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Newark post. (Newark, Del.) 1910-1969, December 11, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053005/1918-12-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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KHAKI COLLEGES NEEDED
IN AMERICA
a
SHORT COURSES FOR RETURNING SOLDIERS
C. A. McCUE MAKES TIMELY SUGGESTIONS FOR
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
C. A. McCue, Professor of Horti
culture, addressed the students
and Faculty of Delaware College
on Agriculture Reconstruction,
Professor McCue is known as the
"Peach Man" owing to his great
success in raising peaches, but he
has stimulated every phase of
horticulture through this region.
He is President of the American
Society of Horticultural Science.
He combines happily the scientific
and practical grasp of his subject.
His address was m part as fol
lows :
The late world's struggle in
which we have been engaged has
been quite largely won thru the
ability of the American farmer to
rise to the emergency and increase
his output of food stuffs. The story
of how the American farmer re
sponded to his country's call for
food will, when the all is told, from
a glorious chapter in our nation's
history. The war has demonstrat
ed beyond all peradventure that
agriculture is the firm foundation
upon which rests all activities of
the human race. The oldest of
callings, it has been least organ
the least appreciated. However,
the farmer has now come to his
own and reached his proper station
among his fellow workers.
Now that the war is over there
must be no relaxation in food pro
duction. The .greater portion of
Europe is thoroughly disorganized
and it will be some time before the
countries in that unhappy con
tinent can hope to fully provide
their own food stuffs. Europe is
short of cattle, hogs, and other
sources of meat. She is short on
wool, cotton, leather and of many
staple articles of diet. This short
age must be supplied and largely
from this country. The American
farmer must still keep up his war
time activities along lines of food
production.
Anarchy and starvation go hand |
in hand. The best cure for Bol- i
shevism is a full stomach. The |
normal civic status of Europe can
not be fully restored until a satis
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All you need is a heart
and a dollar
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tying food ration is an aecomplish
ed fact. We must change the
slogan "Food will win the war" to
htat of "Food will save Civiliza
tion."
Many young men who have al
ways lived and worked in cities
will have acquired a love for the
open country and they will be loath
to return to the fettered air of the j
cities. Many of these men will |
turn their thoughts and physical '
efforts toward agriculture. Most
of them will be unfitted for their
task. Physically they may be in
perfect condition for the hard
work on the farm, but mentally
[they will be misfits for the task
| they seek. Yet this great mass of
i excellent material should not be
| allowed to expend its energies j
futility. These men should be fitted
for their task. Plans are already
Agriculture has Promising Future
From the remuneration stand
point, the future of American ag
riculture was never brighter. The
rewards for intelligent farming
were never more promising. For
many years to come agriculture
will afford a satisfactory living to
the farmer who is willing to make
a work team of his brains and his
hands. The experience of the past
two years has shown us that a
higher type of farming is needed.
The emergency has resulted in
many improved methods of crop
production and there is still room
for great improvement.
Youth is ever progressive and
keen to adapt new methods. Our
army abroad contains thousands
of young men who have been called
over night from following the plow
to following the machine gun.
hese men have had a chance to
observe European methods of
farming and on their return to
their rural homes they will be
quick to put into practice many of
the good points of agriculture
wich they have observed in use in
England, France, Belgium and
even in Germany.
under way to provide these men
with lands.
Khaki College Should be
Established
.
Should the government establish
a man upon a soldier's farm and
yet fail to prepare him for his task
of wringing a competency from
the soil? Should not some means
be provided whereby these men
may 4gain an insight into nature
and nature's methods before being
thrust upon "their own?" We
have in this country a great or
ganization for teaching agricul
ture in all its phases. An organiza
tion that no other country has to
near the same measure. I refer to
The common practice of letting
j the land lie idle for a few years to
| ••rest" after it has produced a crop
' of corn is not necessarv. Under the
usual
the hill
coves
seriously depleted in fertilitv after
three or four years. Rotation of
crops keeps up'fertility as well if
not better than letting it "rest"
and grow up to weeds. At the same
j time this practice brings a farmer
more money,'since it keeps the
[land busy all the ti
the Agricultural Colleges. At least
one an every state of the tftiion.
Shall they not be utilized in an en
deavor to at least smooth the way
for those of our returning soldiers
who have but little knowledge of
agriculture? Should they not point
our better and up-to-date methods
to those who have had previous
farm experience?
Are these colleges living up to
their opportunities if they do not
establish "short courses" in Agri
culture for the benefit of the re
turning soldier? Should not the
would-be farmer soldier be offered
and given government aid in fit
ting him to earn a living from
these lands which they are offer
ing him? Such a movement for
agricultural education should be
founded upon a well outlined plan
and not upon hasty laid schemes.
It should have governmental ef
fort behond it rather than depend
ing upon sporadic personal ef
forts. There is need of Khaki Col
leges in this country as well as in
France."
Resting" Land Unnecess
ary and Unprofitable
ii
system of farming in
country even the rich
on mountain sides are
me.
city
In
a
an
A practical rotation can be be
gun by cropping one-fourth of the
tillable area in the spring to soy
beans, which may be harvested for
hay. Subsequently the bean stub
ble can be harrowed and prepared
for a crop of winter rye. The
clover should be sown on the rye
ian< ^ during the late winter or
early spring, so that the field may
remain in clover for two years. At
the end of this period it should be
broken and cropped to corn and
then the rotation should be repeat
ed. Managed in this way the aver
age farm can carry two to three
cows, five to six young cattle, and
a sow with five or six pigs. Several
sheep may also be kept, as well as
a team of horses. Small patches of
alfalfa or sweet clover may also
be grown whenever possible for
hog pasture.
Send Christmas Greens
to City Folks
People who live in the country
often fail to realize the heart hun
ger of their city cousins for greens
and shrubbery. When Christmas
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of Bessie Ellis, deceased:
Notice is hereby given that Let- II
ters of Administration upon the "
Estate of Bessie Ellis late of White ••
Clay Creek Hundred, deceased, •
were duly granted unto Newark 11
Trust and Safe Deposit Company ;;
on the Ffiteenth day of October À. "
D. 1918 and all persons indebted II
to the said deceased are requested "
to make payment to the Adminis- ••
trator without delay, and all per- II
sons having demands against the "
deceased are required to exhibit
and present the same duly probat- +
ed to the said Administrator on or II
before the Ffteenth day of Oct- "
ober A. D. 1919, or abide by the ••
law in this behalf. II
Charles B. Evans, Esq.
Attorney-at-law, !••
Ford Building,
Wilmington, Del.
Newark Trust and Safe
Depdsit Co.,
Administrator
:
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of Harry A. Sulivan, de
ceased:
Notice is herby given that Let
ters of Administration upon the
Etate of Harry A. Sullivan late of
I White Clay Creek Hundred, de
ceased, were duly granted unto j
î Kathryn A. Sullivan on the Eigh
tt-enth day of October A. D. 191S
and ail persons indebted to the (
said deceased are requested to
make payment to the Administrat
rix without delay, and all persons,
having demands against the de
ceased are required to exhibit and
present the same duly probated to
the said Adminitsratrix on or be
fore the Eighteenth day of Oct
ober A. D. 1919, or abide by the
law in this behalf.
Charles B. Evans, Esq.
Attorney-at-law,
Ford Building.
Wilmington, Del.
Kathryn A. Sullivan,
Administratrix.
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JOHN F. RICHARDS
Newark
Delaware
I
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of Isaac R. Johnson, de
ceased:
• Notice is hereby given that Let
ters of Administration upon the
Estate of Issac R. Johnson late of
Pencader Hundred, deceased, were
duly granted unto Everett C. John
son on the Twenty-fourth day of
October A. D. 1918, and all per
j sons indebted to the said de
ceased are requested to make pay
ment to the Administrator without
delay, and all persons having de
mands against the deceased are re
quired to exhibit and present the
d Ad
same duly probated to the
ministrator on or before the Twen
ty-fourth day of October A. D.
1919. or abide by the law in this
behalf.
Add re:
J. Pearce Cann. Esq.
Attorney-at-law,
Ford Building,
Wilmington. Del.
Everett C. Johnson,
Administrator.
i
!
comes, save your money for War
Savings Stamps and send your
city friends a box of Christmas
decorations from the woods and
fields. In most sections, princes
pine, holly, laurel, Jupiter twigs
with their berries, sprays of black
alder bearing shiny red fruit and
similar materials may be found.
In some sections the bay berry,
branches may be found There are
few people living in the towns who
would not be pleased to get such
a box from the country. It enables
them to make their own wreaths
and window decorations, which is
an item worth considering for
wreaths purchased in the market
are expensive now.
of
Christmas Gifts
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FOR
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LITTLE FOLKS
AND GROWN-UPS
r
TOYS
DOLLS
Fine Line of Beautiful and
Practical Gifts for every
Member of the Family
AT
LOUIS HANDLOFF'S
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The Volume of Business
done by the Security Trust and Safe Deposit Company
speaks much for the usefulness of this strong, old bank:
institution.
i
:: _
All matters receive that attention and
which make it so satisfactory to deal with
care
Checking
US.
accounts are solicited.
I
Established 1885
SECURITY TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY
SIXTH AND MARKET STREETS, WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
Member Federal Reserve Syst
:
t
era
. l .. | - l .. ; .. ; .. ] .. [-H - H-l - l-l - !-l - l - l - l-l"I"l 1 - I-I - I-I-l-L I 1 1 d-H 1 1 1 11
For
COUGHS and COLDS
An excellent compound
of Soft Tar, with extract
of Cod Liver Oil and Men
thol. Our
own prepara
tion, 50c for 1 "2 pint.
Cough Lozenges and Knox
a-Cold Tablets.
RHODES' DRUG STORE
NEWARK, DELAWARE
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JENNY'S
1918 ;
o
We have something New every day. I
The most up-to-date Flats of the Season. \
Agents for the Vogue, Rawak, Castle and j
Smolin Blue Bird Hats.
§
g
$
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o
JENNY'S
5
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5
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203 West Ninth Street—near Pott Office }
WILMINGTON, DEL
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Formerly of 834 Market St.
o
How Three Boys
Wakened Father
One of the outstanding results
of boys' agricultural club work in
Tennessee has been its effect upon
the parents of the members. Three
sons of a Madison County farmer
joined the corn club last year. One
son produced 144 bushels on hi
acre, another 139 bushels, and the
third 120 bushels, the profits from
the 3 acres being $464.64. This
demonstration wakened the father
to the opportunities at his very
door. He has pulled out of the rut,
adopted progressive ideas, and has
become a "live wire" and a re
fccgnized leader in his neighbor
hood.

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