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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, May 21, 1891, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1891-05-21/ed-1/seq-7/

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REGISTERING AND TOTING
6,027 Voters Were Put
the List on Saturday.
on
THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATIONS
Eugene. Sayers Wins the Con
test for City Assessor.
ensrs. Fugun, Quinn, Murray
Win the Co
Shea
steil Winds for the Coi
«limaille Nomination—The Registriitl
Shown Ther
Is an Active Intercut 1
Coming Flections.
Oyer 6,000 voters registered, on Saturday,
•n increase of 2,000 over the first day's
w,,r k In tho mayoralty campaign of three
The registrars had
▼can ago, _
difficulty und everything passed' off plea"
tly. Another opportunity to register
I ne given next Saturday. The detailed
of Buturday's work
No- For
olgu White
I ■
will
i>d Total
First waM:
First dlstrlst_
Second district.. (Hi
Third district.... 78
Second ward;
First district__ 47
Second district.. 40
Third district... 4H
Fourih district.. 138
Firm district.... 68
Third ward:
First district.... 83
Second district.* fli
Third district.... 81
Fourth district.. 51
Fifth district.... 117
Fourth ward:
First, district.... 101
md district.. U.'l
Third district. 1«7
Fourth district.. 71
Fifth ward :
First district..... 110
Sscoud district.. 18«
Third
Fourth district... 183
Fifth district.... 1B1
Sixth district.... 167
81x111 ward :
First district..... 117
Hecond district.. tiO
n
18
84
BO
92
111
13
BJ
J 111
85
-,
Bit
■ 'I
r,
81
89
II
13
81
M
181
81
«9
7
22
131
131
104
IB
in 1
0
: a I
",
186
28
M
48
12.%

15
28
11%
l-..
II
160
25
120
2
1 D1
6
78
52
.
Foui th dlstrlc
Fifth district. 18«
Seventh ward :
First district. ... Ill
sond district.. 13:)
Third district.... 201
Fouith district.. 131
Fifth.Usui
lu>
27
162
Vi
11
a
; ■
i
2
1 111
2
I A
Seventh district. 87
Eolith ward:
Flr-t district. 77
d district
Third district..
Fourth district
Fifth district..
Sixth district.... 86
BevAuth district. 100
Ninth
First
Second dl
Till«cl district..
Fourth district,
Tenth ward :
First district...
nd district
Third district..
Fourth district..
Fifth district_ 77
Eleventh ward:
First district .. 100
Mecond district.. 54
Twelfth ward :
First district.... 123
Second district.. 4.3 10
Totals.4907 ÏÏÜÔ
102
I
3

108
105
. 9
18
89

92
126
u
:
9
I
12
132
13
53
120
0
96

136
97
0
97
181

o
110
45
'<%
•26 G027
DEM OCRA Tt t • FRIMA R TES.
• I for Ah««
Eugene Sayers Noml
mr in
in .Southern Dintr
The Democratic
for assess«
ntest for a candidate
d collector of the southern
district Saturday afternoon was iiuite
spirited, and resulted in the choice of
Eugene M. Bayers of the Third w
handsome plurality. He i
of age, and a member of the firm of Buyers
Brothers, plumbers. The vote was as Al
lows:
«i by a
about 42 ye
lows:
P
g
i

I
w
ASSESSOR.
w
f
5
:
First want...
Second Ward.
Third
Fourth ward..
Tenth ward...
01
24
241
15
■i.
6.3
682
Kiev
Twelfth warJ..
6
18
Totals.
..1409
10.0
182
124
Bayors'plurality,_ 329
The returns of tho
follows :
WARD
contests for City
Council were
North. South. Tot
179 153 .332
27 42 <9
Petor A. Fagan.
Jesse K fi&ylts.
Fagan's majority.
t-KCONl) WARD.
.263
EnBt. Wo
.. 107 35 232
.. 79 147 2.6
Tot
William H. Qu«u„.
J. K. (Jurron.
Quinu's majority.
THIRD
James M. Griffin.
No opposition
6
.417
r
rontTR WARD.
James A. Magee..
No opposition.
i
HI ; il
Jarnns Murray....
M. J. Sharkey....
Charles O'Connor
Î45
Murray's plurality.
ELEVENTH
John White..
No opposition.
.218
. Philip U. 8h«a.
Eugene McDermott
Shoa'e majority..
The returns
.21
received and announced
at the meeting of the City Democratic
Association, Saturday night.
LOCAL POLITICAL NOTES.
George Johnson announces himself as
an independent candwlate for City Council
in the First ward. Mr. Johnson is pro
prietor of the Ship Hotel, No. 404 West
Front street.
A. 8. Hurlock, who wns n member of
the police forco under Mayor Rhoads,
candidate for appointment us city detec
live under the Two Defectives bill passed
by the Legislature last week. Ex-Police
Sergeants B J. McVey and James T.
Whelan are also candidates.
Itaal Kntnte Sale«.
A well-attended sale of real estate was
held by Heald A Co. Saturday last, with
the following result: Lot south side of
Sixth 8tre«'t, 105feet cust of Rodney,35x128,
Hubert Cassidy, 920 per foot,9700; lot south
corner of Rodney and Sixth street, 28
xlOö, Hubert Cassidy, 920.25 per foot. 9735;
lot cast side of Rodney street, 28 feet so
of Sixth. 50x105, Hubert Cassidy, 92
per foot, 91,262.50; lot east side of' Rodney
street, 78 feet south of Sixth, 50x105. Ben
jamin Willis, 922.50 per foot. 91,125; lot
fiouth side of Ninth street, 150 feet west of
Clayton, 75x110, John Brown, 911.50 per
foot, 9862.50; lot northeast corner of Rod
ney street and Shttllcross avenue, 25x100,
Hubert Cassidy, 919 per f«»ot, 9475; lot east
2ml ii R°d«ey street, 25 feet north of
bhallcross avenue, 50x100, Hubert Cassidy,
fin per foot, 9750; lot oust si«le «if Rodney
•treet, 75 feet north of Shullcross avenue,
Henry Charles, 915.25 per foot,
976*..50; lot east side of Rodney street, 125
feet north of Bhallcross avenue, 176xltN),
bamuLi U. Cleaver, 915, 92,025. Total
amount of sole, 99,297.50.
ut h
A Fi-unk, Full Apology.
C. G. Satterfield of Bridge ville, writes
over his own signature :
I, C G. Butterfield, do hereby acknow
ledge my inability to stand up before It.
Oliver Gannon, also Oliver B. Jacobs in u
fair mill, either with
- , without gloves,
for any number of rounds. And further.
I do by these writings, give up all claim to
the championship or belt. And do hereby
admit that I am no good, and will never
I make any mure brags of ruy pluck.
WEST CHESTER THRASHER.
Tim Field Club Cricketer« Administer n
«hin« Defeat to Tlielr Opponents.
The first eleven of tho West Chester
Cricket Club wns beaten almost out
sight at Elsmere by the home club
Huturday. This is all the more remarkable
®nd also creditable to the Field club play
" the Philadelphia papers, notuhly tho
/Vm, foretold a thrashing for the Wil
mington cricketers. The following score
pretty clearly shows how they underesti
mated the vulue of tho Wilmingtonians :
CHESTER.
K. L. Pornt, c Reinhardt, b Holm wood
W.jP. Htalpley, b Turton..
•1. 11. i arhon, lb» C'urtoa
Smith, o N 1-dan, h Turin».
A. (Joodwln.c
W. W. Hoop«»
A. 8. t-lmrulo

Of
H
a
lolnhardt,
0
-, t) Hot it
Mlolmwood....
1 " I
fi
:
J. I*. No
•Jr.. I. I u
Jacob», Jr.. 1
Wldoa 4, log byo 1
Total.
1
.41
ANALYSIS.
B. U. M. W.
Holm wood.
Holm wood bowled 4*
i '
■■
. .ON
den
I. T. Turton. b Perot...
Martin, b .Smith.
I>. J. Reinhardt, bShii
W. ». lllllee. e Got
I
xlwln,
S3
I win.
H. it. Krlnghurst, u tjoodwlo
J. E. Smith. 1 bw Shipley...
11. L. Tallinn.
W. Hol I, wood, b
J. P. Melds,
J. P. Wains,
Pu
1
4
Byes 18; leg byes Will os, 3.
Total..
22
.18(1
ANALYSIS.
. IL M. W.
Milplfo
Hinlih
Austin
21 21
,
IS
! ■

3
.21 1U 0
.18 13 0
1
jodwln.,
bhipley
8rt 8
ÎACII WICKET.
Wf
ibester.15 15 82
Doluwure.CO 57 98
M M
26 27 85 38
110
111
.3 186
Neg
and Rv
Belawnro 1 wilixht, colored o
The Republican nomination has placed
some pretty good and capable candidates
before the citizens soliciting suffrage. Bo
the colored voters are concerned we
will undoubtedly support them, provided,
however, the party will encourage its can
didates to pledge themselves to gi
preresentation according to population. It
is no longer a question of time with
the day of salvation is at hand. Wo will
to ussist, in supporting candidates of
that party willing to pledge themselves
ignitii
under the
tration. There is
bugle. Candidates
••an not hoodwink tho
longer by making a few
Isos and all
after they
with the hare and hold with tlie hound''
this trip. We should immediately negoti
ate plans and formulate an organization
this deserving claim. It is a ques
tion of vital importance worthy of
undivided attention and united effort. A
»ting to that effect should be culled
among colored voters who are in positio
to practice the preaching of this gospel to
the letter. We want no coward in our
band. Nothing but earnestness
vince the whole people of our . ;
done and recognition is assured.
far
wlmg to the pop
•xt municipal adminis
•ertain sound in this
!
>t shrink. They
negro vote any
individual prom
• tlie party to break the
elected. They can not "rt
top
dll e*
right. This
Special Corresponde
oaity Capture«
G027
<J Journal
., May 10.—Captain Edward V.
Hemlnxson of the schooner Annie L.
Russell, caught a curiosity in the way of a
fish in the Delaware hay near the big
stone a day or two ago. The fish is about
3J feet long, nearly us wide and about 11
inches thick. Tho two large fins extend in
''I a way as to show no vestige of a tail
•1 makes the whole fish have the nppear
ce of the head of some great sea m
Tim mouth is small and in the pi
teeth it has two solid pieties of bo
grinders. The eyes are large, the skin
rough and very much like gristle when
cut into. It is u perfect description of a
short sunfish" as given in Webster's die*
»nary and is a native of southern seas,
being of tho family dindotiiida. It is now
on exhibition in front of the Dorsey
It is supposed to have strayed
from its native haunts and wns caught
with a large boat hook, taking it in its
mouth as soon as it was thrown into the
water, i he monster weighs
pounds and (here is some talk
Mil
in
of
Al
a
nster.
ce of
sod
i
ti

it to a museum in Philadelphia Then 'to
tho Bmithsonmu Institute at Washington.
of
15
Orp
The following matters were transacted at
nhans court on Saturday: The Equit
able Guarantee and Trust Comp
appointed guardian of Annie
minor; the Security T
Company gu
John H. Ro
ail minist rate
Diehl,
124
»«! Safe Deposit
Seville, minor;
st
linn of Louis?
Iney, Esq., filed ;
• or the estate o
«1 also secured
.
. . order f«>r the
of sale of the property of Felix
deceased; Samuel VV. McCaulley,
Esq nuule a return «>f the sale of property
of William Craig, deceased; Francis M.
Walker, Esq., usked for an extension ol
time for the suie of the property of Mary
topper, deceived. J. Frank Biggs, Es«..,
obtained an order apportioning the estate
of Henry F. Albert, deeased.
.332
<9
)' Neill,
6
Rnjoyuhlo KlrmcHH I
The participants in the recent children s
kirmess were given a
Saturday evening in
Webster. There w
«»'clock until H.3U, and
pleasant
Eden
t reoep
Hall b
, : ,y A - 8 -
s dancing from 8
music was furnished
by n selected orchestra. Refreshments
served, and Mr. Webster was pre
. rm tw î\ pretty etchings elegantly
•d. The kirmess will lie repented
-ening at Dover. In addi
o the dances Mr. Kale of Philndel
Iftÿ'toior' and Miss Blanche Appleby of
this city, soprano, will Bing. A special
• hielt will leave here at 4.501>. m
has been chartered. It will stop at < lnv
ton for the accommodation of citizens of
that place and Bmy
fri
net Friday
rain.
Want ll
Milford Chronicle
The Legislature will adjourn to-dav and
John I*. Donahoo is still speaker. It. would
be a just rebuke to the man for tho
bf.rsof theBenato, equally divided among
the two great purties, to unite for one«,
1 nt tlie last moment select another as
speaker. If Governor Reynolds lives until
January, 1895, Donations being speaker
would make but little real difference to the
people, but if death should claim tho
present governor then t
begin. Better at the last
>t at all, gcntlomcn.
lined.
ho trouble would
nient than
Tlie
The Dolaw
Association held its
Clayton Ho
constitution
« of Oleomargarine.
Dairymen's Protective
•eting nt tho
day ufternoon. A
».v-l,uvs were adopted,
the articles of umorporntion were read
aud the officers elected temporarily iit hist
meeting were made permanent. The
action suggested nt the previous meeting
in regard to employing, if necessary, a de
tçative for investigating Illegal sales of
oleomargarine and also in regard to ask
ing the next Legislature to appoint a milk
inspector was adopted.
Bat
\\
pal
the
Many peoplo think a baby Is
swallow nasty modlolno for months u
thoughtful friend tolls them of Dr. Bair« BaLy
Syrup.
Us» LnxHdor tor tho distress and discomfort
rosultiuK from ImitKeation and be
lioveil. This wonderful remedy is sold by all
druggists.
born only
Sermon to Fin
Ill First Presbyterian Church Sunday
night Rev. George M. Hickman preached
to firemen, i'ne church was thronged
and about 75 firemen were present. TI
sermon was interesting
by the text Hebrews xi, 84.
oiled tho courage and usefulness of the
firemen and recommended two reforms—
life insurance for firemen und putting
overheud wires, especially electric wires,
under ground.
«1
ir.mz
.
A .Sleep Imlucer.
Horsford'a Acid Phosphute. Dr. J. E.
Lockridge, Indianapolis, ind., says: ''From
y experience, 1 would say 'that,
-rvc restorer in exhaustion from any
a sleep iuducer, it is of the
«...
Old
One
him
cause, and
greatest vulue.
DASHED TO DEATH.
n
tho
:
Two Young Lives Crushed Out by
a Railroad Train.
Of
•lohn Bonn and MIhh Mugglo Now
over, While on Their Way t» n Wod
ing. Run Into By »» Train and A1
oHt Instantly Klllort-Lylng Hldu l»y
tie in Doath.
Special Correspond «»nee ot Oazotto and Journal
Dover, May 15.—Yesterday morning a
fatal accident occurred on the Delawu,»
ruilroud at Harrington, by which a brake
man lost his life. It Is
fatality among
others
H
ded ns
railroad
fatal accident
to follow and the supersti
fuit li fully carried out last evan i
Last night train Vo. til, due toleavo V
mington at 7 o'clock, left there about
time. William H. Redmile w
running engine No. 81»,
Hawkins was conduct
smoothly until t he first c
. grounds woe...
Engineer Redmile observed a team co
Posed of a grey horse and a
buggy, attempting to cross t
directly in front of his engine. Ti
Htantly was impossible, but Engii
mile checked his train
binary could
Hawkins
this State
a
0
turn w
:
nc;
1
. Everything
g above the
W.
falling-ton
the track
■■
lié"
■ork, and (fondue
at o
what hud caused the stoppage.
I hey were not long in suspense. About
•)0 feet soul h of tho.crossing. immediately
above the Dover fair grounds, the body of
discovered lying in tho gullv
at tho east side of tlie track. At his feet
young woman,
opposite
I
! his assis
Ml
S3
1
4
s extended the bodv of
her head pointing rigidly in
direction and her feet
tho direct!«
22
inching those of
ail's head lay in
on. I lie
, and his body was
ith the hands
■ r u.
ix tended as stiff
post, ...
thrown overt he head. His face wa
,
dined slightly to tho right and from
a crushing wound in the right side
of his skull tlie blood (lowed
The woman lay with
otiching tho man's, and her body
stretched out in nil opposite direction.
s imbedded in the ground he
. k. ami a gaping wound on the
left side of the head, just back of the
temple, plainly indicated whnt had c
lier death. When Conductor Hawkins
1 Brukeman Fred Ross, who quickly
hack with lanterns os soon as the ir
upped, reached tho scene of the accident,
was dead. The young
gave a few gasps after their urrival,
syithin throe minutes he hud also
into
3
1
jTofusely.
Her face
side the t
MMl
young w
but
ed to breath. The horse
upped uni n j
Conductor Haivkins, after the
I'.i'-L
II.
• I.
:cident,
•1 alter reporting
. „ , , _Ind took I
bodies aboard his train. He then conveyed
them to Dover, where they were taken in
charge by Undertaker Fox. The body of
young Beim was soon recognized, but it
•erul hours before tho body of bis
companion was identified. It w
ascertained that she was Miss Maggie New
•f Dover. She had started out last
evening in company with John Beim to go
' the residence of George Phillips, about
five miles west of Dover, for the purpose
innanying Miss Sadie Phillips
the wedding of Alias Retta Culveyhoiiso
and Edward Marvel, in Dover, last night.
Miss Phillips decided to go with her
brother, and Miss Ncwninn and Mr. Beim
id off by themselves, only to
their death.
The hr
tlie
do
t lie
mi
that was drawing their vehicle,
a light gray, was evidently detached from
the carnage by the force of the collision,
and, dashing madly along the road, ran
into Dover und finally reached its stable.
Young Bonn is the son of John Bonn, a
well-known citizen of this town, r.nd
Worked at the Richardson it Robbins can
ning factory. Miss Newman worked at
establishment. Bho was an
orphan, who was raised by the family of
Chancellor Suulsburv. Coroner Fox of
Kent county will hold an inquest over tho
bodies of tlie victims to-day.
tho
skin
a
die*
its
the
16.—Yesterday afternoon
at 1 o'clock t'«»roner Fox held an inquest
oyer tho bodies of John Bonn, Jr., and
Miss Maggie Newman, who were killed at
the crossing near the fair grounds Thurs
day night. The conductor, brukeman,
engineer and fireman of tho train gave
their testimony. No new facts
brought out. The jury reiuleml a
diet that the deceased came to their death
by being accidentally struck by the loco
motive of train No. 61. and exonerating
the company from all blame. Miss New
man's funeral will take place to-morrow
afternoon ut 2 o'clock in Christ Church.
I he funeral of Mr. Beim will be ut 3.3U
o clock at tho residence of his parents on
. Interment ut Lukaside
of
sod
to
w
'to
G
• ornors av
M. E. cemetery.
I »• < v
• May 18.—The remains of the
two young people who were killed at the
railroad crossing Thursday night were
id to rest yesterday. Miss Maggie New
an « funeral took place from her home
on New street, at 2.30 n. in., f lie Rev. L. W.
Gibson officiating. Interment w
in the Episcopal cemetery. The honorary
null-lieurers were Miss Huttie (.'ole, .Miss
Annie Boyer. Miss Campbell, Miss Badie
t\ ells, Miss Martha Kersey and Miss
Cole. The pull-hearers were Edward Mil
». ( 'hurles Popper, John Haw...
William Townsend, John Clark and
Morris Miller. Immediately after inter
ment the largo concourse of people went to
the homo of John Beim, Jr., the other
victim, on Governors avenue, where the
Rev. J. A. B. Wilson preached the funeral
services. I he same ladies that acted us hon
orary nail hearers at Miss Newman's funeral
served at Mr. Bonn's obsequies. The pall
bearers were Edward Milbourne, Edward
Baker, Harry Porkum, James Harrington,
Wilber Hammond. The employes of the
Messrs. Richardson, about 12o, attended in
a body.
at
.
the
M.
ol
«
l„
s
8 -
8
of
of
of
Arrested in rh!la«lelphla.
Policeman Galvnrt of Philadelphia,
while off duty Tuesday night week ut
Seventy-third and Woodland avenue, thut
«•hy. apprehended James Belt, alias Carr,
churning to reside in Sharon Hill, on the
charge of
descriptioi..
at the police station
ceived fr " ' *
dor. Calvert had a
of Belt, which hud be
l which hn«l been
, , . Chief of Detectives Wood.
Belt is wanted in Wilmiugbi
thechargeof murder. The off«
mittedon
when, «hiring
Boon, No. 2
rbui
.
ber
Tho
f
a
of
to
of
of
last
thenightof November 17th, 1890,
atlghtln Patrick McMahon's
228 Tut mill street, an Italian
named Antonio Bus.su was so si
beaten that lie died a few «lavs ui'te;
The coroner's jury accused t'arr.
'Schooner" Long und William Bullen of
the crime, und they fled fro
I
sol
rorvly
tlie city.
Rrukci
took Killed.
Special 0
wp »nd
Gazette and Journal
Dover, May 14.—William Cook of Wil
mington, a brnkeumu
freight train, wus run ovor .
killed ubout 7 o'clock this
Harrington. He w
the south-bound
and instantly
orning at
slutting ears und
«mur F
fell between them. L
otifie.I. The unfortunate
married and boarded at 512 Lombard
street, Wilmington, and his mother liv~,
in Harrington. He belongs to the Brother
hood oi Brakcmen.
of
fraud
few
back
woll
Inst
agent
On Saturday Sheriff Simmons sold the
'owing properties: House
Harris««
street near Pleasant, property «if Tlieodo
ll.'l'ratt to J. Ernest Smith for 9050; horn*
d Market, property of Angus
« to Lore «t Emmons, for «1«.
in
tus G
Beith.prtipcrrios were subject to mortgage,
s reported that Howard Wright, a
hand on the farm of John Peoples
the Lancaster pike just outside tho city,
has «lisanpeared since Tuesday last. It'is
supposed he is either demented or has been
foully dealt with while coming to the city.
\\ right is described as 25 years of age, 6
feet 6 inches in height and weighing ubout
160 pounds.
Funeral services over tho remains of
James Smith took place on Sunday after
noon at the residence of the deceased
and Lincoln streets. Tlie Rov.
Kensey J. Hammond of Emanuel Episco
pal Church in tlie Highlands conducted
the services, du Pout Post of which tlie
deceased
It
his
72
from
his
yo
. , ber attende«! in a
body, rhe nost was accompanied bv the
Hibernian Fife und Drum Corps. Inter
ment was made at tho Wilmington and
Brundywino cemetery.
eck
injury.
day
ensued,
At
ment
which
26th,
vania
recite.
"A fresh woun«l Is
«... 0 healed." Betlmos
Old Saul s Pile Olnluiout for piles,
oeute.
"A bird In the cage Is not half a bird."
neither le a
One box of Old
him a whole
ce äß
catnrrb h*lf a man.
's Catarrh Cure will make
. Dont take any other.
CENTREVILLE'S LYNCHING.
ResideuU of the T
In IheT
Did Not Take Port
K«'tly—The Mob Came from the
Lower ftectlon of Queen Anne's County.
Centreville, Md., Mav 13.—While the
lynching of the colored
Green, for felonious assault .... .
Howard Toison was the work of u hastily
formed hand of citizens of Queen Anne's
county, it is believed here that very few,
if any, residents of Centreville were active
participants in the affair, it is well known
that the people of Centreville were rather
disposed to acquiesce in the
twenty-ono years' imr"
by the court, and did all they
reconcile popular sentiment to that result.
In spite of all this the belief prevails to a
considerable extent, among the colored
people especially, thut the outbreak
in good measure to the active efforts of ho
of the younger men of Centreville. This
entirely wrong impression. The
ost careful investigation of the matter
has l)oon made, and not the slightest evi
dence can he obtained to show that the
townspeople were engaged in the affair.
Though the participants
thoroughly disguised ami masked, it would
h ave been possible still to recognize si
_ voice, maimer or ligure if they
hud been citizens of the town: that no
individual has boon so recognized seems to
be pretty conclusive proof that the mob
1 of strangers. This is tho
. They were mainly people from the
er part of Queen Anne's and from
Kem island, where tho Toisons live and
where the crime was committed.
t)n Monday night a largo number of
mines came up i lie Corsica river to the
rhurf at Centreville. This fact w_
*nted upon at tho time, but its full sig
nificance was not appreciated, ll is now
thought that the men who arrived in tho
y from thut part of the county
south of Centreville. During Monday
night a number of men came up with
also, and the vehicles, most of them
l»y
a
, Anbury
iris

l to
due
all
of them by
Ml
fact
at least, were left lust
junction of tho Easton and Queenstown
loads, close hy the residence of Mr. Wool
J. Gibson, three-quarters of u mile
Centreville, The owners of tlie.se
teams quietly entered tho town and after
the fearful work had been done, quietly
The people of Centreville were
it and fearing it and
them saw the lynching, but it is not true
that they did it.
From l lie moment sentenco w
nou needc
>f tt
the
fri
dispersed.
Hiking f.
Of
pro
Green—imprisonment instead
of death—the angry feelings of Mr. Toi
sons neighbors und friends were freely
expressed. The excitement wus at 11 very
high pi tell among them on .Saturday during
the trial, especially when Mrs. Toison and
her mother were giving their testimony in
tears and mortification before a crowded
10111. The slightest thing would
have sufficcdtocuu.se an outbreak at that
moment. The verdict of guilty rendered I
by the jury did much to cairn the excite
ment. 1'ho ]>eoplc; of Centreville remained
calm throughout, but it must he stated
that ever since tlie ill advised lynching
serious apprehensions of further trouble
; a consequence of this affuirhuve existed,
This uneasy feeling was caused by re
ports that the negroes would retaliate.'The
colored people were, of course, excited,
but they kept to themselves, in groups,
giving no evidence that they contemplated
the least violence. A strong patrol mus on
guard all Tuesday night. During the day
the stores where firearms and unimunition
isold were thronged with i
who pretty well exhausted
ply. The
the better
shusers,
the sun
P
class of people, who
do not habitually go armed or keep
firearms about their houses. Every pre
caution was taken to insure the preserva
tion of order and to protect the property
of the town. The standpipe was kept
full of water, fires were kept up in the
water-works and the firetne
alert. All tho authorities
experienced citizens exerted themselves to
allay excitement, and it is not considered
probable that any further trouble will
follow. Thereiwas not the slightest show
of trouble all Tuesday night.
the
I the rat
ELKTOS.
on
tenth of a Font
Delutvaroan—Cnidl
««Minty's Railroad.
N, May 17.—John Welsh Draper,
«ild and highly respected citizen «>f
Elkton, died suddenly this morning at his
residence in West Elkton from tho effects
of a stroke of paralysis which he received
lust December. Ho was in the 79th year of
lus age and wns born in Dover, Del.,
December 26th. 1813. During the w
member of tho Second Delaware
Regiment, mid was badly hurt by an ucci
dent at Petersburg, Vu., in 1808. He lmd
been married three times, and w
father of 19 chlldron and grandfather of
17. His widow, formerly Miss Margaret
C. Milburn, three sons and two dang
survive him. He claimed the ho
voting for the grandfather of Beniamin
Harrison for President.
Articles of incorporation for tho railroad
to be built in < 'coil countv were signed
Saturday by Walter M. Franklin of Lan
caster. Josoph M. Bhowalter of Oxford, in
corporators for Pennsylvania, and J. D.
w . • W- T. Warburton and Robert
Mackey of Cecil county, incorporators for
Maryland. The road will lie known as tho
Lancaster. Oxford & Southern railroad,
crossing the Pennsylvania lino about five
miles south-east of Oxford, and running
Bingerlv, in Cecil county, on tho Philadel
phia division of the Balt imore .t Ohio rail
«I. It is said tho construction of the road
will commence soon.
El
i."
to
of
«
Henry, tlie six-years-old
of Wilson
the athlete «if Berry ville, die«l
suddenly of diphtheria this morning, after
llncss of
«lay.
Rcfor
At the eleventh council «»f tlie New York
and Philadelphia Bynod of the Reformed
Episcopal Church, held last week in New
York, Dr. S. (\ Brincklo of this city wns
elected a member of tlie finance committee
l the Rev. J. Howard-Bmith, formerly
of this city, a member of the standing
committee. Bishop Nicholson read his
annual report for the synodical
closed. Tho result, showed 210
i «l UpiH« opal C
Ml. il.
.
nhrnm
ishes
crated,'
dies opened. 1 c
sceived
:h
ministers
denominations, 3 ordinations
, sbytery, 31 presbyters
connected with the synod, and total num
ber of organized parishes in the synod, 31.
Tho retiring treasurer read his report,
showing expenditures for past fiscal ve...,
f 3,11*0.22; receipts for year, 93,030: leaving
a balance of 9100.22 due him. TI
of the chairman «>f tlu: state of the synod,
stated the totul contributions for tho ye,
to he 9100,032; for foreign missions, 97,1.57,
of which latter sum Grace Church of
Scranton contributed 93,121; total number
of communicants, 4,425, a gain «>f 401 over
last year; Biinday-school scholars, 4,400;
teachers and officers, ö;sü; current expenses.
904)032.

fro
i he
I
i
Swindler 111
E. L. Hubbard, win* swindled a number
of Wilmingto
fraud ule
en through
' the city
few days ago for his crookedness, and is
back in Wilmington again. It might, be
woll to keep a look oiitf«>rhim. When
Inst here he represe
agent of n firm , " **•
facturera.
«1 forged checks,
again. Hubbard was released fr«
«1 himself as the
of Philadelphia safe munu
Fatal Stroke of Apoplexy.
While sitting on his back porch
Thnrsdaj' James Smith, who residqd ut
Wawaset and Lincoln streets, fell fr,,„ 4 ..
his scat and died immediately. He was .
72 years old. Coroner /narl« and
County Physician Smith, alter an ex- i„
amination, gave
from apoplexy.
certificate of death
!• me«
by tt Calf's ltite.
(Carter of the Sraitliville
neighborhood, Kent county, Md., died nt
his home oil |Wednesday week aged 71
bitten by a calf about a
Mr. Willis
till,
s. Hew
yo
eck ago, but paid no uttmition to the
injury. He washed asparagus the next
day and boon afterward blood-poisoning
ensued, with fatal results.
of
the
will
the
D.
at
At the nieraoriul services of Encamp
ment No. 81, Union Veteran Legion
which will be held in Eden Hall on Mav
26th, General W. P. Bnyder of Pcnnsv
vania wUl deliver an oration and mL
Elizabeth C. Btorey of Philadelphia will
recite.
T
A EH ROES SEEK f'ES ft E A X CE.
They Iliii-n Um II*
» Hnf
ough
e*» Vlelim
Port
the
the
.
few,
active
a
This
The
evi
the
they
no
to
mob
tho
the
from
and
of
the
sig
now
tho
with
flngton in Ketallatl
for Tli
oil's E
n—Tho Bn
on Dnat
Narrowly K
Hpeclal Mirresj
Dover, May 14.—Word lias been received
here that the house of William Buffington,
father of Louisa Huffington, win
snulted by James Tin
sinned by lire 01
lluffington.H reside
It is reported finit Louisa
>e frr
agratii
thut some fri
the house through revenge.
May 15.— Â
f (iAzettn na<l Journal
ihgoori, was con
ight. The
Mon la
ade a narrow
cd to death in tho
red. It is thought
•1 of Thormighgood fired
being b
. btlt Wfl!

to
jireHcntatlve of
Viola yesterday
to learn the particulars of the burning of
the Huifiugton home. Fate seems to bo
against the family amt especially tin* littlo
giri Louisa. The home, a neat little framu
dwelling a story and a-hulf high, stood
about a quarter of a mile north of Viola.
Hero Htifiiiigton, liN wife and four little
children lived happily until recently their
troubles began. They had just got through
With tlie I'horoughgood case and settled
to homo life whei
night t he house
due
all
I
sd:
i to the ground
and all its
al, leaving the
family v
ly destitute. 1
the money
ness fees in
•hieb they had
the (rial amounting to abo
burned.
There s
*50,
a to lie a mystery as to tho
origin of tlie fire. It was
nliimt lu o'clock hy Emily Itensun, n
neighbor. Bhe gave tho alarm ami by
heroic efforts aroused the family and got
them from the building just
' . All tlie children were
some extent, but Louii
discov
Ml
about to cave
burned
to fare the worst. J
about the head and lier e
entirely
burnt off - . Huiftngton himself was tho
last to bo brought from
says she could not wake hi
him
the house. Emily
m and pulled
by the feet. When lie was
out it was found that he was intoxicated.
The lire started in tlie rear of the house
a littlo back shed. Borne think if euuglit
mldering coals that were left
the lire which the supper w
pared on, and others think
a friend of Tin
sentence of death for
girl.Louisa.lt i
fington drunk
mile
after
were
true
the
fr<
11 ."
fro
as lirod by
ighgood, who is under
uniting the little
n «posed thut they g<
d took revenge by firing
Of
>t Huf
Toi
a
u . County Bible Moeiety.
and 1 Lorrespoudoneo of Gazette and Journal
in Georgetown, May 15.—The Bussex
bounty Bible Society met in the M. K.
t!l !R r ''n m Georgetown yesterday morning,
with President Charles F. Richards in the
I «hair. The meeting was opened with
scripture reading and prayer by the Rev.
F. G. Moborley, of Lewes. The President
appointe«! the usual ot
vice-president, reported u number of Bibles
donuted. M. B. Steele of Bultimorehun
dred showed that he had been very active
re- in the work by reporting 3-i Bibles donated,
i'i )U committee on nominations re|iortod
1,10 following officers who were unani
mously elected : President, Paynter Frame
oI.l'/dmn River hundred; Vice-presidents,
on Vvilllam H. Boyce, Georgetown; George
J** Smith, Little Creek; Thomas R. Harp
Seaford; Isaac K. Wright, N. W. Fork,
W. \\. Blian, Nanticokc; II. P. Burton,
Broadkiln; W. W. Morgan, Broad Creek;
D. L. Mustard, Lewes and Relmboth; B.
M. Vaughn, Indian River; R. W. Dasey,
Dagshoro; M. B. Steele, Baltimore; (i. \V.
Jones, Gumboro; Recording Secretary, J.
B. Clark; Corresponding Secretary, C. W.
Cullen; Treasurer, Dr. C. 11. Richards;
Depository, W. W. Vincent. The com
mittee on resolutions reported advo
cating n still more thorough organi
for tho distribution of Bibles.
A report from the American Bible
Society showed a balance in hand
to the credit of the Sussex County Bible
Society of #2,272.30. Dr. Moffett of tho
American Bible Society explained the
workings of that society and suggested
that it would bo advantageous to both the
parent society and the Sussex County So
ciety if the lutter would authorize the
transfer of a part of this credit fro
purchase to the donation account, in uo
cordanee with this suggestion the Rev. A.
D. Davis moved that the Bus
Bible Society transfer Sl,5oo «
chase account to the donutio
After considerable discussion the
the table for consideration at
the afternoon session of tho next annual
meeting. The M. E. Church of George
town was selected as the place of the next
■ting. The Rev. F. C. MeSorley of
••es delivered a very interesting add
after which tho society udjt
the evening session. In the evening ad
dresses were made by the Rovs. Robert
Watt of Milford, A. D. Davis ami C. T.
W yatt of Roxana.
the house. There b
arty is, as all of Thoroughgood's friends
wide further down the State.
mittees. The
to
or
«>f
the
«sex County
p
fus laid
of
by
a
I."
i until
Lan
in
D.
for
tho
five
rail
road
Th
onto
Drowned.
Three lives were lost Sunday afternoon
by the upsetting of a sailboato
kill river off Gibson's Point, i
:tion of Philadelphia. The victims w
Mrs. Susan Pascoo, her infant f
topher, and Miss Mary Carr. There were
also in the party Fred Tidmun. Samuel
Peltz, Robert Chamberlain and Mrs. Marv
- mes, a twin sister of Mrs. Pascoe. and
her four-yeurs-old son, Willie. The party*
started out for a sail down the river, Ti.l
, tho owner of tho boat, uetin
. After being
an attempt to "go about" the ropes
came tangled round Cbamborlaiu's feet
and the boat upset. The three men are all
«vs and they succeeded in get
ing tlu? woinon and children on to tho
of the unturned boat, hut they be
e hysterical and g«it buck into the
water frequently. Finally Mrs. Pa«
with lier infant and Miss
the surface, and were
keep Mrs. Joneson the boat, badly sprained
bis wrist. After drifting about for some
time, those still clinging to (he bo
. Pascoe'sbody w
ubout an hour afterward. She held her
child lightly clasped in lier
I 4'onfi
thcSchuvl
the lowe

;
ing-muH
in
die«l
wns
his
sank bel
the boat. Peltz, i
his effort
-i
Col«
At Thursday
«if the PhiJndel
31.
of
phiu A. M. E. Conference reports from
churches were received, generally showing
that the work of the church wns gradually
being extended with favorable results.
J he secretary rend the report of the Dollar
Money I* und« This fund is designed to
"-Present n dollar for every member of tho
in the c
denominut _ _
showed that during the fiscal year
ceipts amounted to 992,004.52, am
balance of 90(57.84 remains in the ;
this time.
ï. It
tho ro
1 that
reusury
VT . .ding the fact that
the New Jersey Conference has
made it
fwitlis
vet
•port. The funds raised by this
,. , applied t«i paying salaries of the
bishop and general officers of the church,
t«» the support of widows and orphans, and
to maintaining the work of the board of
publication; also, for many other purposes
of minor importunée.
A "Hoi
>le K
inple."
, in alluding to
hilnting tlie Dola
..... the Chicago fair,
Sunday: • The exhibitio
old whipping p«,st taken
will not he edifying;
certain utility as a
The post in question
•«•ton originally in 1857, and 1ms out
grown its usefulness. Visitors to the fair
would look on it. more kindly if it were
nie last relic of barbarism (of this sort)
that, Delaware or the United States had to
The New York Trlb
tho proposition of
are whipping pu
t li-
Chicago fj
fr«
1 Unaware
though it may have a
'horrible example.' '
was
.. . ..
. I ,>■• Jiut w ® are informed that '»
Ä ft lÄ*" "
i„ news to leanuhat there
/ill be
•New Castle jail. It
of
'
fro
tes
■ i'ushii
ISiSFSkn
informed.
ij but just how the 'mode
from the ancient one we u
si,
The first woman who has completed
till, two years' course of study und
work lit the Hew York Dcnconcss
framing School of the Methodist
Church
out
was
one
loss
e
a

ing*
i
24
/ere admitted to the Order
of Deaconesses and receive her license
interesting service on Monday at
the Park Avenue Methodist Episcopal
Church, New York. Bishop Andrews
will conduct tlie consecration services,
the Rev. M. I). Crawford ^presided
U» Kov. Charles L. Thompson.
D. IJ., of the Madison Avenue Presby
terian Church, made an address.
at
EW YORK FASHIONS.
Trlinmii
«love
d (
Wraps—Parasols—Millinery.
Spécial Correspondence of
Np.w York, May 18.—-The popularity
of coffee creum, tan or gray shades,
renders a continued employment of
black trimmings almost a necessity, be
cause forming
ami also rendering these pale costumes
available to a large class of persons who
otherwise could not wear them. Black
passementerie is fashionable as ever and
•3 in all widths; that designed for
the bottom of skirts being in straight,
close patterns and sometimes very wide.
Trimmings upon the lower edge of
especial feat ure of the time
^ din them there is considerable variety.
Two ruffles are very frequent and may
be of the material, of plain silk on a
fancy pattern, of lace or chiffon, the
mer sometimes placed
flounce. Two narrow'
n - She
if< rnal
admirable contrast
for
?r a plain
lace ruffles are in
great vogue, but wide lace in a single
flounce is so essentially elegant as to
command its use, the more
niizes with basque skirtings of the
ne, while lace sleeves puffed over
plain ones of tlie material give a dressy
look to corsages and match ruffles about
k. 'These lace trimmings are
certainly in best taste when placed
plain material, hut they are frequently
employed on figured challics or silks
with not such a good result.
Costumes of plain material are sty
lishly finished by a bias band of the
same, with a narrow gilt cord or galoon
for a heading. This is particularly truo
respecting diagonal wools, which are
often made with entire bias skirt though
per contru, velvet bands, or even box
plaitiugs of contrasting velvet
vogue, such combinations
vet i
than tasteful,
acceptably and also black silk, and both
usually correspond with basque skirtings
that have developed almost into a furor.
It is a noteworthy caprice of the time,
likewise, that, while marked and multi
plied, contrasts appear on dresses and
in millinery, shoes und hosiery, and
sometimes gloves should match the
dress. Tun or gray are of course excop
al, because, like glove*, in similar
shades, they are worn with dresses of
any color. But low, colored shoes with
hosiery to match are in demand and this
, patent leather is extremoly fash
ionable. Hevivum is a new dressing
gotten up especially for the renewing of
patent leather and while
it can be added that i
shoe department, to
due for information, tlie only dressing
sold for years, has been Button's Raven
Gloss, because the only
softens and preserves the the leather.
The newest slipper is the "Cleopatra"
with pointed tongue and ribbon tie. All
strictly fashionable shoos and hoots
well, have sharp pointed h
boot
it hur
the
green vel
popular
Black velvet comes in
• tan being
grai
in
to
to
to
as
a
ye
tho Rubiect,
Lortl & Taylor's
•hick thanks
and the
/ now be iaced down the front
instead of being buttoned at tlie sides.
Mousquetaire gloves
fashionable and while they
colors to match dresses, purchasers
most refinement, usually select tan
gray.
still most
are sold in
Mi
1 lie most successful wrap is the single
long cape extending from a pointed yoke
and hero is tlie vantage ground of
coffee cream cloths with some gray
and a small proportion of blue. Black
cloth capes with gilt trimmed yokes
exceptionally handsome and expensive
:s are of black Bengaline. .Small
wraps with mantilla front ends are of
cloth
I
Bengali
or passementerie and
trimmed with braid
i invariably in
black. Costly little capes, reaching to
the waist ure of jetted net combined
witli gilt and comparatively simple but
very pretty ones are made of white or
colored chiffon in a double frill of which
the longer reaches only to the waist.
They will form a charming addition for
young girls or older women of slender
figure.
in
at
of
T.
Parasols bavo never been in such va
riety. The most popular havo a finish
of two pinked ruflles, but coquettish
ones ure edged hy loopings of narrow
pinked silk which form a large and fre
quentlv a very gay rosette when tho
parasol is closed. It is supplemented
by a smaller rosotte
a yet smaller one ut the top. Chiffon is
largely used as an edging or for covers,
either alone or united with luce which
is of course standard and appears gen
erally in successive flounces, though
sometimes in tlie single cover. Ferules
are usually though not nlwavs long,and
unique handles arc furnished with small
berries.
the handle and
fruits
Tho lending characteristic in millinary
is lightness. Except fine leghorns,
straws are open or of extremely light
texture finished by open work and
toques may consist of
îroly three
rings, often of gilt, with an upright
finish at ono or either end. Elegant ex
amples for summer resorts,
frame work, a notable
mere
being com
posed of a single stem that forms a largo
circle. A few thorny stems within
m
pose the frame in wido interlacings and
the trimming is a dash of white lace
side and four large roses. Another
elegant hat is of leghorn, where three
large stems encircle tightly tlie
brim which they compress into folds.
A spray of roses gives conwlcXjfon.
third hat is crownless and from several
large knotty and thorny steins that
form a small circle, a crescent-shaped
front brim of pale yellow quilled chif
fon, extends a support to a half wreath
of exquisite small flowers and berries.
Buc h rare specimens of art are of course
exceptional, but they show the great
caprlco allowable. Elegant, leghorns
trimmed in a more conservative way,
show upright loops of ribbon and
flowers that catch the brims at tlie back
or somewhat ut the sides and quite cover
the low crowns. Rosalind May.
Ilai'i'l.son Wants Quay.
Washington, D. C., May 18.—Senator
"Matt" Quay came into town on Satur
day, but the fact was known to but one
two intimate friends. Ho disclosed
his presence to-day, and has made
rangements to ificot President Harris
this morning. The purport of the c
ferenco is pretty well understood. Mr.
Harrison lias concluded that tho Penn
sylvania boss is still a power in his
state, and is ready to make a deal for
the Keystone delegates. The basis of
tlie deal, so far us Senator Quay is con
■rned, will undoubtedly be his contin
uance as patronage distributor, in which
position ho is not to be interfered with
by Don Cameron, Postmaster-general
Wtinamaker or any one else.
Ide
A
Henry W. Morrow
Friday received
the secretary of Le Société des Bavan*
France, notification of his election
bom miry member and correspondent
of that society
' >n to print ii
lations of his
fro
tes of V
1 n
quest ft>r permis
trans
si,
the society's io
irticlos entitle«
"Rythm" und "Equili
fl "The C
far
brie Dcffcctious.
The tire early Wednesday week seen
out in the direction of Christiana hundred
was discovered to be the burn of David R.
l.ynum. The contents of the barn with
one horse and one cow wore burned. The
loss is estimated at $5.000, upon which
there is small insurance. The Washington
e ire Company started out, but oiler going
a few miles returned to this city.
• .. , JVilmerJ. Ellison of tho Sav
ing* * und, has received a present of an
unusually fine shad, caught at Grubb s
Landing on Saturday by Henry Guest.
i he lish weighed Si pounds, und measured
24 inches from heud to toil.
T
HOT SHOT FOR CORTE.
•or Nicholls Requested to Ask Italy
»call Her Representatives »t Now
Cover
to R
Orleans.
Nkw Orleans, May 17.—Mayor
Shnkespcare yesterday addressed a
letter to Governor Nicholls In which
he takes Bignor Corte, tho Italian con
sul at tills port, severely to task, deny
ing his statement in the controversy in
the rocont troubles and calling upon
the governor to request the recall of
his exequatur by the President. The
letter is
"Under date of May 10th, 1891, tho
consul of Italy at this port, Mr. Corte,
saw fit to address to W. II. Chaffee,
foreman of the grand jury, then in
:ry remarkable letter. Tho
which it was
follows :
'
evening of the day
written the consul sent copies of tho let
ter by the hands of ids secretary to the
daily panera foi- publication. I enclose
a printed copy of that letter.
"Your excellency, being a resident in
New Orleans, is fully
that ever since the assassination of
Superintendent of Police Heunchsy
October 10th, 1890, the papers have
teemed with all manner of vaporings
from Mr. Corto in the shape of inter
views, <fcc. For these reported sayings
he could not properly be held
an official responsible, and since
was scarcely credited with one
statement before another was made,
either exactly the opposite of or largely
qualifying the first, his vagaries and
blusterings were regarded by all but
his own people as either laughable or
contemptible. This letter of May Gth
to the foremun of the grand jury was
very properly returned by that body to
the writer us being impertinent. Besides
being impertinent, the letter contains
statements absolutely false, and beyond
question known to be false by Mr. Corte.
AN ELEMENT
rare of tlie fact
on
he
DANGER.
"If, as Italian consul, Mr. Corte has
ever had any usefulness here lie has
outlived it and has become, through
own acts, not only an unacceptable
element of danger to
this community, in that by his utter
ances ho incites his inflammable people
to riot or sullen opposition to laws and
customs of a country they have sought
as an asylum. Being the depository, as
he confesses himself to be, of criminal
secrets relating to the individuals of his
race resident among us, ho refuses to
give to tlie department of police and
justice the information lie has and
thorby increases the danger to the com
munity from these criminals.
"For these reasons I have tho honor
to request that you ask of the Honora
ble Secretary of State at Washington
tho recall of Consul Corte's exequatur
by tho President. This application
would have boon made to you sooner
but for the reason that I desire to place
in your hands, to accompany your note
to the Secretary of State, a report made
to the mayor and council by the com
mittee of fifty. 1 enclose a copy and
beg leave to call your excellency's at
tention to that part of it relating to Mr.
Corte."
PKOVENZANO WARNED.
Henry Peters, a stevedore, complained
to Mayor Shakespeare yesterday that
tho Provenzanos were intimidating His
affidavit setting
forth the fact, and the Provenzano
brothers were arrested. The mayor
wrote to tho brothers, Joe and Peter,
who it will be remembered, were
charged by the Rev. Fatlior Manoritta
as being at the head of the Mafia and
they called upon him. Tho mayor then
gave them a Jong lecture, warning them
that their acts of intimidation
must stop. He said he wa? tired of this
business,that he knew the brothers were
a menace to the peace of tho commu
nity, that he was aware of the secret
methods by
that ho had
ever bo
The police, he said, would wipe from
the face of tho earth every member of
tho Provenzano gang who raised his
hand against a member of the commu
Provenzanos had very littlo to
say, except to protest their innocence,
and left the mayor's prcscnco very
much crushed.
Connu! Conti In Washington.
Washington, May 18.—Mr. Costi, the
Italian consul at New Orleans, has arrived
here, but declined to talk but of the fatigue
of his trip, lie will call on the Marquis
Imperial! during the day. The depart
ment of state has not yet received a request
from Governor Nichols to recall Mr. Costi.
Mlnnlonury Anniversary.
The Woman's Home Missionary Society
of St. Paul's M. E. Church celebrated its
fifth anniversary Thursday night.Exercises
included addresses by Miss Burton, a
Philadelphia deaconess, Mrs. N. M. Browne
of Middletown and Presiding Elder Mur
ray prayer by the Rev. J. K. will, reading
by Alias Helen Scott and a violin duet by
Misses Foulk ami Hukill. The music was
in charge of Mrs. Thomas Benson and
Mrs. Joseph H. Jones.
person, but
laborers. He made
which they worked, but
determined there must for
end of their intimidation.
nit
tv
The
What is
1
A
A
Castoria is Dr. Samnel Pitcher*» proscription for Infants
aud Children. It contains neither Opium, Morphine nor
other Narcotic substance. It is a harmless substitute
for Paregoric, Drops, Soothing: Syrups, and Castor Oil.
It is Pleasant. Its guarantee is thirty years' use by
Millions of Mothers. Castoria destroys Worms and allays
feverishness. Castoria prevents vomiting Sour Curd,
euros Diarrhoea and Wind Colic. Castoria relieves
teething troubles, cures constipation and flatulency.
Castoria assimilates tlio food, regulates tho stomach
and bowels, giving healthy and natural sleep. Cas*
toria is the Children's Panacea—the Mother's Friend.
Castoria.
Castoria.
" Castoria Is
dren. Mothers have repeatedly told me o£ Us
good effect upon their children."
excellent medicine for chil
" Castoria Is so well adapted tochildren that
I recommend it ausuperior toauy prescription
known to me."
II. A. Abciteu, M. D.,
Ill So. Oxford St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
Du. G. 0. Osgood,
Lowell, Mass.
•* Castoria Is the beat remedy for children of
which I am acquainted. I hope the day
far distant when mothers will consider the real
interest of their children, and use Castoria in
stead of the various quack nostrums which
destroying their loved ones, by forcing opium,
morphine, soothing syrup and other hurtful
agents down their throats, thereby sending
them to premature graves."
" Our physicians in tlie children's depart
ment have spoken highly of their expert
in their outside practlco with Castoria,
and although
medical supplies what is know
products, yet
merits of Castoria has
favor upon it."
United Hospital
only havo among our
regular
foss that tho
to look with
are free to
Dispersait.-,
Boston, Mars.
Dr. J. F. KiNcnsLoc,
Oonway, Ark.
All» a Surra, Pres.,
Tho Centaur Company, TT Murray Street, Now York City.
Tlie Navaswi Hinter V C
Washington, 1). 0. May 18.—The
President disposed of the case of
the Navassu rioters to-day. His
actions are embodied in the fol
lowing: "I have examined with
care the papers that the death
sentences should he executed. The
ç was, as to each of* the prison
satisfuctorily, established and
was felonious is also
tho conditio
killing
that it
clear. But
rounding the pri
most
were
were of a
peculiar character. They
American citizens and under
contract to labor upon speci
fied work within a specified territory.
They were without opportunity to ap
peal to any court or public officer for re
dress of any injury or tho enforce
ment of any eivil right. Their
employers were in fact their masters,
the bosses ovor them imposed fines and
penalties without any semblance of trial.
These penalties extended to imprison
ment and even to tho practice of
up for a refusal
Redress was impossible and
state of things generally \
sucli as might make men desperate 1
prevailed, the United States government f
should provide by law for the protec- ;
tion of laborers in Navassa before pub- f
lie officer, whose duty it should b«
that the men who
go there to labor are well in
formed ns to the nature of the
obligations assumed ami should main
tain in the island
power to hear complaints and to adjust
controversies. There is not a case
for a pardon. Thu crime was a very
grave one but taking into account all of
Its antecedents and incidents I have
consented to commute the sentences to
imprisonment for life.
Harri
-
the
'
offlocr with
a Pardoning Mood.
Wa
kin, D. C., May 18.—Tlie
President 1ms commuted the sentence
in the case of J. D. Moore, convicted in
Texas ol horse stealing, to throe years,
from November 14th, 1889. lie has also
commuted to
mont, the sentence
rad (k Miller, convicted in Minnesota of
violating postal laws. He has decided
to interfere in the cases of N. M. liage,
convicted in Iowa of violating postal
laws;Michael Torre, convicted in New
York of passing counterfeit coin and
having counterfeit coin in his posses
year actual imprison
the case of Con
l^»r«l Cavendish Dead.
London, May 17.—Lord Edward Cav
endish died this morning. Lord Edward
was the only surviving brother of tho
Marquis of ilartington and Lord Fred
erick Cavendish, who was murdered in
i'hamlx Park, Dublin. He would have
succeeded to tlie Dukedom of Devon
shire had ho outlived tlie marquis and
had the latter died childless.
ON, D. C.%Iay 187—The
President to-day made the following
appointments in the revenue marino
service: To be first lieutenants, Frank
II. Newcomb, Charles II. McClellan
and Edmund C. Chayton, and to be
second assistant engineer, J. Elwood
Dorry.
Mori
The Cure For
Scrofula wr
supposed to he the
touch of royalty. To-day, many grateful
people know that the "sovereign remedy" is
Ayer's Sarsaparilla. This powerful altera
tive extirpates "the evil" by thoroughly
eliminating all the Btrumous poison from the
blood. Consumption, catarrh, and varioui
other physical as well as mental maladies
have their origin In
SCROFULA
When hereditary, this disease manifests it
self In childhood by glandular swellings,
running sores, swollen Joints, aud general
feebleness of body. Administer Ayer's Sarsa
parilla on appearanoe of the first symptoms.
"My little girl was tronbled with a painful
scrofulous swelling uuder one of her.
The physician being unable to effect a cure,
I gave her one bottle of
Ayer's
Sarsaparilla, and the '.welling disappeared."
— W. F. Kennedy, McFarland's, Va.
cured of scrofula by the use of AyM**
Sarsaparilla."—J. C. Berry, Deerfield, M*.
" I wus troubled with a
two y
scrofula, I took six bottles of Ayer's
hand for ov
. Being assured the
Sarsaparilla
:
cured."—n. lllnkins, Riverton, Neb.
Prepared by Dr. J. C. Aye
8ol«I by all Drugglata. Pr
Cures others, will cure you
St Co., Lowell, Mnn«.
tiOUl.'rt, $6.
Ice*l;

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