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The Hope pioneer. [volume] (Hope, N.D.) 1882-1964, March 20, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87096037/1919-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 38. No. 52
Hats
and
Caps
For. Spring
fiV^r-fr^*
,5,'7
COME IX AND LET US FIGURE WITH YOU OX THE
HARDWARE FOR THAT XEW BUILDING.
WE FIGURE TO GIVE YOU THE IiEST UUILDEItS
HARDWARE MADE, AT A FAIR SQUARE PRICE.
YOU AX FIGURE OX GETTIXG A SQUARE DEAL
EVERY TIME YOU BUY FROM US.
USE OUR HARDWARE IT STAXDS HARD WEAR.
J. H. McCollom
Men's Toggery
This is the plaoe to select your Easter outfit^
We have a new stock of up-to-date styles which af
fard a good selection for all tastes. We can please
the conservative business man and olso furnish the
nifty, nobby styles that are joy of the heart of the
young man.
Use OUR
Builders
Hardware
A
Leading Styles
in
Shoes
Hosiery Neckties
SILK or LISLE We have a good assost
in the ment of late patterns
Latest Shades and Colors and colors.
Shirts
Negligee and
Dress
Collars
ARROW BRAND
Soft or Dress
KRAABEL & KRAABEL
Hope, No. Dak.
DAVID A. WENNERSTROM
—o— Auctioneer —o—
A Specialty of Live Stock and Farm Sales
Write or phone at my expense for dates
Hope, North Dakota
"Relatively" Well Off.
"They're comparatively rich, aren't
they?"
"Well, I wouldn't say 'comparative
ly,' but 'relatively.' They have a rich
ancle of whom they expect great
things."—London Tit-Bits.
•SV
A New Angle.
"Age goes before beauty," said the
chronic quoter.
"Well, that may be, but there's been
several million young ladles who have
bad the Idea backward for a good
many centuries."
••"T ^'T •UHSi* *rVi'SS"».T*--'« .VJr-v?:.--**
HOPE, STEELE COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, MARCH 20, 1919
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO
DISCHARGED SOLDIERS
Pinley. N. l)ak., March IS,—The
Local Board has been advised by the
Adjutant General that soldiers are en
titled to retain their uniforms, hense
it is not necessary to comply with the
former order requiring the return of
uniforms after a specified time.
It has been stated that all soldiers,
discharged since November 11th, 1918
are entitled to travel pay, at the rate
of five cents per mile. The Adjutant
General of North Dakota states that
he has no official notice concerning
this, but suggests that the individual
soldier take the matter up with the
Zone Finance Officer, Lemon Building
Washington, D. C. If the difference
between the five cents and the three
and one half cents, paid many dis
charged soldiers, is obtainable, that
is probably the paying office.
It is important that discharged sol
diers place their Certificate of Final
Discharge in a safe place, as a copy
cannot be secured. Where the dis
charge papers are lost it is posible to
secure a service record or certificate
from the Adjutant General of the
Army, Washington, D. C. by giving
all the facts in the case, but since all
the camp records are being forwarded
to Washington, it would take much
time to segregate a single one from
millions in the army. The Discharge
is a valuable paper, and will be more
A1'SERVICE
HOPE
VT'r^'.•
?Kjf *-JV
valuable in the future.
The Local Board is expected to
cease to function by March I! 1st, and
all the rccords are now being packed
preparatory to being shipped to Wash
ington. D. 0. Government property
remaining in the possession of Boards
is to be sold to the highest bidder, on
sealed proposals, after proper notice.
MAXWELL AUTOMOKILES
I have just received a car load of
the new 1919 Maxwell touring cars
and wQulk like to have you call and
look thorn over. They are the best
buy that is on the market for the
price. Come early as there is going
STATION" sign alone does not
make SERVICE. Service to be REAL must
be more than good intentions of a dealer. It must
be his ability to render it 100 per cent.
I have just returned from LaPorte, Indiana,
where the famous Oil Pull tractor is built. I was
privilege to attend a two weeks' tractor school in
company with other dealers selected by the Advance
Rumely Thresher Company to take this course.
I went to LaPorte determined to get the utmost
out of this oourse and to justify my appointment as
an Advance-Rumely distributor. I got all of that—
plus an inoreased respect and enthusiasm for the
product and the Company that makes it.
I wish every farmer around here could see the
inside of that OilPull factory. In the first place, it
is a whale of a plant—the machine shop alone is 800
feet long—but what impresses you next to the big
ness of it, is the way things are organized and the
thoroughness with which the goods are manufac
tured, inspected and tested.
I was pretty well satisfied before I went down
to LaPorte that the material and workmanship that
Mhxnvtr
Hlti- CV''.A
SERVICE
FARNEY
Office with Ward Farms Company
LA P03TE WORKS ADVANCE-RUMELY COMPANY INC.— LA PORTE IND.
-i l.+'-tXfs-k
to be a shortage of cars this summer.
In six weeks from now there will be
a lot more buyers ,than cars, so buy
NOW. Price $895.00 f. o. b. factory.
T. M. MAJOR,
Agent
THE HIGH COST OF SMWSW
Now is the time to think of smut
in wheat and oats, not along in June
or July.
Smut in wheat or oats is a disease
just like typhoid feVer In numans. It
can be eradicated just as surely, but
as is the case with typhoid, it is much
better to prevent it than to try to cure
it.
Woman's Club Lecture Course Announcement
Friday, March 21st:
0. D. McKEEVER, Sunshine Lecture
Monday, March 24th:
SCHUBERT CONCERT CO.
at the Hope Opera House.
j-r-
went into the OilPull were the best that went into
any tractor. Now 1 am SURE of it.
We dealers didn't play at that school. It
was hard work, a minimum of talk and a maximum
of action. We learned the OilPull motor by taking
it apart and putting it together. The same with the
transmission, and every part of the construction and
operation of the OilPull that a man has got to know.
I wouldn't sell what I learned at the OilPnll sohool
in LaPorte.
What does all this mean to you, you say It
means just this. My two weeks at the OilPull fac
tory have given me a knowledge and experience of
not only how the OilPull is made and how it works,
but HOW TO KEEP IT WORKING. I have a found
ation for a Tractor Servioe to my eustomers that
can't be equalled in these parts. I put the time in
down there at LaPorte for the sole reason that I
could take proper care of my customer'# interests.
In the Rttmely OilPull Tractor I am not only
selling absolutely the most efficient, dependable and
economical tractor on the market—and guaranteed,
remember—but
$2.00 per year, 5 Cts. per copy
The prevention is very simple. The
seed grain is sprinkled with a solution
of formaldehyde, one pound to forty
gallons of water, and three-quarters
of a gallon of the solution should be
used for each bushel' of grain.
Proffessor H. L. Bolly, of the North
Dakota Agricultural college has pre
pared a pamphlet on the control of
diseases in farm crops, which is avail
able to anyone interested. The mere
statement that the smut crop grown
by American farmers in 1917 would
have filled a train of freight cars
stretching, fram New York to Cleve
land, ought to be sufficient proof of
the importance of treating seed grain.
I am backing it with a PERSONAL
SERVIOE THAT MEANS SOMETHING.
ADVANCE-RUMELY
DISTRIBUTOR
NORTH DAKOTA

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