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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, August 27, 1891, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1891-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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CALVARY CHURCH.
Sketches of the Retiring Iteetor and His
Snceeuor.
The Rev. David Howard completed
his rectorate at Calvary Church Bun
day. His rectorate Jat St. Andrew's
Church, Bridgeton, N. J., will begin
September 6th.
He studied for the ministry under tho
Rev. Dr. Thomas F. Davies, then rector
of St. Peter's Church, Philadelphia,
and now bishop of Michigan, and w
ordained to the diaconato in Christ
Church, Philadelphia, in 1876, by
Bishop Scarborough of New Jersey.
From then until 1878, when he had his
first independent charge, he was assist
ant to Dr. Davies. Ilis lirst independent
charge was at Florence Heights, N. J.,
stationed two years. In
They
the
were
to
that
an
two
said
ing
where he
March, 1880, he became rector of St.
Philip's Church, Laurel, then building,
and finished it during J
months later, when the diocesan con
vention was held there. At that
vention Bishop Lee ordained him a
priest. In 1882 in became rector of
Christ Church, Delaware City, where
he remained four years, during which
he overcame the bad effect which had
been occasioned by the trouble existing
between his
H. L. Phillips
of St. John's Memorial Church, Ash
land, Pa., and in 1887 he became rector
of Calvary Church, this city, where his
foctorate was most successful.
The Rev. V. H. Berghaus, who will
•ucceed Mr. Howard at Calvary, will
begin his rectorate thero
the pulpit meauwhile being supplied.
He is about 46 years old and a graduate of
the West Philadelphia Divinity School.
Hla family consists of his wife and four
sons.
, three
ongregation and the Rev.
. Next he became rector
October 4th,
An Unknown Wl
Man Killed.
An unknown white man was struck
and killed by engine No. 839, attached
to train No. 513,
Ohio railroad at East Junction about
1Û.80 o'clock Sunday morning,
pereons who saw the man killed
'WM a case of suicide, as the
deliberately in front of the train, they
say. and was hurled to his death. The
is not known, and his clothes
tain no marks of identity, lie is de
scribed as being between 38 and 40 years
old, and 5 feet 9 inches in height. He
was horribly mangled by the engine and
rendered almost unrecognizable. Cor
oner Sparks empaneled a jury Monday
morning upon the remains, when
diet of accidental death
death from an evident intent
mit suicide. There i
man's identity.
the Baltimore à
Some
think it
walked
rendered,
clue to the
Rifle Competitors.
A large number of military riflemen
gathered for practice at the Ilealdmo
rifle range Saturday. Colonel Howard
Sim
, inspector of rifle practice, N.
G. D., was present. The
follows: Diamond State record match,
200 yards— Ü. Heinel,Sr.,77; S. J. New
man, 74, 70, 70; H. Simpson, 73, 66; II.
B. Seeds, 70, 69, 68; H. A. Spoerl, 62,61.
Military match, 200 yards, Creedmoor
target—Private Willon, A, 38, 36; Pri
vate Muldoon, F, 38, 85; Sergeant Roe,
Troop B, 84; Private Dill, Troop B,
29; Private Graves, Troop B, 28;
Privato Gillon, F, 27. Qualification
practice—second class, 200 yards— Pri
'vatc T. Gillon, F, 20; Sergoant L. Kill*
, Troop B, 14; Private T. Mecham,
Troop B, 13. Third class, 100 yards—
^Private T. Gillon, F, 21; Private' D. Mc
Clintock, Troop B, 14.
The Top Notch of Humidity.
The feature of Sunday'
if
.'eathcr
its extreme humidity. In this it
reached the top notch of the season. It
more like the close, damp atmos
phere of some sub-tropical jungle than
any respectable Delaware weather. It
caused the complctest physical depres
and exhaustion. The day was in
troduced by a thick gray mist which
some unexperienced people took
mean rain. But the local "probs" shook
their heads and made wise preparation
for a very hot day. It
and
90° at noon
sultry than Saturday. As far
as reported there were no casualties. Ex
treme discomfort and frequent hasty
and unsabbathlike ejaculations
pressed tho popular opinion of the
weather. At 9 o'clock this morning it
was clear with a cool breeze blowing.
A Colored Hoy
James Finer, a colored bov 16 years
old, was drowned while takiug a swim
In the Christiana river near the Lobdell
wheel works South Side nulls, Sun
day afternoon. He was bathing with
some other boys and when diving in the
water he suddenly became exhausted
and there bein
drowned. Ho is supposed
»truck a rock while divi
dcre.d him insensible
to rescue him
have
, which ren
:auso«l his
death. All efforts to find the body were
unavailing. Finer was employed by
ptnuis Bulger, whose home is not far
from the spot where tlie accident oc
curred. On Monday the body was re
covercil and Coroner Sparks, after an
investigation, gave a certificate of «loath
from drowning, without holding an in
quest.
Railway Trainmen.
At the lodge room, Third and King
Itreets, Saturday afternoon, the officers
$lect, Delaware Lodge, No. 1
lood of Railway Trainmen, w
«tailed. The ceremony was
by Past Master C. F. Swoi
city. Tlie office
ensuing y«*
Past Master; T. S. Welch, Master; J. D.
Broomal, Vice-master; J. B. Rodmon,
Secretary; A. T. Ewing, Finaud«
F. Holland, Journal Agent; F. «St« ..
Conductor; O. W. Dunning, Chaplain;
Henry Little, Warden; George Stanley,
Inner Guard, and L. Jefferson, Outer
Guard.
Brother
mnd noted
cney of this
of the lodge for the
follows: J. C. Bice,
M.
Death of A
Andrew McKee died Friday night at
the residence of bis son, ex-County Tax
Collector George W. McKee, N*>. 11*23
West Eighth street. Hit
caused by typhoid fever and blood
poisoning, the latter resulting from a
sprained ankle, which ho sustained
about 11 weeks ago. Ilo was 86 years
old and a life-long farmer.
•leath war
For 50
years he attended Wilmington's markets.
Until throe or four years airo, when he
,*d to this city, ho resided in Mill
Crci-k hundred. Mr. McKee was buried
in Wilmington and Brandywine ceme
tery on Monday.
Gold Hi- «lui Pruneiitoil.
Superintendent, A. G. McCansland
was tho recipient last week of a testi
monial from Division No. 229, Order of
Railway Conductors. The testimonial
constatijd of a gold medal and engrosse«!
resolutions recognizing the superin
tendent'à oourtesieg to the division on
the occasion of its recent exe
Reading. Trai
the W. & N. railroad and Messrs. James
Brook», B. F. Baldwin, H. F. Boylan
and R. E. Boylan were the committee
to present the testimonial.
ion to
ster W. 8. Wells of
John Kieule, tha seven-yc*
of Letter-carrier John Kien le, fell out
of a wagon Friday last and was seri
ously hurt. His forehead
gashtid across the left eye. It is ft
that the lad has received s
injury. Dr. Willard Springer, the at
tending physician found it necessary to
insert live stitches in the boy's forehead,
-old
s badly
!
some internal
THE TWO Rl
'■LA Its,
New
They Become Agitated When Informed
vity of Th
Edward Q. Smith and William Wood,
the two burglars brought to this city by
DetectiVe McVey, Thursday afternoon,
were
the
an
by
Of the
resting uneasily in their cell when
about noon Friday. They wanted
to know when they would bo given a
bearing and sent to New Castle jail.
When asked if they realized the fact
that they would probably be tried
capital charge, namely, that of burglar
izing a house in the night and making
an assault with murderous intent, the
two
said they did
existed in this State.
"What charge was
became much agitated and
.'t know that such a law
against
warrant," Ward asked of Smith, turn
ing to him in his cell.
"Why, the charge of burglary is all 1
heard read," answered Smith. Still the
men we
may have to lie tried
were not inclined to talk much after
they had been apprised of this fact.
that
learning that they
for their life, and
easy
Burglars Woods and "Harry," who
confined in the police station cells
pending action in their case burglariz
ing the house of Robert Smith, No. 1408
Saturday night,
Rodney street,
August 1st, made a bold and
successful attempt to break out early
Monday morning.
Borne time during the night they sue
two small pieces of
grating. The pieces
•y
cecdcd in getting
iron loose from a
were somewhat the shape of a wedge,
and, after wrapping the heavy ends
with pieces of cloth torn from their
clothing to deaden tho effects of the
blows, they used one as a chis«;l and the
other as a hammer. They succeeded in
making a hole in the brick wall on the
King street side, about 25 by 30 inches
square. They were through i
place to the last course of bricks, and
had they had about a half hour's more
time before their discovery the birds
would have flown. The extent of th« 1
hole in the wall, made with crude tools
they used, shows that they arc artists of
;al merit in their profession.
THE WAY E I
GAR DID IT.
Im Anilin«* linpohtrrn
Zollunion With
uf Hin ArliilKtou .1111 In.
It is reported that tho employe of the
Arlington Mills Company
mitted the depredations referred to is
Robert Edgar, the boss dyer at that es
tablishment, who lives * at No. 1233
French street, and that the extent of
his crookedness exceeds $21,000.
It appears that he made that large
by shavings, or in other words,
allowed him by the Phlladel
rho eo
niargi
phia importers upon all tho imported
aniline dyeing material \
in the mill. The agent
numerous occasions that drafts und
orders payable to Edgar from their
Philadelphia importers continued com
ing to the mill. This
tention and then tho suspicion of the
officials.
A large quantity of this expensive
aniline is annually
boss dyer had charge of it. it is stated
that by collusion with the importers
through a series of years he managen
defraud the company out of the s
mimed. For three ve
the company have hud their suspici
and detectives have be
watch.
On Thursday
rest of Edgar w
■hich is
N.
II.
B,
28;
ouseil tho at
«1 and Edgar, as
the officials of
the
*k, itisstateii, the
made in Philadelphia.
One of the detectives who had shadowed
brushed by him stepping on his
if by accident. An apology was
it
It
It
in
ade
bv the officer. A conversation ensued.
The two men went into a saloon for a
drink and when tho detective had satis
fied himself upon all points he needed
he forthwith arrested his companion.
It is stated that ho is quit«; well off,
houses in Philadelphia.
Edgar is the same party against whom
Post Office Inspector Maxwell investi
gated charges brought by Miss Katie
Morrow, of No. 1228 French st reel, for
using the mail for immoral purposes last
June.
and
far
Ex
June.
A BOUND LAD RESCUED.
lOth.T I lint
or in«
j
ll R«HllltN
tliiK o
An unfortunate lad
Walker
Special Agent Frank Stout of the S.
P. C. C. from the cruel hands of Rufus
D. Lingo
Sy«
•«I David
Thursday by
farmer *.f Mlllaboro
ho
he w
bound o
-ith the past nil
Agent Stout we
Thursday
and has be
living
y«*ars
• Goorgc
«I brought th«* b
the police station here Thursday where
lie i
Walker is 16 years of age. In 1882
ho was taken from tho Southern lb
in Philadelphia by Ft
since he has been the victim of the
brutal farmer's inhuman cruelty. <>n
Monday week the boy was so horrlblv
lashed Y>y Lingo, who
whip
sod his snake
ucifully, that he «li;t«>rmined
He stole socretly
to
n the
my.
house of .Judge Cull
That muitlenian was
, at Geo
so shocked at the
i the
mor boy's story
; of
black and blue welts ir
he immediately procured
pon his body tiia
•ith 8« pi ire Thompson,
•hen the latter
diilo the
1 a hospitable home at the
notified Age.
poor lad ft
isidence
f Joseph Pri.le of George
-sted and fined
1 costs bv til
$20 :
quire.
)n Friday Agent :
«•ok the boy
back to the .South«
dclphia, when t:ure will b<
fall into the hands of
I!.*
liken that
he does not agai
a guard!.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria
A
n't. I'revl
David Reed,
ratch
•mploy
I. T. Quigley's in
manufactory, accidently full iuto ;
•ater, about sixte
week, s
Downing by James Young
:
a
larg
vat filled
Icep, yesterday
cued frr
d Robert Da
c hauste« l
•d t«. co
fo Workmen. Reel
it,
si mss through the
efforts of Dr. John C. Fali. y and after
o his home, No. 818

ard removed
West Fourth street.
by *-i«»
*ph Way, located be
Squarc
was struck by lightning Sunday and
totally destroyed. Mr. Way's «7
crop of wheat and hay an«l his farming
implements were burned. No live
•ere lost.
Ilnrn Sti-i
The barn of .1
Ce
tw
of
on
stock
lie had a good insur
:o in the Mill Creek F;
i Company, b
:r the loss
tlie exact figures of which could not
be learned.
>t sufficient t«
rhich
i.
to
of
i Apopl
James Burns, aged 40 y
going to work at the yards of the Harlan
& Hollingsworth Company, on Monday
morning, was stricken with apoplexy on
;ar Washingto
carried to Jester «fc McDaniel's statbles.
II«.* was afterwards remove«l to his home
and Jackson streets, in
conscious conditon.
8, while
at
to n , .. . r r a , ± , , „ , ,
wnlldren Lry lOMrit CnCr S L astorifi
Front st re«
b
!
The Negroeft »ml
l.iberla.
New Yor
«
As Senator Bruce says the negroes of
the south are doing too well where
make the hazardous experi
ment of emigrating to Liberia under the
seductions of the boastful eloquence of
an agent of a Liberian colonization
scheme.
In many respects they are the most
fortunate laboring population in the
world. They passed suddenly from
d citizenship, the
transition involving a complete social
revolution, and yet the change took
place peaceably. Their former owners
suffered a tremendous loss of property
by their emancipation, but the negroes
were not nude victims of the vain re
grets of their masters. The relations
capital and lnb<
rally revolutionized, yet
lisiou occ
formed into
became a
is
Ihoy
r'ery to freedom
dt
violent col
The slave was trans
d he
ised,
to a tree wage earner,
sharer of the crop he
or a tenant of his old
whom he received every opportunity to
profit by his own industry and frugality.
If he suffered from lack of capital, his
landlord also was often, if not usually,
in the same situation himself. Both
were obliged to trust to the chance of
the crops' t<
aster, fro
through, lift
thelr hens and pay thei
plies, fbe tenant was better off than
the landlord in having a lighter load of
obligatio
nothing •
with nothing except hi
Thus the former '
tunities for
enjoyed by i
l fewer wants. He risked
:ept his labor, for he began
is own bauds,
slaves lmd oppor
I
•q Hiring
> other laboring papula
tion. They w
Miollv agri
•st
culturists, and lnn«l for their tilling was
ready at their hands. They had a sub
stantial monopoly of the labor, and they
it. Their
•ere peculiarly adapted t<
capacities
understood fullv by tho s«
bv whf
• 1 their detten-iiclc
them people,
■«I with
they w
diligence which they
it have
received elsewhere; f<
of slavery had ennemi«
the habit of «»
the expern;
1 in th«
bites
.-.vising guardiansliii
over mem, and of feeling a sense of
sponsibility for
thei
ith all the talk about outrag
d though some of it
justified in certain sporadic c«
trust and affectio
lienee,
ï5 on the
the
if the emancipated
to no other people. They still honor a
s the highest type
mnt of
spect and confidence which they yield
beside.
Under such treatment and with op
portunities so extraordinary, the ad
it of the south«*
ancipation has been without a
the liistory of a people so
ith out excep
tion, there is not, a capable, industrious
in th*; south who is
As Senator Bruce
so lithe
of manhood,
gentlem:
«1 »rive him
parallel i
lately enslaved. Almost
«1 thrifty
ot prospering.
shows by statistics, the
from complete Illiteracy to an e.ducati«
which the free schools are makiug
versa! among the new generation, and
from absolut«; poverty to gre
ons. So far. therefore, frm
lererving the criticism tin
•e has passed
gate posai
tin; south
it lias unjustly treated the nog
emancipation, it is «mi title«! to great
praise and glory for the justice, liber
ality, wisdom and consich .tion with
which it has dealt with them. The
dous social revolution has pro
ceeded simultaneously with a
ful development of iho prosperity of the
region, and if in the general progress
either race has gained tlie more, it has
•oiiiler
been the African.
It i
s not surprising, then, that the ne
of the south ilo not hanker after
ia, though it is in the land of their
«1 is a republic of their own
a
Lib
Ilo Took Süll in IIIk CoiToe.
I
"I saw the prettiest bit <*f bluffing at
Waukesha the other day that I ever ran
last night. "Quit«* a <
s had a late dinner the other night
. At
gray-haired judge from Nashville
.!
of
• right
ho also wears the title of colonel.
When tin; coffee
old
•rved the
into his cup a tca
!" salt instead of sugar,
was so plainly the
salt dish for a su
spoonful
This acti
It Of
mistaking
.
that sov
ho noticed the
ment wer«* nearly choking with laugh
ter to se«* the victim slowly stir the con
tents of his cup preparatory to tasting
of the nauseating mixt
a
ade.
elv as lie paused
nidst of
ar him
outhful «if his Halt
o \
had
We watch«*«! hi
fi
for
the
n ni
tl delib
era tel y t
•ok
Thc slightest indie
coffee.
prise on his part
'«»nid have bee
he
signal of an oxplopi
him that
•f hilarity am
I
ade the china
He. But i
sch* «>f bis face betrayed that
lid
Not
he «lid not thoroughly enjoy his unique
Irink.
We w
surprised and ours
prise «leepe
*.i whe
* the south
to sip l»is
•flee with ap
s the story telling went on.
"He finished his coffee before we did
s and order«:«I
This
settle«!
ind ; having
«le
he cheated <>
«•f a
I coffee. 1 folt «-ertain that
; <"'"1
rllmlmirwl
rvti. But... of
•d,
u
: hi bit i«
:
! II«* plumped «
thcr spoil
ful of salt i
*• the sen«md cup and
;nt
ith his stnr
:ernc*d us if
onplaee thing in
it
the world.
"Suddenly he ?
I
observe the
al facial expressio
d him.
«•!'! wry
"Well.-wlist is i
s the matter, boy
What the
,, v . . . ... ,
'1 IK °' i
i.. r" "fli,,' J , ,
' V, In 7 v" , "o
it o ! o 'in !' 11 8R . lt '
H. st thing the world tor dyspepsia, j
1 ry it. It tsn t half bad when vmtonec ;
v' i
mi, try it for
dick
i alwa
Taste had?
;dto it.
•f it. Why,
self.'
J
"And, do you km
half-minute he had
at salt«*«! coffee.
, in less tli
»11 aipp
; away
Wo didn't g
ulong
•as enough for
fixture f ever
very well; one swell«
■ t »rst
attempted to «Irink. After that I think
tho claimed to
I looked up«
tie*
like such stuff as a « >rtof heroic*
to the
mrtyr
•f digestion.
A
I) I
later, how«
1 joined the
. 1 «
•I i
cigar on tl
yours, that salt cum for dyspepsia,' 1 re
marked.
'"Ye
'It's qu
before to-night; but it will bo queerer, I
think, if I ever have such a notion
again. Ugh.'"
• la. 'Queer idea of
it is rather queer,' ho replied,
r that I
<*r had such an idea
During the week the number of
bathers at tho Raymond tree
5,469; men, 454; boys, 4.688; w
girls, 261; totul to date, 43,061.
bath were
F««r the week ending at
day Registrar Colquli».»
•re than
r; 85 births, 15 more than
ftat
reports 28
perhid
for the
death.-, 12
lust
sam«; period last year, and 8 marriages,
for the corresponding week last
thr
Til IT TAX-EATING BRIDGE.
ro of the St.
lii«'* , ' Expo*
Bridge Fraud KiuIdi-mmI.
« Every Ev.
tgus
the
ised
have !
pro
Delaware City News.
Augustine bridge has long been a po
litical cow, milked by local politicians
and fed by the publie treasury, which
has exacted from the people of New
Castle county within the past few years
$81,000.
•lust think of it. Is it any wonder
that we groan under taxation? $81,000
is a big sum of money to l»o taken from
the taxpayers of this county. Where
has it gone? Expended
a useless
bridge—gone into the poCketa of labor
ers and politicians. How? Simply
used a lover for influence. Certain poli
have openly boasted that "they
tarried the votes of part of St. Georges
their vest pocket," and they
do this by giving laborers
:ustine bridge. Me
ed several hundred dollars per year
Augustine bridge have said
fraud, but
rork
\
. r ho have re
for work .
to us, I know it i
pay
of it back."
taxes, so let
» get ««
• of it ? Why we could
pie who have lived for y
proceeds of Augustine bridge
large families.
s fr«
eral thousand dollars a y
been appropriated by the Levy Court
for Augustine bridge. Where doe« it
go? Into the pockets of a few political
Now, if Au
•fui to the county
bln- travel, we would not say
ord. But It is not,and wo do
the tax-payers de
If a bridge is
the people and the
Levy Court think it is, then let them
build a stone embankment—somethin
that will last—a c
by Every K
be done; the
"loaders" they i
• «ailed.
gustine bridge w
and
pose longer t<
I ni mied.
(which it is nor), b
tewuy, as suggestou
. Something must
pie demand it, and the
d it in the interest
y press «
"t the people of the county.
ma y ni: s
I LD HERE NOW.
phn
Outi-bcht Sin«
The latest iss
illy 'Illlli.
of the New York
ains the following item
Phonof/iu
of local interest:
to press the official
comes that the Co
lumbia Phonograph Company, Wis
consin Phonograph Company, Ken
tucky Phonograph Company, Pacific
kunpany, the Eastern
Phonograph Company
d the New England Phonograph
Company have applied for per
to sell the phonograph, and
that in the states controlled by these
companies they
"The Columbia Phonograph Company
controlling the phonograph in Delaware,
Maryland and the District of Columbia,
was the tlrst
tliority for tho
"As
a
is
Phonograph
IV
svlvaui
! now for sale.
•inpany to r*;ceivo
strutted sale of these
Monday, July 20th,
offered its subscribers and the public the
option of rental or purchase.
Ilieli Aground*
-g Patriot.
Pri
cretary Tate had a visitor
: who has had
has
to
up
of
you
the other d
ronderful
•e. It was Commodore Gilke
late of tlie United States
on the retireil list. Ab«
i"
y, but
ago, he say
he
officer on the
United Stat
«I calm
ssel Wateroe. One clear
noon, when about 30
aft
mil«
)ff the cons
ivas seen bearing do
enormous
upon tlie
•as brought about
de up«
d 30 minutes later was left high and
dry upon a mountain three miles hack
coast anil 1,700 feet
ship. Tlie Watt
•ot the w
its crest,
ti
fr.
tho Peruvi
above tlie lev
el.nl at a rate
1 of the sea, having trav
er 60 miles
The loss of life by this tidal wnVo
frightful, on«* city alone of 30,000 i
habitants having been <
All the vessels in the neighborhood of
an coast foundered with the
of the Watered, and while
as safe the ship was a loss,
d, there being
my of getting it down from th«;
ies appointed
tigate the catas
irwhelmod.
IV
I
*pti<
f
to
of
tie- «■
an«l it lmd to be ahamlo
untuiu.
bile they adv
trophe, but,
theories tin
plained the
.I
ny
isfactorily c-x
un I LA It EL UH I A A UFA 1RS.
Robert Cow: , , _
drowned Sunday while swimming in
old,
16 v
•ry ford.
a .|
William 11. Lex, who
shot himself with suicidal intent
Thursday died on Saturday.
Exports of petroleum last week
footed up 8,513,032 gallons ; total since
January 1st, 120,161,956 gallons.
The dead body of an unknown man,
s old, was foun«i floating
Ex-Pol ice
63
Sntuaday.
Emily J. Christian, 82 years old, died
on Saturday, it is alleged, from tho
« fleets of laudanum taken with suicidal
out.
Another Jseries of raids on "speak
mailo Sunday, and reputed
in various parts of the city
i shed belonging
and Samuel White, in
.vas struck bv lightning
l sustained $1,500 dam
propriet«j
■,t. l.
A st«
O F. A. Hoy
barn and
Ge
i«lay
a
age.
William Br
, about 30 years old,
Pennsylvania' railroad
ilnj^pnî'ir "fell fr"
I'rtiipmat., " 11 rro
•ar in Camden,
bile
Atlantic City, and front.
'turning from
red ids skull,
nturdny articles of
tilcil by tlie M:
moth Chestnut Company with a capital
stock of $60,000, $1,000 paiil in, the ob
jects of which ar«; to buy and Kell real
«1 to propagato mammoth
»y.
if
ate
iiiwiniits.
Information was lodged in tho office
, of the United Btiifes district court
i Saturday by the. district-attorney for the
I'.irfelinre of iwenty diamonds, seized
Jdly -'»Ui in the pLlesdun of Daniel
lt ' Simt. a passenger on the steamer Swit
j „rin'mt.on ihnallogntin,, that ho w
; „ttempting to smilgBlo thorn. Tlie din
i monds are in tlie possession of the col
for i K;t o r of the port.
William King, 18 years old, Andrew
Jam«**, 9 years old und Jerry Rogers, 11
years old, all colored, were committed,
on Saturday, for a further hearing on
recent fires
front are at
their in
of arson.
the char
to
he De law
tribut«*«.! by the fire marshal
cendiary efforts. The police think the
boys had a
th«
, without any thought
fire engines
of the consequences.
re
I
of
Two contract laborers, steerage pas
pengers from Austria on the steamer
Fulga, were detained at New York
Sunday.
The pension office during the week
ending August 15th issued 5,297 pension
certificates, calling for a total first pay
ment of $564,847.
of
A statu«* of Lord Baltimore, made for
Calvert Hall, Baltimore, has been placed
and will be formally
in positi<
veiled next Sunday.
A dispatch from Ottawa sayi
doratood that Mr. A. Senecal,
tendent of tho government
28
the
s it is
j superin
printing bu
i«l who was «îonneeted with the
scandals, has resigned and that
I his resignation has been accepted.
last
A WYOMING JUSTICE.
flow Mr*. Morrla Dliponeil of Her Firat
San Franolaro Call.
Soon after the women of "Wyoming
enfranchised some gentlemen de
cided that it would be well to have a
woman justice of the peace, so they
selected Mrs. Morris, a Connecticut
woman, who had been an earnest and
judicious woman suffragist, and worked
for her appointment in South Pass City,
the county seat of Sweetwater county.
Charles P. Jackson of the California
Pioneer, tells the story :
This recalls a very pleasant meeting
with a Mrs. Morris, at Albany, N. Y.,in
'76 or about that time, who was then
making her home with her son there,
who nuy be the same Mrs.Morris. Mrs.
Morris had recently been an active jus
tice of the peace in Wyoming, and gave
me the circumstances attending her ap
pointment, and her experience with her
first, case in court. It seemed there had
grown up a little feeling toward tho in
cumbent—not from any maladministra
but because he had held the office
tor a long time, and another man, who
had his friends, wanted the position.
There was growing up quite a feeling,
! when it occurred to a couple of business
, friends of both, to try and allay
the feeling by suggesting that "Mother
Morris'' be made magistrate. Before
calling on Mrs. Morris they called
the incumbent and would-be squire and
stated the object in view, viz.: that they
both yield in favor of Mrs. Morris,
which both, on the enthusiasi
moment, agreed to do.
pointed committee then called
Morris, and stated the purpose of their
visit. Mrs. Morris at once said : "Me a
magistrate? Why ! I never looked in a
law book in my life. What could I do
in dispensing justice? The idea is pre
posterous." "Well, Mrs. Morris,
know you and your sense of justice,
and have all confidence in your honor
and integrity, and the candidates for
the office have both assured us that if
you will take the office they will cheer
fully resign all claims, and will
cry effort for your appointment.''
"Well, if these are the facts, I will con
sent 1o take the office, but you know,
gentlemen, that I know nothing about
the duties, but I will do the best I can."
In due time the appointment came and
Mrs. Morris was installed as justice of
the peace of Wyoming. Tho docket of
"the incumbent" was handed over and
in due time came the first case. This
a trivial matter between two liti
gants, botli well known to Mrs. Morris,
which had been commenced before the
former justice.
Of course, it became known through
of the
The self-ap
Mrs.
Of course, it became known through
the town that Mrs. Esquire Morris was
going to have her first trial and every
spare citizen must, of course, be present
to hear it. The "court" met in the.
time and called
sea
tho
tw
court
the plaintiff, through his attorney, to
state his
called on in the same manner,
attorneys have stated your case correctly,
se. The defence w
"Y
have they, gentlemen ?" "Yes, ma'am.
"Then this court has
jurisdiction
." The attorney f«
plaintiff immediately r<
meuced talking, but the "squire" said :
"Beg y
has no jurisdiction
Turning t«> the litigants, she said :
"Here, Charles, l want you and George
to go home with me; come right along."
They both went, und, on arrival at lier
house, she turned to George and said :
"See here, George, you owe Charles
much; now y
up right hero
of you another piece of pie as long
you live." They both burst into a
hearty laugh, and did then and there
sotilo' the matter in dispute, and after
heartily congratulating the
squire" on her justice, went out and
ttdd the story, which
known through the town, and Mrs.
Morris' first cas
tho
pardon, sir, but this court
îr this
just pay him and settle
I will never give either
became
court h«;c:
f
.•as its justice.
It was a fact that she had no jurisdic
tion over the case, but why she knew it
to be. so she could not say, only that she
knew it to be so. Mrs. Morris admitted
that she did not make much money out
of the office, but she did feel that she
lessened litigation ami
friends among would-be litigants.
de more
A Complied!
«1 «'use.
Cbtc
I N«
"I've got a job for y
,"said the hard
to the young lawyer.
"V
"That
hat. Damage suit. You
see, my man lie goes to a picnic not long
ago, an«l the
Of course he had
helpin' hold the thing down, and when
the feller hollers 'let go,' Eleazar—that
—he kep' er hangin' on and
igh a quarter of a mile.
Eleazar to
b'loon ascension,
be foolin' uround,
ray
khufe
Then it
let go. Do
he comes, right
railroad track. That is, he would a hit
the track, I guess, if a train hadn't been
a-rattlin' along jist then which knocked
him into a old well that was keerlesslv
left open nearby. Now, I want to know
who I'm goin' to git damages from—the
, the railroad, or the feller
ms that well?"
the
b'loon
that
EVENING ECHOES.
pcctcdly Literal.—Elder sister
(out rowing with a possible suitor
and her little sister, who is frightened
by tho waves)—Theodora!. If yo
will you be at
my age? Little sister (meekly)—Thirty
seven, I suppose.— Life.
"What is protection, father?" "It is a
, for raising the prices
oods."
is a
u
, what
scheme, my
that our people pay for our
"And wliat i
ji procity ?'
scheme for lowering the prices that
Brazilians, Cubans and other foreigners
pav for our goods ."—Utica Obm rvcr.
Old lady—"Doctor, do you think there
is anything the matter with ray lungs?"
Physician (after a careful examination)
—"I find madam that your lungs are in
a normal condition." Old lady (with a
sigh of resignation)—"And about how
long can I expect to live with them in
that condition .—Pharmaceutical Era.
What they wanted—The officers of a
staid, conservative church in a neighbor
ing city wrote the other day to a gentlc
man in this city, asking him to suggest
a good man fora pastor. "We want,"
they said, "a man of some pulpit ability,
but for gracious sake don't reco uimend
'hose brains a
lung »."—Hew York Tribune.
A preacher in Iowa lost his pulpit for
telling tiie truth. He was a forcible
preacher, but deficient in education,
and occasionally committed some grave
misdemeanors in grammar. One Sunday
evening while speakin« rapidly heniudo
Llndley Murray. No
11
in hia
to
a gross assault
sooner had the sentence escaped hin lips
than he stopped und said : "I am aware
that my education is deficient. I re
gret that I did not have the advantage
of good schools while a boy. If I had
been more fortunate, I would now be
preaching to a more intelligent congre
gation." The minister told the truth,
tho last time he preached in
that church.— Poston Advertiser.
for
ut it
For KltjepleMuua»
Horsford's Acid Phosphate. Dr. C.
It. Duke, Bell ville. 111., says : "I have
«I it, nnd it alone, to bo capable of
producing a sweat and natural sleep in
cases of insomnia from overwork of the
brain, which so often occurs in active pro
fessional uud business men."
Ü
bu
the
ft
IN GENERAL.
The body of an unknown
found in a'wharf sink at Baltimore,
Friday, where he must have been for
several months.
Three cottages, a store and a stable,
at Ocean Spray, near Winthrop, Mass.,
were destroyed by lire Friday. Two
, who were asleep in the loft of the
burned to death, as wero
vas
stable, w
also 10 horses.
There is said to be a scheme on foot
by which the militia of all the states
will be put under national pay and
supervision. It was started by officers
of the regular army at the encampment
of the Missouri militia.
L. Grcenlcuse has been arrested at
Slater,Mo., for passing a counterfeit $50
note. Greenlease had always borne a
good reputation and is said to have
traveled about the country teaching peo
ple how to detect counterfeits.
There was a sharp frost at Denison
and Vail, in Iowu, cm Saturday morn
ing. A fall of 50 degrees in tempera
ture occurred at Watertown, south
Friday night, and the.frost
line was touched. No injury was done
to com.
Typographical Union, No. 6 of New
York, at ar special meeting on Sunday,
attended by over 800 members, resolved
that no member of the Union shall
hereafter work under a non-Union fore
man in any newspaper office within the
jurisdiction of the Union.
Charlie Williams, a negro helper, be
came entangled in the ropes of a balloon
at Carolina Beach, 15 miles from Wil
mington, N. C., Friday, and, loosening
the fastenings was earned 5,000 feet into
fell he suc
ceeded in freeing himself and escaped
unhurt.
A dispatch from Arkans
says that Thursday was the hottest for
years, the thermometer standing at 100
In the shade. C. Howard was fatally
sunstruck and several others were over
come by the heat. In the Cherokee Strip
large numbers of cattle are dying from
sunstroke.
the air. Before the ballot
City, Kan.,
Henry Parr, a lad, attending a pump
ing engine of the Louisville and Nash
ville railroad, ne
found murdered at noon Friday. His
throat had been cut from e
of nil
his side. It is pres
committed by tramps.
A San Diego, Cal., dispatch
formation has reached thero thatiAvo
large streams of water are flowing Into
the Sal ton Sea from the Gulf of Culi
er. This makes
of supply for the inland
sea and gives strength to the belief that
tho desert lake will be permanent.
Tho sealing schooner Mattie Flyer, j
warned out or tho Behring Sea, reach- ■«!
San Francisco on Thursday night. She
reports that the United States ste
fire upon the |
Clanton, Ala., was
•nr by
«i by
fornia via the
tw
to
Mam
cod fish in
as obliged t
!:
A
to
,ot
her to heave to.
As the Arugo was
•aling vessel she w
allowed to pi -
ceed.
The treasury department has lea
that then.* is nothing in thei
which will prevent the crew of ihe ;
Cranberry Isle Life Snvi
taking part in the
bition at B;
they do so in thei
their services are not required at tho |
station.
At Bland«
Thursday a number of
ed
■outra« t
rri kexhi- I
•Usl.ii
Harbor. Maine, piovhlui
d I
privai«- capacity
Springs, Alabama, on
to the
»■sted for illicit diBtillin
fight which «•
In the
■il Sims
p«*d, luit I
Dr. A. B. Pugh,«mo of tlie United 8
arsluil's posse, and a son of Sims'
killed and
ded.
brother of »Sims* was fatally I
in a building
New York, Sunday
the property «>f E. 0. Hura
of toys, and I*
facturera, onus
A fi
Brondwav,
irning destr*
an, impo
is Bros
sets
g a lo
f $115.
. As
■ I.
•S 1
bille of tlie
fire depn
»me by the j
«I died before he could In* ré
élit
oke
hospital.
Mrs. Bamh
incut r
, wife
•f one of the
sidents of Helvetia, \\\
fit of
r.:
.during..
drowned her
empor« ry insanity
13
•III 11:
spring. Failing in
effort to kill her
3-year-old son
the sum
halchi-t :
brained him with
1 till n .-It
pled suicide by stabbing herself witl
te
a butcher knife,
necessarily fatal.
The Kansas state board of railroad
commissioners have
Pacific Railroad Company tin
tire lino of the Kansas City railroad
must Iip rebuilt without delay
steel track, and that if tlie <'•
complied with steps will he talo n to
voke the company's charter. This net
grew out of
which w
The people of Lyon county, Ivy., have
refused to pay the Elizabeth'A. Paducah
railroad tax, alleging that it was carried
by illegal voting.
charged by the court with the collection
•day tlie
Her wounds
tille.1 tin* Unit.
the.
1er is
lent s..m«* week
attributed to poor
Us.
The local otfi. ers
of the tax resigned, and
United States
legal papers to be served
individual in tlie county, v
food and shelter.
It is reported from Baltin
Baltimore «& Ohio Railroad Company has
completed negotiati
•shnls, charged
•ith
every
a
a
that the
for the n
hr
of 65
*s of land in Cumberland for
tlie erection «>f its mills, shops and freight
yards. Within a few weeks g
be broken, anil when the imp
finished th«.* Baltimore «V: Ohio will
move its shops from Keys
and Martinsburg to Cumberland.
A dispatch from Dr. W. H. Burk, who
'ear y polar expedi
tes the arrival of the Kite
at St. Johns, Newfoundland, on her re
voyage. Lieutenant Peary, whose
leg had been broken, was left with his
wife an«l five companions in winter
quarters at McCormick's Ray, Murchi
's Sound. All on board the Kite
■e well, and the
l will
, Piemont
a
a
'companied the
dentists brought
h<
ith them large collections of the
1 fan
of G
Secretary Noble says that the opening
to settlement of the lands in Eastern
Oklahoma, recently ceiled tc the gov
ernrae
Pottawott«*]
short ti
of the President for action. This will
open to settlement about. 800,000
As to the Cltcy
ervation, west of Okinln
loting agents
hope«! that 1
made by the coming autumn,
;rvation of about 8,000,O()0 acres will
also be opened to settlement.
A terrible rain storm passed
Pottsvillo, Pa., Sunday afternoo.., «
companied by very severe electrical dis
turbance. Two houses and a gas tank
were struck by lightning, an« l a large
portion of the town was flooded by the
rain, which partook of the nature of a
cloudburst. Trains on the Read in
en land.
bv the Sac
l Fox, Iowa
I
ie Indians,
ill,
dthin a
, be brought to the attention
d Arupalx
d it is
the allotments will all ho
hen this
rork,
be
in
l
Pe
sylvaniu lines we
block«"
«•y
water and debris upon the trucks and
the fires under the boilers in the electric
light works were extinguished, stopping
the street cars. The Chronicle offi - wa
flooded and presses, engine and file«
badly damaged. The total damag« i
estimated at over $100,600. The st,
also severe at other points in the
vicinity of Pottsville.
C.
of
in
the
DEEDS OF
hOOD.
Peace I
>f
Jmllar
The
Officer Takei
Other Violent Deutln«.
Murilm
om .lull and Lynched-
City Marshal Daniel Bruce of Shelby
ville. Ind., was on Saturday shot and
fatally wounded by Charles'llawkins, a
noted desperado. At midnight a mob
broke into the jail, dragged Hawkins
out by the neck and hanged him to the
nearest tree. Ilis body was also riddled
with bullets.
Mrs. J. D. Miller shot and instantly
killed the
contly been divorced, at Nicoletto, Minn.,
on Saturday. She also wounded a young
woman name Schee, to whom Miller was
paving some attention.
During a quarrel at Flatonla, Texas-,
Saturday, between Ding Braddock,
aged 20, and three negroes named
Brownlow, Braddock killed two of the
negroes, shooting them with a repeating
ritiu.
Jacob Stokesbury, a young farmer of
Friday night
nd ho badly beaten that, he died shortly
John
from whom she had
Ada, O., was set upon
afterward. Ilis assailants
Bristol and John Fruth, who mistook
him for another man, with whom they
bad had a quarrel several days before.
Fruth was taken to Kenton, but Bristol
here he is said to be
is in jail at Ada,
in danger of lynching.
During a drunken row succeeding a
Satur
christening party, in Chicago,
day night, Mrs. Amelia Dawald
shot and killed by her brother, Albert
Kiuki. The latter watj flourishing a
volver,
wrest it fro
A dispatch fr«
that the United States marshal's pc
at Blade
tried to
him ho shot her twice.
Mobile, Ala., says
1 when tho w<
enraged at
, whom they
had arrested for illicit distilling, and
the killing *>f the two men who were
guarding Sims, that they not only shot
and killed Bailey Sims and fatally in
hanged
alter, not permitting him to die of his
von ads.
The Earnest brothers, wanted in
Numcdia, Pa., for tho stabbing of Burt
«1 their brother Frederick,
have been captured in tho woods near
that place, and are. now in jail.
W. N. Lowe of Whitehall, Ind., a
prominent farmer and politic!...*, ......
tired upon from ambush on Friday and
probably fatally wounded. Curtis Bane,
Lowe's son-in-law, lias been arrested,
charged with the crime.
n Springs were
the rescue of Robert Sir
<1 .1 i
Sims, hut they
Cleaver
j
|
Walter L. Bn
intor-s
at Spring Lake, New Jersey, Friday.
The house of James Gorman, ne
Friday
«1 robbed of $20,000, the
rings of Gorman and his sister.
d Pekin y
•tuber of the
mmission, died
Middleton, Wis.,
afte
At the Pi
rds, at
Peoria, Illinois,
l took the plac.
They
der the protectic
of the strik
; armed, and
v switchni'Mi.
rork
ßuawlft
ij
JMJ
K
V
I
ÎUlîïïjTj
litA,
j j
-
;
e
I
1
A
//
s
«
//

~///l
J
-_I
. ihn« i
olid
•y
h. I
»ly ui«
ith
only
makes
;

ed I
■dton."
-XI.
Tli
ii
R
I II I.ICGI I I .
>11 it
th« Mf.1l.
«1
un Kxtrnotnf Malt in <•<
>l«ineuta uf Leef
reliable
•n-«i
ADtooiznd Iteof. giving
Ale."
:
tbu
d th« stimuli
ALE AND BEEF
*i:i*TOM/.i;i»—(Extract "ltoviH Cum Malt«")
d by Ibu late «minent KoTmmoil.l..
ALE AND BEEF
P
«f I»
It AI«. Hliil 4 Ounce* uf KVi>t
>0iiniil.tnt . In «
««1 n««r.
d by
•ROS
STOMACH TKOI RLRS and WAlST
hoÎVlrVuÏ
i
IM.
TRUE TON 10 lu c
IIOl
FEVER.
For :
««n't it, ha will get It
THE ALE AND BEEF COMPANY, DAYTON, O., U. S. A.
25 cents p«r bottl«.
What is

A
A
ISS
Castoria is Dr. Samuel Pitcher'» prescription for Infants
and Children. It contains neither Opium, Morphine
other Narcotic substance. It 1» a harmless substitute
for Paregoric, Drops, Soothing Syrups, and Castor OU.
It is Pleasant. Its guarnntoo is thirty years' vise by
Millions of Mothers. Castoria destroys Worms and allays
feverishness. Castoria prevents vomiting Sour Curd,
cures Diarrhoea and Wind Colic.
nor
Castoria relieves
teething troubles, cures constipation and llatulency.
Castoria assimBates tho food, regulates the stomach
and bowels, giving healthy and nutural sleep. Cas- |
toria is tho Children's Panacea—tho Mother's Friend.
Castoria.
Castoria.
' Castoria ts on
dren. Mo
zoeUent
«.illclno for chll
liavo repeatedly told me of Us
good effect upon their cbildreu."
" Castoria Is so welt a-iaptM to children that
it as superior to any prescription
II. A. AnniBR, M. D. f
lit So. Oxford St., Urooklyn, N. Y
I recommend
Known to me.
Du. G. C. Oaoooo,
Lowell, Mans.
" Castoria Is the best remedy for children of
which I am acquainted. I hope the day is not
fur distant when mothers will consider the real
Inte
" Our physicians in tha children's «iepart.
have spoken highly of their expert
la th«!ir on laid u practice with Csstoria,
and although
medical supplies what is known
products, yet we àre free to
merits of Castoria has won
favor upon it."
United Hospital
of their children,
ea«l ot the variousquack nostrums which are
, by forcing opium,
hurtful
Castoria In
only have among
regular
confess that tbs
I.ving their loved
orphine,
mg syrup
agents down their throats, thereby seudiug
them to premature graves.''
to look with
DlflPRMBARV,
Du. J. F. Kixohelok,
Conway, Ark.
Boston, Mass.
Aiaeh C. Surrn, Free.,
The Oentnnr Company, TI Murray Street, Near York City.
THE CHINESE M UST GO.
Ob
ma Mob
Angry Resident* of Mo
Jectlonabl« Celestial!«.
Helena, Mont., Aug. 24.—Within
the last few weeks a violent Chinese
crusade lias been in progress in Mis-
soula, a number of the hot-heads advo-
cating force to drive the Celestials away.
-meeting was held, at
resolved to boycott all Chi
nese and persons employing or patroniz
ing them.
Yesterday a party of 15 masked white
raided the ranch of a prosperous
An immense
which it
men
Chinese gardener, near the city, ■-.
pletcly demolishing the cabin*with all
its furniture. They beat one inmate in
a shocking manner. Another was tarred,
feathered and his queue cut off. A third
rimming the river.
escaped by
Robbed of 80,000 Worth of Jewelry.
Chicago, 111., Aug. 24.—One of the
leaders of the Chicago demi-monde,
Zeo Owens, was robbed of $6,000 worth
of jewelry at an early hour yesterday
•ning. She said she was aroused by
a man who brandished a dirk and told her
to band out all her lewolry on pain of
instant death. She did so and ho backed
out of the room. The woman jumped
from tho bed, seized a revolver and tired
three shots at the thief before he could
get out the door. He escaped, however,
but left a trail of blood on the step*.
The woman thinks he is a discharged
employe.
POLITICAL.
The Republican campaign in Ohio
was opened on Saturday afternoon by a
great meeting at Niles, when Major Mc
Kinley made an addrosB.
The Texas State Farmers' Alliance at
Dallas adjourned on Saturday. It
adopted the Ocala platform and re
affirmed the sub-treasury scheme.
After "the most exciting and vituper
ative campaign ever known" there,
Staunton, Va., voted on Saturday for
jority. Four years
jority of 97.
A meeting «>f delegates from the vari*
commercial organizations of the
Farmers' Alliance met at Topeka, Kau.,
Friday, to effect a consolidation, but
adjourned without accomplishing that
object.
The Arkansas State Farmers' Alli
ance, in session at Little Rock, has en
ded
license by 92
license had a ma
dorsed the Ocala platform and adopt
resolutions denouncing the recent Fc
\>rt
Worth conference of Alliance
sehe
to side-track the reform move
The Illinois state committee of the
People's party have issued an address to
"voters who chafe under their old party
collars," urging them to join the third
party "and thus have a voice in de
termining its policy, principles and plat
form in 1892 for the state and nation."
Forest fires in Nevada and FI Dorado
counties, California, are doing great
damage to property, and a number of
peuple have been made homeless.

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