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Newark post. (Newark, Del.) 1910-1969, January 16, 1918, Image 3

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THE NEWARK POST
SPRING
Newark, Delaware
Will
To
i to
old
500
country
The
the
will
for
was
on a
The
1917
less
The
the
pected
Published Every Wednesday by Everett C. Johnson
ArWress all communications to The
Newark Post.
Make
'(1ST.
,.. hones, D. & A., 92 and 93.
We want and invito communications,
but they must be signed by the writer 's
name—not for publication, but for
information and protection.
all checks to The Newark
our
Ketored as second-class matter at Newark, Del., under act of March 3, 1879.
1 he subscription price of this paper is $1.50 per year in advance.
Single copies 4 cents.
JANUARY lfi, 1918
OUR SCHOOLS DURING WAR TIME
continued from page one
tactics; but our military authorities have been slow to learn their
lesson. The navy has been a training school for several years;
hence there is no cry, such as comes from the army, for better
trained men. We are told that Germany had in her army, at the
beginning of the war 20,000 gas welders; last spring when this
country declared war, our army had 20 gas welders! Any wonder
the army officers are calling upon the teachers of the trades and
industries to rush the training of 300,000 mechanics and mechan
icians!
Get
fied
When
the
England by necessity accepted the services of her best teach
ers and educated men when she first sent an army to check the
victorious march of the Germans through Belgium and northern
France. Later some of these who escaped death were recalled to
assist in training men in the industries at home.
We are making the same mistake; and, unless our Exemption
Boards are instructed to keep hands off our vocational teachers,
some parts of our school system w ill break down. The draft has
taken so many of the agricultural teachers that the farm projects
for high school boys under the Smith-Hughes law are likely to fall.
If food is to win the war these helpers must not he put into
the trenches. The man who trains the youth for the plow and the
furrow is as important as the officer who trains our young men for
the musket and the trench.
The same, perhaps, is true of our teachers of science,
said that Germany went into the war with two hundred fifty chem
ists for every six in England and seven in France,
destruction of brave armies by liquid lire and poisonous gases by
we
such
he
nition
he
more
year
tory
less

will
ing
fact
and
It is
Hence, the
the Huns.
We must speed up in our schools. They are the best training
If our armies are patriotic (who disputes
camps of a democracy,
it?) the boys got their spirit of patriotism in our public schools
and colleges.
There has been revealed, however, in drafting our first great
army, one deplorable condition which sadly reflects on every state
which has failed to enforce the compulsory school law, namely, the
fact that we have forty thousand illiterate soldiers. It is more
than a blot on our boasted democracy—it is the same evil that
threatens Russia. "General Ignorance" is the Kaiser's most pow
erful ally. Under no conditions should we listen to anyone who
proposes to close the public schools, technical schools and colleges.
The teachers and pupils in our schools have been called our Second
Line of Defense. Our schools and colleges are the training camps
Democracy, whether we continue to need soldiers or mtel
of our
ligent citizens. , „ . , ,.
If England and France now see the need of preparing for the
future, whv should we be educational slackers, when we have not
vet tasted the destruction of war, as these nations have.
Last spring in some states high school boys were permitted
school before the term ended on promise to help on the
June, after the schools closed, these seniors stop
- * — They were slackers.
to stop
farms. But, in
ped work, and loafed the rest of the summer.
However, in other states
under agricultural teachers
* camps proved to be valuable aids to farming communities.
in the thirty approved high schools of Delaware
. _:i . i...i(' ,.r Hw.an hpinir hovs. Ot these o.XI
the high school hoys were organized into
hgih school principals.
or
camps
These
There are in _ . . . .
resident pupils, half of these being boys,
hovs no doubt the majority have farm work at home. At the same
dected [ with care a j. neighborhood of the camp
for bohting pujTose«- f "™" 1 ™ supervisor, as to wages,
r äTmÄ* a ' s " kecp 0C T," K
750 non
towns
St
.1
camp.
° r Vt^dents° of Delaware College who have no
; would be eligible to join a camp,
and cities should not send their sons
definite work for
Parents living in
into th* country'
V
the summer, w
the towns
to work alone. „„„„wlv through the summer vaca
All school boys who work regutarly^hrougn other
tion earn (he right *« "JSrl»tlc! we have learned
considerations. I artnl. < hi-h' prices, hut they do not loan
that. They want the prevailing pnw. lheir chU .
their money to their governmen , y conservation
dren to buy thrift «tamps; they refuse^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
pledges; they make no W when wh eat bread is cheaper;
eat buckwheat cakes and c i to feed the Allies and the
they raise larger c [ 0 ^.^^A in t he war stricken countries. There
starving women and child JJj laku advantage of war condi
fore, knowing that some men to take a firm stand
lions, it behooves those int ^ speed up , for democracy must
in favor of childhood. > ", . , ()Ur public schools,
be quickened. Hs very founda£ ^ ' General Wood is reported
Our colleges are no less mpor an of boys> and there is
to have said that he does m tjant ^ be takon from their
good reason why °" r cu '"*** are compelled to draw upon
courses before graduation un css physic ians. Our college
these immature engmeers. c ^ thc mimary authorities to fill
faculties and trustees shou j ^ with enlisted men. It would
up their class rooms and la ^ Genera l Ignorance. Enlisted
be a fine opportunity to h hort unit courses. Delaware
c^. t«,,«.
should be free. hi is r ,,liin-an effort should
r rEency c " urMS ' 9hü
offered for » port <*',*!" that food will win the
We must educate. Mr* J" , turned into brain power. In
he is right if the food can oe iur*. fuH ()f tr i a i s and
tellecf 1 will win the war, or dem °o ar 'brightest and best educated
" SSSÄtfÄ- their present s.audardl Let
gpced up now!
no
us
! if we
! wheat
" ! stop
i have
have
and
We
the
of
SPRING PLOWING
IN FRANCE
Will Be Done By Tractors
From America
To increase France's crops and
to lighten the burden of toil on her
old men, women, children, 1,
500 farm tractors will go to that
country from the Unted States.
The first hundred are already on
the way, and the whole number
will be in France by March, in time
for the spring plowing. Deck space
was provided for the first shipment
on a naval transport. Schools of
instruction will be organized.
The acreage sown to crops in the
uninvaded portion of France in
1917 was about 10,000,000 acres
less than in 1913, or 24.4 per cent.
The increased production through |
the use of tractors this year is ex
pected to greatly improve the food
situation.
corn
did
have
put
ahead
were
known
much
year
our
cost
had
eral
and
Get Ready For
The Spring Drive
Many of us think in a self satis
fied sort of way that we have ac
complished everything humanly
possible during the past year.
When we look back to 1917 with
the added vision of another year's
will see how childish
for
and
progress we
we were in supposing w T e did any
such thing. Every American, be
he soldier, farmer, miner, or mu
nition worker, will do more next
must do more next year than j
year—
he ever did before.
More grain, more food crops,
meat must be produced next
more
year than ever before in the his
tory of the country, and that with
less labor,
plished simply by working harder
— by cultivating more acres. It
will not be accomplished by work
ing longer hours,
fact most farmers work too hard
and too long as it is.
needed is something far different.
Probably the first step toward
greater accomplishment will act
ually lessen labor,
through the elimination of dupli
cated efforts brought about by
thought, better planning,
It will not be aecom
As a matter of
What is
This will come
more
better preparation, and less dupli
cation of effort will pave the way
toward larger crops with even less
labor than usual.
There will really be very little
excuse for any of us if we have to
unhook from the drill to go to
town to get a load of fertilizer, or
FOR
-
*3 '..A' •;
.
~-:y i
,>• Ï- iil
m
4 r :A,
x
: v&sL
efrCi ys ! ~
O'*
r;>* \ v
r- "T" -
v- js
<r
:
jjR j
Lf I
ÿ' î ;
J'
-
A J
ar
1
y
_ •frr~T
4 *
'■
V F
is
the
In
and
Let
>
Interest Paid on all
Deposits
2 per cent, on Check Accounts
4 per cent, on Savings Accounts
NEWARK TRUST AND SAFE
DEPOSIT COMPANY
NEWARK, DELAWARE
if we are two days late starting
wheat harvest because we have to
stop and fix the binder. We should
have been prepared for it; should
have hauled the fertilizer early
and fixed the drill on a rainy day.
We will have little reason to bless
the railroad if it delivers oiir car
of fertilizer too late to put on the
field. The railroad probably
R.
|
corn
did the best it could and we could
have done better. We could have
put the order in weeks or months
ahead of the time we did. If we
were on the job we should have
known by the first of January how
much fertilizer we needed for the
year and gone ahead and placed
our order for it.
cost no more and we would have
had the goods on time.
It would have
Courts Busy In 1917
During 1917, the Courts of Gen
eral Session, Oyer and Terminer
and Common P'eas of New Castle
disnooed of (120 cases,
County
marking an unusually busy year
for the courts. Charges of larceny,
false swearing, violation of a
consent law, breaking and entering
and murder were especially nuni
on
of
erous.
Eight prisoners were before the |
Court of Oyer and Terminer on |
Before General
j charged with breaking an 1 enter
ing, 32 for false swearing, 50 for
robbery, 263 for larceny, and three
for manslaughter.
murder charges.
Sessions Court 27 prisoners were w.
It
act
by
WILSON
of
is
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR
Prompt and Personal Attention
way
less
little
to
to
or
TENT AT CEMETERY
Appointments the Best
PICTURE FRAMING
R. T. JONES
FOE
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR
FOR
Upholstering and
Repairing
tf.
Second Hand Furniture
Bought and Sold
ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE
—of—
PERSONAL PROPERTY
tf.
on road from McLaughlin'9 Mill toCowen
town, on
MONDAY, JANUARY 21st, 1918
at 11 o'clock
Horses, Cattle, Farming Implements,
Hay, Straw, Fodder, Corn, and Potatoes.
F.verything to be sold.
of
the |
on |
for
HARRY BROWN,
HENRIETTA BROWN,
Adms.
w. S. Armstrong, Auci.
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of Evan W.Lewis, deceased
Notice is hereby given that Let
tera Testamentary upon
Estate of Evan W. Lewis, late of
White Clay Creek Hundred, de
ceased, were duly granted unto
Annie B. Lewis on the eighth day
of November, A. D. 1917, and all
indebted to the said de
the
persons
ceased are requested to make pay
ment to the Executrix without de
lay, and all persons having de
mands against the deceased are re
quired to exhibit and present the
duly probated to the said
same
Executrix on or before the eighth
day of November, A. D. 1918, or
abide by the law in this behalf.
Address :
J. PEARCE CANN, Esq.
Attorny-at-law,
Wilmington, Del.
Best
ANNIE B. LEWIS,
Executrix.
Want Advertisements
For Sale, For Real, Leal tad Feond
FOE BALE—New two and one-half story
frame eight-room dwelling en lot
OOzSOO. Bare chance. Price $2200 to
quick buyer.
NEWAEK TRUST AND SAFE
DEPOSIT CO.
lteal Estate Department
;
FOR SALE—Pure bred stock cock
erels—Barred Plymouth Rock,
Rhode Island Red, and White
Leghorn of the famous Lady
Eglantine strain. $2.00 each.
G. W. MURRAY,
Phone 252-J, Newark.
tf.
WANTED — A stenographer and
first class office girl. Must be a
good penman. Apply in own
handwriting stating experience
and salary expected. Permanent
position for the right person.
Apply XYZ
tf.
Newark Past.
FOR SALE—New 9-room house,
barn and chicken house with
nearly nine acres of good land
about one mile from postoffice.
WELLER'S 5-10-25c STORE.
\
12-5-tf.
FOR SALE—Eight room house on
Delaware Avenue. All modern
conveniences. New pipeless |
heater this year. Apply
ISAAC R. JOHNSON,
Newark
of
all
12-5-tf.
FOR SALE—Large dwelling and J
tract of land in the business 3
centre of Newark. Has front of
139 feet on Main St. (much wider
in rear). Extends 887 feet to B. !
and O. R. R. Side entrance on ||
Choate St.
Front suitable for residence
or business block, centre for
building lots, rear for coal,
lumber, manufacturing or other
business requiring a siding.
Fine opportunity for the right
man. Apply to
EDWARD W. COOCH,
Equitable Building,
Wilmington, Delaware.
de
de
re
the
n
or
FOR SALE — Berkshire Pigs, six
weeks old.
EMORY P. EWING,
'Phone 98-J-2 «
l-9-2t-pd.
.
FOR SALE—Small place, 28 acres.
JOSEPH KEMETHER,
R. D. 2, Elkton, Md.
l-16-4t-pd.
\'a
m
Berkshire pigs, seven
FOR SALE
to eight weeks old.
1-16-2t.
'PHONE 119.
I
/
K'M your
m—f ye*t
mm wmA mk* m4 1mm with
mr corn
nti kit ktral«» to
Cäu hnto to
• to
TtototoOMkad;«.
Ttew » too m Koto*
h««J h.ml
»•*
i
JOHN F. RICHARDS
Del&wi
Newark
BUILDING LOTS FOR SAL.
Buy a lot on the installment
plan. Five dollars per front foot.
Lots 50x150 feet deep, and psy
ments $5.00 monthly. Only a fei
left at this price. Why p'
more
rent all your life when thru 1
Building & Loan Assosiation y
can own a home in 12 years? C
to see me if interested.
T. F. ARMSTRONG.
Own
Desirable Properties fc
Sale
Store, with dwelling attach
ed, 40 foot lot adjoinix*r j
excellent location. Pos
March 1, 1918.
sion
Price reasonable.
Also—Dwelling, 8 roi
with modern conveniei
lot 70 feet front, situate
West end of Newark.
Apply,
FARMERS TRUST
COMPANY,
Newark, Dlaware.

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