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The Hope pioneer. (Hope, N.D.) 1882-1964, February 28, 1907, Image 10

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87096037/1907-02-28/ed-1/seq-10/

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J. D. BROWN, President K. D. DANSICIN, Cashier
S. J. DANSKIN, Vice-P es
15he
All Work Guaranteed
strictly First-class.
I
•V V"
I
folate State Bank
General Banking.
HnHnBBHHMHHnnsxBBxmaa
We pay a liberal rate of Interest on Time Deposits
FARM LOANS.
E
City Dray Line.
•fl" AM PREPARED to do anything in the draying
II business, and all orders left with me will receive I
nrompt and careful attention. The moving of
household goods is solicited. Pianos and Organs re
moved without risk of njury.
Vour Patronage is Respectfullv Solicited
ft.
j|i DEALER IN
ANDREW STARK, Prop.
KLOVSTfID
AL and WOOD.
A Good Supply Always on Hand.
D. W. Vadnie,
Hope Dray Line.
Prompt and Accurate Service.
Calls attended promptly, and goods
removed without risk or injury.
••"Garden plowing- given special
attention.
Call on us for anything in the way drayiag.
A M. McLauhglii)
D«al«r 11)
Coal & Wood
T. F. BEADLE,
Genera! Blacksmith.
JOHN DORRANCE,
Xiver?, Jfeei) an& Sale Stable.
toope, Worth Bahota.
fine ttutnout* Caccful
er
?r
9
Hspe, North Dakota.
Polishing Lays
Specialty.
A DESPERATE
BATTLE
By HARRY SINCLAIR.
The following story was told us by
a stalwart Indian, who, having been
among the French half-breeds a good
deal, had received from them the
French name of Baptiste. He told us
the story as we were huddled around
a campfire on the eastern side of Lake
Winnipeg, from which '.ve and our
dogs had been driven by a bitter,
blinding, blizzard storm. He said:
"One summer, long ago, I was with
a large party of Indians. We were
making a long journey over the rolling
prairies from one place to another.
That we might have plenty of meat to
eat, two of us were appointed to keep
about two days' journey ahead of the
company to kill all the game we could.
"The reason why we kept so far
apart was because we had dogs, and
babies and women in our party, and,
you know, they all make much noise,
so they would scare the animals far
away.
"Well, we two hunters had kept far
ahead. Some days we had good luck
and killed a great deal, and then other
days we did not kill much. What we
got we cached, so that the party could
easily find it by the sign we gave
them when they came along. We al
ways put it near the trail for them.
Then we could push on, looking for
more.
"One day as we had passed several
valloys and had seen nothing that was
worth our while, we came to the top
of a pretty large liill and cautiously
looked over. There was a sight that
we shall never forget.
"Right down before us, within gun
shot. was a very large grizzly bear
with two big buffalo bulls. Well for
us tlie wind was blowing from them to
us. They were very very angry look
ing and were preparing for a big fight.
The buffalos seemed to know that the
bear was an ugly customer, and he
looked as if he did not know how to
manage the two of them at once.
After a while both of the bulls sud
denly lowered their heads, and to
gether they charged the bear. Aa
they rushed at him he- quickly rose up
on his haunches, and as they closed in
upon him he seized one of them by
the head and neck, and with a sudden
jerk so quickly broke his neck that he
fell down as dead as a stone.
"The older buffalo, which had
charged at the same time, gave the
bear a fearful thrust with his sharp
horns, one of which pierced him be
tween his ribs, causing an ugly wound,
from which the blood soon began to
How. The bear, having killed the other
buffalo, tried to seize this one also,
but he, having given the bear the ugly
wound, quickly sprang back out of his
reach. He ran off for a little distance
but as the bear did not follow he came
back again. There they stood looking
at each other, both very angry, but
both very cautious. As they kept
moving around it seemed to us as
though the buffalo had so come aroiujd
on the windward side of the bear that
he caught the scent of blood from the
wound. The smell of blood always
excites to fury these animals, and so.
lowering his head, he furiously
charged at his wounded yet still sav
age enemy. The bear rose up on his
hind quarters to receive him, and
seizing him as lie did the other killed
him on the spot.
"We saw him go from one buffalc
to another and smell them both, bul
he did not offer to tear or eat either.
We could see that he was very badly
wounded from the way he kepi
twitching his side, from which the
blood was running. It was an uglj
wound, and he was a very sick bear,
but he looked so cross that we wert
not in a hurry to let him know any
thing about us.
"Imagine, if you can," said Baptiste,
while his eyes flashed at the recollec
tion of this royal battle, "how excited
we were as we lay there in the long
grass and watched this great battle
"Then we thought: Now if we can
only kill that wounded bear we will
have plenty of meat for the whole
camp—enough to last a long while
But although we had our guns, we
were none too anxious to begin the
battle with such a bear as that one, so
we crouched low and watched him. It
was very forunate that the wind,
which was quite a breeze, blew as it
did. He never seemed to suspect that
other foes were near.
"After a while he went off a little
distance and laid down in the long
grass, which rose up so high around
him that we could not see him. We
waited long for him to get up, but as
he did not, and we could not stay
there all day, we prepared for a big
fight with him. We put our knives
where we could instantly draw them,
and carefully examined our guns to
see that they were all right. Then
we began to crawl down through the
grass.
"We got very close to him, although
not near enough to see him. Then,
hearing no sound, we made a little
noise but he did not stir, so we got
up and crept forward, when we found
him as dead as the buffaloes. Without
firing a shot we had a great quantity
of meat."
The recital of this story has brought
the whole so vividly before Baptiste
that he became very much excited,
and concluded with: "What would
you not have given to have seen that
battle? And what would I not give to
see another like it."
Punctuality.
Punctuality is the stern virtue of
men of business and the graceful
courtesy of princes—Bulwer.
HURRY AND WORRY
THE TWO CHIEF CAUSES OF NER
VOUS EXHAUSTION.
Avoid These, Says a Leading Physl
cian, and You May Live Out Your
Allotted Days and Do Your
Life's Work Well.
Dr. Thomas C. Ely, of Philadelphia,
an article on neurasthenia in the'
Journal of the American Medical asso
ciation, lays much stress on hurry and
[Wgrry as leading causes of nervous ex
haustion. He has this to say:
I "Learn to hurry little and worry net
at all. An illustration consists in the
jfatigue in the hurry to catch a train,
[which is out of all proportion to thej
^physical effort expended. Individuals
are too much like the modern tele
jphone sign, 'always on duty.' For
(hurried and worried business or hur
ried and worried pleasure, hurry alone
or worry alone are poisonous to the
.'normal functions of the nerve system.
JBut the American combination of wor
ried hurry is deadly. Each brings into
jaction the worst features of the other."
Of course every one who stops to
.'think will agree with the author, but
how few are able to follow his good
advice? Worry is only the extra work,
the increased wear and tear for which
^we are never paid. It always hinders
(but never wins. It means incapacity
'for anticipated efforts, and yet we con
stantly blame circumstances rath I:
than our individual selves. The man
.who is always ready and takes tinio
•to be sure befor9 he starts never need
hurry or worry. How few can do this
consistently! Then comes the break
down which* is so often charged to
mere overwork. In 99 cases in a hun
dred it is the worry, always useless,
that eventually weakens and kills.
The gloomy foreboding not only saps
,tV.e energy of all valiant endeavor to
conquer difficulties, but cheats us in
the end by proving the old adage, that
"the expected never happens." If we
•compare notes we can easily prove the
comforting truth of the saying. If
the disconsolate man who for years
feared the death of his invalid wife
could have known she would survive
him for more than a quarter of a cen
tury how much unnecessary men
But this is going to be the way with
the average nervous American. It was
he, in fact, who invented neurasthenia.
The disease has become a habit with
him, and worry, hurry, restlessness
and irritability are its leading features.
He takes his business home with him,
eats with it, sleeps with it, dreams
with it. It is his shadow at the fire
side and table it blurs all his pleas
ures, stands between him and his fam
ily, all because he must borrow trouble
and mortgage happiness, health and
life in the balance.
The Best Nervine.
Tt
Bleep
out of doors for a month
is better thqn a trip to Europe. In
this climate one must have a roof, of
course, but any piazza that is open to
serve as a bedroom and the gain in
happiness is unbelievable. With an
abundant supply of good air the sleep
soon grows normal, deep and un
troubled and refreshing, so that we
open our eyes upon the world as glad
ly as a hunter or any pagan shep
herd in the morning of the world. We
grow anxious and flustered and har
ried with distractions the goblins of
worry becomes an inseparable com
panion, and we groan in spirit that the
universe is all awry, when in truth
half a dozen deep breaths of clean air
would lend a different complexion to
life. Our anxieties are nearly all ar
tificial, and are bred indoors, under
the stifling oppression of walls and
roofs and the maddening clangor of
pavements, and a day in the open will
often dispel them like a mist.—Bliss
Carman, in American Craftsman.
Results Just as Bad.
The Beggar—Please, sir, will you
kindly assist a poor man who has
three wives to support?
The Pedestrian—Why, do you mean
to say you are a bigamist?
The Beggar—O, no, sir. Two of
them are tlie wives of my sons-in-Jaw,
—Stray Stories.
15he
5
tit
1
suffering would have been spared him I
The absolute utility of worry is thr
lesson of it all. The future, as a ruU
is more .often a surprise and delr 'i
than a disappointment and disei lin
We grieve when we look ahead a:i.'
smile when we look back. But with
most people experience count: io:
nothing when new obstacles appear.
It is the old story that the last f!ini
culty will be insurmountable. But ear!:
in his turn soon learns that he raun
control events, disturb the relations of
cause and effect, or alter the
immuta­|
ble laws of destiny, no matter how
strongly he may yearn to do. so. The
only reasonable way to ul. ust matters
is to wait until the time comes for the
solution of the dreaded problem.
Mostly, also, wo lack the courage,
patience, good judgment and prepared
ness to meet the issues as they arise.
We waste though!, strain nerve and
banish sleep in anticir^tiou of that
which never transpires. "Don't shoot
until they come out" combines lots of
sound wisdom with no end of good
philosophy. We not only worry in ad
vance of the thing, but after it. is done.
Jf we calmly planned our escape and
tried car best what more could have
been done?
Amain difficulty is in striving to do
too much and in overtaxing our capaci
ties. The strong, steady, self-reliant
man has no misgivings, but the weak
one mistrusts every thing, himself in
cluded. He contrives against odds and
worries and hurries, while others eat,
sleep and are merry.
iX
STATE OR NOHTH DAKOTA, I
County of Steele
In District Court,
[Auction Sales!)
Holt & Cou ron
Auctioneers that make a Specialty
The Man That Pleases Everybody
IS DEAD, but it don't matter even if you are as rich as King Sol
omon or as poor as Job's turkey, we shall endeavor to please and
treat you all alike.
The State of North Dakota to the Above
Named Defendant:
You are hereby summoned to answer the
complaint in this action, a copy of which is
hereto annexed and herewith served upon you.
and to serve a copy of your answer upon the
subscriber within thirty days after the service
of this summons upon you, exclusive of the day
of service and in case of your failure to ap
pear or answer judgement will be taken
against you by default for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
Dated this lHth day of February, A. D. 1907.
C. S. SHIPPY.
Attorney for Plaintiff.
You will please take notice that the com
plaint in the above entitled action was tiled in
the olllee of the Clerk of the District Court in
and for the County of Steele and State of
North Dakota, at the Village of Sliet-broolie,
in said County, on the lilth day of February,
A. 1J. 1907.
Dated February, 19th A. D. 1907.
at Blabon or Northwood, N. D„ or
N. A. COURON,
I at Hope, N. Dak,
Rhone Lis at Our Expense.
Third Judicial District.
A. T. Ward. Plaintiff.
vs.
Jacob Smith Defendant.
S O N S
Hope, N. D.
Residence and Post Office address, Hope,
Steele County. N. Dak.
To the above named Defendant:
S. SHIPPY,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
Hope. N. D.
J. Y.
Smith
CONTRACTOR
and BUILDER
I am prepaired
kinds of
to do all
Repairing.
Shop in rear of Fulmer's
Jewelry Store.
+4,+++++,l"Hi,M'4'+++++4-H4
Let me figure on that
NewBuilding
Telephone No. 2.
To Cure Rheumatism
Tree the system from tho poison which causes
Rheumatism—iind then prevent its formation.
Learned physicians will tell you this Is the
only way—it is the way by which DU. SHOOP'S
KHKUMATIC CU1U4 brings relief and cure
makes an end of pain and swelling—an end of
suffering—an end of Rheumatism. It is put up
in handy tablet form, convenient and econo
mical. Hegln to use this remedy today. The re
sults will be lasting. Sold and recommended br
JOHN J. WAMBERG.
!$XJ.S u* T. I
of
Live Stock SeJes I
Years of practice in auctioneering in all branches make
us feel capable of presenting any Pedigreed Animal, Article
or Thing on earth to the best possible advantage.
Choose Your Auctioneer 1
just as you would an attorney if you decided to go into court with an
important law suit. Procure a Salesman of ability and experience and
realize full value out of your property. Why should y'ou have some 4
Cheap John One Horse Slow Poke Stammering Stuttering Would-be
Auctioneer that will only get you partial value out of your stock?
Your patronage solicited.
TERMS REASONABLE
BEFORE CLAIMING DATES CALL
A. B. HOLT,
Pedigreed
Colmly
Conunt^tD°mCe
toinsi
r.i
+. (•+$
STATU OP NOKTII DAKOTA. I
County of Steele )"ss
In District Court,
Third Judicial District.
H. A. Hurner... Plaintiff,
VS.
J5*ver Land Company, a corporation, and
all other persons unknown claiming any estate
or interest in. or lien or incumbrance upon the
property described in the complaint.
Defendants.
S O N S
The State of North Dakota to the Above
Named Defendants:
ou are hereby summoned to answer the
complaint in this action, which is on tile in the
office of the Clerk of the District Court within
m' n01^1,
of
Steele and State of
N01 th Dakota, at the Village of Sherbrooke.
said County, and to serve a copy of your
answer upon the subscriber within thirty days
after the sen ice of this summons upon you
vfin
t,ilv ot
sorvk'e-
and in ease of
iJJn 1 1 1 appear or answer judgement
liefJ/»m5Win
ami,s'
you by lefault
for the re­
lief demanded the complaint.
Dated February, 20th 1907.
C. S. SHIPPY.
3 Attorney for Plaintiff.
RMS.S
adai'eSS'
To the above named Defendants:
il,V't.,iliere,b'V
,e
shiplfpfnt ,,
m?i
ihoV'p"ty"s|now
V"
H01e'
notifl.ed
that the relief
sought in said action consists wholly in exclud
ingthe said defendants from uny imeS tn
01 lien 01 incumbrance upon specific real pro
»„v
*hieh said* action
w'n^r
described real estate
S I VOUnty °I
SteeUi iind
State Of
to"WJl:.
Lot numbered fifteen
ix '~(1'
in the
hi0the Otlice nl 't'i^ V}'er?of
original
tounsite of the Town Citvl of Hone ae-
on llle or of
for said Steele County^""61" °f
record
DeedS in aDd
Dated this 20th day of February. A. D. 1907.
C. S. SHIPPY.
Attorney for Plaintiff.
Hope, N. D.
STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA I
County of Steele )'ss
In District Court,
1'ii'd Judicial District,
Charles Amos Plaintiff.
against
R«'d Kiver Land Company, a comnrnMnn und
or hHeresUn0^- «li»ming any estate
or
a dC foi- ho ctt?!•
'"cumbrance upon the
pioperty described in the complaint...... ......
Defendants.
S O N S
named lJefondants:?
Duk°ta T°
tbe above
th,e
vom- failure
^'strict Court within
North l)a\mt-v of Steeic and State of
in said Cm f„,I
Vlllai-rea
of Sherbrooke
in stiiu v. ountj. and to serve ennv of imn
of
*ul'viee. and in case of
Dated, February, 15th A. D. 1007.
C. S. SHIPPY.
Residence and PostAKey,^SintSoPe
Steele County. N. Dak. """"jss. Mope,
To the above named Defendants:
sought in'said^Iction consists whom?in "W
jug the said defendants frwiran Interest Tnrnr
two thrm.' iV'r numbered one 11,
two I-!* tinee Ml. four 1, (lye (fi ulv ml
Ste«'ieC-muu.vC"'SlCrotUeedsll'^d for said
Dated this lstli day of February, A. D. 1007.
C. S. SHIPPY.
Attorney for Plaintiff.
Hope, N. D.
-JTH
-4*

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