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Newark post. (Newark, Del.) 1910-1969, February 27, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053005/1918-02-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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GLASGOW
Mr. and Mrs. Newton Mahan
tended the funeral of the latte- „
sister, Mrs. Mary McClure, in Wil
mington on Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Frazer
at
r's
. - an d
son, spent Sunday with Mrs. Fraz
er s parents. Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
Stoops of Cowentown.
Miss Miriam P. Alrich is spend
ing sometime with relatives in
Philadelphia.
Good
ri ui- P nces were realized at
1 ublic Sales during the past week
this neighborhood.
The dances held in the hall
every Thursday night still con
tinue to grow in popularity. Hav
ing a large crowd the last Thu
day night than ever before.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Stafford of
Stanton, spent Sunday with her
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Laws.
Mr. and Mrs. Delaware Wright
and daughter, spent Sunday with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Wright, of Gooch's Bridge, Dela
ware.
in
rs
APPLETON
Miss Marion Smith of Rowland
ville, is the guest of Miss Pearl
Barben.
The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth
Money was held from the home of
her daughter, Mrs. William Cav
ender, on Sunday. Interment T '"
made in Bethel Cemeter
Money would have > . , ,
seven years of a-' '
March next. on ^5th of
Miss p
.*as
Mrs.
j •
-.ertha Finley of Wilming
, was the week-end guest of
relatives near here.
Miss Anna Zebley was an over
Sunday guest of the home folks.
The pie social held by the Ap
pleton Social Club, was a very suc
cessful affair. It netted the neat
sum of eighteen dollars, besides
affording Ibts of pleasure to the
folks both old ana young. The
money is for the comfort kit fund.
ton
Red Cross Work At W. C. D.
Tuesday night the Red Cross
chapter of the Women's College
held its first regular meeting. Miss
Beckett, the chairman, presided.
She announced the chairmen of
the various committees: Miss
Long, committee on knitting; Miss
Powell, surgical dressings; Miss
Rich
Announcement was made of work
done since September 20, by the
students For the Red Cross they
have kn ted 138 sweaters, 4 hel
mets, 1 p ir wristlets and 3 scarfs;
for personal distribution 40 sleeve
less sweaters. 10 sweaters with
sleeves, 16 helmets, 4 scarfs, one
pair mittens, 4 pairs socks.
Chapter voted to buy a knitting
machine, that many pairs of socks
may be turned out.
Drive On Next Week
On Wednesday a drive for new
members will be begun. It will
last a week, and the progress of
the campaign will be shown by a
big clock situated in a prominent
place. The aim is "100 percent of
W. C. D. members of Red Cross."
Surgical Dressing Class
On Tuesday a class in surgical
dressings will be started,
be under the instructions of a
teacher sent fiom the Wilmington
Chapter, and will work for an hour
and a half every Tuesday evening.
scrap-book and magazines.
The
It will
Interesting Chapel Talks
At Women's College
On Monday Professor Saleski of
Delaware College, gave.a scholar
ly talk on "Words,
ed the pecularities of one language
with the German and French, and
in closing made an appeal to the
students to read and study the
poetry for the inspiration to be
gained.
On Tuesday Mrs. Henry B.
Thompson talked to the girls about
the Women's Land Army. She ex
plained how in England women
have taken men's places in the
fields and have harvested the
crops. Last year the plan was
tried in America. Units of work
college girls were
He contrast
ing women or
sent out to live in groups under a
leader and chaperon. They were
hired out by the farmers in the
neighborhood, and worked by the
day doing practical farm work.
The farmers testify to the excel
lent service rendered by the
healthy youngwomen who will obey
orders and are not afraid of work.
Mrs. Thompson said that the plan
is to be carried out in Delaware
this summer, and that the girls of
the Women's College should par
take in the patriotic service of pro
ducing food.
Wednesday Miss Marie LeCates
resume of an article from
the Atlantic Monthly on the
schools of Belgium which are
"under fire"; and she described in
a telling way the thrilling exper
upilSj^M
gave a
irs.
Thursday, Dr. Sypherd
gave a
short on Robert Herrick, the Eng
lish poet, and read half a dozen of
his poems.

Friday's Chapel h
patriotic one.
d
in
our was a
After the religious
exercises the students, under the
direction of Miss Bachrach, leader
of the Glee Club, learned the first
stanzas of the National Anthems
of England and France, that they
may be able to sing the hymns of
our allies as well
at
of
as our own.
Washington's Birth
day Observed
Friday evening the dining
at the Women's College was dec
orated with blue and white stars,
red lighted candles,
flags, and the lights covered with
red, white, and blue
room
American
crepe paper.
Card board flags and red, white,
and blue hatchets served as place|
cards. After dinner the girls made I
their patriotism touch at hony e
when they presented a Land knit
ted sweater to Harrington, the
of
faithful ll ',ght watchman, who has
^ UP .1ded the college since its be
ginning, and who has done many
little kindnesses for the students.
The Real Opportunity
of
A successful farmer once said
that he made the most money in
years when conditions were un
favorable for crops. "For," he
said, "any man can grow a good
crop during a favo.able year, and
the price is always low. On the
other hand it takes careful fertil
izing, cultivating, and harvesting
to make a good crop in a poor year.
But for that very reason, because
supply is low, any farmer who can
make a good crop in a poor year is
assured of good profits."
This truism will be borne out
next year as never before. Fertil
izers, machinery, seeds, and labor
will be harder to get next year
than ever before. Even if the sea
son is good there will be small
chance for ordinär}- methods to
bring through a fair crop. To be
gin with, ordinary crop growing
methods presuppose a plentiful
supply of cheap labor.
Of one thing we may be sure.
Labor will not be plentiful in 1918.
Nor will it be cheap. On the other
of
Whether it is for complete plumb
ing work for a new house or a
small repair job, any service
perform large or small receives
the same careful attention and skil
ful handling. We have the exper
ience, the knowledge and the facil
ities to do any job right, at the
right figures. Get our estimates.
J y
we
/$
Y
I
n
-Lit;
E
£=
KV
'U
W. D. DEAN NEWARK, DEL
is.
P.
mr
m
ea
Most Any Lens in an Hour
—Any Lens in a Day
At the Largest Optical House
in the State of Delaware
«
fj
OR the past decade we have cared for the "Eyes
of Delaware" and have builded in that time a
business prestige founded on proficient,
tious service.
F
conscien
IVhen you require eyeglass attention ask your
doctor or oculist or most any eyeglass wearer in
Delaware about our service and charges.
r
MILLARD F. DAVIS
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
9 & 11 E. 2nd ST. and
10th and Market STS.
OPTOMETRIST
[.& OPTICIAN
FOR RENT
Frame Dwelling, good dry cellar, Barn, Corn Crib,
etc. $12 per month.
Also—
Frame Dwelling, etc. $6 per month.
Above properties within five minutes walk of Iron
Hill Station, P. B. & W. R. R.
Apply to Newark Trust & Safe Deposit Co.
•Real E* f
n- *■
hand crop prices are bound to be
high next year because there will
be an active demand for
thing we can possibly produce.
I here is a real opportunity next
year for the forehanded man ; the
man who gets in the game early,
the man who gets his supplies of
fertilizers and seeds while the get
ting is good, the man who is pre
pared for every eventuality, the
man who uses what labor he has
a
to
ever}'
a
r 4
f
t
Kill yw
Mf CORN
«V * m wfcZX?
»
I
t
JOHN F. RICHARDS
Delaware
Newark
BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE
Buy a lot on the installment
plan. Five dollars per front foot.
Lots 50x150 feet deep, and pay
ments $5.00 monthly. Only a few
more left at this price. Why pay
rent all your life when thru the
Building & Loan Assosiatio-n you
can own a home in 12 years? Call
to see me if interested.
T. F. ARMSTRONG,
Owner.
is
WILSON
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR
Prompt and Personal Attention
TENT AT CEMETERY
Appointments the Best
PICTURE FRAMING
to the best advantage and uses it
only to grow good crops. For this
sort of farmer America holds
forth a promise as never before.
For Peter Tumbledown the pros
pects are a little worse than usual,
which means that they
than nothing.
are worse
R. T. JONES
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR
Upholstering and
Repairing
Second Hand Furniture
Bought and Sold
'2SvS2f<%
a
Don't Let The Snow
Fool You
[I
f
A lthough

there is snow,
everywhere, and Jack Frost is in
snow
'5$
! -
the air, the calendar tells
us that Spring
is just around the
1
\
I
cor
Not many weeks
will pass before the
running in the
trees, and it will be too
late to prune them.
Plan to do this work
ner.
sap
O
A
will be
!)

'y ■
early.

I
A full supply
A>
OF
PRUNING SHEARS
NOW ON HAND.
I
&
l
Thomas A. Potts
!
NEWARK, DELAWARE
m
ii
r
Have you Seen the Pipeless Heater
made in Philadelphia by people making heaters for the last seventy years?
One register will heat the whole house. The system is especially adapt
ed to homes with open stairways and wide doors; to churches and
rooms. It means a perfectly cool cellar.
see one on the floor.
store
Call and
ALSO PLUMBING AND STEAM AND HOT WATER
HEATING
DANIEL STOLL
'Phone 159
NEWARK
For COUGHS and COLDS
An excellent compound
of Soft .Tar, with extract
of Cod Liver Oil and Men
thol. Our
tion, 50c for 1-2 pint.
own prepara
Cough Lozenges and Knox
a-Cold Tablets.
RHODES' DRUG STORE
NEWARK, DELAWARE

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