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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, January 01, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1891-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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Dn.AWAit» <n/,i:Tii,
• »tlAWAIII
F.NTARLINHEU 17H4
ATI; JOIJKW A I-, ENTABIJIMHLD 1881
WILMINGTON, DKL AWAKE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 1891.
C 0 N 801 . 1 I»AT£ 1 > 1 H 88 .
NEW SERIES-VOL. XI-NO. 28
The
' Methods In Public Affairs.
Resuft of
Business
THE DEPARTMENT'S FIGURES
I Gratification Expressed by
Business Men.
o Present St
is of the W
«linen—
ent-FIffiires Dp«
[ml«
New Work and
Ji
iml Efficient Olli»
lo
The recent announcement that the
vnter commissioners
rplus of more than
ir to City Council as
JL an excess over and above all expenses
6\. of tho commission for the past year has
attracted a great deal of attention among
I the citizens.
The fact of the existence of the large
Kift balance, reassurance of which is given
BL by Mr. Grobe, Ims caused the liveliest
■BBT satisfaction in business circles in Wil
$•?:. mington and also among the citizens
w generally who look upon the aiinounce
a gratifying proof of tho possi
L bility of having the public departments
a business footing with financial
d altogether independent of
political entanglements.
This is the public comment on what
the water commission has achieved this
year and to the conditions referred to
above is ascribed tho cause of its sue
cess.
Hll legist rar of the
B Hffi Would have a
$ 11,000 to hand
ment
When the water commissi
into power, '83-'84, following the year'
litigation, when Messrs. Willi:
Porter, William G. Gibb«
tian Febiger bee
came
T.
and Chris
; commissioners they
found "The Watering Department of
the City of Wilmington," as its
dignity and title was
mirably financial nor
The department's property had been al
lowed tf> get out of repair. The city
dam (third dam) was dilapidated—in
fact everything was out of
pump running to its ut
most capacity in order to furnish tho
ci tv with water.
iji is true the water rents were mostly
collected. But here existed (by almost
general consent of public opinion)
suspicion that the money collected w
çm applied by C<
for which the water tax
/was the development of this opinion,
/definitely placing the administrate
r the water department by the
ot City Council in disrepute, that c
polled tho existence of the water
mission which by legislative
took those duties fr<
icipal representatives.
The first thing the commission did
to order the collection of the delin
quent water taxes. At the next meet
ing of the commission the registrar re
ported that the collect«
irdered, but that tho delinquents had
>aid no attention whatever to the col
eotors' requests for the back rent
fient
*t very ad
efficient, condition.
■pair. There
r as but
•il to the purposes
laid. It
to
of
mbers
itment
the hands of the
a
by
of
long over
Then the commissioners ordered that
other request, be made for the money
and that tile delinquents be informed
that if not attended to a fortnight from
date of notice their water would be shut
off. It worked like
a charm, for next
• up and paid his
An amusing incident of this little
1- of tin
the fact that three of the delin
quents were members of City Co
effective bit of work, for
ever since to this date have the collec
collccting water
dîiy every
on
of
to
rent,
first skirmish
lies i
• com m iss
•il.
It was
tors had any trouble i
rent.
A glance on tho following tables v
show with what exact success the vi
•ill
r rent
collected anil the trifling i
unents have bee
•unts that
have gone by default
h year, and
that through
> laxity
the commis
sion hut by citizens'
1—1.880, $94,00
■8.49, all »-oil«
all
collected; 1837
1388, $111,0(59.4:
1889, $113,108.5:
niter shin
lust
$15 due, wi
An important point
above table i
the amount of in»-*
shut oil'.
oticeable in the
he gradual increase in
o. It is probable

the
mts' figu
rater
s of the coming
January
double of that of 1880. This ah
•ill sho
this
fairly looked upon as evide
the efficiency of the present water
of
?r
;
fi
Fr
the adv:
'Q sheets seen at the
offlee the total surplus since 1886 to
1889, with the estimated surplus of this
r hich
„ J reach the s
$45,009, is $118,683. This is the
earned outside of expenditures of all
kinds.
When the eommi
effect, there being
hand, it was emp«
ture to b(
sum of $35,000 is still outstanding. The
commissioners immediately canceled
$35,000 of the bunds by payment of
that amount from the
y<*
•f
mint
Huit
on first went into
funds whatever in
ered by the Legisla
$120,600 on bonds. Tho
>
city,
land
' .
y realized
'hen tiie water bonds
the market. Bo fn
receipts the oommi
sufficient to w
grant of $120,000.
The present indebtedness of the water
department is $606,500, which, as stated,
will be reduced by over $43,000 at the
current January report.
$606,500, tho amount of $521,500 w
incurred previous to the establishment
of the water c<
In regard to what has be
plished by the commission in
and improvements of a permanent char
acter, the following, extracted from tho
• books, as some • >f the chief items, will
afford interesting information to the
public.
its annual
rplus
has collected
fipe out the legislative
div
!'«■
)f this s
Ido
• work
has
New mnin
Fr
-■li and Eleve
.$15.1
9
Ne
k. City Ulli
Now Wei
New boil
Il p
mi
ity .Mill
N
I
iy
New
Lit
ItÙi I
A'iditl
*1»
Water p
oiih
8 prh
' Hod I
St.
Du in
last
Gulf
of
at & w
-k
id.-i
n uml boil
»1
I
1.60
three
oi
RermnKtou
•iu
Bl
Bp
Third
Mark«
2 , 735.49
Among.the above perhaps the most
valuable acquisition is that of the water
power plant.
Spring is 2,590,000 gall»
ney street 1,600,000, and thero is no ex
pense, except the cost of a little oil
grease, attached to its uso.
the race muat at some time or other be Jmator
tion
tion
Its capacity to Cool
and to Rod
In
mt i
a thoroughly efficient condition,
t must be walled and deepened.
On the other side of the Brandywine
oo, where the city is rapidly extending
the citizens
facilities simiiar to those
side.
is
;
d.
iding water
the south
Mr. Porter also recognizes the need
of improving the drinking water. The
rule is good. Freshets cause
; muddy but this trouble is
readily met by shutting off ingress to
the reservoir 'where there is always
hand. What
it to bee
by
several days' supply
as referred to, howeve
•as the i
provement of the water as it averages
through the year. Coatesville and other
their refuse into the 13
dywine. Mr. Porter explained that that
feature of the question is one that is in
tho hands of sanitary engineers all
the country. Engineering science has
not yet evolved plans of a sufficiently
pecuniarily feasible nature to allow of
their adoption here. Mr. Porter is in
clined to surmise, however, that the cit
izens of Wilmington are not suffering
iunt of bad water.
places pi
as
of
to
MASONIC TEMPLE BURNED.
The
iltlm
Mas
h Loose Their
HiiiiiIhoiii« Ktructiiec by Fire.
—One of Baltimore's
noted buildings—the magnificent murble
front Masonic Temple, on Charles street,
near Saratoga—is to-night a blackened
in, the work of a few hours of devastat
ing lire. Nearly all the records of the
Grand Lodge since its organizatio
than a century ago, the piirupliernalia,uni
forms of individual lodges, costly banners,
relics that cannot be replaced and which
throw light upon the early history of the
city, the line library of the Grund Lodge—
all these have been lost.
Bai.
The fire broke out i
theatre on the second and third floors,
which is occupied by Forepaugh's. See
after scene flared up until the curtain
relied out like a balloon, and, unable to
hold the heat any longer, flew up. In
instant the
the lodge r<
the flies in the
ss of
pread to
burning
thore the flames s
a up-stairs. The
•as isolated by a paved yard
from Ht. Paul's 1*. E. Church
1 from the
the north
d factory of
iss Company on the south.
•Iiic.li had cost $450,000,
entirely gutted. The 1
•y. The crowds of people that, the
the tiro had
the P. 11am
The building,
holiday gave libe. _ ...
ly one thought—how fortunate that the
fire did
later.
Shortly after the
part ment Charles S. Coal and John Kelly,
firemen, had a narrow escape. The men
>n the south-west corner of the front
the Imild
break out.
and a half
ival of the fire de
cornice fighting tliei ..... _
ing when t liw (lames sliot frt
dow. Captain Dunn, chief of the chemi
cal department, with the uid of others,
two ladders in an upright position
the wi
placed
1 the
Dr. D. F. I'cnington, president of the
Lodge Relief Association, had a narrow
eseape while endeavoring to save some of
the records of the order. He hud climbed
to the third fl<
side, where the n
started back with
papers. Becoming confused, he mistook
the door to an ante-room for the main exit.
Picking up a large hook, he knocked out
the window of the small roo
. midway of the
orth
»«I, and had
armful of books and
ful
climbing to the
the
in exit, when he fell,
of crushed in. Mr. Phili
just
Kell, past
led h'
a
aster, was following him,
ly before he was injured.
The old St. 1'aul's P. E. Church, corner
d Charles streets, which
.separated' from the burning building by
a smiWl alley, was in imminent danger at
•eral times »luring the fire. Sparks
showered on the roof, but wero quickly
extinguished before any harm w
The top of the building was used largely
by th« 1 firemen in throwing streams »If
water into the north side of the build
of Saratoga
the
158
ing. One of the stained-gloss
on the south side was broken by falling
timber.
Thomas
of No (» Engl
Irnm the hose carriage
to the lire and w
the body.
T.
Sexton, assistant engineman
finie'
badly bruised about
•us thrown
the way
HER Ii USB AND PROTESTS.
Mu «'flag« a
the
to
of
Loi
also
Mrs. Durke-It«
Hi-; list
London, Dec. 24.—The following
letter is published in to-day's Pull Mull
îference to the Burke-Koche
Gazette i
div(
Sir : I have s
paragraph ii
erring to mys
quasi divorce proceedings in the
of America, and
1 that such an action had
id against me, whether
be within your knowledge
ely
to-day for the first
your issue of Friday
IF. in connection witn
lust
>m which
ight I
□ ■
cesfitlly or
t.
It
b
this date myself and ..
d in a similar manner, quite
; of the fact that, as it is
wu. there are not the slightest grounds
such proceedings against me in any
il
?r
;
fi
fact is that when I unfortunately
ied the lady in question 1 thereby
■d her a native of this
Tii
untry,
mn try
*f t hit
alone that she c
s a party
Huit of this nature.
he needless to
Heitor:
It
idd that neither
With
tiss
here,
had
row
when
down
rille,
fired
his
lie
on
rying
tery
sion
A
A
for
It is
and
Giffin.
elf
proceedings. Yo
, faithfully,
James Rociik.
> Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 24.—Of the
Burke-Roche divorce, after reading the
husband's letter published in London
Hportod by cable to-day, Henry
Flanders, one of the best lawyers in the
city, said: "A woman married in Eng
land to a British citizen is herself a
British subject, and a divorce grunted
' . Delaware, even after siie 1ms fully
implied with tho requirements of the
orco laws <jf Delaware
div
. .'ould _
ognized by the English courts,
l think a divorce obtained under
•os would be recognized
any one of the United States except
Delaware."
!
!'«■
Ido
RAILWAY MILEAGE OP IS 90 .
Figures oftl
Tc
C
lotion During
the €
I
Ne
Y'ork, Dec. 25.— F
statistics
published by tho Engineeriny News, it
the total addition to the
country's railway mileage during 1890,
has been nearly 5800 miles,
than was laid ii
ot railway c»
•y 1st, 1891, Mill be 167,1
amount, 36,912 miles
appears th:
7(10
mi 1er m»
1889. The
pleted Jnn
2. Of this
22 per
constructed eluting the
The Southern Atlantic,
sippi states, with
>tul
;ent., has bee
last live yc
Gulf and Miss
of 2,158 mile
total
they have for
three years past any other two groups
oi states.
siding
last
is
has
.ass
Jmator ueit conference year.
UJÇO tho N»*gro.
6.—The Wnshing
ivc Association, c»>inpose»l «»f
colored citizens of this Strife, has been
organized here. The object of the associa
tion is stated to be to encourage immi
tion of colord people to this state
Tv
Pro
nating
away
with
by
t < i
11 «
town
M E. Church has in
Fosnocht to return
GRACE'S PA8TOR-ELECT.
iv. Dr. Spellmayor
evv. paper«.
In a letter to William M. Field,
dent of the board of trustees of
M. E. Church, the Rev. Dr. Henry
Spellmeyer of East Orange, N. J., who
recently*was invited to become pastor of
Grace Church, thus refers to the Rev.
Dr. John Y. Dobbins of Trenton, who
has accepted a pastoral call from the
church: "I believe that Dr. Dobbins
will have a very successful pastorate.
He has always been popular with the
young, highly evangelical and a pro
ved success wherever 1 have heard
of his work. 1 congratulate you all."
Trenton Daily IStutc Gazette says :
"Very many of our citizens will learn
with regret that the Rev. Dr. Dobbins
of State Street M. E. Church will leave
Trenton next spring, at the close of the
conference year. He has accepted a
call to Grace Church, Wilmington, Del.,
at a salary of $3,000, with a parsonage
Just completed at a cost of $25,000. This
of the finest appointments in the
Methodist church and Dr. Dobbins will
fill it ably and successfully. He has
been one of the most eloquent and ef
ficient pastors in Trenton for several
years, and his people will miss him
greatly."
Trenton Daily True American says:
"The Rev. Dr. John Y. Dobbins, the
popular pastor of State Street M. E.
Church, has accepted a call to Grace
Church. Wilmington, Del. The official
board of State Street Church was noti
fied at the meeting held on Tuesday
night and a committee was appointed to
express the feeling of the board relative
to the departing pastor to the quarterly
ce, which meets next Monday
night. The church to which Dr.
Dobbins goes is one of the best ap
pointments in the gift, of the church.
Dr. Dobbins is one of the most
popular and successful ministers in the
Now Jersey Conference. He ha? occu
pied all the leading pulpits in the con
ference and is greatly beloved by the
congregations whom he has served,
is now serving his second te
Street Church, 'l'lie first te
here for three years. He has
three years of his
all probability he
Kind Words of
d Treu I o
firace
is
to
of
He
at State
served
and in
•ould have served
longer had he not received
this flattering call. Dr. Dobbins is a
finished speaker, always expressing his
thoughts in th« 1 most elegant language,
und in his pastoral work he has always
been popular. His departure from tho
city will bo greatly regretted."
two ye
CITY COUNCIL.
Pr«
d!
f a Uriel and Cheerio
»Id Frill
\<i
J
Evening;.
The Council chamber was decidedly
cold, Friday evening, and City Council's
adjourned session w
President Farra presided, and Messrs.
Beale, Colton, Curren and Sharkey
were absent. The electric lights \\—
also unusually dim at times, and alto
gether the sessio
rather brief.
not a very cheer
ful
The police committee reported in
favor of awarding the contract for 2,000
dog tags to W. E. Lindsey, at
$19 per thousand. Adopted.
The city treasurer reported : Balance
bank to the credit of current ex
penses, $87,680.98; special deposit,,
$12,8,19.62; total, $100,480.70. Receipts
during the week : Board of Water Com
missioners, interest cn water bonds,
$5,790.
Physician M. J. Hughes Of
the North-western district reported :
Primary vaccinations, 18, of which 13
cssful; Vaccine Physician W.
Miller, North-eastern district :
Vaccinations, 160, all primary, of which
158 were white and three colored.
Tho miscellaneous monthly pay-roll,
$1,847.17, and the police pay-roll,
$3.828.35, were allowed.
A communicatic
T.
at
read from tlin
Board of Water Commissioners, asking
the co-operation of Council in presenting
to the Legislature an act to regulate the
time and manner for employes of
( to recover damages for in
juries sustained while at work. It w
referred to the law committee with i
structions to confer with the Water
Commissi
A communication from the Star Pub
lishing Company,claiming that its action
printing tho delinquent tax list was
regular, and in accordance with estab
lished usage—the order of the chairman
of the prin ting committee—was read and
referred t< » the law committee.
The interest list duo January 1st,
$8,487, was allowed.
Bills for the removal of garbage w
asset! as follows: Thomas Fag*,..,
407.81; Fred Winchester, $104.77;
Loi ion Collins, $134.10. The bill of
Frank Barrett, $95, for laying
graph cable across the Christiana, w
also allowed.
porati.
tele
MISSISSIPPI POSTMASTER S1IOT.
With Gun in H
Wrong Druggist.
Carrot/ton, Miss., Dec. 20.—John Pren
tiss Matthews, Republic:
here, was killed y
McBride, a wealth
had quarreled at
nesduv nigl
row there ;
when Matthews w
down the street t<
McBride .fc Co.,
rille, McBride stepped toward him and
fired the fatal shot while Matthews had his
preparing to shoot
Matthews had rendered himself very
odious'to the people of the community by
his offensive conduct as the carpet-bug
postmaster of the present administration,
lie 1ms been arrested almost every week
on charges of drunkenness, profanity, car
rying concealed weapons, assault and bat
tery and other offenses. He took posses
sion of a passenger train on the Georgia
Pacific railroad while drunk, and was only
con»|uered by the porter and conductor
beating him down and disarming him.
A Now Desk for the Deputy Sheri IT.
A new desk, handsome, modern and
convenient, has been put in by Sheriff
Simmons,at hisoffloein the court house,
for the use of Deputy Thomas Giffin.
It is a change that has been long needed
and is highly appreciated bv Deputy
Giffin.
II« Goes After the
m postmaster
day noon by \V. S.
îy young druggist. They
the post-office on Wed
e McBride had raised a
alunit his mail. Consequently,
yesterday coming
•ward the drug store of
nied with a winchester
SS1Ä
ject
of
of
'
the
two
in
other
The
the
qui
»
other
New
Mother of Six Children
ithinTwo Ye
Marlboro, Dec. 25.—M
Boswell, wife of Mordecai Boswell, re
siding near tiiis town, Saturday night
last gave birth to three children. This
is the second time iu two years that she
has given birth to triplets.
Mordecai
mus
the
runs Flro.
VinoQUA, Wis., Dec. 26.—The fire origi
nating in Linderaann's building swept
away the entire block except the Tremont
. involving a loss of fullv
with but $10,U<)0 insurance. It w
by great exertio
ward
street,
street.
11 «
$150,000
a« only
the part of the fire
anil citizens that the remainder of the
town was saved.
LEG I SLA Tl VE A LLi
VANCES.
of
the
the
:
the
a
the
has
ef
the
E.
to
A PI«« for Betr
«•!i
Along the
Editor Gazette: 1 desire to call the
attention of the members of
moral Assembly to some of the abuses
at have crept into the item of allowances.
clerks of the House and
(•<
The pay of
.Senate has i
$700 to $2.500 'each. 1 which
î of the State's
that these offices e
a few years fr<
money, as all know
be as acceptably and
ithirdthe
whatever the c«
immends
completely tilled fa
omit.
mitte
jeounts
mmittce always
adv
ver that of its* p
isen bi the sum a I
doe
•r, thus it has
ntioned.
Think of it. tho clerk of the 1 louse
the whole nine
here of the
three clerks
amt paid the
mite. The salaries of tho
omit to «
3-half the
:mhers of both ho
combined, less their mileage. Now this is
both absurd and ridiculou:
a safe asse
,s I think it is
of the appli
de during the
for
three
ml always a
lidates
jorlty of the defeated
cants for the position
ing clerk, thereby admitting that if they
ot get $2,500, they
about the :
' »PP» -
sistant «»r read
er
3 willing
of work for $400,
d usually the assistant clerk 1ms been
more competent of the two.
The abuse can be c
<lo
the
orreeted by fixing
wo chief clerks to
; not over $1,000 for clerking,
id publishing their jo
it will he sought ufteratthese figures
bv thoroughly competent and acceptable
their pay by law, the t
g, enroll
)s, ami I
ing
know
The reading or assistant clerk of the
House should be selected i
nor as the chief clerk,and his salary should
als«» ho fixed by law.
It seems proper that the members who
desire the above reform should so declare,
before the selection of the clerks, other
wise the latter would think themselves
eiving the ad
badly
ated by
ie by the journals of the legislative
committee of the
$4,5
th:
there w
disbursed
ate office
who nl
ready had their
than i
le. The first two items are $500
e clerks for indexing and .super
intending the printing of their journals,
while the combined work of both should
not require more than one week if the
journals are properly kept, yet the State
' 1 $1,000 for it. Next, the State tre:
received $015 for signing and printing 750
bonds ; then the secretary of State
received $700 for superintending the
printing of laws and bonds ;
the insurance commissioner received $1,500
for preparing and superintending the
printing of his report, which is only a
. " ' uual statements pub
lished by the companies doing busi
this State. Then the State auditor is al
lowed $000 for superintending the printing
of his report, and to give a suitable wind
up, the clerk of their committee, after
securing $0(i for three days work, i
thorized to draw on the State treasurer for
$50 for superintending the printing of his
: a j Q f p aRe8| t j lc cost 0 f printing be
g not over $10.
But the precedent has been set by former
committees, and these gentlemen only fol
lowed in their footsteps.
The expenditure
the last four years
I should think, be a matter ot iiivestiga
s to whether the results justified the
Another favorite raid
He
in
a
f the
■1°
over $75,000 during
militia, would,
tion
in
at
the State treas
ury is the expenses of serving requisitions
other states for persons
crimes in this State, and the passing of
laws for indexing the county records,
whereby we usually pay $500 for each $100
worth of work performed. All the above
will he before you, so keep an eve «
them, as it is expected that you gcntlem
will make good the before-eloction pr<
ises of reform, and not smilingly inf»
that the platform and promises,
hustings were only intended fur the gulli
ble voter and never to be kept. More than
usual is expected of y
' • thew
■cused of
I
:
:
ming ses
. of needed retrenchments
, and it is to be Imped that you
ill not disappoint the people.
und ref<
OllHRRVER.
Dover, December 23d, 1890.
PRESIDING ELDER'S VISITS.
Dr. Murray's Last It
meats Tills Conf.
Presiding Elder Murray's official
gage.ments during the remainder of the
conference year arc as follows :
Preaching—January 4th, at Hart's and
North East; January 11th, Rising Sun,
Mt. Pleasant and Port Deposit; January
17th, Zion; January 18th, Hopewell and
Principio; January 20th, Cherry Iiill;
January 25th, Elkton and Christiana;
February 1st, Red Lion, New Castle and
Kirkwood; February 8th, Delaware City,
and St. Georges; February
15th, Madeley, Kingswood and Swedish
Mission; February 17th, Cookman; Feb
ruary 22d, Asbury, Union and Marshall
ton; March 1st, St. Paul's and Grace;
March 8th, Newport and Hockessin.
Quarterly conference—January 3d,
at Hart's; January 5th, North East;
January 9th, Port Deposit; January
19th, Rising Sun and Mt. Pleasant;
January 17th, Hopewell and Zion;
January 19th, Principio; January 20th,
Cherry Hill; January 24th, Christiana;
January 26th, Elkton and Newark;
January 31st, Red Lion; February 3d,
New Castle; February 3d, Brandywine;
February 7th, Delaware City and St.
Georges; February 9th, Mndoley;Fobru
ary 16th, Kingswood; February 17th,
Cookman; February 18th, Scott; Febru
ary 19th, Union; February 21st, Asbury;
February 23d, Marshallton; February
25th, Claymont; February 20th, St.
Paul's; March 6th, Grace; March 9th,
Newport.
i»l of Engage
Port P
of
BRUTTED P. R. R. MOVEMENTS.
Its Line
Or»lor to Meet. «. & O. Improve
Propositi»)
to .Straighten
Rumor:
railroad authorities have in view the pro
ject of a comprehensive straightening out
of the lino bet ween Washington and New
Y'orlc. The move • • -
of shortening tho
' ' line in order
A Ohio lmsae
the time between
•tropolis.
Along the Maryland division the Pc
railroad civil engineers have
afloat (hat the Pennsvlvani
is for the purpose
ihedule time along the
•et what the Balti
plishcd in reducing
the capital and tho
in
tra
de
,eys since July. The sec ...__
included admeasurements of propcrtic.
lands ami furm buildings along the more
direct lines where the e
shortened. At points
Newark there exist e
>ut of which
two s
North 1
s the
•ould throw
ing ofi time. This is true of
straightening «
in a large suvi
other pn
The farmers and property
the points roferred to
and Maryland.
already
the
qui vive.
The movement of the B. ä O. people i
piercing u tunnel under the Pataiwo
s railway terry and
• haul through the city of
» >. which will save that line* an
other 20 minutes between Washington and
New York, is one of the features that is
arousing the Pennsylvania railroad author
Fire
of
for
the tedio
mus saving
the long, si«
Rahim»
There were four deaths here on Christ
day. They include Catharine A.
Qarrity, No. 1880 Tntuall atreot; Ed
ward O'Donnell, No. 424 Tatnall street;
Bridget Luwlor, No. 425 East Ninth
street, and Fred Ott, No. 203 Tatnall
street.
OBSERVANCES
the
the
and
How the Festal Day was Cele
brated in Wilmington.
A DAY OF QUIET ENJOYMENT
and
Bright Music and Fitting Ser
mons in the Churches.
omit.
Merry Dane
«1 Festive
Makers
has
I
Ively Few A
■I»
to May«
Cheer I«
lef and !
•li
-Uonc!
Hospital Path
tho
the
Christmas Day was ushered in with
the usual accompaniment on tin lu
which began bef<
Christmas eve, and eo
occasional lull until midnight. About
daybreak the discordant salute began
again and broke out at intervals through
out the day.
This was the sign of the coming of
the day that was heard on the streets.
Indoors peopl
ticipatif
to obse
is
: dark
is
the
•ss fell
rltb
for
they
-
read
$400,
been
<lo
juietly, with happy
i and thankful hearts, prepared
r e the great Christmas holiday.
" ' ?day
vded
ho thronged
search of appropriate gifts
or friends. The express
offices were deluged with packages for
all parts of the country and Europe,
and the extra force of clerks worked
late shipping and delivering the Christ
to
The businc
Wed
streets
afternoon and ev
I
ith Christmas shoppers,
the st»
for relath
the
who
ad
Nearly all of the public schools held
ppropriatc exercises on Wednesday
fternoon. At No.
•arded to wi
in a compel i
* in study. Contribu
eeived at the schools for the
Associated Charities. Many packages
of provisions and clothing were brought
diolurs. They were sent to
the Associated Charities, where the
agefs distributed them to the needy and
deserving poor.
tion for excelle
tio
nl
$500
the
750
the
;
the
a
al
for
his
be
fol
the
in by the
CHRISTMAS DAY
was quietly oqserved. Every
had a fireside of their own took advan
tage of the opportunity and spent the
holiday at home. Many stores we
open during the morning, and for a few
hours the streets were lively with be
lated buyers. The stores closed up
toward noon and from that hour the
city had a quiet, Sunday-like appear
ance. There was some drunkenness
and early in the afte
flro attracted a crowd to the lower part
of Market street.
An unusually large number of Christ
mas trees were sold in the market, and
on every street, shades were raised in
the houses to give passers-by a glimpse
of tho beautiful Christmas fruit they
bore.
ho
f
ah
IN THE CHURCHES.
Asbury and Scott M. E. Churches held
the usual Christmas morning services at
5 a. m., the Rev. Vaughan 8. Collins
and the Rev. J. D. C. Hanna, pastors of
the churches, led the services.
At St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral, the
Church of the Sacred Heart. St. Paul's
and St. Mary's Roman Catholic
Churches, early mass was celebrated at
5 o'clock In the morning, and also at
10.30 o'clock. Vespers
o'clock in the evening. Mass for
people was celebrated at St. Joseph's
Church at 5, 8 and 9 a. m. At 7 p. m.,
the children of the school gave
taimnent.
At St. John's Episcopal Church
vices, including beautiful selectI
Christmas music, were held at 6.30 and
10.30 a. m. At Trinity Church Holy
Eucharist was celebrated at 7.30 a. m.
Services were also held at 10.30 a. m.,
the Rev. H. Ashton Henry preaching
the sermon. In the evening the Sunday
school festival was held and Bishop
Coleman delivered an address. Services
at Old Swedes and Calvary churches
wore held at the usual hours.
The Christmas entertainment of the
New Jerusalem Church was held in the
evening.
Rodney Street Presbyterian Churcli
held Christmas services in the morning.
The reformed Episcopal Churches of
the Covenant and Redeemer, held a
' ;e in the latter churcli in
the morning. The Rev. Charles Hen
dricks of the Church of the Covenant
preached tho sermon.
of
of
•as said at 7.30
lured
enter
of
union se
POLICE NOTES.
Good order was preserved throughout
the city by tho police. Twenty-eight
made during the day,
mostly for drunkenness. The patrol
wagon answered 98 calls. Samuel
Hawkins, Dr. 13. G. Shortlidge and
Samuel H. Baynard presented boxes of
cigars to the force.
On Wednesday evening Mayor Har
rington was caned by Dr. Shortlidge, at
the police station. The cane is of oak,
handsomely silver mounted. The same
evening Chief of Police Swiggett was
presented with a pair of handsome gold
cuff buttons, a gift from his class in St.
Paul's M. E. Sunday-school.
aru ste
GENERAL NOTES.
An entertainment was held at the
Homoeopathic Hospital in the morning.
Each patient and nurse
. Thero w
&
•eivctl a pres
Christmas tree i
also a largo
tree at the Delaware Hospital. Every
patient and nurse received
priatc present.
An entertainment, followed by re
freshment« was given in the W. C. T. U.
reading room at Eighth and Market
streets in the evening.
Both theatres gave matinees and ev
ing performances. Tho attendance was
ent
of the wnrds. Thero
appro
and
the
Ne
the
not as good as last year.
Prof. A. B. Webster gave his usual
Christmas matinee dance at, his dancing
the afternoon. It
academy
attended by about 100 pers<
German Bakers' Union gave a ball
in the evening in German Hull. About 50
couples participated in the promenade.
Gottlieb Ihle was master of ceremonies,
August Papendiech first president,
George »Single secretary and Fritz
Schmidt treas 1T .
tra furnished
Street-car travel
1. The cars of all lines r:;
Sp<
log
Humboldt's orches
by
with
who
mates
weel
time
ras heavier than
ell
filled.
Several members of the Fame Hose
Fire Company, serenaded their fellow
firemen with blasts from horns. They
were entertained at all uf the engine
houses.
Numbers of little folks
happy Thursday in being the recipients
of tho pretty Delaware dolls wht
dainty attire brought them first pre
miums at the recent National Doll
Exhibition iu New Y'ork city. The
greater share of them
among the littlo inmates of the Homo
for Friendless Children, the Cheerful
Home, the Homuiopathic and Delaware
•re made
distributed
soon
Hospitals and another share to the Asso
ciated Charities.
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., gave
to each of their employes for a Christ
mas gift, a box of fine confectionery.
In accordance with their custom the
Harlan «& Hollingsworth Company on
Wednesday afternoon presented each
of the 38 boys employed as rivet heaters
in the company's works with
fortuble overcoat as a Christmas present.
Captain Thomas Johnson made a speech
of presentation.
The Hilles «& Jones Company pre
sented cacli man in its employ with a
turkey.
The Uni
Veteran Legion, the Sons
of Veterans, the Grand Army of the
Republic, and the women's branches of
ization, spent the «lay in
distributink^lfts among disabled veter
ans and soldiers' widows and orphans.
Friday the task was continued.
At the Christmas meeting of the Wa
waset Gun Club there were five s
In the first G
the last
with
of
ceps.
•go Miller was the win
1 W. Buckmaster; Third
Miller and Buckmaster equal; Fourth
Buckmnster; Fifth C. M. Buckmaster
first.
At the Healdmoor rille range there was
a whole day's thorough enjoyment. The
rifle and pistol shooting was very good,
some fine records being made. Lieuten
ant Howard Simps«
beginners who seemed to take eve
more interest i
veteran rifle
?r; in the se
for
took care of the
the sports than the
FRONT .S i
KET RAILWAY.
It Changes II
ils, the Co
trol Passing
te to Local
the 3lrC.mil» Ks
Man a
Control of the Front and Union streets
railway lias changed hands through the
purchase fi
McComb's estate by Franklin B. Colton,
representing a syndicate, of 2,201 shares
of the 3,135 shares of stock of the com
tin; administratrix of the
i
the
to
and
The City Passenger Railway Com
pany had the option for s*
making the purchase, but for s
nsummnted. As it
organization i
, although, fr
: Jof those in
r purchase it is not
beyond possibilities, but that the pas
senger railways of the city may yet be
all merged into
time of
it was not c<
stands
independent conce
chat
terested in the
till!
the
few
be
up
the
and
in
ho
Friday with
system.
With the new control will follow the
long-needed railway improvement
Front street. The purchase covers only
the Front and Union railway. No
syndicate of railways to be established
anew and branching all over the city is
contemplated by the purchasers. The
necessary improvements will be made in
the spring and this will include the
abolishing of horse and mule motor
power and the substitution of electricity.
It looks at present as if the new owners
would expect to obtain their electric
motive power from the City Electric
Lightning Company. Otherwise it would
be necessary to establish an expensive
electric plant costing some $50,000 at
the ;. proposed Silverbrook terminus.
The past and present
condition of the
Union railway is ascribed to the fact of
the controlling power being in the
hands of an administratrix which condi
tion works in the direction of with
holding expansion or enterprise. This
avoided as the control will be
under the direction of a live directorate
which will give immediate local atten
tion to all needs and improvements.
Nothing whatever definite has be
formulated ns to extensions of the line
ill those interested state anything
exactly as to the transformation of the
road from a horse railway to an electric
\ There is the general statement that
work will commence in the spring.
f
at
of
the
at
at
m.
of
a
poor
and
Front
of
At tho regular quarterly meeting of
the vestry of Immanuel Church, High
lands, held on Friday evening, Der
ber 19th, the following was adopted:
Called to mourn the loss of one of their
number, taken in the prime of mutnhnod
and Christian usefulness to his heavenly
•cor'd
ho
. tho vestry desire to place
thoir sense of the loss this j.
taiued in the death of Willi.
As a member of the vestry and of the
choir also, he has faithfully served in this
parish since its organization a few years
g cheerfully of his time, thought ,
i voice, in promoting its welfare,
u a due share of its success must
ago, giv
means ;i
and to hi
be attributed.
Broad in
judgment, and
lie undertook, lie exercised
quite.beyond its bounds. lie was a warm
sted and faithful
his business and devoted, kind
tionate in his ho
The vestry desire to offer their sincere
sympathy to his sorrowing family in their
bereavement, and to assure them' that the
great loss they sustained is shared by them,
and his manly and Christian life will be
affectionately remembered. They also
Smolved, That a copy of this bo sent to
the family of the deceased, that it be pub
lished in the Wilmington napers, and
ered upon the minutes of the vestry.
Kensey J. Hammond, rector.
n Ainsworth,
Junior Warden, for the vestry.
his sympathies, discreet in
' earnest and faithful in what
influence
) friend,
id affec
Ki
Have Nat the Contract.
The Philadelphia Record says that "a
contract for the construction of one of
the largest passenger steamboats i
world has been awarded to the Harlan
& Hollingsworth Company of Wilming
ton, Del. The new vessel will be 50 feet
longer than the celebrated steamboat
Grand Republic,
the
r plying between
d Rockawny, and will be
. Tho
el will be 332 feet long, registering
• 2,000 tons. She will be a floating
palace in all respects." This announc e
ment has been made in other papers,
and denied by the Harlan & Hollings
worth Company. A representative of
the company said Friday morning that
nothing was known of a contract for
building such a steamboat.
Ne
York
the property of the s:
but
was
hose
The Yule L
iTospondeni-»
in Sussex.
Sp<
d Journal
ïKTOWn, Dec. 25. —The yule
lighted i
log has be
and
the Buss
•ill remain kindled for a
Sussex hospitality requires that
xehange of social courtesies.
»Sania Claus paid a visit to the almshouse
early this
generous old follow was impersonated
by Dr. Richards, whose annual visits
•no of tho delights of the county's
wards. With a half dozen friends the
inmates were visited, and each presented
with a box »>f candy, cakes, apples,
oranges, bananas, nuts, and to those
who smoked, pipes, tobacco and cigars.
Christmas cards, pictures and reading
matter in abundance were left the in
mates who were deeply gratified for the
offerings.
weel
time
•ning. The genial and
for
fire
were
The Episcopal Church at Seaford will
soon buy a $1,300 pipe organ.
gave
the
on
each
pre
a
A TRIBUTE
)M EMPLOYES.
H. H. Carter, Retiring Superintend«
Ii Kullroud, Presented
u Handsome Silver Service.
of
Hi-' 1-.
Wi
The sincere regret among the em
ployes of the Maryland division of the
Pennsylvania railroad oceasioned by
the retirement of H. II. Carter as super
intendent of the division, found fitting
expression on Wednesday afternoon in
the presentation of a magnificent silver
:e to Mr. Carter. The handsome
•as also an earnest of the high
held by
his subordinates, and thus combining
the sincere motives of the presentation
and superb offering itself, the gift will
most vividly recall the willing co-opera
ever lent to the retiring superintend
entd uring his administration of this
portant line of iron
The presentation
toko
esteem in which Mr. Carter w
Sons
the
of
in
Wa
tion
highway.
entire sur
prise to Mr. Carter who, after returning
from luncheon on Wednesday afternoon,
was requested to stop into the large
office of the station building, and com
plying with the invitation found him
self surrounded by railroad attaches
and employes, the head of every de
partment from Philadelphia toQuantico
being represented. Confronting him
was a superb service, a veritable triumph
of the silver smith's art. It consisted
of 27 pieces of massive repousse work
all resting in a large chorry case and
half buried in drab plush. The several
articles of tho set were lined with gold
except the coffee and tea urns, the in
e of the finest white
win
was
The
the
the
terior of which
metal.
Station Master Gookin,
oldest and most valued attaches of tho
road, made the presentation. He took
in the presentation to say a
in behalf of the employes of
the road to the retiring superintendent.
He said :
! of the
the
occas
farewell
the
It is with univesal feeling of regret that
we learn of your leaving this division. We
have worked for you now about eight
years, we understand what you wanted
done and have tried to the'best of on
ability, feeling sure that liowevei
effectual our efforts are appreciated by
1 speak for the men generally when"
that they desire to offer you a* slight token
of their regard so that in future years y
may have occasionally brought to mind
the pleasant associations they 1
you. We trust that you will
testimonial of our good will, and that you
will find in. your now station content and
fortune.
Mr. Carter was quite affected by this
sincere expression of regret at his de
parture, conveying as it did the hearty
ood will and good wishes of the liun
reds of employes of the division. He
extended thanks to the men and paid a
compliment to their willingness to exe
cute at all times and under all circum
stances all orders, and to this fact much
of whatever success he had attained as
superintendent was due. After a gen
eral handshaking farewells were said
and the exchanges of good wishes for
the future made.
The presentation was attended by a
number of employes of the division and
Mr. Carter'3 personal staff of officers
stationed here. There were beside
trainmaster and assistants, with station
masters, supervisors and assistants and
yard masters from Philadelphia, Balti
more and Washington; in fact, the heads
of all departments of the P., W. & B.
railroad, Baltimore & Potomac railroad,
and Washington Southern railroad.
it
in
not
pas
be
of
i r e had for
•cept this
the
No
is
in
the
at
of
the
be
»1 in a CcHKpool.
Joseph Newell, aged 20 years, an
employe of the Wilmington Coal Gas
Company, was found dead i
:osspool
at the gas works Friday morning. He w
one of the night workmen, and lived at
1112 Chestnut street. Thursday evening
he complained of feeling
lie went to
o'clock went out to the
rell, when
d shortly after 6
. water closet,
rhich is over the cesspool. As ho did
>t return, it was thought that he had
gone home. Friday morning he w
missed and a search was begun. His
spool. Newell
d although
Tl'..
of
body was found in thee
had been subject to fits,
has had none lately, it is supposed that
he was taken with
the water closet, and falling into the
cesspool, was drowned.
• after
entered
,
A Family Tangle.
Quitman Prose.
Marshall Hopper, youngest son of
Mr. J. H. Hopper,and Miss Mary Alder
, daughter of Mr. Thomas Alder
•ied Thursday, the Rev.
Wilson Johnson officiating. Mr. Thomas
Alderman is Mr. J. II. Hopper's
law, Mr. Alderman's second wife being
a Miss Ilopper. Miss Mary, the hand
some bride, is his first wife's child. Thus
it will be seen that Mr. Hopper's son is
son-in-law of his father's son-in-law,
and is also son-in-law of his own
brother-in-law, »fee.
A Sudden Death.
Elzie R. Shaw, aged 37 years, a
painter in the employ of the Jackson &
Sharp Company, was taken with a chill
yesterday morning week, while at work,
and went home and to bed. lie grew
worse rapidly, and Thursday Dr.
Springor was called in. He gave all the
aid possible, but congestion of the lungs
had developed and death ensued at 1
o'clock Friday morning. Mr. Shaw was a
member of numerous societies. He
leaves a wife and three children. Mr.
Shaw's residence
Fifth street.
No. 431 East
A Lively Christ
Laurel, Dec. 25.— Bad whisky caused
much lawlessness to-day. Captain Jef
ferson Rickets was beaten to a pulp,
John Davis is minus a finger which was
fiiilo ho is bruised severely;
•pli Waller, a powerful man, was
knocked insensible with bricks and
clubs. On regaining consciousness he
drew a revolver and endeavored to
shoot his assailants, but was prevented.
Laurel.
oi
off,
to
i:
niuze in a < lolhing Store.
A slight tire broke out about 2 o'clock
Thursday after
Harris'clothing store, No. 114 Market
street. An alarm of fire was sent out
from box No. 41, at \V
but the fire was extinguished by a plug
stream. The loss is about $100. A large
d collected about the store, which
was roped off. The crowd
ropes until a couple of streams from the
hose warned them to keep back.
,,
of
's wharf,
the
the
ing
Fi
A meeting will be held in tho Wash
ington engine house un January 13th
for the purpose of organizing :i »State
fire association.
be
Henry Robinson, Isaac Shields, John
Raison, Lewis Blake and Jesse Bostic,
teamsters for George W. Bush «& Sons,
were
will
fact,
will
warded prizes at the
inspection uf the stables of the firm,
yesterday week. The judges were Charles
Jester, Samuel A. McDaniel and Geurge
White.
i. annual
GENERAL NEWS SUMMARY
of
An Advance of 20 per cent In
Plate Class.
em
the
by
in
high
by
will
NATIONAL ALLIANCE MEETING
Sawtelle Convicted of Mur
dering His Brother.
Pennsylvania Miners Present a Demand
for More AVages-A Santa Claus Ar
rested for Thoft— Business Faillira.
Over 100 consumptives
ment by the Koch method i
hospitals.
The piano and organ store of Peck A
Curtis, at Red Rank, New Jersey, waa dam
aged to the extent of $13,000 by lire on
last night week.
Frank E. Dickinson and Minnie Bruud
drowned at Ann Arbor, Michi
gan. on last night week, while skating
a mill pond.
Maggie Murphy, aged 15 years, had a
quarrel with Edward McDermott at a
party, in Jersey City, Thursday and crushed
his skull with an axe.
Sawtelle was found guiltv of murder in
the first degree in Dover, N. H., Thursday,
and was sentenced to be hanged on the
first Tuesday in January, 1802.
It is reported that the five negroes who
were arrested in Mecklenburg county, Va.
Saturday night, for the murder of Dr.
E. H. Reggan, were taken from jail and
lynched,
J. E. Brady shot and killed J. C. Colcutt,
a private watchman, in Norfolk, Va., early
Thursday morning, because he refused to
arrest a man who had been offensive to
Rrady.
A syndicate of New York capitalists has,
within the last, few days, purchased for
$000,000, gold, the sugar plantation and
factory known i
largest in Cuba.
The coasting schooner Katie arrived at
Victoria, British Columbia, Thursday, hav
ing on board the captain and crew of the
wrecked bark Atlanta, which went «town
during the recent gales.
The large dry goods firm of Henry Eise
rnen & Company, in Council Blurts, la.,
failed Thursday morning. The liabilities
* reported at $200,000, the assets at $300,
>. The lirm expects to resume business.
under treat
New York
sur
large
com
him
de
him
and
gold
in
age w
tho
took
a
of
the
that
We
eight
on
you
and
this
de
He
a
as
said
for
a
and
and
B.
.anion,
of the
for
this
rhe Varwig Manufacturing Company's
building, in Cincinnatti, was damaged bv
tire Thursday morning. The plant was
destroyed, but the building is believed to
be intact. Loss $40,000 covered by insur
ance.
t , « proprietor o'f a livery
stable in New York, shot and killed James
Bummings 27 years old, Thursday, and
also shot Edward Hurley in the left cheek.
Gallwan claims that he'did the allotting in
self defence.
The Spanish bark Felo, at Brunswick,
Ga., from Havana Thursday, had on
board the captain, his wife and the crew of
the bark Fred E. Richards, from Philadel
phia for Havana. They were picked up
from an open boat.
The supreme court of Michigan has »le- •
cided as unconstitutional the law passed by
the last, legislature providing f»>r cumula
tive voting for representatives to the state
legislatives in districts where more than
member was to elected.
All the western switchmen have agreed
to accent the compromise offered by the
railroads, under which they will bedivided
into two classes according to the point at
winch they work, the first class to receive
the Chicago scale of wages,
class to receive $5 per.'
Michael Galhv
«1 the second
ass to reeeive $5 per month less.
Tim railroad law of Michigan, which
n ' Michigan whoso
$8,000 per mile
and $3,000, 21 cents, and all others 3 cents
has been affirmed by the state supreme
court.
William Strong, aged 22 years, while
taking part in a Santa Claus entertainment
in the Bingl
Methodist Episcopal Church in Pittsburg
on last evening week, was arrested on
ting robbed his f.
an
provides that all roads n
gross passenger earnings
limited to 2
at
tho,
annum i
whose earnings
betw
6
and Thirteenth Street
on last evening x\
the charge of havi
employers, Schnette «t Co., of$l,ÖÖ0.
Th e oxecutive council of the Farmers'
Alliance has perfected the insurance plan*
of the order. Circulars will be sent, out
after the holidays. Only persons eligible
to membership in the Alliance can insure
in the Alliance. The executive council is
opposed to calling a convention on January
The miners of the Central Pennsvlvanlft
coal regions have served notice
operators, demanding a change in
' e of mining from 50 cents gross to
cants not ton, and a new working scale
of prices, which they want to go into effect
on tho 1st of January. If the demands ?
not granted, the men, to the number
15,0(i0, will, it is said, quit work
of the year.
A meeting of plate-glass manufacturers
and jobbers will
At th
cided
of
is
the coal
the
to
the til
be held i
Pittsburg.
Y'ork meeting it was de
es 20 per cent, but
made a standi
. . J. "The avowed in
tention of the fraternal combine is to keep
plate-glass ut tho highest figures possible,
and at the same time keep it low enough
to shut out all importation."
The Kansas board of
sionera have rendered a decision in the
case of J. K. Mayberry of Emporia, against
the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis,
holding that the company must furnish
ears to transport coal, even tin.ugh tho
haul over its line to the connecting line is
sufficient to pay the expenses. It is the
first decision of the board on this point,
as bitterly fought by the railroad
■ent N
advance prie
; then western me
for 25 p
dv
a
lroad eoinmis
d
company.
The proposed combinat!»
bacco wnrehous
of the
, isville and Cin
cinnati will, it is stated, probably prove a
failure. The articles of incorporation
! time ago
•ore filed s.
organ iza
tion effected, but it does not seem possiblo
to carry the plan through. The deeds by
hich the various warehouses were con
veyed to the combination have been nulli
fied by deeds which recuuvev the same
properties to the original owners.
The bureau of American republics has
received information of the organization
oi a corporation in Brazil with a capital of
fJO.Ooo.OGi;, a largo purl of which has been
furnished by bankers
- -- er chan to of
pc and the remainder by local in
vestors. The object of this eor'p ..
to establish 2 » agricultural settlements
upon the public I/imis of Brazil, which are
given free of cost by the government to
the enterprise.
The house of Samuel Mai
i:
is
,, . , . ., in Holden,
Mo., was burned rhursdav morning,
the firemen arrived on the scene one side
of the house fell out. and bv the light of
• Mr. Malone and John
ling to
the fire they s
Hicks, hi
brother-in-law,
their bed-roo
escape. Then
•fc
•■•f fell in.
ing
1 the
sight.
hidden fn.
Their eha
id bodi
is in the
bel it
It i
1 Malone and Hicks
were drugged, the ho
robbed ami then
The legislative eommittenof the National
Alliance will meet in Washington in r.»b
ruary. Thirty- .
sented ami the Third
sti
ill I
il
be
II«
Kansas Alii:.....,,
will eventually embr
organizati.ins in '
fact, about 11 of them
except the graneo
grangers
Alliance,
will be organized, but
proper time."
The
all
the I
•«1 :
'«• t
•f
«4
« I ■
•ill I
dem

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