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The Hope pioneer. [volume] (Hope, N.D.) 1882-1964, November 23, 1922, Image 1

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Official Paper of Luverne, N. Dak.
VOLUME 42.
No.
86
G. I. CARNEY DIED SUDDENLY
ON SATURDAY EVENING
OVER-EXERTED HIMSELF IN RUN
WITH FIRE DEPARTMENT
AND DROPPED DEAD
The community was sadly shocked
"Saturday night when It became
known that Mr. C. I. Carney had
:assed away. His death was most
untimely as he had just passed the
lialf-century mark and he is sur
vived by his wife- and fifteen child
ren. eight of whom are under four
teen years of age. His death was
caused by over-exertion in helping to
get the fire apparatus to the lire at
the Curtis barn Saturday evening.
Mr. Carney came to Hope several
years ag and for a time was em
ployed iu the Husome barber shop.
Later he opened a shop of his/ own
and has continued in the business
since. Of late he has been assisted
!jy bin son. "Link" who will con
tinue the business.
At a meeting of the Hope Volun
teer Fire Department, of which he
was a member, on Monday evening,
was decided that the department
was deeply indebted to Mr. Carney
ana iiat it was their duty to at least
take care of the funeral expenses.
.» The funeral services will be held at
the Methodist Church this afternoon
a'.
2
o'clock and interment will be
made in the Hope Cemetery.
Mf.THODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
\Y. W. Smith, Pastor
Church service Sunday at 11 a. m.
Subject—"The Good Samaritan."
Evening service—"A Mighty Con*
vision"
Sunday School at 12 a. m.
Plan to stay to
This
service if pos­
sible.
fsunday December 3rd church roll
call. An earnest invitation is ex
tended to every member to be preaen1
sent.
White Cross Work
This movement began in Omaha,
Neb., in 1919 with Bishop Sirutz as
its first president. Its iur»»se Is to
minister to the needy everywhere,
enlisting the sympathy and. co-opera
of every member of the church
and friends of the sick and depend
en t'.
It represents the true spirit of
Jesus in his* ministry of healing. Its
it.ecitic purpose in North Dakota Is
to promote the work of hospitals
and homes within the church. To
this end will all funds be used.
Membership in this orguni-.at'ion is
analogous to that in the Red Cross
movement, $1 tor adults and 25
for children 14 years and under.
This is general membership. There
no other memberships as follows:
upporting $5 Family $10 Sus
ia'ning $25 Service $50 Life $100
Life Patron $500
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
If not a worshipper elsewhere join
in iu the services no-it Sunday at the
usual lioura:
Morning Worship at 11 o'clock
Sabbath school at 12:15
Evening Worship at 7:30
Choir rehearsal Sunday afternoon
a 3 o'clock. A full attendance is
requested.
Thanksgiving service Thursday
November 30th. at 10:30 a. m. The
Rev. W. W. Smith, pastor of the
Methodist church will deliver' the
message. An offering will bie re
ceived for the Children's Home in
Pargo. You will be made to feel at
home in the "Church of Cordial Wel
come."
HuAi,
GEO. R.
Pastor
MICKIE THE PRINTER'S DEVIL
E UlHEU *V0 UMMM6R A AM&TAACfi.
UE TWAWV tw A&tu =.
?AM PBB. It M-U OM6R rtU
TURKEY PRICE BASED
ON BIRD'S CONDITION
Because the price received by tur
key raisers of North Dakota on the
Thanksgiving market depends large
ly on the condition in which they are
received on the market, turkeys that
do not grade No. 1 might as well be
fed for the Christmas market, accord
ing to statement made by O. A. Bar
ton, poultry specialist at the North
Dakota Agricultural College this
week in answer to Inquiries about
market poultry.
"The old birds that are to be sold
and the well grown young ones that
are not to be retained for breeding
purposes are best sold at Thankglv
ing," according to Mr. Barton. "They
should be shipped early enough so
tl\at they arrive at the market three,
to five days before the holiday.
A little feed given to the turkeys
now may mean several cents a pound
more on the market, and more weight
for the dressed bird, says Mr. Bar
ton. The best turkey raisers remem
ber that turkeys are graded not only"
on their fleshed condition and size,
but largely on the condition of the
skin and the care that was used re
moving the pin ftathers and any ble
mishes on the flesh asd skin.
"In packing turkeys for shipment
cracker and sugar barrels have been
found most convenient," Mr. Barton
states. "The barrel should be clean,
however, and lined on the bottom
and on top with clean paper. The
top can then be covered with clean
cloth and securely nailed. It is al
ways wise to grade turkeys carefully
packing those of similar grade in the
same barrel and marking the barrel
No. 1, No. 2, or culls, according to
the grade.
"Turkeys are best killed by the
sticking method, then dry-picked
quickly, and thoroughly cooled for at
least 24 hours before packing. The
beard and a slight ring of feathers
on the neck and on the ,wing tips are
usually left. Be sure the birds are
well bled, thoroughly cooled, free
from pin feathers, and the head care
fully wrapped In paper.
RENEW VOIR ALLEGIANCE!
The proclamation of President
Harding relative to the Annual Roll
Call deserves a popular response com
mensurate with the fine strength of
his invocation to service. The Presi
dent appeals for a "prompt and gen
erous response" and he impresses up
on the people the abundant reasons
why it is necessary that the strength
of the American Red Cross shall be
maintained and increased, that the
ranks of those consecrated to service
to their fellow man shall be ever in
soiid formation and marching on to
the goal of world betterment.
It is a very candid and kindly pro
clamation, closing with an acknow
ledgement that is not only the Presi
dent's but that of all Americans: "In
c.he interest of our common humanity
and of the service which we owe to
our fellow men, I invite my fellow
citizens to r#new their allegiance to
tlie American Red Cross during the
period of the Membership Roll Call.''
Can any person who ever has worn
the button bearing the Red Cross con
sistently avoid a renewal of allegiance
to the American Red Cross? The
question answers itself wi a decisive
negative. And when the President of
the United States, who is also Presi
dent of the American Red Cross. In
vites a regeneration in the interests
uf common humanity it is entitled to
unanimous and enthusiastic accept
ance. The invitation of President
Harding is as a command to Roll Call
workers and a warm welcome to all
the people. It must be answered
magnificently.—The Red Cross Cour
ier.
li ©Ve'tM OAi
MO &O-N0 *c
HOPE, STEELE COUNTY. NORTH DAKOTA. NOVEMBER 23 1922
W!!AT A WL WU 0S60 1b WHEN
Winter Wheat planted this fall
which failed to germinate, due to lack
of moisture, is not likely to make a
crop next year, according to Dr. H.
L. Walster. agronomist at the North
Dakota experiment station.
"Reports indicate that quite a Jew
farmers have planted small acreages
of winter wheat this year, paiticul
arly in the Red River Valley count
ies," said Mr. Walster today. "In
•v. any localities, not enough mois
ture fell to start germination. Any
fields which are not yet up probably
will not make a crop nr-xt y.-ar for
two reasons. In the first place, m.jch
of the seed will lose its vitality dur
ing the winter, and second, plants
.hat are produced hru spring gtrmin
ation of the seed will not 6end up
staks and produce heads.
"The future of the winter rye crop
is problematical, but conditions are
against it in many places. In many
cases not sufficient moisture to
start the crop unless it was
planted quite early or under except
ionally favorable conditions such as
summer fallow. This crop is' deffer
ent than winter wheat, however, in
that plants starting next spring will
head out during the summer. A
long, cool spring, favorable to the
development of an extensive root sys
tem and plenty of stools, would be of
great benefit to the winter rye crop."
WOMAN'S CLUB PROGRAM
Thursday, November 28rd
Leader, Mrs. Standley
Hostess, Mrs. E. D. Washburn
Review Drill of Making Laws
ALASKA
Transportation Mrs. Smith
Telegraph and Postal Service....
Mrs. Miller
Literature, Music and Art
VJJMCM 1W A »MVCfcV(£
'member
VJU WEBS ASKEP TO (URRy file HORSE AN5
jjMlttV OSiOKSTS! W
flETCMA lit HAv'6 fe,
A O O
vAji- jH.V W HAVS W
LlJE
w'vMtRtH'
N'eVfesyTH'^
WINTER WHEAT LOST
Mrs. Gumb
V/t-lL
$50.00 REWARD
The City of Hope, Steele County,
North Dakota, will'pav a reward of $50
for the capture of. or for information
that will lead to the arrest and convic
tion of any person or persons guilty of
stealing Turkeys from anyone residing
in the trade territory of Hope. This re
ward does not apply to any duly author
ized officer of the law.
FOR PlTVi SAKE.
ARE YOU EVES. C0MIN6
IN 1b PiffNER?
EVER'THI/^
©erriNfc
cap
-MA
HOYS, GIRLS COMING
IF NOT GERMINATED TO INSTITUTE
UoeeOM KMOWIt IU' OWKttBMCe V1H6U OOCfoK lAAVt&S A
SOON
Ab:ut 125 members of boy-: and
girls' clubs in North Dakota, winners
in the various counties in .which club
work Is carried on, will be the guests
of the North Dakota Agricultural
College at the Thirteenth' Anaual
Boys and Girls' Club Achievement
Institute, the date having been ten
tatively set for the week beginning
December 18, according to an an
nouncement made today by Harry E.
Rilling, state club leader.
Among the counties which will
send delegations are Barnes. Cass,
Dickey, LaMoure, Stutsman, Bur
leigh, Grand Forks, Steele, Bottin
eau, Ward, Williams, Billings, Ben
son, Walsh and Sargent. In each
of these counties the winners of the
various projects will be selected by
the county club leaders this week.
The projects include raising of swine,
beef and dairy cattle, poultry, corn,
potatoes, gardening, clothing, baking
and canning..
The program wiliest during the
entire week and will be made up of
entertainment and study. Home ec
onomics problems will furnish the
subject matter for the girls and stock
and crop judging for the boys. Offi
cers of he Institute, elected by the
boys and girls at the 1921 meeting,
are Herbert Warner, Milnor, pres
ident Harvey Hill, Hesper, vice
president Mildred Pierce, Ellendale
secretary, and Delia Gransberg,
Kempton, treasurer,
LUTHERAN CHURCH
H. L. Wiese, Pastor
Nov. 26th. Divine worship in'the
English language at 10:30 A. M.
Bible Study at 11:45 A. M.
Nov. 30. Thanksgiving service at
the usual time, English language.
We shall be pleased to have you wor*
ship with us.
iw
Butues vr
OUOEKTAKSR
tottper
COLGATE NEWS ITEMS
Rev. and Mrs. Doty of Oakes,
Sunday School Missionaries have
been holding evangelistic meetings
the past week
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Bacon left for
Henrietta, Minnesoat, where they
will spend the winter months with
relatives.
Miss Edna Barker spent the week
end as the guest of Miss Thelma
Smith at her home near Page.
Mr. I. H. Stralka is filling the va
cancy in the depot agents position
caused by Mr. Kaaras' departure.
Mr. Karras is now located at Fin
ley.
Miss Doyle spent the week end at
her home at Fargo.
Edna Barker, Ida Carlson, Jimmy
Hueston and Herbert Zimmermann
were Thelma Smith's dinner guests
Sunday.
Inga and Mabel Gorseth visited at
Hope, between trains, Saturday.
The Embroidery Club organized
last winter, was reorganized as The
Ideal Club. The first meeting was
held at Mrs. Orser's home. The fol
lowing officers were elected. Presid
ent Mrs. S. Wiswell. Vice-President
Mrs. Wm. Sherman and Secretary
Mrs. Howard Curtiss. A set of by
laws were .drawn up among which
were the following £he hours shall
be from 2:30 ti]l 5. A fine shall be
imposed on a tardy member, no gos
siping tolerated and every member
must bring some work. An enjoy
able time was enjoyed by all pre
sent and the hostess served a del
icious lunch. The club will meet
next with Mrs. Geo. Brooks Thurs
day, November 23.
Wm. Sherman purchased the
Knight building and has moved his
poolroom into it and has fitted up
the hall so that Co]gate again will
have the advantages that a hall of
fers. The grand opening will be in
the form of a dance given Friday ev
ening, Nov. 24th.
CARPENTER CULLINGS
Mrs. Will McKellips visited with
Mrs. Will Sussex last Friday.
Eugene Sussex is staying with his
grandparents and riding to schoo].
Gladys Wood spent Thursday and
Friday with Mrs. Will Newell of
Hope.
Ole Haugen's Ford broke down on
I he road £o Hope with the school
children.
Annie Nelson. Mike Rassmussen,
and Clifford Beverly of Luverne, and
Knud, Ras. and Karen Ronde spent
Sunday evening at the S. Wood home
R. Curry's new home has not been
completed yet.
Mr. and .Mrs. Jesse Warren took
six o'clock dinner wi{^ Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Rickard Sunday.
Earl Wood ate dinner at the Will
Sussex home Sunday.
Jake Anderson and family spent
Thursday at- the C. E. Elston home.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rickard spent
Tuesday at the Frank Rlskard home.
KIRBY LEAVES
S. R. Kirby, "the Medicine Man,"
who for about a year past has made
Northwood the mecca for "the lame,
the halt, and the blind," who have
benefitted as their faith, imagination
or the possible curative powers of his
peculiar medicines and decidedly
obnoxious treatment may have de
creed, left Northwood, on Tuesday
afternoon to resume his practice
whence he came—on his farm near
Theif River Falls, Minn., where re
port- has it that he has erected a
large private hospital for his use and
that of his large following.—North
wood Gleaner.
'-V'J*--i,t::i*rJX (•.--•« '. (V r: r:,-| A te:«5PS tf'i-'rf.-i"'
Official Paper, City of Hope, N. Dak.
$2.00 per year, 5 Cts. per copy
FIRE DEPARTMENT RESPONDS
TO CALL SATURDAY NI6HT
RAIN AND MUD HINDER WORK
FIRE CONFINED TO BARN ON
J. M. CURTIS PROPERTY
About 10 o'clock Saturday night
the Are department was called out
to fight a fire in the barn belonging
to J. M. Curtis, located in the north
west part of the city. Owing to the
rain which had Vaen falling for a
number of hours the streets were
ankle-deep with mud and moving the
apparatus was no light job.
Owing to the location of the fire,
it was necessary to^ ..a the fire en
gine from thtf Are haw to the cistern
Just east of Mrs. Thompson's resid
ence. The rain and mud combined
put the Ignition system out of order
and caused some delay In starting.
During this time a bucket brlgate was
formed and devoted their attention to
protecting the surrounding property.
The Are was first discovered by
Mr. Curtis who was returning from
down town. He immediately got out
his cows, pigs, horse, chickens, and
automobile and some small tools. His
loss outside of the building consisted
of a quantity of feed and hay. The
delay in starting the engine caused
no additional loss as it would have
been impossible to have saved the
build'nj. The mow was full of hay
and this was all ablaze before the
fire was discovered. The loss is part
ly covered by insurance.
The saddest part of the fire was
the death of Mr. C. I. Carney, a mem*
ber of the engine company. He as
sisted in hauling the engine for sev
eral blocks and then announced he
could go further. He and a com
panion then went over toward the
fire to see if they could be of as
sistance there. At the corner of the
Bleeker property, Mr. Carney col
lapsed and had passed away by the
time Dr. Samms could be brought to
care for hime. Death was probably
due to an internal hemorrhage
caused by over-exertion.
STATEMENT OF REUSLTS OF THE
CAREFUL CROSSING CAMPAING
"Preliminary figures Just compiled
by the American Railway Association
show in part the results of its "Care
ful Crossing Campaign," for the re
duction of highway crossing accid
ents. The Campaign began on June
1st and extended to September 30th.
These preliminary figures Include
returns from 108 railroads, covering
204,091 miles, or about four-fifths
of the Class 1 Railroad mileage of
the United States.
Despite an increase of 9.7 percent
(as compared with the same period
last year) in the volume of railroad
business during the campaign per
iod as indicated by the car loadings,
and an increase In registration for
the same period of 2,009,021 auto
mobiles and trucks or 21 percent, the
number of accidents at highway cross
ings increased only 3.6 percent, the
non-fatal injuries 2.4 percent of
fatal injuries 3.6 percent. This is
an average of 3 percent for non-fa
tal and fatal injuries.
The total of the accidents reported
for the period was 4,411. an increase
of 153 the total non-fatal injuries
was 1800, an increase of 42 and the
total fatal injuries was 693, an in
crease of 24.
It is believed that when final com
pilation is complettd tne ngures will
not vary more than 2 percent from
those shown above.''
The Red Cross Roll Call is on this
week. Have you Joined? Do your
share in keeping up this work.
On Making Mistakes
PRltlteR AMVSTAKC
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