenever dividends current and cumulative have all been paid on
the preferred stock, the Directors shall, if in their judgment the surplus or net profits
shall be sufficient for such purpose,.have power then or thereafter to declare and pay
a dividend on the common stock up to, but never exceeding, 10 per cent, and if there
Shall then remain
any additional or net profits, it shall be distributed as a
dividend ratably among all share holders without preference."
Gross Price of Patented Machine $2500
Gross Cost All Expenses, Each Machine 1000
Gross Profits on Each Machine 1500
All Threshing Machine Stocks Pay Large Dividends
UNION STATE BANK, Otto O. Tollefson, Vice President, Minneapolis, Minn., says:
"We take pleasure in saying that we know the principal officials of the Sageng
Threshing Machine Company personally, and can testify to their reputation for up
rightness and strict integrity. Some of them, not known to us personally have
been highly recommended by parties in whom we have the utmost confidence. We
are glad to give this testimonial without solicitation from any source.0
HON. OLE NYHUS, Legislator, Thresherman and Parmer, Berwick, N. D., writes:
Gentlemen: While in the Twin Cities recently I am glad to say that I took the
time to thoroughly examine the combination thresher just completed by you from re
cent invention of your president, H. O. Sageng.
Having had twenty years of practical experience as a thresherman and at the
present time owner of a threshing outfit, I am, I think, competent to judge as to the
merits of a threshing machine. I spent some time in criticaL inspection of the ma
chine at the factory in Minneapolis* saw it in actipn both as traction and thresher and
am free to state that it fully meets every point claimed by you as to its superiority
as a money, labor, time and grain saving proposition.
Your machine has come to stay and cannot fail to wholly revolutionize the
threshing business. The "Sageng" will be my next purchase, sure.
Anything that I can do or say to assist in its introduction will be freely done
at your command.
AARON T. LARSON, Farmer, Live Stock, Thresherman, Flandreau, S. D., writes:
Since visiting your city on the 18th inst., I have thought much of the wonder
ful invention embodied in the Sageng Combination Threshing machine.
I thoroughly believe your inventor, Mr. Sageng, has struck the keynote of suc
cess, and that your thresher as completed in the model 40-inch cylinder mashine that
I had the pleasure of examining while in Minneapolis, is going to be the m-eaton*
tbreshing device that has ever been put upon
the
the farmer's friend. I wish you great success. ,,
market.
I am enclosing you herewith bank draft, for which kindly have issued to me
preferred stock in your company.
I have had several years of experience with and about threshing machines
which prompts me in the assertion that the Sageng will prove
Only Sixty Shares of Stock
is allotted to be sold in Oakes. $100 p'er share cash or terms Full infor
mation will be furnished by Mr. Fontaine at Vinkle House.
This is a company made up of responsible farmers and busings men from the coun
try. all thoroughly competent This company is absolutely reliable and unusu
ally Successful. Your, inspection and patronage is cordially invited."11
The Sageng Threshing Machine Company
va 4- By P.B. Fontaine, Salesman, Vinkle House.
\o
I
be in every senae'
.I-'
1
A
),
"ts&i 'iiil I

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