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The Hope pioneer. (Hope, N.D.) 1882-1964, July 02, 1903, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87096037/1903-07-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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Hon,
A. B.
PEPPER ft KEENE, Publisher*.
Official Newapaper of Steele County.
SVBSCRIPTlOy HATES:
Per year, fa
airance..,
Six Mouths
#1.50
ts
Entered at the po«t office at Hope, North Da
kota, as second class matter.
THURSDAY, JULY 2nd 1903.
Valley City now has a popula
tion of 3,329 an increase of 847 in
three 3'ears.
The city of Casselton is adver
tising' for bids on its electric
light plant and offers a twenty
year franchise to a priyate light
ing plant.
Editor Brown of Page was
elected justice of the peace at the
recent village election at Page.
A good man and one who will
make a good official.
The Fargo Call is received
here on its day of publication in
stead of a day later as formerly.
This gives us a good service and
makes the Call one the most wel
come papers on our list.
The State Insurance Commis
sioner has revoked the license
the St. Paul Mutual Hail a~d
Cyclone Ins. Co. but reports are
to the effect that the company is
still doing business. Watch oat
for them farmers and if they call
on you give them the "marble
heart".
The jury in the case of the
Uuiled States vs. Gildre, Randall
and Miller, insurance promoters
of the State Mutual Hail Ins. Co.,
fit Hankinson, returned a yerdict
Saturday
Qf
guilty on the first
count of the indictment which
was a charge of conspiracy to
commit fraud against the U. S.
The rifle in the hands of the
small boy is still in business.
Two deaths are reported
recently as a result of the com
bination. How long will it be
before indulgent parents awake
to a realization of the danger to
which they are subjecting their
fellow men when they buy their
young hopeful a gun. The air
gun is next to the rifle too and is
capable of much danger.
The new vagrancy law went
into effect July 1st. It defines
vagrancy and makes it a mis
demeanor punishable by a fine of
not to exceed fifty dollars, or by
imprisonment in the county jail
not exceeding thirty days, or by
being compelled to work on the
streets or public highways not to
exceed twenty days. It there are
as many hoboes around this ye?r
as usual the towns ought to be
able to get the streets up in good
condition.
ftarkwta'ber Times: The
Hope Pioneer thinks the other
papers of the state are not on to
the law as to foreign fake hail
insurance companies, and quotes
a law passed by the last legisla
ture to show that no foreign
mutual company has a right to
do business in this state. The
Pioneer would be correct if the
legislature had not passed a law
four days later that knocked the
law quoted into smithereens.
The last law parsed allows a
foreign mutual company to do
business upon depositing $25,000
i-i the state treasurv. If the
l'ion er can knock this last law
o'lt they will -«ave the farmers
ma ly thousands of dollars.
We think the last law passed a
marked improvement over the
0 I condition of things and it
would seem that the required de
jxmituf 925,000 would tend to
keep out all irresponsible com-1
1 The $25,000 i* consti­I
tuted a fund for the payment of
I e« and i- a ifjxul thin there
fore wc shall not try to "knock
it
out.
mf
i',1-
ube ijopc pioneer ^mtirnimmmmmmmgmmmwmwmwmmfflmmi
Call on him for
anything
WANTED
IN THAT
LINE.
&
&
Tk* laerltable.
"Well, I suppose ou and your wife
•re now tcrapping- over the name of
your new heir."
"Not on your life. What gave you
that idea?"
"Well, I thought it wns usual."
"Not, when there's only one rich
bachelor uncle in tho family."—N. Y.
Times.
Cful Finale.
Stubb—Yes.theQossip Sewing society
is going to meet to-night. My wife
•ays they are going to rip up old quilts
•nd make them into rugs.
Penn—What will they do when they
finish ripping up the quilts?
Stubb—Why, they'll rip up every one
in the neighborhood.—Chicago Daily
News.
ffkMt Flsnrra Lie.
Joe—Women are all right in some
branches of learning, but they have
no heads for figures.
Fred—Come on with the explana
tion
Joe—I lfno^r girl fchose edqe^r
tion cost heF old dad $7,000, find
thp
can't even figure her own age cor?
rectly.—Cincinnati Enquirer.
A Header.
Binks—My atars! I heard that
you had died of heart failure while
drunk.
Winks—That's a mean, miserable,
malicious slander.
"Then you were not. drunk?"
"I didn't die of heart failure."—N.
Y. Weekly.
Of Crane.
"Gwan, Learned Luke," said Weary
Willie, "how could you pipe oft such
lie ter de leddy as you bein' a 'son
o' toil'?"
"It's the truth. Weary. Haven't I
often been in the 'toils of the po
lice'?"—Baltimore Ilerald.
A Dnca mt DIUs.
Dora—Wouldn't It be lovely if we
had $35,000,000?
Clara—Of course.
Dora—Perfectly Heavenly! This
book on "Facta and Figures" says a
ton of diamonds can be bought for
that.—N. Y. Weekly.
Vmi the Sky:
"Where do skye-terriers come
from?" asked four-year-old Maggie.
"Why, I should have thought every
body knew they eame from the sky
when it rains eats an' dogs!" ex
claimed five-year-old Bobby, con
temptuously.—Boston Globe.
Luxarjr *4 HtctuKjr,
"Marriage," said the student of so
cial conditions, "is fast becoming a
luxury."
"Yes," assented the other, "but di
vorce remains necessity."—Town
Topics.
Net H»»**ltary.
"Do you know that little boy of mine
•ays some of the brightest things you
»ver heard?"
"He does, eh? Doesn't take after hl»
father much, does he?" Chicago
American.
As It (track Him.
The teacher had endeavored to make
clear to her class of small children
the story of the Boston tea party. Sev
eral days later she questioned them in
regard to it.
"Why would not the Americans drink
any tea?" she asked.
A small boy promptly replied. "Be
cause the English put tacks in it."—N.
Y. Times.
Kea*r ItsMur,
"How did you become good at fig
ures?"
'"Heredity."
"How so?"
"My mother was bitten by a
•nake."
"What's that got to do with it?"
"It. was an adder."—St. Paul Dis
patch.
Ho Farther Proof Itielel,
She—Do you think Friday is an un
lucky day, dear?
I He—Yes, I do.
I "Why, Gabriel, I was born-on Fri
day!"
1
"What further proof do I need
then?"—Yonker# Statesman.
Qea ft- luce,
Dealer In
Farm Machinery.
The Hummer Gang and Disc PLOWS Mitchell
WAGONS and TANKS
BUGGIES, SURRIES ROAD WAOONS.
WWWWWVW%WV\WVIVVV%
The Heine Self Feeder
Cuts the bands from the bottom. All rotary motion, simple
and easy running. Guaranteed to give satisfaction.
West End fipA A I IT f*R HOPE,
a t\. i^UWl^r, "iORTH DAK.
73U4U4iU4UUlUliUmaiUaUlUmUlUU4U4ii4Ui4i4Uiaa44iUiUS^
BEGIN AGAIN.
What Tom Sand* Heeded After He
Was Dlieharsct from the
Inebriate Aijlaa.
Everyone in Oakdale knew when Tom
Sands was sent to an inebriate asylum.
His mother was born in the village,
and, although she now lived, and had
for many years lived, in New
York city, all the village people were
interested in her and her family.
When Tom was discharged, cured, he
went up to his grandfather's farm in
Oakdale, and all the village made ready
to help him and give him good advice.
The old ladies shook hands with him
silently, shaking their heads as over
a dead body the old men spoke many
plain words of warning.
"To think of your going down that
low, Thomas! At your age!"
"Had you no
thought of your mother?
I hear her hair's turned white in theae
last two years."
These were some of the greptjngs
which he received, and his old f^endf
who said nothing followed him with
meaning glances as a criminal con
demned to death.
The old doctor gave a dinner forlorn
Bands, to which the foremost men in
the county were asked. He knew that
the young fellow had made a hobby
of geology, and asked him to give them
his views on the chances of finding oil
or natural gas on their farms. Tom
was interested and talked well the
JUST OUT OP AN ASYLUM.
Bin listened respectfully. They were
cordial and friendly. After they were
gone the doctor and Tom discussed the
chances if Tom should take up the oil
business, showing him that he expect
ed him to make a success with his
knowledge and shrewdness.
"You forget one thing," the young
man said, bitterly, "that I am just out
of an asylum for drunkards. You have
not reminded me of it once."
"Why should I remind you of it?"
•aid the doctor, earnestly. "Why
should you remind yourself of it?
When a man, with God's help, has
strangled a vice, is he to sit brooding
over the foul thing for the rest of his
life? Carry it about with him as a
criminal used to'do, chained to the
dead body he had killed? No forget
it. Tom. Waken the other man that
is in you, strong, clean, helpful. Leave
the old sin to God's mercy, and begin
aguin, boy—begin again."
There are many lads who need this
counsel as much as Tom Bands.
Youth's Companion.
Light frost Bacteria.
The use of photogenic bacteria in
a miner's safety lamp is new, but
the existence of light-giving bacteria
has been known for years. Those
used in the lamp may be produced
by keeping the flesh of fresh herring
or haddock in a three per cent, solu
tion of table salt at a temperature
a little above freezing point. In a
few days the whole mass will give
off a greenish light, which may be
brightened bf adding sugar
Science.
Tennia Game laterrapte*.
Charlie Finn—Well, how did the
tennis match come out?
Willie Gill—It didn't come out. We
hadn't more than got started before
come fool fisherman came, along and
drew in the net.—Stray Storiei.
9
He has the Best
HARVESTING
MACHINERY
On the Market.
6 and 7 ft. HODGES
QUEEN.
10 and 12 ft. KING
Binders, Mowers &
Rakes.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
H.M.PHIUP, M. D.
PmsMCIAN AND
SuaOKCH.
Residence first house west ol the Meth
odist church.
HOPE, N. DAK,
STANDLEY & GILMORE,
COLLECTION AGENCY
CMTMftoMteme Solicited.
References
ft
tii
C. JOHNSTON, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEOK
Offices: FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLOCK.
HOPE, N.
J. McMAHON,
A W E
Horfc, N. DAK,
€. S. SHIPPY,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
AND NOTARY PUBLIC,
HOPE
T.. CARPENTER,
9
N. DAK.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
REAL ESTATE & COLLECTIONS.
FINLEY. N. D.
II* X. STANDLEY
J. Y. GILMORK.
Hope State Bank
first National Bank
HOPE, NORTH DAOTA
W. L. Aldrich- & Son-
Blacksmiths.
WE WILT, GUARANTEE
ALL OUR WORK TO BE
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS,
X—HORSRSBORIXG A SPECIALTY.—Z
H. H. FULLMER,
THE JEWELER
JEWELRY,
WL WATCHES,
CLOCKS
SILVERWARE.
REPAIRING and ENGRAVING
R. R. FISCHER,
The Sl)oerT)aKer,
Is prepared to do all work
in his line. Repairing a spec*
ialty. Give him a call.
HOPE. N. DAR.
The New Policies
THE-
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANOt
Company of New York,
Aft He Mnt liberal Written.
B. C. MAW. Special kit at.
til)#
'id-'tf^uia^i
A Ptall libit of
.-WUMVI. -W^YS»*«S.»F
^.-^^R
St&saii&Mt ©00$#.
MAOXSTtC RAB6S&
3. fx dbcCollom, I
\Thei
hope Roller Mills.
Merchant and Exchange Work-
AU grades of flour and feed In stock at all
times. Grist grinding for farmers receives
special attention,
9
Jefferson & 2orrence
XlvecE, Jfeeb ant Sale Stable.
Ibope, mortb DaUota.
tftne Hurnouts. Ca eful ©rivers.
OUR BACON is Cheap at
10
Perfectly Kataral.
Mr«. New rich—What do you think of
our statue of Venus? Isn't it lovely? I
Mrs. Homt-r—Yes but the expres
rion of the face seems rather hard. I
"Ot
course it is. How could it be
otherwise when it's cut oat o2 real-mar*
We."—Philadelphia Daily Ktws.
The Bos She Had.
Mre. Boaster—Henry and I attended
the opera last night. We had a bo*.
Mrs. Blount Caramels, weren't
they? I MW you in the grallery eating
comethlng.—Richmond Dispatch.
A Point la Good Dmilag,
One of the essential points in good
dressing is the harmony of tones and
13
the best quality.
PORK SAUSAGE, in caseing or bulk
at
10
cts. is a Bargain.
LARD at
12%
cts. Come in and try it. We
want all the business we can get.
2& Mid 50 lb. lots
1
eolors. A mass of coloring in clothe*
always a ttiistnke.—Ladies' Home
Journal.
To the Fool.
7to
man is wise in the
t^et ot
"Cfefcayo UaJljr 2fcwa»
a iw],
cts. and
cts. cannot be bought at
any place as cheap, considering the
excellent quality.
BOLOGNA good enough for any one
at
0f
Cents a Pound.
/•beat
sa]t Pork at Ten
/^TlDopc^"
dftarket, I
Ux lb. £ahcv, iPtop. tig
UNION
1 Telephone Line-
COMMUNICATING WITH
Sherbrooke, Portland,
S Mayvllle, Roserllle,
Clifford, and the Wallace
and Gassell Farms.
Transact your business
by Telephone. Prompt ser
vice, 25 cents to all points.
Hope Office: At Central,
First National Bank Block.
•T-«"*
i.
*T
:-4:

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