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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, January 22, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1891-01-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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DELAWARK (1AZETTE,
DKI-AffJ
ESTA11LWHEI» 1784)
KSTA1ILI.N11 Kl» 1831J
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1891.
NEW SERIES—VOL. XI-NO. 31
CONSOLIDATED 1883.
: STATE .
IIRNAL,
DEMPSEY lUDLY WHIPPED
Knockcd Out by Fitzsimmons
in 13 Rounds.
THE NONPAREIL HEARTBROKEN
A Hurricane Battle Between
the Prize Middle-weights.
The Bell Saved tho
Knock
•Invincible" From
•tonight.
Like a Child
III* Crushing Deleat—The Champion
Record.
—I)omp*c;
Wept
the Hum
•Si,
New OrlRV.t»"-, v'js i4.— Tack Demp
sey, the Invincible, the Nof.pareil, is
more champion middle-weight prize
fighter of the world.
Boh Fitzsimmons, tho tall New
Zealander, in a single fight has leaped
into the front rank, gaining the title of
middle-weight champion and winning
$12,009. He whipped Dempsey in 13
from all parts
nty, in the rooms of thcOlym
rounds, before 4,500
of the
pic Athletic Club.
Dempsey was outclassed from the
start. The city is ringing with Fitz
simmons' praises to-night, at such good
judges as Frank Stevenson, Jim Corbett,
Billy Meyer, 'Parson Davis and others
;of like note deelaring him nothing short
>t a phenomenon, and voicing the opin
that a great many of the heavy
busi
weights have
demonstrated his ability to the satisfac
tion of everybody when he defeated the
acknowledged king of his class for
many ye
nth him. He
with such astounding ease.
Deinpsey never had tho faintest glim
mer of a hope of defeating *.he big
blacksmith from the
called for the third round, or the first
round either, for that matter, as Fitz
simnn
»ment time was
forced the pace and drove his
before him with irresistible force.
Dempsey landed ofte
but the
•r the No
enough to wi
ii u
fight
alked right
ipode
roil and
struck him two blows for the
reived in return. His reach was some
thing wonderful.
Dempsey's seconds
nding their
censured to
up like a
night
j floef to tho slaughter when he had no
t chance of winning, but tins criticism is
1 harsh, as they were in favor of throw
ing up the sponge.
It was Dempsey himself who in
» stated on fighting on, his exhibition of
l gameness being such that it will never
gotten by those present. When
Id scarcely raise his hands to a
K level with his chest Fitzsimmons begged
H him to stop, and said repeatedly:
"I don't want to strike you, .lack."
"Well, 1 would punch you if I could,"
1 was Dempsey's only reply.
The southern and western contingent
have won very heavily over the mill,
but the northern and eastern sports will
have to walk home.
» attended by a physician in Ins
dressing room. He
tacle
Ills
be f<

He
a sorry spec
is he lav back with closed oyes.
so is broken. His eyes will both
be very black to-morrow.
The Noi
would say
return to B
to his wife
Jimmy C
office before m
roil is heartbroken, and
thing. Fitzsimmons will
St. L
child.
ii was at the telegraph
idnight to wire the tid
ings to his wifoand Fitzsimmons' family.
mI to be an abundance of
•j r , and the betting, which had been
languid up to that time, bee
what brisk. Fiizsimmon:
looked-for support, and
that some of fh.
is in the morning
ft
some
the fact
ho had bet against
him eariier were hedging w
Btrated beyond the shadow of doubt.
they were deceived by
short-sightedness. Because
ake a rat
dr
Dempsey had
iglected to
mm tling set-to with Jack McAuliffe at the
n Audubon Cl jb on Tuesday night, and
had sparte
carried a«y.
carelessly they w
y by the erk
of Fitzsim
whom hud
>• f y fight, but who had
ms supp. it
never
been
Arthur U|
Every on<
.Dempsey is rot a fancy glove Achter.
He is a ring generat and a finish fighter,
and it is in si-eh contests that he shines.
There is not a particle of doubt that
Dempsey played a part when he per
mitted McAuliffe to slap him in the
face and rattle his ri
day night. 1
lie knew righ
plenty of i
then Fit/.si
•>ut
m to sleep i
r. the
short
orth knows that
Tucs
fox, and
.'ell that there would he
betting at the ring side,
after his indifferent showin;
i"
s as cute a:
As he left t he ring after the exhibition
the Nonpareil winked at Uns Tuthill,
and the two exchanged a .smile that
meant volumes. Several tie
dollars of Dempsey money bet at odds
of 5 to 4 were hedged at even money
before noon to-day by the anxious con
tingent, the agent of a well-known New
York champagne h
lugubrious countenance as he tried to
balance his book and find out where he
stood.
It was a hurricane fight from the
start, Fitz fi
sands of
ost
•ing the fighting and gain
very vantage. Dempsey frequently
clenched and slipped to the ground to
evade punishment. In the lOlh round
Dempsey was knocked down, falling
heavily, and but for the ringing of the
gong at the time it would have been a
knork-out.
Round 11 was butchery, nothing like
it ever being seen in the annals of glove
contests. Dempsey knocked
times. Fitz entreated his plucky
opponent to throw up the sponge, biit
Dempsey, although blinded by his own
Mood, declined.
Round twelfth
and there was a
I Jempsey,alter being repeatedly fl<
rolled over and m*
and the
ing
dow
set
sickening
•hen
»red,
•d i
his agony,
s general satisfactlo
seeing the sponge thrown up at the be
ginning of the
Dempsey had be
last few
that he
broke d<
hill and McAuliffe
derly as a
and bore him to his cor
mons, with scarcely a
but his body showing
here and there, rushed
at
•xt round.
sobbing during the
runds, and when he realized
s no longer the Nonpareil he
n and
child. Tut
raised him ns ten
on Id lift her babe
. Fitzslm
mark on his face,
ugly rod blotches
. . . . over to where his
ival sat gasping for breath, and took
the limp hands in his, leaning over and
whispering words of encouragement.
Fitzsimmons by his actions during the
entire fight won the respect of every
man present, and hundreds pressed for
ward to wring his hand in congratula
tions. Carroll and other rabid support
ers of Fitz were wild witli joy, while
there waa mourning in tho liempaey
•pt like
other
cnmp, Tuthill and McAuliffe wearing
funeral fares
effects and
room.
\ as they packed up their
departed for the dressing
FITRIMMONS* RECORD.
Bob Fitzsimmons gives his record as
follows: "My first appearance in the
ring was in an amateur boxing tourna
it at Timaru, New Zealand, when I
knocked out four
winning the Amateur championship of
New Zealand. The following year I
competed in the tourament again and
knocked out five men, sustaining my
title as champion, and on the same night
besting Herbert Blade.
My other fights were with Arthur
Cooper who I defeated in three rounds,
Jack Murphy in four rounds and Jim
Crawford in three
ni .'hl,
I succeded i
a

nds, all of which
fought under London prize ring
rules. After this I left Now Zealand and
went to Sydney, sparring at Larry
Foley's athletic hall, where I defeated
Brinsmead,
of
13
hcavy weight, in two
rounds, and Jack Greentree, a middle,
in three rounds, after which I returned
to New Zealand, and defeated Dick
Sandel, the amateur champion, in four
rounds. Bill Slavin came next. I de
feated him in seven rounds.
"My other battles were with Eagan,
who 1 defeated in three rounds; Con
way, champion of Ballarat, i
rounds; Dick Ellis, who
pounds against
knocked out in three rountts
fought Jim Hall for the middle-weight
championship of Australia, defeating
him in five rounds. I then fought Star
light, the colored champion, and
knocked him out in nine rounds. My
last fight in Australia was with Prof.
West, who I knocked out in two
minutes. (Joining to San Francisco I
got on a match with »Billy McCarthy,
and, although I had very little training,
I knocked him out iu three rounds. My
last fight up to date was with Arthur
Uphani, who I defeated in five rounds
at the Audubon Club at New Orleans."
threo
sighed 178
ounds, 1
next
i I
£
Dempsey Badly Used Up.
New Orleans. La., Jan. 15. —Jack
Dempsey slept under the influence of
iates last night. The bridge of his
nose is broken and his ribs were s
that tho physici
opt
who accompanied
him from the club administered a
strong narcotic. This morning lie
looked hfttllv bruised and swollen about
the face and mouth, and a piece of skin
the size of a man's hand is scraped from
the back of his neck
Kilrain says his nose w
fourth round.
a
is
the left side,
broken in the
a
Hiding From Russian Nihilists.
Paris, Jan. 16.—A most mysterious
disappearance is the talk of ]?arta this
morning. Prince Giedroyc, a well
known member of the aristocratic cir
cles of the Russian colony in this city,
has disappeared from his mansion in the
Rue Galliice. To make his disappear
ance all the more astonishing
the furniture of the mansion
apparently transferred to parts un
known during the night. It i
lieved that Russian Nihilists have threat
ened to blow up tho prince's residence
with dynamite and that this threat con
tained in mysterious notes sent to the
prince caused the latter .so much alarm
that he decided to disappear and locate
himself in some place where the Nihi
lists would not be able to annoy him.
bc
Canadian Reciprocity Project.
Toronto, Jan. 16. —The Empire , the
government organ, says: "The state-
ment published by the Toronto Mail to
the effect that the dominion government
lias been requested by the imperial gov-
ernment to endeavor to arrange matters
in dispute between Canada and the
United States on the basis of a wide
-- of commercial reciprocity is
not true. On the contrary it is learned
from the very best sources that the
Canadian government has recently been
approached by the United States gov
ernment with a view to the development
of the trade relations between the two
countries and that the Canadian govern
ment has requested the advice of her
majesty's government on the subject."
Ancolu Wont
e Int
iewed.
Southampton, Jan. 16.
Dr. Jasper
P. Bradley, the United States consul at
this port, at 4 o'clock this morning
boarded tho North German Lloyd
steamer »Saale having the United States
Minister Hon. Robert T. Lincoln
board. Mr. Lincoln
ley in the kindest n
refused to be int
the number of
tives who had c
ed Mr. Brad
possible but
•r représenta
many |
land in the hope of getting Mr.
coin's views upon several points of
thcJBehring Sea dispute.
V
s of
:

val to EnglUU Brewer*.
San Francisco, Cai,., Jan. 16.—The
American Brewery Association of San
Francisco was o£ranizcd yesterday.
Adolphus Busch of St. Louis was elected
president. Other prominent brewers
and capitalists were elected directors.
Between two and three million dollars
will be expended on the plant. The
brewery is started in opposition to the
English syndicate., which recently
bought out all the breweries in San
Francisco.
Will
old a "Big Talk."
Washington, Jan. 15.—A telegram
ns received at the war department to
day from General Miles, asking per
lber of Sioux chiefs to
visit Washington for the purpose of con
ferring with the President in regard to
condition. After consultation with
Secretary Noble, Secretary Proctor tele
graphed General iiiles giving the de
sired pc
for
their
A Club Kupiuliato
Parnell.
Cork, Jan, 16.—A dispatch from
Tralee suys that the National Club of
that town, has by a vote of 46 to 39, re
fused to support Mr. Parnell. The club
also refused to hear Mr. Timothy D.
Harrington, M. P., who finally addressed
a crowd of people from a window. The
victorious party was headed by the
priests of the neigoborhood.
Flour r
Palosa City, Wash., .Tan. 16.-*-The
Board of Trade and the Farmers' Alli
ance of this place have sent a carload of
flour to the destitute farmers in Chey
enne county, Neb.
1 ;i
Indian* Give Up tlie Dunce.
Reno, Neil, Jan. 15.—A special says
there is nothing in the Indian scare at
Star Valley near Beath Station, Nev.
The Indians quit dancing and have
quietly dispersed.
Two miners, named Hill and Smith,
were fatally injured at the Springfield
coal mine, at Paua, 111., Thursday, by
tho explosion of a keg of powder.
THE SEAL niSTVTE IX COURT.
biI Question
of Esc-»]
niiliite'H Dis«
4i<
Fa
t-A Mer
Opened to lilt
New York Kv
I
I
Mr. Blaine's diplomatic discussions
have always been full of surprises.
They are nothing if not dramatic. The
discussion he has been carrying on with
Lord Salisbury during the past year
been a mixed question of law and i
The question of fact has been whether
the United States cruisers had seized
British vessels in the open sea ofitside
the three-mile limit, for catching seals;
the question of law has been whether
the United States cruisers had the right
to do this for the protection of the
Behring Sea or any other seals, or for
any purpose, except the suppression of
piracy. There has been a prodigious
cloud of words raised about the matter,
but the above were the essential points.
There was no question of national honor
or policy involved; no dispute about ter
ritory, or about belligerent or neutral
rights. The controversy has arisen in
time of profound peace. In the htinds of
Seward or Marcy the public would prob
ably hardly have heard of it all. Either
of these statesmen would, in fact, have
been very likely to leave the matter
wholly to the decision of the admiralty
courts, as the British government left
the decision of the question whether
slave-trading was piracy. It is in part
for the settlement of such questions that
courts of admiralty exist. When
Canadian or British sealer was captured
he had his remedy before the United
States tribunals. All that either his
needed to do
a suspension of sealing
until the decision of the
has
fact
I
1
government or
to agree
opératif
court of last resort had been reached.
Instead of this Mr. Blaine has blown
his wont is, into
the question up,
newspaper controversy, full of digres
sions and side issues, and tu quoques,
and tits-for-tat, and irrelevanci
every description, illustrations that did
not illustrate, and precedents that fur
nished no light, ana
50 newspaper columns to avoid arbitrat
ing, has finally agreed to some sort of
arbitration.
In the meantime, a British subject
has been slowly seeking his remedy in
i for the capture of his sealing
tho high
Of
after writing 40 or
ship by
seas, and has reached Jhe Supreme
Court
when
Amerir
cruiser
appeal. This appeal
decided would unquestion
ably have closed the diplomatic
mouths of both Blaine and Salis
bury. If either of them hail taken any
further steps, they would have had to
bo belligerent steps. If the Supreme
Court were to award damages to tho
appellant in the Sayward case, it. would
leave Blaine without a leg to stand on.
If, on the other hand, it decided in his
favor, it would "ut Salisbury in the
position, which he could not hold for a
moment, of disputing the judgment of
the highest court of admiralty in the
world—a position which he would be
only too thankful to keep out of. In
short it would settle the Behring Sea
controversy out of sight and out of
mind, and would leave the field clear
for some joint convention for the pro
tection of that interesting animal, the
seal. In truth, the fact that this suit
pending made the diplomatic contro
versy somewhat ridiculous, because en
tirely superfluous.
The Candiuns havo at the last moment
changed their policy ns litigants bv
abandoning the proceedings in the suit
for restitution and damages^and asking
the Supreme Court for a writ of prohibi
tion annulling the proceedings in which
the vessel was condemned in the United
States district courts. Two petitions
for this have been filed; one by the
of the vessel, the other by the
Canadian attorney-general, who alleges
the approval of his proceeding by the
imperial government. The contention
of Mr. Blaine's friends now is that the
intervention of this last-named official
if not a foul insult,
official attempt to
carry into ordinary litigation a question
already under diplomatic discussion.
We must confess that while it is per
haps the greatest compliment ever paid
by foreigners to a court of justice, and
really ought to flatter the national
pride, it is ill judged and unfortunate in
that .while it will not make the judgment
of the court when it comes any more
decisive, it will furnish Mr. Blaine with a
means of at least temporary escape from
a position which is both embarrassing
and humiliating. It glveB him ân open
ing for a new controversy, involving
neither law nor fact, but raising numer
points of honor, courtesy, etiquotto,
and the like, in which his journalistic
pen will be able to rove about with all
the freedom of the wild ass on the plains
of Kittimengo. No one whose business
it is to follow him in his diplomatic ex
cursions can heai without a shudder that
lie is "beginning the preparation
another diplomatic note, in which li
to chastise the Canadian attorney-g
oral, and Lord Salisbury, and all others
concerned for their mean and discour
teous behavior. The incident reminds
of the wise old minister of the
Close-Communion Baptists, who was
consulted by his deacons as to what
they w
lady of his congregation who was visit
ing her daughter, should come a second
time, uninvited and unqualified, to take
the communion. "I would," said he, "if
meats the offence, get my gold
headed cane out of the vestry-room, and
hit her over the head with it."
A QUESTION OP LAW. $£?,'
impertine
inasmuch
it i
of
to do in case the mother of
she
Iialtimore Run.
The question of the extent of tho
of tho laws and courts of
?r the waters of
jurisdieti
the United States
Behring Sea, or any other sea, is neces
rily a Question of law to be deter
mined in tue last resort by the Supreme
Court. Grant that it is a question of in
ternational law—in tho absence of any
international tribunal to interpret and
enforce that law—the courts of each
nation furnish their own interpretation
and application of its rules, which
binding upon their
the courts of the United States have
lformly done from the foundation of the
government, and tho fabric of modern
international law
labors of Chief Justice Marshall, Judge
Story and others, their colaborers and
tho question of
jurisdiction has been a matter of diplo
matic discussion, it does not follow that
far as the country is concerned it is
not also subject to judicial determina
tion. It must not be forgotten that the
Supreme Court is not only a co-ordinate
branch of the Federal government, but
that it is invested with powers in some
respect paramount to those of bath the
other branches. Like them, it derives
its powers directly from tho constitu
tion. It may declare the acta of tho
citizens. This
38 much to the
•cessors. Bee
President
illegal. It may declare
gross unconstitutional and void.
may annul a treaty even, as not having
been made "in pursuance of the
stitution."
Ii is absurd, therefore, to talk of the
submission of the Behring Sea dispute
to the Supreme Court as an insult to any
"'her department of the government.
Secretary Blaine will do well to restrain
upon that point before he pro
to castigate the British foreign
immerse its chief "in boiling
something of that sort."
.'ill do well to suspend further utter
his part until ho hears from the
Supreme Court. If that court shall
of the opinion that it has jurisdiction
is safe to say that it will not bo deterred
from the performance of its constitu
tional duty by the fear of hurting
feelings of the Secretary of State. It
not a question of etiquette or of courtesy,
but of legal right. And the British
government surely cannot be reproached
for having preferred an appeal to our
courts ratlwr than continue an end
less bandying of words, dignified by
name of diplomatic correspondence,
failure of which would leave but
alternative—open
BEnniXO SEAL IX COUHT,
of any executive officer
:t of Con
it
The
with
right
the
for
of
ter
a
of
have
left
part
that
a
his
the
has
fact
M8
x
oil
The Rennt« Don't
'ant the Differences
Adjudicated in Kuprc
Washington, Jan. 15.—Mr. Morgan
offered a preamble and concurrent reso
lution on
formation
prohibition i
the subject of the recent
suggestion for a writ
the Supreme Court
connection with the Behring Sea dispute
with Great Britain.
'Flie resolution declares such proceed
ing to be without precedent to be preju
dicial to the comity of nations and
the usual and amicable conduct of
ternational relations and not to be
sonance with the dignity of the govern
ment and people, or with the respect
due to the President of the United States.
Referred.
a
did
fur
of
in
high
Of
or
Light-weight Dollars.
Philadelphia Record.
The gist of the silver contre
wholly iu the fact that 4124 gr
silver will not sell for a dollar. If i
h silver should be worth u dollar the;
ould be u sudden nbando
■sure for free silver coinage. If
•h silver should he worth a dollar tho
of bullion certificates for the market
value of the metal would f
of bullion. Suppose tliat Congress should
s a law t hut three peeks of wheat should
make a bushel! The injustice of such
. «ceding would be manifest. But the
silver speculators insist that 75 ceittp worth
of silver shall be mode to pass for a dollar.
Is there any good reason why the owi
of bullion silver should have such an
vantage over the owners of wheat
Up to the present time the government
itself has profited by the difference between
the market price of silver bullion and
the face value put. upon the legal-tender
silver dollars issued from the mints.
nit lias received the sil
t timed out for a dol
lar's worth of taxes due to it, and
has kept them at par with gold thereby.
With free coinage of silver the govern
ment could
lies
s
of the
any
to
tho
on.
his
the
a
of
the
be
In
Sea
of
the
en
bv
suit
the
the
the
the
to
in
a
all
ex
the
"if
isfy the owner:
iron?
But thegi
longer pay out gold dollars
dollars. It could not afford
lose the différence in value; and the result
would be tho establish ment of a silver
bosjs in this country, instead of a gold
basis, with such a resulting overturn of all
credits and all business as lias not occurred
since the government levied a forced lo
by making its paper
tes a legal tender. What is the necessity
for such legislation?
or silv
the
up
Peaches for Forcing.
John Thorpe, a peach grower of New
York state, makes the following
tribution to Carden and Forest : One
year- old plants should be obtained m
and placed singly in 14-inch pots,
boxes, tw
tected i
and then taken i
the tempera!
than 50° at night. They will need
syringing twice a day, and the top
shoots, as soon as they are three inches
long, should be pinched back to three
leaves. This will give the lower shoots
a slight advantage and balance the
growth generally. Of course it
that the plants have been pruned into
shape before planting—that is, the side
shoots are to he cut back and the tops
reduced one-third. After the growth
completed in the greenhouse, they' must
bn removed out-of-doors and water given
them in sufficient quantity to keep
them from shriveling. Such plants can
he brought into the forcing-houses
about the first week of November.
Peaches require good loam, bone and
potash to grow in. If boxes arc used
they should not. be less than a foot deep
and a foot wide, and the plants in
box two feet long, and so on. The
boxes may be two, threo or four feet in
length, and I prefer them to pots.
California'* Returning; Prosperity.
California Correspondence Christian Register.
as pleasant to observe during a re
cent visit in Southern California, that that
section is slowly reviving from the depres
sion following the "boom." The harvest
this year of cereals amt fruits is something
enormous, even for California, and brings
smiling content to all her people. The
orange crop of San Bernadina county this
estimated at 2,100 car loads, valued
at $1,680,600. The cron of grapes, raisins,
plums, apricots, peaches, olives, &c\, has
wer before been so luxurious. I know
the state that have
ar from $300 to $2,000
in crop of Fresno county
ill be the equivalent of 1,000,000 boxes,
-half, the entire yield of the state. Not
less than 10,000 carloads,
100,000 tons of fruit, fresh
ned, will go from California to the eust
. The gross return to the state
will be something like $10.000,000, with
about an equal amount received from the
wheat crop. The fact that Ventura countv
day recently 28 carloads of
beans to Boston, will awaken thrills of
responsive emotion in the breastikof many
of your readers.
:h box, pro
• outhouse for two months
greenhouse where
is kept not
of
It
orchards all
yielded this
. Tnc
presenting
dried ami
this y
of
of
in
Death From Koch'* Lymph.
The current number of the Medical
News publishes a cablegram from Berlin
giving the result of examinations made
by Professor Virchow on the bodies of a
number of patients who had died after
being inoculated with the Koch lymph.
Virchow says there
that in internal organs acute inflam
mation and active proliferati
up injections of the fluid. The most im
portant effect observed, however, was
ption of fresh crops of tubercles
after tho injections. This occurs es
pecially in the pleura, pericardum and
peritoneum, and Virchow says that i
the case of these serious membranes the
statement that the substance of the
tubercle is destroyed by the remedy is
not confirmed by his examinations.
be
doubt
sot
Letters testamentary upon the estate of
tho late William Bush have been granted
by Register Bradford to the Security Trust
and »Safe Deposit Company. The entire
estate, estimated at $ 200 , 000 . is left to the
widow and grandson of the deceased.
It
the
any
pro
He
the
he
it
the
is
our
the
the
Prof. Koch Reveals the Secret
oj. His Discovery.
HIS CLAIM IS SUBSTANTIATED
He Tells How He Made the
Investigation.
ri K a
ice—How It It
Scientist Rev*
cronies a Factor
4 Prepared—The Gcr
:als the Secret of
The Gt
Sei*
Disc
>ry.
Berlin, Jnn. 15.— The long-talkcd-of
secret of tho ingredients is entering into
the composition of Prof. Koch's fame
lymph is given to-day to the world
large. Prof. Koch says: Sinee pub
lishing two months ago the results
my experiments with the new remedy
for tuberculosis many physicians who
received tho preparations have been
abled to become acquainted with
properties through their own experi
ments. So far as I have boon able
view the statements published and
communications received by letter,
indications have been fully and
pletely confirmed. The general
census of opinion is that the remedy
has a specific effect upon tubercular
tissues and is therefor, applicable as
very delicate and sure regent for dis
covery latent and diagnosing doubtful
tuberculosis processes.
Regarding the curative effects of
remedy most reports agree that despite
tho comparatively short duration of
application many patients have shown
more or less pronounced improvement.
It has been affirmed that in not a few
has been established.
in
of
in
to
in
cases
Standing quite by itself is the assertion
that the remedy may not only he dan
.'hielr have advanced
too far—a fact which may forthwith
conceded—but also that it actually pro
motes the tuberculosis process, being
therefor injurious. During the past
weeks I, myself, have had opportunity
to bring together further
touching tho curative effects and diag
nostic application of the remedy in
cases of about 150 sufferers from tuber
culosis of the most varied types in this
city and in the Moabit Hospital.
only say that everything I have
latterly seen accords with my previous
observations. There has been nothing
to modify iu what I before reported.
As long as it was only a question
proving the accuracy of my indications,
it was needless for any
what the remedy contained
Re
i
so
tho
a
the
and
sil
dol
it
lies
of
the
l
to kn
whence
the contrary, subse
quent testing would necessarily be mi
unbiased the less people knew of the
remedy itself. Now, after sufficient
confirmatory testing the importance
the remedy is proved, my next task is
extend my study of the remedy beyond
the field where it has hitherto been ap
plied, and if possible to apply the prin
ciple underlying the discovery to other
diseases. This task naturally demands
a full knowledge of the
therefore,
arrived when the
in this direction shall bo i
done in what follows.
Before going into the remedy itself
deem it necessary for the better under
standing of its mode of operation
state briefly the way by which 1
at the discovery. If a healthy guinea
pig be inoculated with the pure cultiva
tion of German kultur of tubercle
bacilli the wound caused by the inocula
tion mostly closes
•as derived;
to
all
rnedy.
shier that the time lias
juisitc indications
de. This
•ived
is
is
a
in
with a sticky
matter and appears in its early days
heal. Only after 10 to 14 days a hard
nodule presents itself which
ing forms
Unites until the animal dies.
Quite a different condition of things
occur when a guinea pig already suffer
ing from tuberculosis i
from fc
adapted for this purpose. In such an
animal the small indentation assumes
; sticky covering at the begin
ning, but no nodule forms. On the con
trary on the day following or the second
after the inoculation the place where
the lymph is injected shows a strange
change. It becomes hard and assumes
a darker coloring, which is not confined
to the inoculation spot, but spreads
the neighboring parts until it attains
diameter of fr
break
ulcerating sore which con

inoculated,
reeks before is best
to si:
the
.05 to 1 centimeter. In
a few days it bccomas more and more
manifest that the skin thus changed
necrotic, finally* falling off, leaving
flat ulceration which usually heals rap
idly and permanently
any cutting into the
lymphatic glands. Thus the injected
tubercular bactilli differently affect the
skin of a healthy guinea pig from
affected with tuberculosis. This affect
is not exclusively produced with living
tubercular bacilli, but is also observed
with the dead bacilli, the result being
the 8amer whether as I discovered by
périment* at the outset the bacilli are
killed by a somewhat prolonged applica
tion of a low temperature or boiling heat
or by means of certain chemicals. This
peculiar fact I followed up in all direc
tions and this further result was ob
tained—that killed pure cultivations of
tubercular bacilli after rinsing in water
might be injected in groat quantities
under healthy guinea pig's skin without
anything occurring beyond local sup
peration.
Professor Koch here interpolates a note
that such injections belong to the sim
plest and surest meuns of producing
peration free from living bacteria. Ti
culosis, guinea pigs on the other hand,
killed by the injection of very small
quantities of such diluted cultivations.
In fact within six to 43 hours according
to the strcngth'of the dose and injection
which is not sufficient to produce the
death of the animal may cause ex tended
necrosis to the skin in the vicinity of
the place of injection,
dilution
until it i
the animals inoculated remain alive
and a noticeable improvement in
their condition soon supervenes.
If the injections are continued at inter
vals of from one to two days, the ulcer
ating inoculation wound becomes
smaller and finally scars over, which
otherwise it never doe
swollen lymphatic glands is reduced, the
body becomes better nourished, and the
morbid process ceases unless it has gone
too far, in which case the animal perishes
from exhaustion. By this means
the basis of a curative process against
tuberculosis was established. Against
the practical application of such dilu
tions of dead tubercle bacilli there pre
sented itself the fact that the tubercle
bacilli
tion points, nor do they disappear in
another way, but for -a long
without
adjacent
sup
uber
If the
still further diluted
scarcely visibly cloudy
; the size of the
ot absorbed at the inocula
ti me remain unchanged and engender
greater or smaller supperative foci. Any
thing therefor intended to exercise
healing effect on the tubereulouso
cess must be a soluble substance v
would be lixiviated to a certain extent
by the fluids of the body floating around
the tubercle bacilli and be transferred
in a fairly rapid manner to
the juices of the body while
the substance producing suppuration
apparently remains behind in the
tubercular bacilli or dissolves, but very
slowly. The only important point w
therefor to induce outside the body the
process going on inside if possible and
to extruct from the tubercular bacilli
alone the curative substance. This de
manded time and toil until I finally
succeeded with the aid of 40
50 per cent solution of glycer
ine in obtaining an effective sub
stance from the tubercular bacilli with
the fluid so obtained I made further ex
periments on animals and finally
human beings. These fluids were given
toother physicians to enable them
repeat the experiments. The remedy
which is used in the new treatment con
sists of a glycerine extract derived fr
the pure cultivation of tubercle bacilli.
Into the simple extract there natually
passes from the tubercular bacilli be
sides the effective substance all the
other matter soluble in 50 per cent
glycerine. Consequently it contains
certain quantity of mineral Balts, color
ing substances and other unknown
extractive matter. Some of these sub
stances can be removed from it tol
erably easily. The effective substance
is insoluble in absolute alcohol.
can be precipitated by it though not, in
deed, in a pure condition, but still lit
combined with the other extractive
matter which is likewise insoluble in
alcohol. The coloring matter may also
be removed rendering it posible to
obtain from the extract a color
less dry substance containing the
effective
hich
the
In
Gcr
His
into
at
pub
of
who
its
to
the
my
as a
dis
the
the
shown
few
dan
be
pro
being
six
diag
the
tuber
this
have
of
principle
much
concentrated form than the origi
npplica
nfication of the
no advantage
eliminated
the human organism.
The process of purification would make
the cost of the remedy unnecessarily
high.
nal glycerine solutions,
tion in practice this
glycerine extract o
because the substances :
unessential f<
F
CITY COUXCIL.
Payment of Tv
fused—Other
Adi
Using Bills Ro
4 Transacted.
üiisinc«
At Thursdnj* nights meeting of
City Council the police committee re
ported favorably on the hills for laying
the telegraph cable across the Christiana,
with the recommendation that one-half
he charged to tire companies and
half to the police appropriation.
Mr. Sharkey objected to saddling any
of the cost on the fire department ap
propriation, as the work had been done
by order of the police committee.
Mr. White said that cable would
the fire department appropriation $80
per year heretofore paid for rent of
cable to carry the lire alarm telegraph
wires, and it should therefore hear half
of the cost.
The committee's report was adopted.
The printing committee, on the com
ication from tho Sunday Republic
for the payment of the balance of
$17.92 on a bill for printing tho annual
city statement, reported adversely, as
the advertising was done without
thority. The committee
report on similar grounds, on the Sun
day Republic's bill of $48.70 for printing
the last city statement. Mr. Currcn
said the last publication was made with
out the authority of any member of
Council and upon the sole responsibility
of the publisher. Both reports were
adopted.
The city treasurer reported : Balance
in bank to the credit of c
penses, $121,843.20; special deposit, $12,
849.62; total, $134,692.82.
The school board's appropriation for
January, $8,691.66, was ordered to be
paid.
During the evening bills were ordered
paid, as follows:
John McBride, $4; O. J. Ilession, $27.75;
Alexander A Wells, $49; .1. M. Solomon,
$20.88; O. J. Hession, $21.75; Mrs. B. Joyce,
$37.50; estate of Henry Eckel, $37.50; Ö. J.
Hession, $7.75; O. J' Hessi
Dillon. $9.53; W. H. Hartlm
F. Kelley, $10; J. J. Pierce, $42; P. Car
berry, $9.55; Alexander & Wells, $6; M.
Megary & .Son, $0.50; J. M. Sol
City Electric Co., $235.22; O. .1. ....
$7.<5; W. Y. Swiggett, $40.32; G. W. <
$10.85; Hannah Wood, $4; Ilorstman Bros.,
$10.56; J. H. Greenman & Son, 75 cents;
M. F. Kelley, $5; S. E. Parker. $21 15: Wil
mington Coal Gas Co., $43.88; It. J.
Fougeray, $40; Joseph David, $13.75;
George W. Stone, $11.35; J. C. Prison,
$5.34; W. II. Fennimore, $10; N. B. Dan
forfh, $5.50; John K. Marr, $4.19; J. E.
Wirt, $44; F. R. Smith, $9.15; Howard
Milman, $5; E. G. Shortlidge, $9; H. S.
Bullock, $25; J. IT. Bunnell & Co., $22;
same, $367.60; Michael Leonard, $2.70;
William Dollard, $46.50; Every Evening,
$4.05; Wilmington Printing Co., $11; News
Publishing Co., $2.80; Every Evening,
$3.84; Evening Journal, $3.03; Star Publish
ing Co., $37.85; H. A. Roop, $173.25; M.
McEveley, $1; A. F. Messick, $3.25; M.
McEveley, 35 cents; Davis it Co., $2.05;
Wilmington Printing Co., $12.80; James
Mills, $1.40; -
$7.98.
it
subse
the
of
to
ap
prin
other
I
to
I,
lias
is
ade a similar
•ived
to
hard
an
con
to
a
con
best
L U.
; M.
. $31 ;
In
more
is
a
rap
the
by
are
heat
This
ob
of
the
of
in
in
, $13.90; O. J. Hession,
AVa* it a Suicide.
George E. McKee, who was killed
the P. W. & B. railroad, yesterday
week between Edge Moor and Landlith
stations, boarded with J. Curtis Wig
gleeworth, at No. 206 Jefferson street.
He leaves a wife and two children, a
son in Philadelphia and a daughter in
Maryland. His wife who has heen visit
ing in Still Pond, Md., was notified yes
terday weekfand arrived in this city
Thursday. An eye witness of tho acci
dent says that ho appeared to step di
;tly in front of the train, which he
had seen. Suicide is suspected. An in
held Thursday afternoon and
a verdict of accidental death by being
struck by train No. 59 was rendered.
Double Wedding; at Ko
Centheville, Md., Jan. 14.—An
interesting double wedding took place
at the residence of Robert Eareckson,
Kent Island, in which the brides
were sisters, and the grooms
brothers. Miss Mamie Earecksoi
ried Mr. Horace Moore, and Miss Carrie
Eareckson married Mr. Henry Moore.
The brides are nieces of Mr. A. Ran
dolph Weedon.
quest
the
Another Editor Placed
Mr. Levin T. Cooper has retired from
the editorial management of the Laurel
Gazette , and has been succeeded by
Emmet 1). C. Hegeman, as editor anil
publisher. Mr. Cooper has been ap
pointed to a lucrative office by Senator
Higgins.
A Methodist Episcopal church will
soon be built a Leipaie.
Any
a
to
while
the
very
w
the
and
bacilli
de
finally
to
sub
with
ex
given
to
con
bacilli.
be
the
cent
a
color
sub
tol
It
in
lit
in
also
to
color
the
A DELIBERATE SUICIDE.
Died by
William Green
Mi(l«llet«i
His Own Hand.
hich
William G
inent citizen and a
Governor Cochran, who died
day|evening week, committed suicide by
shooting himself in the head. The act
was committed in the most deliberate
of Middletown,a prom
in-law of Ex
Tues
manner.
Some time in the afternoon he went
to his room, locked the door, and plac
ing a wicker chair before a large mirror,
seated himself in it and prepared to end
his life. Putting his right foot on a stool,
he rested his right elbow on his knee
und placed the muzzle of an army re
volver which he held in his right hand,
against his right temple. Then
grasped the muzzle of the revolver
his left hand and held it against his
head. Taking a final look at himself
the mirror he pulled the trigger and
died without a struggle.
The position in which he was found
hears out this statement of his deliberate
actions. His head fell back on the
chair, his left hand dropped to his lap,
found burned with powder.
Ilis right hand fell and the pistol
dropped to the floor.
The bullet went through Mr. Green's
head and came out at the left of the
hack, and was found on the floor. His
face and head were burned by the pow
der.
and w
Mrs. Green, who is deaf, did not hear
the shot, but about 7 o'clock, thinking
that he had been in the room
usually long time, sent for him. The
.'as burst i
the position described. Dr. Irving
Vallandigham w
found Mr. Green dead.
It is said that Mr. Green's mind has
hern affected for sc
d he was found i
summoned, but
time, but lately
•as believed to be better. On several
•asions he, has asked Dr. Vallanding
and drugs,
ham about various poisi
inquiring about the length of time they
took to kill,
much
origi
the
make
he has doubtless been
contemplating suicide for some time,
and committed the act in a fit of aberra
tion of the mind.
Coroner Sparks was notified of the
suicide and went to Middletown. He
investigated the case and gave a ccrtifi
catejof death in accordance withthe facts.
SUDD EX DEATH.
Mrs. Elizabeth A. Sand
a Brief Hit
Dies After
Ro
Mrs. Elizabeth A. Sanderson, wife
the Rev. Henry Sanderson of the Wil
mington M. E. Conference, Bed yester
, 411 Washington
street, in the 72d year of lier age. She
had been ill about a week and died
pneumonia. Her funeral took place
Saturday morning last. Services were
held in Uni
of
re
laying
any
ap
done
$80
a
half
com
of
as
Sun
with
of
were
$12,
for
be
J.
Car
M.
Wil
J.
Dan
E.
S.
$22;
M.
M.
day week at lier hi
Church, this city,
a member, and buriaA
made in the Methodist Episcopal
cemetery near Newark.
ar Newark and was
daughter of John and Elizabeth Fitz
simmons. In lier childhood she became
a member of the Methodist Episcopal
church and throughout her life was es
cliarac.ter and
married ft
•hich she was
She was horn
her Christi
benevolence. She w
times. Her first husband, the Rev.
John Bayne
phia M. E. Conféré:
Rev. William Irons,
and resided
Rev. Daniel Lamdin, was
elder in Philadelphia Conference. Her
last marriage was solemnized in July,
1369. Her only child, John Bay
was called for "his father, died in early
youth.
Mrs. Sanderson left property valued
at about $10,060. She had often talked
of bequeathing
porting superannuated preachers, but
died before having prepared a will. On
the occasion af the dedication of Union
Church she contributed for the benefit
of that church the s
half of this
the church will re
id f.
tee
s a member of Philadel
the second, the
a local preacher
Dover; the third, tho
presiding
, who
ssist in sup
ey to
of $500. One
ount has been paid and
re the remainder.
rol to Have a New Railroad.
Laurel, Del., Jan. 15.—A meeting
of representative men of the Peninsula
îcld here to-day* to discuss the
building of a railroad from here to
Chesapeake hay. The proposed line
to be known iis the Laurel & Roaring
Point railroad. A charter will be
granted by the Legislature, and work
\ The road will
fine fruit growing country.
: of the best oyster hods
U.
M.
will be begu
open up
Besides
will be brought into connection with
city markets. Enough capital lias al
ready* been subscribed to build the line.
It is thought by many that when the
road is completed a charter will be
granted the Baltimore & Ohio to paral
lel the Pennsylv • •
with this and other branches to be built
future.
a*
$31 ;
system and connect
in the
Sussex County Institute.
Superintendent J. W. Gray of Sussex
county announces the sixteenth annual
teachers' institute, to he held at Coul
born's Hall, Seaford, January, 20-23 in
clusive. The evening lectures will be
on Tuesday, George P. Bible, Esq., of
Pennsylvania; on Wednesday, George
E. Little, Esq., of Washington, D. C.,
Thursday, Hon. W. C. P.
Breckinridge. Deputy State Superin
tendent of Pennsylvania Schools lion.
Henry Houck will be present through
out nil the sessions. Dr. A. N. Raub,
f 'resident of Delaware College, and L. I.
landy of Newark Academy will bo in
attendance Thursday and Friday. Super
intendents Bessey and Cooper will
make addresses.
nd
a
in
city
di
he
in
Wllmlngt
The stockholders of the Wilmington
Agricultural and Industrial Society held
a meeting at the Board of Trade rooms
yesterday
Fair Stockholders.
reek.
presided with T. D. Bro
The purpose of the meeting
range some definite financial plan for
the future. A committee comprising
W. H. Foulk, R. L. Armstrong, F. if.
Hoffecker, Esq., Willard Ilall Porter,
Esq., and ex-Senator Calvin Crossan
was appointed to investigate the present
situation of the association and to report
a plan for meeting the indebtedness.
The committee will report at the annual
meeting January 22d.
George A. Elliott
secretary.
to
Now These
e on the List.
Delawareans as follows nave been
pensioned : Additional. Matthew' Mack
len, Wilmington; Is:
Cheswold; J<
»Spencer Hitch,
Wilmington.
H. Pears
ph M. Watson, Bethel;
Milford; Oliver Jacobs,
Original, Joseph Zieber,
Wilmington. Re-issue, James L. Collins,
Milton.
The widow of the Rev. J. W. Weston,
a member of Wilmington M.
E. Conference, has been appointed
matron of the Methodist Episcopal
-uxhanage in Philadelphia.
who
by
by
act
Ex
What the Institution Has
Done During the Year.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE'S REPORT
went
plac
end
stool,
knee
re
hand,
lie
in
his
in
and
found
the
lap,
pistol
the
His
pow
Revenue Inadequate for the
Needs of the School.
At the Refon
Boys in the Institution During the
Yttar-Ileuu of Receipts and Expendi
ture#.
Were B3
The managers of the Ferris Industrial
School held their annual meeting yester
day afternoon week at the office of the
president, Dr. Caleb Harlan.
Superintendent II. E. Haines reported
that there are now 41 boys in the school
ranging in ages from *9 to 20. Tho
number of boys under instruction on
January 1st, 1890, was 33; 20 w
mitted during the year, making a total
of 53; four were discharged, 10 released
leave of absence, and two were re
turned, making a total now of 41.
The executive committee made a
lengthy report, an important item of
which was the statement but owing to
the rapid increase in the number of in
mates, we find our revenue entirely in
adequate for the proper support of
institution, and we hope that some pro
vision may be made either by increased
appropriation of public funds or by
private bequests, so that the. deficiency
may be provided for. Already tho
school room and dormitories arc taxed
to their utmost to accommodate tho
iw buildings will be re
quired for the increased numbers who
entrusted to
The finance committee made the fol
lowing report on the corporation's in
vestments:
hear
The
S.
has
tho
i
but
lately
drugs,
boys and
they
been
time,
the
He
facts.
In bonds and mortgages.$30,100.00
In property rented for income... 36,500.00
In Woodside farm, oi.
the institution for its
ïcupied by
. 27,500.00
401.46
. 1,315.81
. 1,394.57
outfit account..
School outfit
In debit balance to profit and loss 2,611.16
After
of
Wil
She
of
place
were
Amount to the credit of the
school on the ledger.$99,823.00
The balance to the debt of profit
dl
2,611.16
2,329.11
xpenditure of $282.05
beyond our income in 1890. The $,500
appropriation from the levy court has
not yet been received.
The following report
expenditures
board of managers :
At the
t* time in 1889 it
Showing
of
a
Fitz
es
and
receipts and
s handed in by the
hand January 1 st, 1890.. . $1,065.69 •
rent of real estate
»rt gages
annual membership
life memberships...
farm produce.
Total.
Cash
2.825.50 .
1.641.50
1
interest,
6.00
F
. 40.00
. 2,305.18
Rev.
Her
July,
early
but
On
.$7,883.87
the
tho
Paid account of general expenses.$ 253.88
Paid real estate expenses. 250.05
Paid farm expenses
1,280.82
Paid school expens
5,314.48
308.93
Paid school outfit exp
Paid farm outfit expen
Cush balance.
401.46
who
Total.
.$7,873.87
The Woodside farm committee's
follows:
port is
Value of live stock
per invent
sup
. $1.433.00
. 727.65
Value of farm implements
Total.
Value of farm producer
Value sold during 1890.,
Value used by school...
...$2,100.65
. .$1,138.25
:: i.muot
hand.
One
and
.$3,443.43
Total.
The committee on indenturing made
the following report :
Boys discharged by order of board of
s, 4; given leave of absence and
found employment,9; left employment
and voluntarily returned to school, 1;
found other employment, 1; released to
parents and returned as unmanageable,!.
A lengthy and interesting statement
a the ladies boai d
stated that if tho
inmates of the industrial
the
to
is ;
be
will
hods
jeived fro
with
al
line.
the
be
of managers. It
boy
school had been committed to jail tho
cost of their maintenance to the county
would have been $1,826.
brought forward as a logical
additional aid from the county' ti
the support ot tho Ferris "industrial
School.
This
ASS A WOMAX CAXAT.
Judgment
ilered Against the Con trac»
or in 45 Suits.
in
:
of
C.,
P.
I.
in
, at George
town yesterday week, 2 test suits, brought
Before Esquire Thumps
er wages for work done
th»
to
Assawoman canal. The plaintiffs, who
were laborers employed in making tho
excavation, were represented by Charles
F. Richards, Esq. This work was begun
in 1889, under
He was succeeded by
conducted the
The
named Fortuuato.
a Mr. Hart, who
.'ork until June, 1889.
3 Mr. Seybold took charge
k until October, 1889,
when he, too, quit, leaving his
paid and other bills aggregating in all
$t,000 to $5,000. Since Seybold left,
the work has boon continued under tho
government contractor, Mr. McLean.
The plaintiffs were me
worked under Seybold and the suits
were brought to recover from McLean
the wages which Seybold should havo
paid.
Testimony was adduced to show that
istiug between McLean
of principal and
ntinued the
ho had
if.
the relation
and Seybold w
agent a"nd to establish McLo:
sibility as principal for liabilities con
tracted by Seybold. The defence w
that
's respon
a sub-contractor and
ot bound for his
debts. The referees, from the evidence
in each case, inferred an agency and
gave judgment. The suits were brought
under the foreign attachment act. There
were 45 cases in all, involving o
$2,000, and upon the hearing of the two
test cases the defence abandoned tho
others and judgment was entered in all
of them. McLean says he will take ao
appeal to court.
ybold w
McLean
ver Bunk Election.
of Ouzotto a
Special Correipouil
Dover, Jan. 15.— The annual
ing of the stockholders of the First
National Bank was hold Tuesday after
noon and the following hi
tors w
year: President, N. B. Smith*
L. Cannon; Manlovo II:
B. Conner, James Penne \
Richardson and Samuel Wharton.
if< urnal
■■■;
d of direc
elected to serve the
Vii
II, 11

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